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February 3, 1910

KANSAS RABBIT HAIR YARN.

Angora Breed Thrives There and
New Industry May Result.

"Kansas may soon furnish the hair for the very fine Angora rabbit yarn which is now imported from France," said H. Lee Mallory, a manufacturer of New York city, at the Hotel Baltimore last night. Mr. Mallory and his wife are on their way to the coast.

"The finest yarns at present are those of the Angora rabbits. These yarns are woven into the very expensive jersey, or sweater coats, and other articles of apparel. It is a silky yarn, much softer than any other, and very warm. Next to the Angora rabbit comes the llama of South America, the India cashmere and the Angora goat. A few years ago a Kansan happened to be in France at the same time I was, and he took home some of their Angora rabbits. They thrived in Kansas, and the hair he sent me last year was fully equal to the imported hair.

"The automobile is responsible for the popularity of the sweater or jersey coats and costumes," continued Mr. Mallory. "The manufacturers are now turning out complete suits, consisting of helmet caps, or hoods, coats, mittens and slippers. Slumber robes have also been added to the list of articles for the benefit of those who wish to sleep in the open. Dressed in these garments, a person could almost brave a trip to the North pole.

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January 26, 1910

THEY'RE NOT MISSOURI LIONS.

Girl's Damage Suit to Federal Court,
As Owner Is Non-Resident.

Complications in the damage suit brought by Ella May Cushman against the Hippodrome Amusement Company and C. W. Parker of Abilene, Kas., resulted yesterday in the transferring of the case from Judge Slover's division of the circuit court to the federal court. The girl asks damages in the sum of $10,000 for injuries received, it is alleged, when a lion at the Hippodrome, two years ago, reached through the bars of its cage and clawed the girl's head.

After the plaintiff had completed her evidence yesterday the Hippodrome company showed that the lion was owned by Parker, who has a herd of wild animals which he exhibited, and on the showing the liability of the company was removed. Parker then had the case transferred to the federal court on the ground that he is not a resident of Missouri.

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January 18, 1910

NEARLY WRECKS STORE.

Horse Smashes Through Plate Glass
Window and Damages Stock.

Frightened by a passing automobile, a blind horse attached to the market wagon of Maurice Abramovitz, a vegetable peddler, stampeded and did $300 worth of damage to J. E. Biles' shoe store at 21 East Fifth street, yesterday morning. The horse freed itself from the shafts of the wagon and broke through a $150 plate glass window into the store and badly damaged the stock.

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January 7, 1910

BITTEN BY DOG, IS
DYING WITH RABIES.

STRAY PUP FASTENED TEETH
IN LIP OF CHARLES W. YOUNG.

Police Ordered to Kill All
Stray Dogs in Kansas
City, Kas.
Charles W. Young, Victim of Hydrophobia.
CHARLES W. YOUNG.

Two deaths within a few weeks, as a result of injuries inflicted by dogs suffering form rabies, has aroused public apprehension in Kansas City, Kas., to such an extent that extra precautions are being taken by the police department to protect the citizens against danger from this source. Orders have been issued by Chief of Police W. W. Cook to kill all stray dogs found in the city and a special officer has been detailed on this work. The general public has been notified to communicate with the police department with reference to any dog running at large.

Charles W. Young, a carpenter living at 436 Everett avenue, was bitten three weeks ago yesterday by a small fox terrier and is now in a critical condition at the Grandview sanitarium, where the attending physician said last night he could not live through the day. Violent convulsions, incident to the last stages of hydrophobia, have convinced the physicians that his condition is the result of the injury inflicted by the fox terrier.

A desire to relieve the suffering of a poorly fed tramp dog prompted him to reach down and pick up a little fox terrier, which promptly repaid this act of kindness by snapping his teeth through the lower lip of his would be benefactor.

The injury was dressed by a physician and Mr. Young continued with his daily work at the Union Pacific railroad shop. On Tuesday of this week he was obliged to quit work because of what he believed to be a severe cold in his throat. Yesterday morning Dr. Albert Huber was summoned and pronounced it a case of hydrophobia. The man rapidly grew worse and last night was removed to the sanitarium.

A small child was bitten several weeks ago by a mad dog in the northern part of Kansas City, Kas., and later died with what the physicians said was hydrophobia.

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January 6, 1910

TRAINED "DAN" AND "JOE."

Mark Kesler, Former Kansas City
Fireman, Passes Through City.

Mark Kelser, formerly of the Kansas City fire department, who trained "Dan" and Joe," the famous team of fire horses which won honors at London in the international exhibit in 1893, was in Kansas City yesterday afternoon, stopping off a few minutes on his way to Excelsior Springs.

Kesler is now with the Oklahoma City fire department, where he is engaged in training eight fire horses. He was here a short time ago, having been sent with three other firemen to make a study of the departments of large cities with a view of strengthening the Oklahoma City department.

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December 28, 1909

SWOPE PARK ZOO NOW OPEN.

Many Animals Needed to Make
Place More Interesting.

"The zoo buildings in Swope park are open to visitors," said Gus Pearson, city comptroller, yesterday, "but we have not much in the way of exhibits to show them. The big place looks dreary with its array of empty cages, and if the people who volunteered to contribute animals and birds will begin sending them in they will be appreciated.

"The lions and buffalo are the largest exhibits we have, and there is room for the elks promised, and the moose that we were to get from C. W. Armour and the camel from the Shriners. Birds and smaller animal pets are also needed."

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December 26, 1909

BEST OATS BRING
BIG HORSE LAUGH.

NEW MEANING GIVEN PHRASE
AT CHRISTMAS FEED FOR
POOR "COBS" AT HALL.

Rules Given Masters and "Black
Beauty" Books Also Distri-
buted by Humane Society.

A new meaning was given yesterday to the "horse laugh." From 1,000 to 1,500 horses in Kansas City not accustomed to a square meal stood in their stalls, free from work and protected from the weather, and munched full portions of the best oats the market affords.

And these horses laughed. It was Christmas day and they were enjoying a Christmas celebration planned especially for them.

The "feed' for poor work horses was given by the Kansas City Humane society as the result of a plan evolved by Mrs. E. D. Hornbrook and Mrs. E. H. Robinson, members of the board of the society.

For the purpose of carrying joy to the hearts of the poor animals which struggle under burdens on the streets of Kansas City every day and which are indifferently fed and kept, largely because of the poverty of their owners, the Humane society purchased a half dozen tons of the best white oats and did the grain up in five and ten pound sacks, giving out these packages to owners of horses whose cases had been investigated by the society and to whom tickets previously had been given.

THOUSAND TICKETS.

About 1,000 of these tickets were given out and sacks of the grain were also given to others who had not received tickets. Provision was also made for still other cases and an automobile furnished by the Kansas City Rapid Motor Transfer company will take "feeds" to the cases which were reported too late to be cared for as were the others.

It was at Convention hall that the Christmas dinners for the poor horses were given out and the committee in charge of the distribution was composed of Mrs. F. D. Hornbrook, J. W. Perkins and E. R. Weeks, president of the Humane Society.

The sacks containing the oats were placed on long tables and when horse owners applied for the "feeds" they were required to present their tickets, give their names and the names of their horses. They were then given the sacks of feed, a tag which they promised to read and a copy of "Black Beauty." Where owners had sick horses they were also given blankets for the disabled animals.

RULES FOR MASTERS.

