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February 3, 1910

TO CELEBRATE THE NEW YEAR.

Kansas City's Chinese Colony Be-
ginning to Make Arrangements.
Happy Chinese New Year

"Vely fine happee New Year" will be the common greeting in the Chinese world next Wednesday which marks the beginning of another twelve months for the Mongolian race. The Kansas City colony, the seat of which is West Sixth street, is already making elaborate preparations for the annual festivities. The Moys, the Sings, the Chins, the Lees, the Wahs, the Lungs and all the rest of the representatives of the various provinces of China are combining their efforts to make themselves conspicuous, despite the fact that there are comparatively few Chinamen here.

Spaghetti, Irish stew and bean chili must all sink into the caverns of oblivion as toothsome dishes for a day at least and good, old chop suey, with noodles on the side, together with gloutchew, Oriental prunes and other equally palatable things from the Celestial standpoint, will be in evidence. A large shipment of Chinese fruits, vegetables and wines arrived Monday and is held in readiness for the celebration.

"We feel much glad on New Year," said Kwong Sang, a tea merchant at 113 West Sixth street yesterday afternoon. "We can't have so much big time here as in New York and San Francisco, because there's not enough Chinamen. All same we have much feast and music."

Kwong Sang has commenced to hang decorations in his store and his wife was busy all day yesterday arranging the rear of the room for a banquet table. They expect to entertain a number of their countrymen. The little Sang children have caught the spirit of the occasion and are already crying for goodies they can have only on New Year.

Shung Fung Lung, a dealer in fancy Chinese goods at 123 West Sixth street, has also sent out invitations to several of his out-of-town friends and will assume the role of host in a brand new silk suit just received from China.

"We like the fireworks on New Year," he said yesterday, "but no allow it here. Much sorry."

The warring Tongs, the Hop Sings and the On Loongs, of which there are a few of each here, have apparently patched up their differences sufficiently to permit speaking terms of one day, if no longer. The Yongs, most of whom are laundrymen, are showing a disposition to be clannish and are said to be planning some exclusive parties on East Twelfth street, but their doings will not worry the wealthier merchants and importers of the North End. There is no likelihood of any serious quarrels and it is safe to bet that the local Orientals enjoy a peaceful advent of their New Year.

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February 2, 1910

NEGRO ORATOR PRESIDENT.

Down Town Kyle-for-Mayor Club Is
Return for Advice Given.

C. H. Calloway, one of the best known negro orators in Republican ranks, has become president of a Kyle-for-Mayor club with headquarters at 815 McGee street. Dr. E. C. Bunch is secretary of the club.

The negroes reside in various wards, but opened a down-town workshop patterned after "Shootin' Gallery" Bill Green's work for Darius A. Brown in the Eighth ward, where the white Republicans have a down-town office, a permanent headquarters and an auditorium for blow-outs in the Spiritualistic church farther east in the ward.

The negroes formed a club to work for Judge Kyle in return for advice he has given them that the way to elevate their race is by patronizing negro businesses and professional men.

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February 1, 1910

JIM CROW BILL BEATEN.

Two Democrats Vote With Repub-
licans and Kill It.

Two Democratic aldermen, W. C. Culbertson and Isaac Taylor, voted with the Republicans in the upper house of the council last night and defeated an ordinance providing for separate street car seats for negroes.

Mr. Culbertson's reasons for voting against the ordinance were that he feared it to be a trouble maker, and that it was not sufficiently explicit as to how the negroes were to be separated from the whites when the cars and platforms were crowded. Mr. Taylor gave a like reason.

Here is the vote:

For the ordinance -- Steele, Wirthman, Titsworth, O'Malley, Logan, Gregory; total, 6, all Democrats.

Against the ordinance -- Edwards, Havens, Tillhof, Bunker, Republicans; Taylor, Culbertson, Democrats; total, 6.

Absent -- Cronin, Democrat; Thompson, Republican.

Eight votes were necessary to carry the ordinance.

Before the session opened Alderman James Pendergast came over from the lower house and loudly proclaimed opposition to the ordinance. He said that it could not be enforced, that it would be declared unconstitutional and under his breath he told Democrats it would be a bad move politically.

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January 31, 1910

FINAL "JIM CROW" ACTION TONIGHT.

Alderman J. E. Logan, Au-
thor of Measure, Disclaims
Any Political Motive.

The council is expected to take action tonight on the ordinance requiring the Metropolitan Street Railway Company to furnish separate cars for negroes, or if permitted to ride with white passengers, to designate certain seats for them. As the measure is championed by Democratic aldermen there is every probability that Republican members will permit them to do all the voting in favor of the passage of the ordinance. This is the sentiment in the upper house, but not altogether in the lower house, for if Alderman Frank Askew, a Republican, has not changed his mind he will second a motion to be made by Alderman Miles Bulger, a Democrat, that the ordinance be passed under suspension of the rules.

This will call for ten affirmative votes, and if they are not forthcoming the ordinance will have to go to a committee.

All of these possibilities depends of course on the action of the upper house. A special committee headed by R. L. Gregory, president of that branch of the council, will recommend the passage of the ordinance and this can be done with eight affirmative votes. There are nine Democratic aldermen in the upper house, and the tip has gone out that they have been lined up to vote for the ordinance. Some of the Democrats were hesitating on the propriety of passing the ordinance on account of "political policy," but it is now stated that they have been induced to see it differently.

In political circles the cry has been set up that the ordinance has been introduced at this time to cripple the candidacy of a Republican alderman, who is seeking the nomination for mayor, and who will be called upon to cast his vote either for its passage or defeat. Alderman J. E. Logan, a Democrat, who fathers the ordinance, denies this allegation.

"There is no politics or racial question involved in the ordinance," said Alderman Logan yesterday. "Similar laws are in effect in other cities where there are large negro populations, and they are entirely satisfactory to both races."

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January 25, 1910

JIM CROW CARS
PLAN REVIVED.

ALDERMEN SHY AT ORDINANCE
AND SPECIAL COMMITTEE
IS APPOINTED.

Success in Southern Cities
and Negroes Approve,
Mr. Logan Said.

When an ordinance was introduced in the upper house of the council last night by Alderman J. E. Logan, making it obligatory on the Metropolitan Street Railway Company to operate cars for negro passengers, or to designate a part of the car for their use if they are to be carried with whites, there was a perceptible dodging of the aldermen to assume responsibility for having a hand in the legislation.

"I'd like to have the ordinance go to the streets, alleys and grades committee," proposed Alderman Logan.

"The streets, alleys and grades committee has all it can attend to now," replied Alderman Wirthman.

"Public improvements committee," suggested somebody.

"That's no place for such an ordinance," pleaded Alderman Baylis Steele. "It should go to the sanitary committee."

DODGING GETS LIVELY.

"The judiciary committee should pass on it," recommended Alderman W. C. Culbertson.

"Alderman Logan is chairman of that committee and he doesn't want it," volunteered Alderman W. A. Bunker.

The dodging began to get livelier.

"How would you like to have me appointed to a special committee, Alderman Logan?" interrogated President R. L. Gregory.

"That would suit me."

"Would you ask that I be put in the committee?"

"Yes, sir."

Gregory took an inventory of the aldermen.

"How do you stand on this proposition?" Gregory asked of Culbertson.

"As I have said before, it looks like a trouble-maker, but," Culbertson was saying when Gregory interrupted.

FAVORS ORDINANCE.

"You have killed yourself," he said, "and I appoint Alderman Thompson, Republican, and Alderman O'Malley, Democrat, and myself on that committee. I'm for the ordinance heart and soul. I think negroes and whites riding on street cars should be separated."

"I'd like to be excused from serving on the committee. I surrender to Alderman Logan," said Alderman Thompson.

"You don't want to serve?"

"No, sir."

"Well, I would like to have a Republican on the committee. How about you, Alderman Bunker?"