The tag which each owner promised to read contained this "horse" talk:
"What is good for your horse is good for his master.
Your horse needs good care as well as good food.
Never work your horse when he will not eat.
Water your horse often. Water should always be given fifteen minutes before feeding grain.
Daily grooming will improve the health as well as the looks of your horse.
Give your horses rock salt, and head shelter from the heat.
Economize by feeding good oats and good hay.
Good drivers are quiet, patient and kind, and have little use for a whip..." and so on.

EXAMPLE IS SET.

"This horse dinner means a great deal more than most people think," said Mrs. Hornbrook. "It is intended to show the horse owners that their animals must be cared for and to set an example for them to follow. Some of the papers have made a humorous affair out of it, when it is anything but humorous and has a most humane object.

"It is not intended simply to fill the empty stomach of some poor animal for the time being," said Mr. Weeks, "but is to create a kindly sentiment for dumb animals. We show the horse owners what a sample meal is and that is something some of them know very little about. The ten pounds of oats we give them is a double portion of a standard feed. The owners of all the big fine animals we see hitched to drays on the streets feed their horses five pounds of the best oats at a meal. Along with the oats we give out, we also give the horse owners a copy of 'Black Beauty' and the tag containing advice about the care of horses an d we hope your Christmas dinner for the horses will do good."

To many horse owners, who called for feed at Convention hall between 9 a. m. and 6 p. m., Mr. Weeks, Mrs. Hornbrook and other workers agents of the Humane Society gave good advice. Some of the callers were persons with whom agents of the society had come in contact in their work and there were scores of promises, such as "well, we'll take better care of our horses from now on."

Posted about the corridor in Convention hall yesterday, were copies of new cards issued by the Humane society. They read, "Be kind to your horse. Do not forget his water, feed and shelter."

Christmas day was the most notable day for the poor work horse in the history of Kansas City. No wonder a new meaning was given to the slang expression, a "horse laugh."

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December 23, 1909

THREE FIREMEN INJURED.

Early Morning Run Disastrous
Both to Men and Horse.

Three firemen were painfully hurt and one horse injured so badly that he had to be shot yesterday morning when hose wagon No. 3 was making a run to a fire at the city market. The fire started in the kitchen on the second floor of Julius J. Blake's restaurant, 25 city market.

As No. 3 hose wagon with two horses attched was making the turn at Tenth street and Baltimore avenue the wagon bounded into a five foot excavation. The great speed caused the wagon to bounce out again with such force that Captain M. E. Gaffey, Lieutenant George Monahan and W. L. Grooms, the driver, were thrown from the wagon. The horses were badly frightened, and ran east on Tenth street to Main where they collided with a trolley pole, which threw both to the ground. One horse was uninjured, but "Buffalo," who had been in the department since 1901, suffered a broken leg, and had to be killed.

Captain Gafffey was cut on the forehead and Lieutenant Monahan's right leg was sprained while Grooms, the driver, got off with a sprained shoulder. The injured men were helped back to the fire station where they were attended by Dr. C. E. Wilson. All are expected to be able to resume their duties within a few days.

It was estimated that $1,500 would cover the damage to the fixtures and loss on the building.

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December 23, 1909

OWNS 4-YEAR-OLD BUFFALO.

Frank Lemen, Only Missourian to
Possess Big Quadruped.

Frank Lemen, the showman, enjoys the distinction of being the only personal owner of a buffalo in this section of Missouri. He has a 4-year-old cow buffalo on his farm near the Little Blue, and he made a proposition to sell it to the city for the Swope park zoo prior to the presentation of two of this rare variety of animals to the park board.

The buffalo now in the possession of Mr. Lemen is one of two he had with the Lemen Bros.' show. A year ago one of the buffalo became savage and unmanageable, and to keep it from harming itself it had to be killed.

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December 21, 1909

ZOO AT LAST HAS OCCUPANTS.

Gus Pearson's Four Lions Transferred
to Swope Park Yesterday.

The four lions that are to form the nucleus for Kansas City's zoo at Swope park were yesterday transferred to the building from the barn they have been kept in at Dodson. Two buffalo, male and female, presented to the park board by A. Weber, arrived from Kansas last night. They will be exhibited for a few days at the store by Mr. Weber on Walnut street, after which they will be sent to the zoo buildings. C. W. Armour has presented several deer and the Elks several elks, but before they can be shipped from the West to Kansas City a permit will have to be secured from the state game warden.

"After we get all the animals and birds together we will have a pretty fair collection," said Gus Pearson, city comptroller and father of the zoo, last night. "Beside the lions and the buffalo, we have three monkeys, a badger, a wildcat and several smaller birds and animals."

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December 20, 1909

ARREST A SACK OF SNAKES.

Police Also Take "Grave Robber"
and "Wild Man."

Detectives who do not object to tackling bad men draw the line when it comes to taking snakes into custody. There was a case of near insubordination in the detective bureau last night. It came about owing to the arrest of the proprietors of an animal show which held forth at 525 Bluff street.

The animals consisted of a choice selection of snakes, one fine specimen of Gilamonster and a weird and non-descript sort of animal which was advertised on the handbills as the "South American Grave Robber." There was also a "wild man of Borneo," but he was roped in, tusks, nose rings and all and deposited in the holdover at police headquarters. The detectives were willing to go up against the "grave robber" and even tackle the Gila monster, but they drew the line at a gunny sack full of lively reptiles.

S. H. Terry, S. D. Rose, L. Crossman and C. H. Hornsen, the alleged proprietors were taken to police headquarters and booked for investigation. The arrest was made on complaint of a man who declared that he had been defrauded of $30 while in the show room. The stock alive and kicking was left at 525 Bluff street.

"Suppose the animals should escape," said the inspector of detectives. "You men had better go back and bring them down here." With one accord the officers declared that they had no experience in animal training. The matter was finally compromised by letting one of the proprietors out on bond to care for the sackful of snakes.

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December 18, 1909

DOG MIND-READER IS
FOOTBALL ENTHUSIAST.

REMEMBERS SCORE OF THANKS-
GIVING GAME HERE.

Master Lives on the Money Earned
by Pet He Bought for Price of
a Drink Eighteen Years
Ago in Paris.

Pilu is a ragged little black-and-white dog, an Irish terrier, blind in one eye and deaf in one ear. He is eighteen years old. He was purchased from a drunken Englishman in Paris for a drink of whisky. Sig. D. Ancilotti bought him at this low price when Pilu was a clumsy little puppy and little did the purchaser know then that he was making his whole fortune out of his kindly impulse to take a fluffy, whining cur from a drunkard. But he was.

Pilu today earns more money than a dozen laborers working ten hours a day could earn. Pilu is the only mind-reading dog in the world and the large audiences that are frequenting the Orpheum this week are being boggled by the truly marvelous feats performed by the canine. The act is an absolute novelty to vaudeville and is so entertaining that the animal and its master are invariably fatigued ere they finish answering the repeated encores.

Pilu performs his tricks with the aid of a low, horizontal bar on which are hung a series of cards numbered from one to ten. A fence of green cord is strung around the poles and inside this fence, up and down the length of the pole, the dog mind-reader walks stiffly and tells you what you are thinking about.

Pilu is very fat and has a stub of a tail which wiggles as he walks. Now and then he looks at Ancilotti and smiles, slipping out a great length of pink tongue with a knowing leer.

THINGS PILU DOES.

Pilu tells how many babies there are in the family of the police headquarters man and he gives the ages of several persons in the audience.

Last night this wonderful dog attempted a new one when some football fan asked Ancilotti if his pet could remember the final score of the Missouri-Kansas football game.

"Certainly," responded the master. "Pilu, what was the score of the Missouri-Kansas football game?"

Pilu cocked his head over to one side and ran out a length or two of the pink tongue, batted his blind eye and marched twice up and down the length of the pole. Then he put up his fuzzy paw and knocked down the cards thus, 1-2-6. And that, it pleasant to recollect for the Tiger, was the score of that memorable conflict on the local gridior last Thanksgiving.

M. Ancilotti protested that he had not known the score and to show his good faith, went off the stage with a number written by a spsectator and shouted over the scene:

"Allons, Pilu. Allons."

"Allons," in French, spoken to a wooly old mongrel, means, "get on your job." And, Pilu got on the job by knocking down the figures 2, 5 and 8 -- 258, which was the number that had been written by the auditor.

Of course everybody watches Ancilotti closely in the hopes of catching him giving the dog signals, but no one has yet announced a solution of the mystery as to how the animal knows what to do so unerringly.

"My dog never makes a meestake," he shouted toward the close of his act. "To show you, here is a newspaper. Now, Pilu, how many letters are there in the name of this paper?" Pilu promptly knocked down a 2 and a 0, meaning twenty. Once more the mindreading wonder was correct, for Ancilotti held a copy of The Kansas City Journal, in which title there are twenty letters.

PILU WELL LOVED.

When the show was over Pilu trotted down to his dressing room to Mme Ancilotti to be kissed and patted. He was well hugged. He ought to be. For years he has been earning the living of all three of the Ancilottis.

Sig. Ancilotti says that it required ten years of hard, persistent training to teach Pilu the science of mind-reading, but he would not intimate his method of training. He insists that the dog possesses not a dog mind, nor a human mind, but a superhuman mind and that he has no set of signals by which he aids the animal in its tests. The king of Italy shares Ancilotti's opinion as to the superhuman qualities of the dog's mind, for he has presented the shaggy little fellow with a handsome gold watch, believing that he could and should know the time of day.

Pilu will tour America until July and then will be taken to London, where he will make his farewell appearance on the stage. Old age forces an early retirement and Ancilotti already has his eyes cast wistfully on another dog with which he hopes to continue his harvest of gold.

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December 17, 1909

YOUNG HANSEN TO BOONVILLE.

Master and Faithful Dog May Be
Separated Indefinitely.

"Lawrence Hansen, I am afraid, will have to go to Boonville."

Dr. E. L. Mathias, chief probation officer, made this statement yesterday when asked what would be done with the Kansas City, Kas., youngster who ran away from his home Monday night with $5 of his mother's money.

"We had him once at the McCune farm, but he ran away. The only place for him, now that he has violated his parole, is the reform school."

"Will he be given back his dog, Jack?" was asked.

The doctor laughed.

"I want to tell you I have been in hot water all day. There was a woman down here at 7:30 o'clock this morning demanding that I give the boy his dog. Several persons stopped me on the street to inquire what I intended to do."

But Dr. Mathias would not say whether he would reunite dog and master. If Lawrence is sent to the reform school by the juvenile court, it will be impossible to keep the two together. Lawrence will be kept locked up at the Detention home until Monday, when Judge E. E. Porterfield will decide his fate.

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December 17, 1909

CHRISTMAS FEED FOR
CITY'S POOR HORSES.

NEGLECTED COBS AND FALLEN
THOROUGHBREDS INVITED.

Humane Society to Be Host at Con-
vention Hall Where Equine
Event Will Show Sufferings
to Local Philanthropists.

The poor horses of the city will be fed to satiety at least once this year. By arrangement with the directors of Convention hall yesterday, the Humane Society, in conjunction with Mrs. Emma W. Robinson, 3208 East Tenth street, and Mrs. E. D. Hornbrook, 3229 East Eleventh street, will give a feast of oats, bran and ground corn, with trimmings of real hay, to the neglected cobs and fallen thoroughbreds of all sections in the big Auditorium Christmas day.

"It will not be an equine quality event," Mrs. Hornbrook said yesterday, "but it will be on invitations, anyway. This is to prevent spongers from feeding a team at our expense. The money will be raised by subscription. We are asking the wholesale houses to donate enough feed for several hundred animals."

The invitations are being printed today. They read:

"Christmas dinner for the workhorse,
Given by the Humane Society,
Call at Convention hall Christmas day between 9 a. m. and 6 p. m .

The plan of giving one good meal to the horses is original with Mrs. Robinson. She always has been interested in the dumb animals, and is a member of long standing of the Humane Society. She said last night:

"Someone has got to take up the horse's end of this charity proposition. It is not right that people should go on year after year giving alms to the human derelicts and entirely ignoring man's best friend, his horse. The scheme to give old work horses at least one square meal has been carried out to perfection in Norway, and someone should try it here. I suppose it will be scoffed at by some, but that is because it is new. In a few years, when through such humble means the attention of the world is directed toward the old horse and his suffering, it will be looked upon in a different light."

Edwin R. Weeks, president of the Humane Society, is in favor of the "banquet."

"Not for itself," he said yesterday, "but merely as a means to bring the suffering of our four-footed friends before local philanthropists. The Chicago idea of tagging the horses that are misused or underfed is not a poor one, but this one will get emaciated subjects of charity together by the hundred, in one hall, and let people see them."

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December 15, 1909

BOY LEAVES HOME
TO JOIN HIS DOG.

LAWRENCE HANSEN, PAROLED,
CAN'T BEAR SEPARATION.

Leaves at Night by Bedroom Win-
dow and Is Found Next Day
Playing in Street With
"Jack."

When Lawrence Hansen, 10 year of age, was released three weeks ago from the Detention home, where he was placed after being arrested for "playing hookey" from school, agreed to give "Jack," his fox terrier, to a neighbor. To get Lawrence away from his former bad associates, of whom one was his pet dog, Mrs. Hansen removed to Kansas City, Kas.

For two weeks following his parole Lawrence was a model boy. He attended school regularly and minded his mother. Then came the relapse. The separation from "Jack" could not be borne. Last Monday night Lawrence packed a few of his belongings, lowered them from his bedroom window, stole downstairs in his stocking feet and took $5 from his mother's dresser.

The juvenile officers in Kansas City, Mo., were warned Tuesday to be on the lookout for the boy, but not until yesterday could trace of him be found, when word came that the boy was at 410 Troost avenue where he had been seen playing with "Jack." Juvenile Officer Holt arrested the boy yesterday afternoon and took him to the Detention home.

With tears in his eyes Lawrence was taken before Dr. E. L. Mathias, chief probation officer. "Jack" had been left behind.

"I want my dog," he pleaded with the juvenile officer. "I want Jack."

When told that he could not have "Jack," he cried his eyes red. And he continued to cry for an hour after being locked up in the detention room. Finally, when told that he would never get to see the dog again unless he quit crying, the boy dried his tears and became his amiable self.

"That boy is a proposition," said Dr. Mathias. "When he has his dog he is a good boy, but he will not be separated. I expect that the dog will have to be returned to him."

"Jack" has neither pedigree nor physical attraction. The boy several months ago picked him up on a downtown street and took him home. But for all his attention, three meals a day and a blanket to sleep on, the dog could never take on the polish of society and culture. He is still an unpedigreed mongrel of the gutter, but for all that, the inseparable chum.

Arrested three weeks ago for truancy, Lawrence told the juvenile officers he would not go to school because he couldn't take "Jack." The boy and his dog were locked in the same cell, where they ate the same food and shared the same bed, three days and three nights. They were companions in misery. That disregard of law and the rights of others, engendered into the dog from his own life on the streets, was bred by association into the life of his little companion.