"I'm much obliged, but you'll have to excuse me," spoke up Bunker.

"How about you Alderman Tilhoff?"

"What is it you want to know?" innocently asked the alderman.

"We are going to put the negro where he belongs," answered Gregory.

TILHOFF UNWILLING.

"No, I do not wish to serve on the committee," promptly interposed Tillhoff.

"I'll put you on the committee, alderman," addressed Gregory to Alderman Logan. "I had hopes that we should make the committee non-partisan, but I can't get a Republican to serve, so, therefore, I'll draft Alderman Thompson on the committee." Thompson smiled, and did not object to being drafted.

The ordinance was drafted by Walter M. Lampkin, an associate city counselor. He explained its provisions, providing for separate cars for negroes, designation for them in the car if they ride with whites and placing authority in the conductor to seat passengers to fit conditions.

"Suppose passengers will have to stand. How about that?" asked Alderman Culbertson.

TO HAVE MORE CARS.

"That won't happen. We're going to have more cars," replied Counselor Lampkin.

"What's a passenger to do that wants to go forward to the lobby to smoke?"

"I had expected such questions, but I am not prepared to answer them."

"Have you prepared separate straps for negroes and whites?"

Lampkin appeared confused, and Alderman Logan came to his rescue.

"This is no joking matter," said Logan. "No political or racial prejudices should obtain. It is simply intended to facilitate the convenience and comfort of travel in the street cars. It is a success in Atlanta, Birmingham, Jacksonville, Mobile and other Southern cities. Whites as well as negroes vote it a welcome convenience, and if the ordinance is enforced negroes will be grateful recipients.

KANSAS CITY DIFFERENT.

"The purport of the ordinance is the greatest good to the greatest numbers. they have no such law in Northern cities as they they have not the preponderance of negro population that Kansas City has."

Alderman Isaac Taylor asked Counselor Lampkin if the city had a legal right to pass such an ordinance when there is no similar law in force in the state.

Mr. Lampkin answered that his first impression was that the city did not have the right, but upon consulting authorities he found that the city, under the laws of police powers, has the right. He cited the Florida supreme court as giving the cities of that state the authority, under police powers, to enact laws similar to the one proposed for Kansas City, and said that the supreme court of Massachusetts had ruled that school directors could segregate white and negro children attending public schools.

"I can see where good results would obtain by the enforcement of such an ordinance, but it looks like a trouble breeder to me," observed Alderman Culbertson.

LIKE SOUTHERN LAWS.

The ordinance is patterned after the law in force in Southern cities, and provides a fine of $25 for a person refusing to take a seat assigned him by the conductor or after refusal to leave the car for non-compliance of the rule. The company is subject to a fine of $500 if it fails to operate the separate cars, or comply with the required designation.

Should the ordinance become a law the New Orleans plan will be followed. The conductor will designate the seats in accordance with the prevailing conditions. It is proposed to have negroes occupy the front part of the car. Seats for their use will be appropriate labeled, and they must occupy no others. When their allotment of seats becomes filled, and standing in the aisles is necessary, they must keep within the limits of these seats. They must not seat themselves in seats reserved for whites, and any violation of this rule will necessitate the immediate retirement of the offender from the car or his arrest and punishment by a fine of $25 in the municipal court. The same rule applies to whites occupying reservations for negroes.

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January 21, 1910

WHEN ELMAN WAS POOR.

Charles Grossman Was a Childhood
Playmate of the Violinist.
Charles Grossman, Kansas City Playwright.
CHARLES GROSSMAN.

There is one person in Kansas City who is awaiting with unusual interest the coming of Mischa Elman, the violinist who will be heard here in concert for the first time at the Willis Wood next Friday afternoon. He is Charles Grossman of 3212 Charlotte street, a young sketch writer, who was a childhood playmate of Elman and shared his clothes and even meals with the infant prodigy, destined to be one of the world's greatest violinists. Elman's father was a man of brilliant education but desperately poor and lived next door to the Grossmans. The younger Grossman is eagerly awaiting the violinist's coming to exchange reminiscences with him. They have not met for a dozen years and in the meantime the 7-year-old concertist of the parting has become at 19 one of the wonderful players of all time.

"I am two years older than Elman," said Mr. Grossman yesterday. "I well recall the time when I first heard little Mischa play his father's violin at the age of 4 years. In my childish way I thought to have him punished and I told his father he was playing the instrument, which was about the only thing of value in the Elman home. The father was at first angry, but soon recognized the hitherto unsuspected skill of his son. He had no means to educate him, however, but my father gave him his first start by placing him under teachers in our home town of Tolnoe. Later he was sent to Schapola where a Jewish millionaire named Bodsky became interested in him and sent him to Odessa, where Professor Auer of the St. Petersburg conservatory took him up. the story of his phenomenal rise is history, but I know that he will be glad to see his playmate of the old days. He was the guest of my brothers in New York, one of whom is a rabbi and the other an attorney. I hope to have Elman as my guest next week.

"Incidentally I do not see why Elman should be called the Russian violinist. He is a Jew and though the czar himself has given him a medal and other honors Russia is the prosecutor of this race, and Elman himself was not allowed by law to live in St. Petersburg until he had secured the august permission of the czar."

Young Grossman himself bids fair to attain a high degree of success in his chosen profession and may yet be a dramatist who will shed luster on the Jewish race, as he is already the author of many successful plays.

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January 19, 1910

MAYOR CALLS NEGRO HERO.

Modifies Prejudice Against Race and
Will Try to Get Him a Job.

"You are a hero, Washington Johnson, and I take great pleasure in recommending you to Superintendent of Streets Pendergast for a job on the street cleaning gang," said Mayor Crittenden yesterday. Johnson, a negro janitor, was in charge of the Rialto building the night it burned. Risking his life, Johnson awakened sleepers on the several floors.

"For the once I am going to modify my prejudice against the negro in positions that bring him in contact with the public. I'm giving you temporary work until you can find something that will pay you better."

"Thank you, mayor," was Johnson's response.

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January 15, 1910

PARISH FOR COLORED CATHOLICS.

St. Monica's Catholic Mission
Organized by Franciscans.

A Catholic mission, known as St. Monica's Parish for Colored Catholics, has been organized by the Franciscan Fathers of the city at 2552 Locust street. The first divine services of the new mission will be held at St. John's school, 534 Tracy avenue, tomorrow. Regular services will be held at the parish headquarters on the second and fourth Sundays of each month, a Sunday school service following the services.

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December 31, 1909

NEGROES WANT EXPOSITION.

Delegates to Convention Hall In-
dorse Depew Bill.

Three hundred and fifty negro delegates to the convention of the Interstate Literary Association of the West, now in session at Convention hall, last night unanimously indorsed Senator DePew's bill, asking congress to appropriate $250,000 for a semi-centennial American Emancipation exposition to be held in some Southern city in 1913 to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the freedom of negroes. The proposed exposition also is for the purpose of showing the progress of the race. Professor R. R. Wright, former paymaster of the army, is one behind the movement.

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December 30, 1909

WHITE GIRL TO WED INDIAN.

Miss Albertson of Richmond, Mo.,
to Become Bride of Educated Creek.

A license was secured yesterday by John A. Phillips, a full-blooded Creek Indian of Okemaha, Ok., to marry Miss Lulu B. Albertson, a white woman living at Richmond, Mo. The groom is a well-to-do real estate dealer.

Phillips is an educated Indian. He is a graduate of McComb college of Muskogee. He is a widower of a few years. His first wife was a white woman. Mr. Phillips and Miss Albertson met last summer when the latter was visiting friends in Okemaha.

The bride will return to her home in Richmond, to join her husband later in Oklahoma.

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November 30, 1909

JEW AND ITALIAN
DRIVE OUT NEGRO?

DOCTOR SAYS HIS RACE IS LOS-
ING NORTH END.

Suggests 10th to 31st, Troost to
Montgall as Desirable Location,
But Learns It Is
Too Late.

The park board was told yesterday by Dr. M. H. Key, a negro, that there are 35,000 negroes already in Kansas city, and that in a few more years they will number at least 100,000. He said that the proper housing of the race was becoming a serious problem. It is his opinion that the only district left for them to locate in is between Troost, Montgall, Tenth and Thirty-first.

"The negroes are being driven from the West bottoms by the invasion of railroads; from the North end by Jews and Italians, and from other districts by the progress of industry and improvement," said the doctor.

PASEO EXTENSION PROTEST.

The purpose of Dr. Key's explanation was to protest against the condemnation of land occupied by negroes in the vicinity of Twenty-sixth and Spring Valley park for the extension of the Paseo. He feared that their property would be practically confiscated, and that they would not be sufficiently recompensed to find abodes elsewhere.

The members of the board assured Dr. Key that the valuations of the negroes' property would be protected, and that he had come too late with his objections, as both the board and council had approved the proceedings.up to the north park district..

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November 23, 1909

SETBACK FOR NEGRO THEATER.

Permit Denied Promoters Who In-
tended Remodeling Synagogue.

A permit was denied yesterday to the promoters of a proposed negro theater at Eleventh and Oak streets. It was the intention to remodel the old Jewish synagogue. Matt Shinnick, in charge in the absence of John T. Neill, superintendent of buildings, said no plans were submitted.

One of the main objections to the remodeling of the old synagogue is the stairway entrance from the street. The steps are only ten inches wide, and the incline is steep.

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November 20, 1909

NEGRO THEATER MANAGER
LOOKED FOR NO PROTEST.

Louis Woods Says His Company In-
vested $5,000 in Contracts for
Rebuilding Synagogue.

Louis Woods of 722 Charlotte street, owner of the Kansas City Son, a negro weekly paper, a negro who leased the Jewish Synagogue at Eleventh and Oak streets to open a theater for negroes, said last night that he was surprised at the opposition the proposed theater has received.

"For years I have been giving this matter much needed thought," he said. "I have seen white play houses in Kansas City prosper and added to every year. I noticed another thing -- that few negroes attend a white theater unless a negro troupe happened to be there. Then the first and second balconies are packed with negroes who pay nearly as much as those on the lower floor. It struck me that as all negro shows that come to Kansas City are liberally patronized by negroes, they might as do as well by a theater managed by a person of their own color.

"I talked with Sam Conkey, advance man for the Cole and Johnson show, with Bob Motts, proprietor of the Pekin, a negro theater in Chicago, and with Sir Green, supreme chancellor commander of the negro Knights of Pythias who just has completed a $100,000 negro theater in New Orleans. We combined on the project. It was our intention to have a chain of negro play houses over the country. We have been looking at a proposition in St. Louis.

"We had no idea that there would be any objection to our going by ourselves. White people usually want the negro to keep to himself, but just as soon as he attempts to do so, they object. We had no idea that we would meet the color objection with this theater.

"The theater was to be an investment. We examined the lease and found it without restrictions as to color. The building and the location were so well adapted to our needs that we put money into the business. We have let several contracts and have spent about $5,000.

"Had we known that our going there would have been offensive, it would have caused us to look for another location. So far as I am concerned I do not wish to raise any strife. I was born and reared in Missouri and expect to live and die here."

When it was known a negro theater was to be near them business men on East Eleventh street got up a petition remonstrating against the lease. It was signed by nearly every business firm near the theater.

A. P. Nichols, a real estate agent, has charge of the synagogue property for the owner who lives in Omaha. The principal objectors are D. O. Smart and the North-Mehornay Furniture Company. Mr. Smart has under erection a five-story building west of the proposed negro theater. There are many retail firms along East Eleventh street, members of all of which are opposing the lease to a negro theater.

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October 29, 1909

NEGRO COP SHOOTS A NEGRO.

Victim, With Shattered Leg, Falls
at Wife's Feet in Kitchen.

His right leg shattered by a bullet from a negro policeman's pistol which struck him as he stood in his own kitchen door, Martin Young, also a negro, fell at the feet of his wife as she was eating supper last evening.

Young, who lives at 1126 Highland avenue, was playing poker earlier in the day near Tenth street and St. Louis avenue, it is claimed, and the game was raided, but he managed to escape. Patrolmen Gray, Tillman and Campbell, all negroes, in plain clothes, surrounded his home. Tillman went inside while Campbell guarded the front of the house and Gray the rear.

Wilson went out of the back door and seeing the officer standing behind a fence started back. Gray shouted at the ma but as he made no attempt to stop, immediately shot him down.

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October 15, 1909

NEGRO BAPTISTS MEET
IN ANNUAL CONVENTION.

MAYOR JONES OF INDEPEND-
ENCE GIVES WELCOME.

Rev. Caston of Jefferson City Says
Black Boys and Girls Be Edu-
cated and Refers to Macon,
Missouri College.

From all parts of the state are negro Baptists in Independence attending the twentieth annual session of the Baptist state convention which opened yesterday morning and will continue in session through Sunday night. The convention was organized or the moral, intellectual and spiritual uplift of the negro race and is presided over by Rev. J. T. Caston, M. D., of Jefferson city, Mo., a prominent negro preacher in the state.

In calling the convention to order, Dr. Caston said:

"We must lift up our own race. The negro boys and girls must be educated, and it is up to us to do it. There is no man or woman on earth who can inspire the negro like the negro. Our boys and girls are looking up to us and we must not go around with a long face. Let us be men and women.

"Twenty years ago the negro Baptists started out to establish a college in Macon, Mo. It was then that we have put down our money and we have been doing so ever since. You must know what we do. The Western college at Macon stands for itself. We are building up little by little. You need not expect the work to be done in a day or in a night. You must look to the future, look to your own strong black arms, if you would make the race anything or if you would be respected by others."

The convention opened with song and praise service, conducted by Rev. O. P. Goodwin of Shelbina. Deacon W. L. Bennett of Jefferson City was appointed marshal. After services the president appointed a committee on enrollment, consisting of Revs. J. H. Downey, I. H. Robinson, E. S. Redd, Mrs. Bell Wood and Mrs. C. E. Alexander.

The feature of the morning session was the annual sermon preached by the Rev. O. T. Redd, D. D., of Chillicothe, Mo. The work of a gospel minister was laid down in the sermon.

In the afternoon session the Rev. Dr. E. A. Howard, pastor of the First Baptist church, white, was introduced and delivered a strong address. He told the ministers that it was a good thing to live a life of Christ, to be consistent with the teaching of the Bible, to do all in their power to make the race better. He reminded them of what they had before them, what they had to do for themselves. He was glad to see they were striving to make their race better. The address was full of good advice.

ANNUAL ADDRESS.

Following this Dr. Caston delivered his annual address to the convention, taking up the work of the past year, reviewing the condition of the churches in the state and asking the ministers to unite as never before for the religious and educational training of the whole negro race. He thought that his people should first do for themselves and then appeal for outside help.

The corresponding secretary spoke. The reports of the treasurer and other officials were made. The women showed that they had collected during the session of their convention, which closed Wednesday night, $1,126. Mrs. C. R. McDowell was complimented for her work.

At the night session Rev. John Goins, superintendent of missions, delivered an address. He took up the missionary work of the negro Baptists.

Mayor L. Jones delivered an address of welcome, which was responded to by Dr. S. W. Bacote of Kansas City.

Revs. J. R. Bennett, J. T. Thornley and B. J. Guthrie delivered short addresses and a large collection was lifted for education.

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September 27, 1909

NEW INSTRUMENT TO HER.

Fiddler's "Ma" Begged Him to
Learn to Play on "Comedy."

"Mother was an old-fashioned darkey with the ideas which prevailed before the war," said Harry Fiddler of the team of Fiddler and Shelton, negro entertainers at the Orphem last week.