"Who is responsible, the boy or the dog?" is the question that the juvenile officers are asking.

Lawrence will be given a hearing next Monday in the juvenile court.

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December 12, 1909

CITY HALL CANARY KILLED.

"Elizabeth," Pet of Water Depart-
ment, Crushed by Door.

"Elizabeth," the canary that had a record of raising a family of eighteen birds since April 15 last, and which always attracted so much attention because it was given its freedom in the city hall offices of Tom Gregory, auditor of the water department, was accidentally killed yesterday. The little warbler was perched on top of a door when a sudden gust of wind closed the door. The bird was caught in the jam of the door case, and its life crushed out. Mr. Gregory and his office force are inconsolable.

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December 12, 1909

HAND BITTEN BY TAME BEAR.

Frank Lewis Tried to Pet Bruno at
Hippodrome.

A young man walked into No. 4 police station at 11 o'clock last night and asked that one of his hands be given medical attention. While taking in the sights at the Hippodrome in the earlier part of the night he had tried to pet a tame bear which is kept in a cage near the entrance of the Hippodrome. The bear closed down one of his hands and left several deep impressions with its sharp teeth.

The patient gave his name as Frank Lewis, 1617 Genesee street, and said that he was a salesman for Mitchell & Rouse, a commission company at the stock yards. He was attended by Dr. F. A. Hamilton and sent home.

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December 10, 1909

HOUSEHOLD IS SAVED
BY UNWELCOME PUP.

HIS HOWLING CALLS MASTER'S
FATHER TO A FIRE.

Gas Left Burning, and Pressure Be-
coming Great Early in Morning
Scorches Woodwork, Making
the Pipes Red Hot.

Because of the vigilance of a four-months old pup belonging to E. L. Hayden, at Sixth and Central streets, the nine-room house and probably the lives of Mr. Hayden and his family were saved from destruction by fire early yesterday morning.

As the gas was so low during the early part of the evening Mr. Hayden left the furnace fire going so that the house would be warm the next morning, and turned the flow on to its full capacity.

At about 3 o'clock he was awakened by the continuous howling of his dog in the room below. He went downstairs to investigate the cause.

DOG IN A FRENZY.

The dog was jumping in a frenzy, throwing itself against the basement door. Upon opening the door Mr. Hayden hear gas hissing. He could hardly make his way down the stairs on account of the stifling fumes from scorching wood. Through the smoke he could see the glow of the furnace, which was red hot. The pipes were red with heat almost to where they were connected into the different rooms of the house.

The heat was so intense Mr. Hayden made his way to the gascock, only after he had thrown a blanket over his arm. He then used a poker to turn off the gas.

GAS PRESSURE STRONG.

The pressure after midnight is strong as most people turn the gas off entirely about that time. Mr. Hayden had not thought of this while shivering in the early evening.

The fox terrier pup belongs to Mr. Hayden's son, who is a pharmacist at the Owl Drug store. The dog has been kept in the household much against Mr. Hayden's wishes. Several times when he has been in the country he has tried to lose his son's pet, but "Romeo" has always "come back."

"Now," said Mr. Hayden yesterday, "you bet that dog stays just as long as he wants to. He probably saved our lives." There are three children in the family.

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December 8, 1909

SQUARE DEAL FOR HORSES.

Humane Society Busy Detecting
Smooth Shoes on Slippery Streets.

For the past two days the Humane Society has been busy in an attempt to give the horses of Kansas City a square deal. The sudden fall of snow, which made the downtown streets slippery, caught teamsters and horse owners unprepared, their animals wearing smooth shoes.

Last Monday Humane Agent Frank E. McLreary, in addition to his regular duties, appointed a field force of a dozen men. The streets are being patrolled thoroughly during the day and late into the evening. If any animal is seen making a vain attempt to struggle up a steep grade its shoes are examined and, if in bad condition, it is taken from the shafts and to the nearest blacksmith shop. The smithies are working overtime, most of their business being at night. An officer patrols the vicinity of the blacksmith shops and sees that the line of animals awaiting their turn in the streets are properly blanketed and protected from the cold.

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December 8, 1909

K. C. HORSES BEST IN WORLD.

Win All French Coach Class Prizes
at International Show.

A clean sweep of all the prizes in every class of the French coach breed, is the record made by McLaughlin Bros., Kansas City horsemen, at the International Horse Show, held in Chicago last week and continuing this week. William McLaughlin, one of the firm, has returned from Chicago, with one silver trophy cup, and cash prizes aggregating $1,050.

The big prize own by McLaughlin Bros., was the silver loving cup, the first prize in the grand championship, which was open to horses of all ages, and was won by Decorateur, a chestnut stallion six years old. Decorateur proved a two time prize winner, taking the blue ribbon in the competition of all French coach horses of four years and over.

Two other individual first prizes were also won by the McLaughlin's. In the three-year-old class, Valina, a brown stallion, won the first place. And in the two-year-old class, Balanceur, a bay stallion, took the first prize. Another first prize won by McLaughlin Bros. included best group of five horses in French breed. All the other horses winning the prizes in the last two classes were imported.

All the second prizes were also won by McLaughlin's, in competition with the largest breeders from all sections of the world. Thirty-one horses were taken to Chicago by this firm, from which the prize winners were selected.

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December 7, 1909

SWOPE PARK ZOO KEEPERS.

Board Appoints August Atkinson
Chief and Fred Morrison Assistant.

The park board appointed August Atkinson head keeper of the zoo building in Swope park at a salary of $75 a month, and made Fred Morrison an assistant at $60 a month.

A test is now being made of the steam heating plant for the purpose of regulating temperatures adapted to the different animals that will eventually make their homes in the place. Tomorrow the board will make a personal inspection of the buildings, and just as soon as the members are satisfied that they are habitable for animals the four lions and smaller exhibits already owned by the city will be installed therein.

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December 6, 1909

MURDER AND SUICIDE
IN HOME OF POVERTY.

BOY 2 YEARS OLD AND DOG
KEEP VIGIL OVER BODIES.

Kansas City, Kas., Baker Kills Wife
and Himself as a Result, It's
Thought, of Jealousy Caused
by Use of Morphine.
Mrs. Myra Campbell, Victim of a Drug Crazed Murder.
MRS. MYRA CAMPBELL.

Neighbors entering the home of Joseph Campbell, 2952 North Seventeenth street, Kansas City, Kas., at 9 o'clock yesterday morning found the dead bodies of Mr. Campbell and his wife on the floor of the stuffy little room which served the double purpose of sleeping and living room. Clasped in the right hand of the man was a revolver. He evidently had murdered his wife, then committed suicide. Crouching down against the bed in one corner or the room, benumbed with cold and fear, was the little white robed figure of a boy, 2 years old, whose crying through the night and early morning attracted the attention of the neighbors and led to the investigation which resulted in the finding of the bodies.

GUN IN MAN'S HAND.

Charles Phillips, 18 years old, who lives next door to the Campbells, and C. R. Lumsdon, another neighbor, were the first persons to make the discovery. The sobs of the baby induced the two men to knock at the door. Receiving no response after repeated knocking they broke the lock and opened the door enough to obtain a view of the interior of the room. The body of the woman was almost against the door. She had remained in a kneeling posture, the head to one side. A bullet had entered below the left breast, passing entirely through the body and lodged under the skin on the right side. The man lay in almost the same position against the south walls of the room and behind the woman. His arms were folded across his breast and the revolver was held tightly against his body. The bullet had passed through the heart. Campbell was a baker. He was 32 years old.
WIFE SOUTH MISSOURI WOMAN.