"She was a devout Baptist of hard-shell kind and tried to bring me up in that belief, as well as in the ways with which had been taught her by the family of white folks to whom she once belonged. Moreover, it was her opinion that a good darkey could not be other than a barber, a porter or a groom.

"I was of a different opinion, however. I wanted to be an actor and go upon the stage. This inclination on my part got me many a good licking, my mother remarking: "Yo's the debbil's own; he shore g'wine get you yit.' The lickings didn't affect me a bit. I practiced all the time.

"When I wasn't doing that I was hanging around the stage door, importuning managers to give me a chance. One day it came. Billy Kersand's minstrel troupe came to town. He wanted a man to take the place of one who had quit the troupe. I heard him ask the house manager if he knew of anyone. I pleaded for a chance.

"The manager took me back on the stage, saw my work, and said I would do. I was to receive $25 per week. 'If you make good, I'll give you a contract for the season,' he said.

"Oh, I made good, all right," chuckled Fiddler. "I got my money Saturday night, and as we were not to leave until Sunday night, I went home and handed mother my salary. It was the first money I had ever earned.

" 'Whah you git dis money, chil'?' she asked.

" 'At the theater,' I replied.

" 'How you git it?'

" ' Danced for it.'

" 'Fifteen dollars for dancing?' incredulously, for this was more money than father earned each week.

" 'Yep,' I replied. But mother couldn't see it that way. Something was wrong. She picked up a hickory club lying in the corner, and, advancing toward me, once more asked:

" 'Look me in both eyes, chil'. Whah yuh git dis money?'

" 'Got it for dancing in Billy Kersands's minstrels. Why, that isn't anything, mother. Billy Kersands gets $250 a week for fifteen minutes' work each night,' said I.

" 'What he do?' she asked.

" 'He plays comedy parts,' I replied.

" 'An' he gits $250 a week fo' playin' dat?' she asked. Turning to my aunt, who was present during the conversation, mother exclaimed:

" 'Yah hear dat, M'riar? Didn't I tole you dat boy was de debbil's own. I dun beg him all his life to learn to play on dat instrument.' "

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September 21, 1909

STEEL CELLS FOR BABES;
SOFT BEDS FOR EVILDOERS.

"Oh, Please Don't Put Us in There,"
Pleaded Mother With Infant as
Police Thrust Her Into Dungeon.

A condition never before heard of at police headquarters in all of its history, existed there last night. Four women, keepers of public rooming houses, all had comfortable quarters in the matron's room. Down in the steel cell section of the women's department of the holdover, locked behind bars, were two worn women, each with a babe at her breast.

Both of the babies were ill and crying, but there was no room in the matron's comfortable room for women with babies in arms. Those who had the beds and slept beneath the sheets are women who today will be accused of harboring young girls in disorderly resorts.

Mrs. Nellie Ripetre, with a baby of 6 months old, was sent in about 9 o'clock p. m. for investigation. It has always been the custom in the past never to lock up a woman with a baby. If there was no room in the matron's room for the mother and the babe, room had to be made by putting someone down in the holdover. This negro woman lay on the concrete floor with her crying baby folded tightly to her bosom. The floor got too hard for the mother later on and she chose an iron bunk in one of the cells. There she lay all night. The windows were open and the place cold. Mother-like, however, she huddled her baby close to her, to keep it warm. Part of the time the child lay on top of its mother, covered only by her bare arms.

About 11 p. m. Mrs. Mattie Bell, with a 5-months-old child, was sent in from No. 2 station in the West Bottoms.. Her baby was puny, sickly and crying. The matron's room, however, was still filed with healthy, well-dressed rooming house keepers, so the mother and her sick child had to listen to the harsh turn of the key in a cell door.

"Please don't put me in that place," begged the mother. "It's cold down there and my baby is very sick."

"That's the best we've got," she was informed.

Mrs. Bell was booked for the Humane Society. She had been found wandering about in the streets with her baby. After she was locked up Mrs. Bell tried the concrete floor, and, like the other mother, had to creep to the steel slabbed bed in a cell. She complained to the jailer and the Emergency hospital was notified that there was a sick baby in the holdover.

In a short time a nurse and a doctor went to the cell room and relieved the distressed mother of her sickly burden. The little one was tenderly cared for during the balance of the night but the other mother -- she's colored -- her babe clasped tightly to her breast, spent a chilly night.

The four rooming housekeepers in the matron's room rested easily.

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September 20, 1909

SUPERSTITIOUS? NOT MUCH.

But Mrs. Whitney Carried Rabbit's
Foot When Near Stepladders.

Mrs. Carrie Westlake Whitney, librarian of the public library, is the possessor of a rabbit's foot these days. About twenty five painters have been at work on the library building for the past six weeks, painting the interior, and there are so many step-ladders around that Mrs. Whitney always pauses before entering the building to see if she has her rabbit's foot with her.

"I wouldn't dare go under one of those ladders without my rabbit's foot," she said yesterday. "My charm is the left hind foot of a rabbit that was killed in a graveyard by a red-headed negro at midnight."

Miss Bishop, assistant librarian, has no rabbit's foot, because she is not superstitious, she says.

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September 12, 1909

NEGRO FAIR OPEN TODAY.

Sacred Concert by Band and Special
Services on Grounds.

The negro fair at Independence came to a close last evening. It was not a success financially owing to rain the first three days of last week. the management has decided to keep the fair grounds open today. There will be a sacred concert by the band, and special services also will be held on the grounds.

The fair was successful from an exhibition standpoint. The handiwork of the negro women attracted considerable attention, as did the cooking department and preserving section, which were excellent.

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September 7, 1909

NEGRO FAIR POSTPONED.

Rain Causes Delay of Events Sched-
uled at Independence.

Business at the negro fair was declared off yesterday on account of rain at Independence, and the chicken and chitlings, prepared for the occasion, went begging.

The horse races were also declared off, and will be run today provided the track can be gotten into shape.

Dr. W. R. Petteford, a southern negro banker who is president of the Penny Savings bank of Birmingham, Ala., will deliver an address today at the negro fair which opened at Independence.

Free attractions are offered in the way of slack wire and trapeze performances. The fair will be open day and night throughout the week.

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August 28, 1909

HALTED A NEGRO PARADE.

Laundry Wagon Driver Was Rough-
ly Handled by Negroes.

During the parade of the negro Knights of Pythias yesterday morning at Twelfth and Central streets a small race riot took place when W. S. Jarboe, a driver for the Fern Laundry Company, accompanied by his wife, tried to drive his wagon in the direction that the procession was marching. His horse was seized by several negroes and others drew the wagon to one side. The excitement subsided of its own accord before the arrival of police from headquarters. Sergeant Robert Smith, in command of the squad, decided that the trouble had been magnified and returned to the station without making any arrests.

After the trouble had subsided and the parade had passed, Jarboe and his wife drove to police headquarters and made a complaint to Daniel V. Howell, assistant city attorney. A warrant was issued for the arrest of George Thompson, a negro lawyer who was leading the parade, and who first seized the horse which Jarboe was driving. The warrant was served last night and the case will be tried in the municipal court this morning.

"I'm not injured -- except my feelings," said Mrs. Jarboe, as she told her trouble to Attorney Howell.

Spectators, both whites and negroes, agree that Jarboe used considerable indiscretion in trying to drive his horse up the line of the parade. Even after the police had arrived and the horse had been rehitched to the wagon, Jarboe had to be restrained from whipping his horse into the mob of persons that were lined along the curbing.

There was very little excitement, considering that it was purely a racial affair, and the parade did not stop. There was no interference on the part of the "armed knights." Mrs. Jarboe was not injured, aside from her feelings, as she admitted to Mr. Howell.

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August 24, 1909

WITH 5,000 NEGRO DELEGATES.

SUPREME LODGE WILL OPEN
THIS MORNING.

Every State in Union Wil Be Rep-
resented on Roll Call -- Recep-
tion at Second Bap-
tist Church.

With a delegation of 5,000 negro men and women from every state in the Union, the supreme lodge of negro Knights of Pythias opens this morning in Ivanhoe hall, Nineteenth street and Tracy avenue, and continues until Friday night. It is the largest gathering of its kind ever held in Kansas City. Among the delegates are doctors, lawyers, bankers, merchants, clerks, porters, barbers, teachers, editors, farmers and every other profession, trade and business followed by negroes.

A reception was held last night at the Second Baptist church, Tenth and Charlotte streets. Grand Chancellor A. W. Lloyd of St. Louis presided and music was furnished by the choir of the Second Baptist church.

Nelson C. Crews, chairman of the local committee, made an address of welcome.

A solo by Miss Ennis Collins followed.

Welcome to the state was extended by Professor W. W. Yates, who represented Governor Hadley. His address was short and cordial. A selection by the Calanthian choir then followed.

S. W. Green of New Orleans, supreme chancellor, responded to this address.

S. C. Woodson represented Mayor Crittenden in an address of welcome.

There was a solo by Wiliam J. Tompkins and a selection by the choir, "The Heavens Are Telling." Other addresses were made by Prof. J. R. Jefferson of West Virginia; Dr. J. E. Perry, E. D. Green, of Chicago; Dr. W. P. Curtiss, St. Louis; Dr. J. A. Ward, Indianapolis; Mrs. Janie C. Combs and A. J. Hazelwood.

The Supreme Court of Calanthe will be presided over by John W. Strauther of Greenville, Miss. The session will be held at the Hodcarrier's hall. In this meeting every phase of the negro's home life will be discussed. Strauther is one of the most noted men of his race in the country.

At 2 o'clock this afternoon a band concert will be given at Cap Carrouthers by the Bixton, Ia., band, and dress parade at 5:30 p. m. by the entire uniform ranks.

Rev. B. Hillman of Terra Haute, Ind., made the opening prayer last night.

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July 31, 1909

DEATH PENALTY PAID
BY NEGRO MURDERER.

CLAUD BROOKS HANGED AT THE
COUNTY JAIL YESTERDAY.

With a smile and a "Good-by everybody," Claud Brooks stepped into eternity. He made the scaffold his stage, and for a few brief seconds seemed to enjoy being enough of a spectacle to cause fifty men and boys, all white, to crowd to see him.

In fourteen minutes after 9:15, when Marshal Joel B. Mayes sprang the trap, he had been pronounced dead. The law had taken its vengeance for the death of Sidney Herndon, struck down in cold blood eighteen months ago.

Brooks taunted one of the deputies with being nervous and asked another not to tie him so tight, as he would not attempt to resist. A few moments later he dropped to his death.

With appetite Brooks at breakfast ate the catfish which had been provided for him according to his wish. Then he asked for whisky, which also was given him. And then for two hours the Rev. E. S. Willett, Rev. J. W. Hurst, Rev. S. W. Bacote and Rev. J. C. Dickson prayed and sang with him. Half an hour before the execution he was given the sacrament. And then the nervousness, if he previously felt any, vanished.

Into the room where the gallows stand there was admitted a motley crowd of some fifty. There were policemen by the fives. There were boys who looked barely over 17. There were men of many types, not to mention several well known in the business life of the town.

Outside, crowds threatened to storm the jail to gain entrance. Marshal Mayes asked the police to protect the entrance into the jail wagon yard, which the crowd appeared to take by storm. Some half a hundred got into the criminal court room, from which the gallows was shut off by brick walls.

Still others stood outside, waiting to catch a fleeting glimpse of what was once a human being. Children of tender years and women with the imprint of respectability were among the number.

Eighteen months ago Brooks killed Sidney Herndon, owner of the Navarro flats at Twelfth and Baltimore, four feet of stature and crippled. He killed him with a hammer. The motive was robbery. The negro got more than $100. Out of this he bought a suit of clothes and hired a carriage to take him to the Union depot so he could escape. The rest he lost gambling and gave away. He was tried, convicted, his sentence affirmed by the supreme court and not considered otherwise than proper by the governor.

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July 25, 1909

CHINESE DON JUAN
ARRESTED IN CHICAGO.

CLAIMED GAW WING ELOPED
WITH MRS. ETHEL GORDON.

Celestial of Many Love Affairs
and Woman, Who Is Said
to Be From Kansas
City, Fine.

White women have a strange fascination for Gaw Wing, a Kansas City Chinese. Gaw has been arrested in Chicago in company with a woman who gave her name as Mrs. Ethel Gordon, also of Kansas City. The two eloped recently, it is claimed, and Chicago was the destination.

Gaw at one time, so it is said, went to Topeka where he fell love with a white school teacher. He flashed his bundle of bills and the school teacher became Mrs. Wing. She was at the police station in Kansas City yesterday looking for her recreant husband.

About a week ago, having forgotten his school teacher wife long since, it is claimed, he and Mrs. Gordon, both known to the police in the person of inspector Edward P. Boyle, left Kansas City. It was common gossip among the Chinese of West Sixth street that Gaw left a wife in Kansas City. This wife to who they refer says she was Mrs. Charles Wilson before she married the flighty Wing. She and the Mongolian also eloped to Chicago and were arrested January 26 of this year and were fined in the municipal court of that city. Mrs. Wilson has a child 2 years old.

Gaw's friends in Chicago paid his fine and he and Mrs. Wilson were released.

They came back to Kansas City and their domestic bark suddenly ran upon breakers. Mrs. Wilson Wing dropped out of sight.

Wing and Charlie Chu, a restaurant keeper at 125 West Sixth street, were fast friends and Gaw spent much of his time at the restaurant. White women came and went and from the lot Wing, it is alleged, selected Mrs. Gordon, who the police say lived at the Madison house, Independence avenue and Walnut street. Gaw, it is said, took up his abode at the Madison house and a rapid courtship followed. Gaw and his new spouse left for Chicago about two weeks ago and from that city last night came the news of their arrest.

Gaw was passing under the name of Charles Foy and Mrs. Gordon was registered as his wife. Inspector Boyle says that he is certain the eloping Chinaman is Gaw Wing. Mrs. Gordon told the Chicago police that she had been living in Chicago for over a year with her brother at 516 North Ashland avenue.

The Chinese and the woman were arrested by Chicago detectives after having been seen to enter a questionable hotel together and register as Charles Foy and wife. They were fined $200 and court costs there yesterday morning.

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July 20, 1909

DON'T TRY TO RUB OFF BLACK.

"Stick to Race Type," Major Wright
Tells Negroes.

"Let us stick to our race type; don't try to rub off the black," was the injunction of Major R. R. Wright of Savannah, Ga., to a congregation at the African Second Baptist church, Tenth and Charlotte streets, last night. Major Wright was one of the two negro army officers of his rank in the Spanish-American war. He is president of the Georgia State Industrial college for negroes, and a member of hte Amerian Historical Association.

"The negro as a race is as great as any that ever peopled the earth," continued Major Wright. "If you are ashamed of your color read history.

"At the time of the Gallic invasion hundreds of thousands of Romans went to Africa and there tried to found a new nation. Africa through its mighty chiefs repelled the invaders, and drove them back to Italy.

"When Columbus discovered America there were fifteen large negro kingdoms in Africa. One of them on the west coast was three times larger than Mexico. The king of this great monarchy was one of a dynasty 1,100 years old. Think of this line of kings and then of that which is represented by King Edward of England and then of America little more than a tenth as old. Such powerful kingdoms are not founded on sand."

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July 15, 1909

NOISE OF THE KIDS
DROWNS SET SPEECHES.

FIRST PUBLIC PLAYGROUND IS
OFFICIALLY OPENED.