He was married about three years ago in southern Missouri, where he became acquainted with the girl, Miss Myra Matthews, who became his wife. She was 20 years old. Although worn and haggard she bore the traces of having been beautiful. Insane jealousy on the part of the husband is the reason attributed for the murder. The bodies were viewed by the coroner and taken to the undertaking rooms of Fairweather & Barker.
Joseph Campbell, Who Killed His Wife and Then Himself.
JOSEPH CAMPBELL.

The killing of the innocent wife and the subsequent suicide of the murderer was but the logical climax of the events which mark the life of Joseph Campbell. Although for weeks Campbell has spoken of domestic troubles, even going so far as to consult Chief of Police W. W. Cook, and on numerous occasions threatening to buy a revolver and "end it all," it is believed by those who knew him best that these troubles and the consequences had their inception in a drug filled brain.

KNOWN AS "MORPHINE JOE."

That the murderer had been addicted to the use of morphine for many years is known, in fact so common was this knowledge that for at least fifteen years he has been known to hundreds of persons in Kansas City, Kas., as "Morphine Joe." A bottle half filled with the drug was found on a chair near the bed.

The police are at a loss to determine at what time the tragedy occurred. The family of William T. Kier, 2950 North Seventeenth street, say that the Campbells were heard pumping water from the cistern as late as 9:30 o'clock last night, but they heard no shots. The family of William Brocket, whose rooms are over those of the Campbells, did not return until about 11 o'clock at night, and no shots were heard by them. Daniel Galvin, a carpenter, living a few doors north, said that he heard a shot around 10:30 o'clock but thought nothing of it.

CHILD AND DOG WITH DEAD.

A scene of utter desolation was witnessed by the men first entering the room. On every side was the evidence of extreme poverty. The ragged covers of the bed, which had not been slept on, were folded neatly back. A few little, cheap pictures adorned the unplastered walls. Despite the cheapness and the poverty there was the touch of a woman's hand, which transformed the scantily furnished room into a home.

The little boy, Earl, crying by the bed where he had stood in the cold during the entire night, and a large dog which stood guard over the dead body of his mistress, were the only living beings in the place of death. The child was hurried to the home of Mrs. C. R. Lumsdon and placed in ht blankets, but the dog growled savagely at the intruders and would not submit to being moved until petted by a neighbor whom he knew.

THE CAMPBELL HOME, KANSAS CITY, KAS.

The news of the murder and suicide spread rapidly over the neighborhood and hundreds of persons gathered about the house. The police were notified and after the bodies had been taken away a guard was set about the house to prevent persons from entering.

The orphan boy will be cared for by his father's mother, Mrs. James B. Grame of 2984 Hutchings street, Kansas City, Kas.

"The news of this awful deed came as a shock to all of us," said Mr. Grame last night. "The fear that something like this would happen has been in our minds for years." The awful condition of Campbell, crazed by drugs, has added twenty years to the age of his mother, who has clung to him through all his troubles.

"It is a matter I cannot discuss, but harsh as it may sound, it is better for the world and better for himself that his life is ended. The thing that hurts me the most is the thought of that poor innocent girl a sacrifice to his drug crazed brain."

Persons living in the neighborhood say that Campbell has made numerous threats against his wife. Mrs. M. J. Cleveland, 2984 Hutchings street, said yesterday that Campbell came to her home Saturday morning and told her that he was going to get a gun and kill the whole outfit, meaning his wife. Practically every person living near them were afraid of the man and it was said that he constantly carried with him a gun and a butcher knife. He had recently secured work at the Armour packing plant.

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December 4, 1909

CAT ATTACKS A WOMAN.

Enraged Feline Held on Till Head Is
Severed From Body.

While a mad cat, its teeth fastened into the chin of Mrs. F. A. Petitt, clawed and scratched her face in a frenzy caused by the approach of a bulldog, the woman's brother-in-law, summoned by her screams for help, cut the cat's head off with a pocket knife.

Mrs. Petitt's eyes were not injured. Her hand received an ugly wound from the knife.

Mrs. Petitt lives at 3020 College avenue. She was returning home yesterday morning through her back yard from a visit to a neighbor when she picked up the cat, a large maltese, nearly full grown. She petted it. The animal seemed to resent any display of affection.

A large bulldog, belonging to Mr. Petitt, came running from the porch to meet the woman. Crazed with fear, the cat sprang for Mrs. Petitt's face. Its needle-pointed teeth sank into the flesh and held on tenaciously, the cat scratching the woman's face and hands in a terrible manner. For five minutes the woman, screaming and terrorized, battled with the cat. H. M. Roxby, her brother-in-law from Yates Center, Kas., who is visiting at the Petitt home, hearing calls for help, ran to her rescue.

Finding that it was impossible to force the maddened cat to release its hold, Mr. Roxby used his pocketknife to cut its throat.

As the knife blade all but severed the cat's head, it penetrated Mrs. Petitt's hand. Mrs. Petitt fainted.

Dr. Herbert A. Breyfogle dressed the wounds and said that aside from leaving a few scars they will not prove serious. Mrs. Petitt's head is bandaged so that she can hardly eat or talk. She is a linotype operator on an afternoon newspaper.

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December 2, 1909

AFTER TEN YEARS
'GATOR HAS A HOME.

STUFFED SAURIAN'S CAREER
FULL OF VICISSITUDES.

Hoodoo to a Chicago Saloon, Brought
to Kansas City by a Bartender,
and Sold to a Doctor for
a Small Sum.

Homeless, disowned and an outcast, the mounted form of a once giant saurian occupies floor space -- by sufferance only -- in Schaefer's buffet on Wyandotte and Twelfth streets. It changed ownership three times yesterday and is now the property of Dr. James O. Lee, who before he can remove it from the saloon must build an addition to his office.

Ten years ago Dan Flannigan, a saloonkeeper at Twenty-second street and Wabash avenue, Chicago, loaned a curio man $10 on the stuffed "gator," which was twelve feet long, and its age estimated all the way from 1,000 to 2,000 years. A taxidermist said it was worth at least $50 to mount the reptile, so Flannigan thought he was in the clear.

ONCE A SHOW WINDOW PIECE.

Joe O'Brien was a bartender at Flannigan's, and he helped put the gator on a shelf in the saloon. From that time on, it was said Flannigan's business suffered reverses. Whether the look that a man would give the 'gator w hen he stepped in the saloon sobered him or made him think that he "had 'em" or whether the 'gator was just a hoodoo Flannigan never decided.

When O'Brien left for Kansas City five years ago, however, Flannigan gave him the saurian. O'Brien shipped the thing along with his household furniture, and the story is told around the freight house that three pay checks still await the claim of negro laborers who looked in the car.

The 'gator passed into several hands and for a couple of years was a showpiece in an Eighth street saloon. Then it came into possession of Jack Murty of 1031 Wyandotte street, who put it in the window of his cleaning establishment. This show got tiresome after a while and he placed it farther back in his store. All his friends admired it, but none would purchase it.

One day W. C. Schaefer happened in. Yes, he would purchase the stuffed reptile. He would give all of $3 for it. Murty clasped his hand to seal the bargain. Yesterday morning four men carried the 'gator to Schaefer's saloon. Not until it was deposited on the floor did Schaefer realize that an elephant would have taken up less room.

AND THE DOCTOR BUYS HIM.

"Give him to me," said his brother Al.