Crowd of 500 Youngsters Rollic So
Enthusiastically That Associa-
tion Directors Abandon Pro-
gramme of Ceremonies.

Thronged with children of all ages and color, the small plot of ground at the northwest corner of Charlotte street and Independence avenue was last night officially opened by the directors of the Playgrounds Association as the first public playgrounds in Kansas City. It was planned to have several short addresses by the directors, but the enthusiasm of the youngsters was such that no attention was given to the speakers, who were relieved of their embarrassment by the band.

Long before the hour announced for the opening the children of the neighborhood had arrived, and were busy with the swings, sliding boards and "teeters," Misses Agnes O'Brien and Elsa Katzmaier, the instructors, were assisted by their supervisor, Mrs. Viola Dale McMurray, in the opening. The instructors will be on duty all day, and will teach the children, according to their ages, games.

GREAT CROWD CAUSED CONFUSION.

Confusion reigned supreme last night, and the real intent of the playgrounds could not be shown on account of the enormous crowd. Mothers accompanied the tiny tots, while older sisters and brothers came "just to see," but were as interested as the younger children. Every little while some child would set up a wail and to the kind hearted young instructors would tell about an older one teasing them. Two or three large boys were put off the grounds because they would not behave.

All nationalities were represented among the children and Italians mingled with the negroes as did the Irish and Hebrews.

THURSDAY FOR NEGROES.

After today the negro children will be allowed there only on Thursday, when the white boys and girls will be barred. Besides the baby game which the instructors will teach, baseball basketball and other amusements will be provided at different hours of the day for the larger youngsters.

Small tables and chairs have been provided for the very little ones who will be closely watched while in the play grounds. All movable apparatus is to be locked up at night. A shelter house extending across one side of the grounds can be used on rainy days. The children will be urged to play in the yard, however, as much as possible.

Between 400 and 500 children were on the grounds at one time early in the evening. When the instructors left the grounds after 9 o'clock, some 200 little ones, who were loathe to leave, remained.

The play ground is in the heart of the thickly populated foreign and negro settlements.

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July 7, 1909

NEGROES MAINTAIN GUARD.

Grizzled Veterans With Springfields
Patrol Dynamite District.

Two ancient negroes, A. L. Jones and Percy Williams, last night did sentry duty in front of the row of cottages on Highland avenue, between Twenty-seventh and Twenty-eighth streets. It was in this vicinity that a house was wrecked by dynamite early Monday morning after it had been let to negroes.

The negroes who mounted guard last night had both seen service in the civil war in the capacity of teamsters. They were armed with old regulation Springfield rifles. As they paced slowly up and down the plank sidewalk they swapped stories of war times, or kept step to "hay-foot! straw-foot!" according to a system said to have been employed by the drill masters of '61.

"Seems powerful lonely out here," said one of the sentinels, bringing his weapon to parade rest when accosted by a lone reporter in the twilight of a flickering arc lamp.

"When are you relieved?" was asked.

"Not until morning."

"Going to carry that heavy rifle around with you all the time?"

"Certainly; this is soldiering," was the answer.

No clues as to the dynamiting have been discovered by the police of No. 6 station.

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July 6, 1909

ESTABLISH PATROL
IN NEGRO COLONY.

REPORTED BLACK RESIDENTS
HAVE ARMED THEMSELVES.

Arrange System of Signals to Call
for Assistance If Further At-
tempts Are Made to Dyna-
mite Houses.

Negroes who live in the vicinity of Twenty-seventh street and Highland avenue, near the vacant house at 2707 Highland which was wrecked by dynamite at 4 o'clock yesterday morning, presumably as a warning to real estate men that Twenty-seventh street is the negro's farthest point south in that portion of the Tenth ward, have organized for protection, and are reported to have armed themselves. Last night they declared they would not act hastily, but that it bodes ill for anyone to attempt to repeat the dynamiting of Monday morning.

Last night Everett Robinson, whose wife is a white woman, and G. F. Parsons patrolled the colony. They arranged a system of signals by which they could get assistance if needed.

OBJECT TO "INVASION."

White residents of that neighborhood as a rule deplore the dynamiting, but they are a unit in objecting to what they call a "negro invasion" of a white residence district, and they declare that every possible effort should be made to rid the neighborhood of the blacks.

The house dynamited yesterday morning is the property of the King Realty Company. It is the third house from the corner, and is the only vacant one of four cottages. The dynamiting was carefully planned and almost wrecked the house. The explosive was placed in the center of the house and a fuse was led through a rear window. The explosion lifted the roof, wrecked the interior and tore out a portion of the wall. Bric-a-brac and dishes in the adjoining house, occupied by G. F. Parsons, were broken.

The noise of the explosion awakened people for a block. For a time the negroes in the colony were panic-stricken. The police and firemen who arrived on the scene calmed them when they searched the house and discovered no more explosives.

WON'T BE INTIMIDATED.

During the day the negroes talked over the situation, and they made up their minds they would not be intimidated. They say they will remain in the homes which they are purchasing and that the authorities will protect them.

When these houses were finished last spring and it was learned that they were to be sold to negroes, warnings were posted on them, declaring that the negroes should not occupy them. But little attention was paid to these notices. About the same time a real estate man built a row of houses on Twenty-eighth street which he advertised for sale to negroes. A mass meeting was held and he was induced to change his mind. They have since been sold to whites.

The dynamiting yesterday morning came as a surprise to the negroes and also to the white residents of the neighborhood. So far as could be learned yesterday no active steps against the negro invasion of the neighborhood had been taken recently and it was suggested it was possible that the person who used the dynamite probably was inspired from a meeting in the Tenth ward Saturday night.

WILL PROTECT THEIR HOMES.

The negroes of Highland avenue are emphatic in asserting that they will remain in the homes which they are purchasing.

"We have to live somewhere," declared the white wife of Everett Robinson. "My husband does not make a large salary and we put what little money we had in this home. I have not heard of anyone who is anxious to give us our money back and I know that my husband is going to protect his wife and babies from an attack."

Parsons, whose home adjoins the wrecked cottage, declared that the negroes in that section are law abiding, but that they have armed themselves, and that if any further attempt is made at dynamiting it will go hard with the dynamiters.

"I am buying my home here," he declared, "and I am not going to be intimidated."

The "warning to negroes" notices which were printed in the evening newspapers was a copy of a notice tacked on a negro's door last spring. No notices of any kind have been served on the negroes since.

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July 4, 1909

NEGRO CEMETERY CHAPEL.

Cornerstone Will Be Laid at High-
land Today.

The cornerstone of the new chapel in Highland cemetery, a burying ground for negroes at Twentieth street and Blue Ridge boulevard, will be laid this afternoon at 3 o'clock. M. O. Ricketts of St. Joseph, grand master of the negro Masons of Missouri, will be in charge of the services. The building committee is composed of: C. H. Countee, Dr. J. E. Perry, A. T. Moore, L. A. Knox, T. W. H. Williams and T. C. Unthank.

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June 26, 1909

PRISONERS SWELTER IN
OVERCROWDED
WORKHOUSE.

On Men's Side Capacity is 112, and
Number of Inmates Is 131.

While the sun's rays sizzled down upon the roof of the Kansas City workhouse yesterday afternoon 131 men lay in cells, panting and sweltering. The cells on the men's side have equal space for fifty-six white men and the same number of negroes, the total capacity being 112. If there are more than that number there are no more bunks for them.

Instead of the men being divided equally, yesterday there were eighty-three white men and forty-eight negroes, making it necessary to place one-third of the white men with the negroes. The municipal farm at Leeds relieves the situation some. There are twenty men there, and if these were in the workhouse it would make living intolerable.

At this season of the year the workhouse is generally running "short-handed." The police, however, in the last month have been extraordinarily vigilant. Many commissions have expired, and more soon will expire, and the new board has announced that recommissioning the men will depend entirely on their records.

The women's department at the workhouse has accommodations for sixteen white and thirty-two negro women. This department, however, is not so crowded. Yesterday there were fifteen white and nineteen negro women prisoners.

The board of pardons and paroles relieved the situation some yesterday by paroling eleven men and two women, all but one of whom will be released today. One of the men will not be released until July 1, when certain conditions have been complied with.

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June 24, 1909

CONDEMNED NEGRO BAPTIZED.

Colored Women in Jail Sang During
the Ceremony.

Claud Brooks, the negro now in a death cell in the county jail awaiting execution June 30 for the murder of Sidney Herndon, was baptized yesterday by the Rev. J. W. Hurse of St. Stephen's Baptist church. Three negro women, who are prisoners at the jail, sang while the ceremony was going on. The cell of Brooks is on the women's side of the jail.

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June 15, 1909

GUY COLBY MUST REFORM.

Former White Ward of Negro
Woman Is Sent to Boonville.

Guy Colby is going to leave Kansas City for four years this time. His ticket reads Boonville, Mo., and he will start today. The sentence is four years.

Yesterday Guy ran away from the McCune home for the second time. He was found and taken to the Detention home before evening. He said he was anxious to see Ernest Crocroft, with whom he ran away from the McCune farm two weeks ago to Jefferson City. Crocroft was sent to Boonville.

At the time his friend was sentenced, Colby also was in court and was told that his next offense would result in a reform school sentence. That was imposed yesterday by Judge E. E. Porterfield of the juvenile court.

It was Guy Colby who was taken by probation officers from Mrs. Sarah E. Carr, a negro woman, who had cared for him for years. His mother lives in Haverhil, Mass. An investigation made by probation officers showed she was not able to care for the boy, so he was sent to the McCune farm.

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June 1, 1909

SIMPLICITY MARKS
CRITTENDEN FUNERAL.

FORMER GOVERNOR OF MIS-
SOURI LAID TO REST.

Rev. Thomas P. Haley Pronounces
Fitting Eulogy in Presence of
Relatives and Friends
of Many Years.

While respecting in every way the wish of the late Thomas T. Crittenden that his funeral be conducted with as little ostentation as possible, hundreds of former governor's friends, men and women, stood under the trees on the lawn at the residence, 3320 Flora avenue, yesterday afternoon within the sound of the voice of the Rev. Dr. Thomas P. Haley, who with the assistance of Rev. Burris A. Jenkins and the Rev. Dr. S. M. Neel, conducted the simple service for the dead.

Governor Crittenden had left a letter addressed to Dr. Haley asking that he officiate at his funeral. The letter was sealed in 1906.

"I count it one of the choicest blessings of my life to have known and loved Thomas T. Crittenden," said Dr. Haley. "He was a man of great heart, noble mind and character, whom none could know but to love and admire.

"Everyone who knew him was his friend. He had close friends far away as well as near, but among those who most revered him, which is an indication of the kind of man he was, are his neighbors, those with whom he came in contact in his everyday life. Every child in the neighborhood knew him and loved him.

WAS KIND TO ALL.

"He was ever willing to recognize his fellows as men, no matter what their station in life might have been. He was as careful to be considerate to the hod-carrier as he was to the banker.

"He would treat the washerwoman with as much consideration as the finest lady."

In finishing his characterization of his dead friend, Dr. Haley touched on Governor Crittenden's rare virtues as a husband and father, saying he was always careful to perform his public duties in the daytime, reserving the evenings for the society of his family.

Over the casket, during the funeral services, was draped the battle flag of the Seventh Missouri cavalry, which Governor Crittenden and Judge John F. Philips organized at the beginning of the civil war. The shot-torn banner was made by the women of Georgetown, Mo., and presented to the regiment. After the war it became the property of Judge Philips, who said it should drape his casket after his death.

NEGRO A MOURNER.

No mourner was more sincere than "Uncle" Dan Edwards, who was Governor Crittenden's "waitin' boy," as he styled himself, during the four years of the war. "Uncle" Dan is now pastor of the Metropolitan Negro Baptist church, at Ninth and Washington streets, Kansas City, Kas. He went to the Crittenden home in the early morning and asked for a last look at the face of his old "marster," and, as he said, "tuck dinner" there. He followed his master's body to Forest Hill, where it was buried.

Among those who came to the funeral was J. B. Waddell of Springfield, whom Governor Crittenden appointed as his adjutant general.

Enough floral offerings were sent to make a great mound at the grave. Members of the family, however, asked that the greater part of the flowers be sent to adorn graves that might go through Memorial day undecorated. Among the pieces sent was one from the children of the neighborhood bearing the card which read:

"Children of the Kentucky Block"

City officials and attaches in their offices also sent many beautiful floral pieces.

The pallbearers were Kelly Brent, John Hanley, W. W. Collins, S. L. Long, Daniel T. Blake, W. S. Cowherd, Porter H. Hovey and Leon T. Brown.

So profuse was the floral offering in memory of Governor Crittenden that Mrs. Crittenden requested that some of them be sent to various hospitals in Kansas City after the burial. The flowers were all left at the cemetery until late yesterday afternoon, when many were collected and sent to the following hospitals:

German hospital, new general hospital, old city hospital, Nettleton home, St. Joseph's hospital, St. Mary's hospital, and Mercy hospital.

RESOLUTION IN COUNCIL.

The council in special session yesterday passed the following tribute to the memory of the ex-governor:

"The death of former Governor Thomas Crittenden is a distinct loss, not only to our city, but to our state and nation. When a boy, following the dictates of his ancestral instincts, he dedicated his life to his country's service and took up his sword to defend its flag. To the closing of his rich and fruitful life, as soldier, congressman, governor, consul general and citizen he gave the best he had, his time, his talent, his eloquence, his energy to the state and nation. He was an illustrious example of American manhood. He was courageous and tender, courtly and constant, patriotic and modest. He honored women, trusted men and worshipped God. He belonged to the rare old school which held honor above wealth and virtue above life. He was every inch a Crittenden, which means that he turned his back to no foe and bended the knee to none but his Maker.

"He has fought the fight, he has finished the work, he has kept the faith and now takes his place full of honor among his distinguished ancestry.

"This city does not mourn alone. Today tears are falling nationwide. We, his neighbors, join with the multitudes in deploring his loss and extend to his sorrowing wife, his distinguished son, our mayor, and all the members of the grief-stricken family our earnest sympathy."

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May 21, 1909

NOT A WHITE MAN'S COUNTRY.

But Hayti Has Timber Wealth, Says
Citizen of Port au Prince.

William Hepple, a resident of Port au Prince, Hayti, who is a guest at the Blossom house, yesterday declared that there was in the islands of Hayti miles of high forests of white and yellow pine and mahogany. Mr. Hepple is in Kansas City to secure aid in cutting these forests and milling the lumber.

Mr. Hepple said that the country had recuperated from the effects of the recent revolution and that the people were well satisffied with the present administration of President Simon. He declared that Hayti was not a white man's country and that no white man could prosper there unless he had plenty of money, or was commissioned to represent foreign interests.

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April 26, 1909

PAID $150 FOR FIRST
COUNTY COURT HOUSE.

DANIEL P. LEWIS BUILT IT OF
HEWN LOGS IN 1828.

Old Building, Now Weatherboarded,
Still Stands at Independence --
Negroes Then Had Their
Own Court.

While Kansas City is considering the erection of a skyscraper court house to take the place of the old building in the North End, it might be of interest to members of the county court to know what was the cost of the first court house to be erected in Jackson county. One can scarcely realize in the present day of a temple of justice being erected at the enormous expenditure of $150, but that was the price which the taxpayers were compelled to pay in 1828.

The old town of Independence, Mo., had grown into quite a village, surrounded by a fairly well settled and wealthy farming community. Justice was dispensed in that early time probably as expeditiously as at present. The need of a building or court house wherein trials and other court procedure could be transacted was decided to be a necessity.