"All right," responded Schaefer and the deal was closed. A short while later Dr. Lee happened in. He could use the 'gator all right and would give $2.50 for him. Again Mr. 'Gator was sold. Dr. Lee had forgotten to measure him before he purchased him and when he discovered that the reptile was 12 feet long and a yard wide, he discovered that he did not want him as bad as he had a short while before. The Schaefers would not take him back as a gift.

A carpenter gave Dr. Lee an estimate on an addition which will have to be built into his office to accommodate the alligator. Meanwhile "Ivory," the porter, will have to mop around Mr. Gator.

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December 2, 1909

CONFUSING HORSE DEAL.

Animal Twice Stolen, Alleged Thief
Almost Escapes Prosecution.

Charged with stealing the same horse twice, Henry Tobin, who was arrested yesterday on a warrant from Justice Theodore Remley's court, can be prosecuted only on a minor charge of obtaining money under false pretenses.

On November 22, Tobin is charged with having stolen a horse from E. T. McElroy and the following day selling it to W. E. Edwards.

Subsequently McElroy, who had searched the city for his horse, decided to offer a $5 reward for the animal's return. Tobin, it is charged, hearing of this, went to Edwards's stable, stole the horse he had sold only a few days before, returned it to McElroy and was given the $5 reward.

When Tobin was arrested yesterday, McElroy refused to prosecute. But as the stolen horse which had been sold to Edwards did not belong to the latter, Edwards cannot prosecute for horse stealing. The only charge remaining is that of obtaining money under false pretenses.

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November 21, 1909

DOG'S HOWLS FREE PRISONER.

Mutiny Among Juvenile Inmates
Feared at Detention Home.

Lawrence Hansen, ten years old, and his dog Jack, who have been held the last three days as prisoners at the detention home, were given liberty.

The last two nights, when the other inmates of the home were in bed, the little fox terrier would bark and howl. To prevent an insurrection among the juvenile prisoners it was decided yesterday to let the dog and his master go home. They are to be in the juvenile court Monday.

The boy was arrested by probation officers for truancy from school.

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November 18, 1909

BOY AND DOG EAT TOGETHER.

Canine Served Similar Meal to
Master in Truant Home.

Two meals were sent yesterday to the cell occupied by Lawrence Hansen, 10 years old, the boy taken Tuesday to the detention home for truancy. One meal was for the boy; the other for his dog, Jack. The dog is given the exact bill of fare served his master.

Lawrence will be held until next Monday, when he is to be tried before the juvenile judge. His dog will stay with him. The dog apparently enjoys the situation. He frisked around during the day and at night slept at the foot of his master's bed. As long as he is not parted from Lawrence, the dog seems happy and contented.

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November 16, 1909

WON'T GO TO SCHOOL
'CAUSE HIS DOG CAN'T.

FOX TERRIER HELD RESPONSI-
BLE FOR BOY'S TRUANCY.

Two Pals, Lawrence and Jack, Re-
ceive Same Sentence in Juvenile
Court and Do Penance
Together.

One of the newest types of juvenile offenders, a small fox terrier, whose master is Lawrence Hanson of Fifth and Gilliss streets, was locked up yesterday at the detention home by the juvenile officers. "Jack," for that is the dog's name, is charged with being an accessory before the fact. His master has been playing "hookey" from school, and Jack has been held responsible.

Yesterday morning Lawrence Hanson, 10 years of age, and Jack, were brought to the detention home. The boy has been attending the Karnes school. The past month he is said to have been absent more days than he has been present.

"Why won't you go to school?" asked the juvenile officer.

The boy sniffled. Suddenly there was an outpouring of tears and the little chap hid his face in his sleeve.

"They won't let me take Jack with me. And I said I wouldn't go to school unless he could go too."

Jack, who had followed the boy to his home, sat at his master's feet. He looked up into the little boy's face. When Lawrence began to cry, Jack also was affected. He jumped up into the boy's lap and slipping his nose under his master's sleeve, licked away the tears as fast as they came.

The dog appeared to take the disgrace even worse than the boy for Jack had been charged with being an accessory before the fact. It was he who had caused his master's arrest.

Presently the clouds disappeared. The boy dried his eyes. Lawrence smiled. The dog jumped down from the boy's lap. He wagged his tail vigorously.

It was decided to lock the little boy in a cell with the other incorrigibles.

"But what should be done with Jack?" was asked.

"The dog seems equally guilty with the boy," suggested Dr. E. L. Mathias, chief probation officer. "It seems to me that he should suffer as well as his master."

So Jack was locked up with his master. The boy considered it a disgrace. But not so with the dog. He skipped up the stairs ahead of the boy and the officers.

Yesterday afternoon, dog and master sat together. The dog was cuddled in the boy's arms, sleeping peacefully. He did not realize that he was doing penance for leading his young master astray.

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November 13, 1909

"MAJOR," FIRE DOG, DEAD.

Mascot of Number 6 Station Killed
While on Duty.

"Major," the mascot of No. 6 fire station in Kansas City, Kas., is dead. He was only a dog, was "Major," a little white bulldog of uncertain pedigree, but he had bee the constant companion and playfellow of the boys at "Six" since the days of his puppyhood, and his tragic death yesterday under the wheels of the fire wagon he loved so well, cast a gloom over the station. "An ordinary dog with perhaps a little more than the ordinary intelligence," you would have said, had you seen him plying about the station. Had you carried your investigation farther eager friends would have imparted to you many wonderful tales of the sagacity and almost human intelligence displayed by the mascot.

The ordinary trick dog seen on the stage would have died of envy could he have witnessed the "stunts" performed by "Major" for the edification of his friends, the firemen. Long hours of patient training had perfected him in every trick known to "dogdom," but it was as a shortstop on the baseball diamond that "Major" gained the greatest laurels.

"The greatest dog shortstop in the world," he has been called on numerous occasions. Hundreds of boys and girls, yes, and grown folks too, have watched "Major" as a ball was batted or thrown from some distant part of the field, only to find a lodging between the jaws of the mascot who judged the ball with the accuracy of a major league star.

Always the first to respond to an alarm of fire, sometimes running by the side of the wagon, at other times riding on the footboard or in the basket, Major was a familiar figure at all the fires in the Armourdale district. About a year ago a can of acid was overturned an d some of it burned the mascot's foot. Since that time he has been unable to run any considerable distance and accordingly has ridden on most of the "runs."

It was while returning from a fire yesterday that in some unaccountable manner he was caught under one of the wheels and his hip crushed. Every attention was paid to him and when it was found that he could not live the fire boys brought chloroform and administered it in the hopes of alleviating his sufferings. Later it was found necessary to shoot him in order to end his misery, and an officer was called from No. 3 police station.

Passersby may wonder at the little mound in the rear of the fire station and smile when told that it is the grave of a dog, but to the fire boys, who knew his love and devotion, it marks the resting place of a friend.

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November 11, 1909

DOG SINGS TENOR
TO PLAINSMAN'S BASS.

BEING THE STORY OF 'MY BOY'S'
FIRST VISIT IN TOWN.

"Smart?" aid Pridemore, "Why
That Dog Knows Everything
I Say to Him" -- Wouldn't
Sell for a Million.

Down at the Union depot last night a dog, half Scotch collie and half, well, the other half is just dog, perhaps, crouched at the feet of a man, a typical cattleman of the plains, who wore clumsy boots, trousers that were turned up half the length of the boots and a crumpled white hat. That there was a story of intense devotion on the part of a dog to his master and of a master to his dog in the picture presented in the waiting room not one who saw them doubted. The fidelity of the dog attracted every man and woman who observed it.