NEGRO HEWED THE LOGS.

The county court entered into a contract with one Daniel P. Lewis. In the fall it was agreed that he was to receive $150 for building a courthouse. In the all of that year Sam Shephard, a negro, hewed logs for the new building. They were dragged by a yoke of oxen to the ground selected as the site for the court house. The lot was No. 57 in the old town, now on the north side of Maple avenue near the square in Independence. The building was only one story and contained one large room, which was used as a courtroom and meeting place for all public discussions and lectures. Later several small rooms for use as offices were added.

The building is still standing in Independence, and the hewn logs of which it was constructed have been weather boarded and the large courtroom divided into small rooms. It is now used as a private dwelling and Christian Ott of Independence is the proprietor. It is understood the proprietor has offered to donate the building to the County Fair Association if it will move it from the lot.

In connection with the negro, Sam Shephard, who cut the logs for the court house, there is a bit of local history. In Independence and the country in the immediate neighborhood the negroes maintained a form of self-government. Each year they gathered together in convention and selected their officers. A judge and a sheriff were the principal offices upon which their government was founded.

PUNISHED BY THEIR OWN RACE.

Recalcitrant negroes and those accused of thefts or other crimes not taken notice of by the white people came under the supervision of the blacks' control. An accused would be summoned to court by the sheriff and the judge selected the jury of negroes from those present. The sessions of the negro court were held in a livery barn or blacksmith shop. If the negro on trial was found guilty after the deliberations of the jury, the sheriff carried out the penalty. As he was vested with powerful muscles as well as the authority of a sheriff, the penalty, which was usually a number of lashes on the bare back, was memorable.

The first judge was Wilas Staples and Sam Shephard was the first sheriff. The latter died in Lawrence, Kas., several months ago.

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April 24, 1909

SENATE BILL FOR JIM
CROW STREET CARS.

WAS ORIGINALLY FRAMED TO
APPLY TO STEAM ROADS.

May Pass Senate, but Is Sure of
Defeat in the House -- Senator
Wilson Framed the
Amendment.

JEFFERSON CITY, April 23. -- A street car Jim Crow bill has been introduced in the senate. This is the Oliver bill, which in its original form was to have applied to steam railroads only. The bill turned up this morning amended so as to apply to street cars.

The street car amendment was put on it by Senator F. M. Wilson of Platte, a personal and political friend of the mayor of Kansas City, Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., the mayor having loaded the senator from Platte up with reasons why the street cars of Kansas City should be arranged to segregate the races.

The amendment was not put on without much maneuvering, and while the bill may pass the senate in this form it is absolutely certain to be defeated in the house.

When asked for his reason for making the bill apply to street cars Senator Wilson said:

"If it is desirable the races should be separated on the steam cars, they ought to be separated in the street cars. Kansas City, so I understand, has something like 30,000 negroes living there. Without advancing any reason for providing separate places for them I merely refer to the state's reason for providing separate schools, the Kansas City park board excluding them from the public bath house and the church custom of letting them flock by themselves.

"The negroes prefer to be to themselves, as shown by their church habits. Accordingly, they must want to be by themselves in the street cars."

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April 19, 1909

PETER YOHANOWIC IS
KING OF 5,000 GYPSYS.

SCATTERED OVER EVERY STATE
OF THE UNION.

The "Throne" Is Located on the
Reidy Road Two Miles West of
Kansas City -- Subjects
Now Gathering.
Peter Yohanowic, King of the Gypsies.
PETER YOHANOWIC, KING OF 5,000 GYPSIES.

Peter Yohanowic of the Egyptian gypsy camp on the Reidy road, two miles west of the limits of Kansas City, Kas., proclaims himself a king. Peter II, as he is locally known, is a hereditary monarch, ruling over all the gypsy tribes of Semitic extraction in the United States. The official diadem, worn only in judgment of the refractories and delinquents of his tribe, is real enough, but consists merely of a silver and copper band hung with shells.

"My rule is unquestioned where ruling is necessary," said King Peter a few days ago. "My father before me was king, and his father before him. This is the Yohanowic dynasty. However, there is not much to do or say in the ruling line where everybody is accommodating and law-abiding. I am afraid that "king" will some time become a title with no force in it."

While saying this King Peter was directing the laying out of a camp for several new arrivals. His remarks to the reporter were interspersed with curt commands not delivered in a kingly way, but more after the manner of a modern civil engineer arranging a grading outfit.

"Two wagons and two tents over here. The same over there. Keep the horses and mules outside the tent line and the dogs beyond the mules, towards the city," were a few of his orders. He was watching camp sanitation and the safety of the chattels from petty thievery at the same time.


THE KING IS TALL.

Although some of his subjects were considerably undersized, the king is nearly six feet tall and built in proportion. He wears a coal black mustache, trained parallel with his upper lip, and wears the sombrero and bandanna of his race. His is good looking and has the most pleasing smile imaginable, showing a double line of strong white teeth. He is about 29 or 30 years old.

"How large a following have you?" the king was asked.

"I do not really know," was the reply. "Perhaps 5,000 would be the figure that would best cover it. You see, they are scattered over every state in the Union. Some of them I never hear from. Others are with me all the time. Whenever I meet them they are subject to me and pay me tribute according to what they can afford. Sometimes months pass and the condition of the tribe I am with is such that it is impossible for me to get any money outside of what I can make personally. My expenses are a little higher now, as I am maintaining a home in Leavenworth for the benefit of my wife and little son, now a year old."

"Is the little boy the crown prince?"

"Certainly he is. He's a member of the dynasty and in direct line of succession, isn't he? The tribe expressed its allegiance and anointed him prince a few days after his birth."

"How old is the Egyptian branch of the gypsy family, and in what manner does it differ from the European gypsies?" was next asked.




ORIGIN OF THE GYPSY.

"Nobody knows just what the origin of the Gypsy was. It is a matter clouded with superstition and faint history. I have often been asked if I did not believe that the Gypsies are the lost tribe of Israel. It has been pointed out to me that we are crafty salesmen and good husbandmen like the Jews. Also that our facial characteristics are somewhat similar to the Jewish cast of countenance. I think it is all rot. There was only one Jew who had the Gypsy instinct and that one was mythical -- the wandering Jew."


A Typical Gypsy Camp.
TYPICAL CAMP SCENE IN KING YOHANOWIC'S DOMAIN.

From all accounts the reign of Peter Yohanowic has been no more placid than that of his contemporary, Peter of Servia. Three years ago a usurper came to the camp on the Reidy road and threatened a permanent overthrow of the regime. He came from Chicago and wore a blazing red suit with many medals of various sorts. Also he had a commission which he said made him king over all the Egyptian Gypsies in the world.


There was some trouble in the camp following his arrival, trouble which began to brew immediately after the newcomer had demanded $2,000 tribute to set up his kingdom. Peter was bitter from the loss of his "throne" and one day he and the usurper are said to have met on the sandy bed of Reidy road. There was then an unkingly joust at arms, literally speaking, and when the dust finally settled over the combatants the usurper was overthrown and Peter was once more king.

ARREST OF A PRETENDER.

Formal charges of obtaining money under false pretenses were preferred against the pretender by Peter and a warrant for his arrest was issued by the Kansas City, Kas., North city court. He was arrested and in default of a large fine, imprisoned.

About a year ago a son and heir apparent was born to Peter in Leavenworth. He will bear the title of Peter III, upon growing to manhood upon the death or resignation of his father. The Reidy road camp now consists of forty wagons. Sometimes it is even larger. This is in the midsummer season when outfits from the Southwestern states, like New Mexico and Arizona come in. During the heart of winter there are seldom more than ten or twelve wagons at the capital of King Peter Yohanowic and the little village is as dead as is Washington between congressional sessions.

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