John H. Pridemore was the man and he raises cattle on a range near the Kansas and Colorado line. His home is thirty-five miles from Fowler, Kas., the nearest railroad point, and the dog with him last night is his only companion in a country where his nearest neighbor is miles away.

"That dog is the nearest thing to a human being I have out in my country," said Pridemore, "and I'd be mightily lonely without him. I raised his mother, and she was my companion before the pup was born. He's one of the most intelligent and sympathetic dogs you ever saw. The only name I ever gave him is 'My Boy.' I don't know why I called him that unless it was that he is the only companion I have and the only responsibility, too. He's a true friend and he's smart. There can't a thing go wrong on my place that his ears don't hear it or his eyes see it. And when he finds that something has gone wrong he romps to the house and tells me about it.

"Often I sing the old songs and he's gotten so that he sings with me. When I sing loud he barks as noisily as he can; when I sing low he follows suit. You know, that dog seems to understand everything I say. Often at night he puts his paws on my knees and lays his head in my lap and I tell him stories, just like you'd tell stories to a child, and he's all attention.

"This is the first time I ever brought him to Kansas City and I'll tell you how it happened. Heretofore I've left him with some of the boys, but when I started to Fowler with a bunch of cattle a week ago I took him with me to help me load, intending to leave him at a hotel there. Well, when we got the cattle on the cars and I was ready to jump into the caboose the 'boy' followed me to the platform. There were big tears in his eyes and he began to moan. This was too much for the conductor and he said to bring him along. 'He may get lost up there in Kansas City,' I said. The conductor assured me that he wouldn't so the dog was lifted into the caboose and started on his first long journey from home. I've had this rope around him ever since we've been here and now we're headed back to the ranch."

"Would you sell him?" asked a man, who had been listening to Pridemore's story.

"Not for a million dollars," said the cattleman, decisively.

Pridemore and his dog started for the Rock Island train. "My boy" had to ride in the baggage car and when he say that he was to be separated from his master there was an expression of anxiety in his eyes.

Pridemore patted him on the head. "Don't you worry a bit," he said, caressing the dog, "I'll be right back in the next car."

And the dog understood, for he lay down without a whimper.

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November 10, 1909

LONG FLIGHT IS DELAYED.

Weather Permitting Carrier Pigeons
Will Be Loosed This Morning.

On account of the hazy atmosphere of yesterday afternoon, the carrier pigeons, which were to have been liberated form the top of the R. A. Long building, Tenth street and Grand avenue, were not turned loose. the pigeons will be set free for their long flight to Colorado at 10 o'clock this morning, if the weather conditions are favorable.

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November 9, 1909

WHO'LL MANAGE THE ZOO?

This Difficult Question Comes Up
Again Before Park Board.

The question of the management of the zoo in Swope park again was up for discussion before the park board yesterday. Gus Pearson, city comptroller, wants it managed by a board of control composed of the three members of the park board, and two members of the Kansas City Zoological Society. He presented a resolution to that effect.

D. J. Hall put in one inviting the Zoological Society to co-operate with the board in a way of advice and suggestion, but to have no voice in the management of the building or the purchase of the animals.

"The society might as well go out of existence. We can't even exercise our boyhood rights to water the elephant," said Mr. Pearson.

"Cheer up, Pearson, it might be worse," consoled Mr. Haff. "We are letting the society co-operate with us, and recommend what kind of animals to buy."

"The order is not to spend a whole lot of money buying animals," said Mr. Pearson, "but to improve civic pride among the citizens and have them donate specimens. If you wait until the city gets money enough to buy animals you'll be a long while without a zoo."

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November 8, 1909

SKYE TERRIER CAME BACK.

Red Caps Shipped Stray Dogs From
Depot Yesterday.

A small skye terrier, covered with mud, wet and bedraggled, his tongue hanging far out of his mouth and his tail between his legs, slunk into the Union depot late yesterday afternoon. He scampered across the floor to see the woman's waiting room and there close to a radiator found a warm spot where he cuddled up far out of sight.

The terrier was the only one of a score of dogs lost, strayed, stolen or deserted that have been making their home at the Union depot who returned after having been captured and surreptitiously placed on outgoing trains by members of the Red Cap brigade. It is likely that the rest will return if they can find their way back.

The Union depot is about as close to dog heaven as a stray would find in many days' wanderings. The waiting room and nooks and corners in the baggage and mail rooms are always nice and warm. Then the food is far above the average dog food. Sympathetic little girls with chicken and ham sandwiches think nothing of feeding them to the dogs and going hungry.

Once it was reported at the depot, a dog died of the gout, so well had it been fed. It takes but a couple of days for the leanest canine to take on a nice glossy coat.

It may be humane to take care of the dogs and permit them to eat the lunch leavings, but the attaches of the depot declare they are a nuisance, so during the summer the dog catcher never leaves the depot empty handed. His visits to the depot are fewer in the fall and winter and the strays who happen along come to regard the depot as their legitimate home.

Yesterday was dull day at the depot. Both incoming and outgoing trains were very light and half a dozen of the Red Caps found time hanging heavily on their hands.

"Let's give the dogs a ride today. They might enjoy a Sunday railroad excursion," was the suggestion of one.

A moment later several Red Caps were hunting up the dogs about the station. They played no favorites.

That it was not easy to get the dogs on the trains without the knowledge of the train crew was quickly discovered. Various plans were adopted. Some of the dogs were smuggled on the sleeping cars, others got into the day coaches and the rest were put on blind baggage or in the mail or baggage cars.

The little skye terrier, who found his way back will probably be allowed to remain at the depot as a mascot.

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November 7, 1909

BOY DIES OF HYDROPHOBIA.

Does Not Attempt to Injure Rela-
tives, but Bites Self, Foams at
Mouth When Face Is Washed.

John Benson Willets, 3 years old, whose parents live in the Missouri river bottoms north of Kansas City, Kas., died at 10 o'clock last night of hydrophobia caused by the bite of a dog, believed to have been mad, which was inflicted last September.

The father, A. M. Willets, was forced to move last summer by high water in the Missouri river. The family made its home at 2516 North Fifth street, Kansas City, Kas. While the boy and his sister, Grace, 14 years old, were playing, September 9, in front of their home, a dog attacked the boy. The animal's teeth went trough the child's hands. He was also bitten on the forehead. when the dog was beaten off by the sister the boy was badly lacerated.

Dr. T. C. Duncan, who lives in the neighborhood, treated the boy. The wounds healed, leaving only scars. Wednesday the father took the boy to a hay field on his place. That night the child began scratching his face and hands. Mr. Willets thought that it was caused by irritation of scratches the child had received in the hay field. When an attempt was made to wash his face to ease his pain the boy began to foam at the mouth.

Later he exhibited symptoms declared to be the infallible ones in hydrophobia cases. He would stand rigidly on his heels, and, with his body forming a bow, would touch the floor with his head. The boy did not attempt to bite members of the family in the paroxysms of the rabies, but inflicted wounds upon himself with his teeth.

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November 6, 1909

'POSSUM SEASON ON
"AN' WOODS AM FULL."

SPORT IN WYANDOTTE COUNTY
BETTER THAN EVER BEFORE.

Two Men From Across the River Re-
port Bagging Thirteen "Enour-
mous Specimens" and Give
Advice About Moon."

In all the flattering reports which F. D. Coburn has rendered this year in regard to Kansas crops, the 'possum has been entirely overlooked, and according to the most reliable information this juicy product of the Kansas forests is to be found in greater abundance this year than ever before.

In Wyandotte and Leavenworth counties the night hunters have gone 'possum mad and some lines of business in the area are at a standstill as a consequence of the overproduction.

Louis Haight, 628 Quindaro boulevard, and Frank Chandler, 2019 North Halleck avenue, Kansas City, Kas., came over to the Missouri side yesterday with the announcement that they had "bagged thirteen enormous 'possums since last Sunday." The largest specimen weighed seventeen pounds and the smallest of the lot tipped the scales at ten pounds.

MANY HUNTERS OUT.

Haight and Chandler have established a 'possum and coon camp on Indian creek, over the Leavenworth county line, and they report that the country is filling with 'possum hunters and that the sport was never better.

One of the season's new fads in Wyandotte county is the introduction of automobiles. In the old days the hunters went afoot or horseback, but last Sunday night there were fully a score of motor car parties searching the woods for 'possum and raccoon, according to Haight.

"It's too early for coons," said Haight. "That is, the ground is too dry and the dogs aren't able to track 'em yet. There is promise, however, that the coon crop will be as good as the 'possum."

Wyandotte county always has been a great field for the 'possum hunter, said Haight, who is skilled in this line, gives some timely advice:

DISREGARDS THE MOON.

The 'possum, for instance, walks in the night regardless of the conditions of the moon. A full moon never frightens the 'possum and he can be found on a bright night as well as on a dark night. A raccoon, he says, never shows his nose when the moon is shining, and therefore coon parties should be sure of the darkness before starting out.

There is a tax of $15 required from all non-resident hunters in Kansas, but according to Haight, and he is ably sounded in his opinion by Joseph Harlan, Wyandotte county's noted wolf and fox hunter, that the law doesn't apply to persons who hunt at night.

One of the gratifying features of 'possum hunting is that you do not need a gun. The dog smells out the 'pussum and trees him, the hunter shakes the tree and brings Mr. 'Possum to the ground and the dog nabs him. If the 'possum is a fighter, all the hunter has to do is to welt him over the head with a club.

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October 26, 1909

TO TEST THE HEATING PLANT.

If Satisfactory, Animals Will Be
Moved Into Zoological Building.

Gus Pearson, city comptroller, yesterday induced the park board to purchase a carload of coal with which to test the heating plant in the new zoological building out in Swope park.

If it works all right the monkeys now owned by the city, and being housed with custodians of the park, and other animals, will move in.

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October 24, 1909

CAT, PET FOR 10 YEARS, MAD.

Pussy Left in Possession of House
While Police Are Notified.

There were lively doings around the home of Mrs. M. Richardson, 813 East Eighteenth street, yesterday morning when the house cat, which had been the pet of the family for the last ten years, was seized suddenly with an attack of hydrophobia.

The family left pussy to rampage around the house to her heart's content, while they notified police headquarters, Patrolman Adams was detailed to shoot the animal.

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October 14, 1909

GREAT CROWD SEES
TWO NEAR ACCIDENTS.

MULES DASH FOR GATE OPENED
BY MISTAKE.

Women Avert Collision in Chariot
Race and Are Applauded --
Horses and Poultry Draw
the Most Attention.
American Royal Livestock Show of 1909.

The rise in the temperature, combined with a cloudless sky during the better portion of the day aided materially in increasing the crowd attending the American Royal Live Stock show and a conservative estimate yesterday placed the paid admissions at about 14,000. There was, by far, more congestion than on either of the previous days, and in some of the exhibitions it was difficult to move around without elbowing someone out of the way. The crowd was made up largely of visitors from the small neighboring towns, though there was a number of country people and a goodly sprinkling of city folk in the throng.

The horses and poultry continued to be the mecca for the crowds and the barns in which they were exhibited were crowded all day. The cattle and swine also came in for a good share of attention, and, in fact, there was nothing on the grounds that was not visited by a fair portion of the visitors.

CHAMPION IS SHOWN.

The usual exhibition and parade was given in the pavilion during the afternoon. In addition to the Morris six, the Anheuser-Busch mules and the Clark ponies, Casino, the undefeated world's champion Percheron, was shown in the parade, together with $3,000 worth of medals which he has won in various parts of the world.

Two accidents were narrowly averted in the arena. The first came when, through a mistake, some one opened the upper gate while the Anheuser-Busch mules were being exhibited. The animals thought it was for them to go through and they swerved toward it. The crowd beyond the gate made a rush to get out of the way but the driver, by a quick manipulation of the reins, managed to turn the leaders back into the arena and no damage was done.

The second came in the chariot race in which Mrs. Georgia Phillips and Miss Fra Clark participated. At the second dash around, while the ponies were going at top speed, Miss Clark failed to make her turn short enough and the pole of her chariot almost crushed into the one occupied by Mrs. Phillips. Quick driving on the part of the women prevented an accident and the race was finished amid a storm of applause.

BARKERS OUT IN FORCE.

The barkers were out in full force yesterday, much to the delight of the rural housewife. There were apple parers that could be utilized in a hundred different ways, can openers, milk skimmers, knife sharpeners, and in fact, all descriptions of household gimeracks which could be purchased from ten cents to a quarter, and nearly every farmer's wife availed herself of one or more of the implements.

The candy paddle wheel man was also in evidence, and he did a rushing business. The feature which appealed largely to the country brethren, though, was a hill-climbing automobile demonstration. A runway sixteen feet long, built on a 50 per cent grade, was erected and the car, in charge of a competent chauffeur, would, like the French general, go up the hill and down again. There was no charge for riding and many a love-lorn swain and his sweetheart from the rural districts enjoyed their first auto ride.

HOT SOUP AND COFFEE.

From a financial standpoint the women of the Jackson Avenue Christian church have the very best proposition on the grounds. They are operating a lunch stand where hot soup and coffee, together with other edibles, can be obtained on short notice at a moderate sum. The place is crowed all the time, as the air chilled one in the barn and the soup and coffee are used to "heat up." Of course there are some who do not heat up on soup and coffee, but they seem to be in the minority, and the church women reap a harvest, between those getting warm and those really hungry.

The Kellerstrass farm of Kansas City, which has a large exhibit in the poultry barn, after the first of the year will add a new industry to its line, that of raising fancy pheasants. The farm has been experimenting along that line for some time and the past year raised 700 pheasants. This decided them that it could be done successfully, and after January pheasants will be listed in the Kellerstrass catalogue. The birds will be sold only to fanciers.

STALLS ARE DECORATED.

Many of the owners in the horse barn have decorated in a most handsome manner, the stalls allotted to them. Among these are the McLaughlin and Robinson exhibits. They have their stalls in white, green and yellow bunting, together with the cups, ribbons and other trophies, won by their animals, over the stall occupied by the horse which won them. The effect adds beauty to the barn and is quite pleasing to the visitors.

The sale of Herefords in the Fine Stock Sale Pavilion yesterday was attended largely. It began at 2 o'clock and continued until 5:30 at which hour fifty head had been disposed of at fairly good figures.

The highest price of the afternoon, $800, was paid by J. P. Cudahy of Kansas City to W. S. Van Natta of Fowler, Ind., for the bull Pine Lad 38th. The animal has one prizes all over the country and is an exceptionally fine specimen. The average price of the day was $166 1/2, which is $15 less that the average prices realized at the sale last year.

There will be a sale of Galloways in the sale pavilion today, while in the show proper the judging of sheep will be started and several classes will be finished up.

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