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February 6, 1910

INVASION FROM KANSAS.

Boys Rush by Collector on Viaduct
but Police Intercepted Them.

Lieutenant Kennedy of station No. 2 and his flying squad, consisting of Officers Scanlon and Hogan, repelled an invasion from Kansas City, Kas., by way of the Intercity viaduct about 9:30 o'clock last night. A report was received at the station that over 100 men had rushed past the toll collector of the Kansas end of the viaduct without stopping to pay the customary toll and the flying squad was sent to the Missouri end of the structure to intercept the invaders. Although greatly outnumbered the Kennedy forces allowed only four or five of their adversaries to negotiate a getaway into Missouri without payment of toll . The crowd was made up entirely of boys bent on a charivari.

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February 4, 1910

PATRONYMICS OF THE GREAT.

Sly Attempt of Wrongdoers to En-
list Official Sympathy.

"Did it ever occur to you," asked Inspector Edward P. Boyle last night, "how many men when arrested will take the name of the chief of police, the police judge or some other official with whom they have to come in contact? They hope to gain sympathy by that ruse. We got a man yesterday for horse stealing, and, by gosh, he gave the name of Edward P. Boyle, my full name. He is in the county jail now under my name, but when we looked him up in the National Bureau of Identification, we find that he has a goodly supply of names."

"Boyle" was arrested by L. C. Barber, a motorcycle policeman, on complaint of of the Kirby Transfer Company, Missouri and Grand avenues. It appears that he rented a horse and wagon from Kirby to do a huckster business and disposed of the rig.

"Boyle's" picture is in the book sent out by the National Bureau of Identification at Washington. He appears there under the name of James J. O'Neil, which, bu the way, is the name of a former chief of police of Chicago. He also bears the names of Edward Riley and Edward Connors, the last being believed by the police to be his. He has done time in the Rochester, N. Y., Industrial school, the Elmira, N. Y., reformatory, and two years in the Auburn, N. Y., penitentiary. He was five years in Elmira. The man of many "police" names also has done short terms elsewhere.

When Hugh C. Brady was police judge there hardly was a week that some bum did not give the name of "Hugh Brady, sir, yer honor."

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January 29, 1910

HE ONCE BUILT HOUSES HERE.

But Now George O. Purdy Is Chief
of Police in East St. Louis.

George O. Purdy, chief of police of East St. Louis, Ill., for the past eight years, whose department has the record of capturing a greater percentage of malefactors than any other police department in the country, arrived at the Savoy hotel last night. It was Chief Purdy who adopted the system of putting practically all of his policemen in plain clothes and sending them out in the shape of a dragnet whenever a crime was committed, and he has advocated this plan at every meeting of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, of which he is a member of the executive committee representing Illinois.

Twenty-three years ago Chief Purdy was a Kansas City contractor. He laid the foundation and the first story of the old Missouri, Kansas and Texas Trust Company building, the first of the Stilwell propositions in this section.

"Kansas City is destined to be the coming inland city," said Chief of Police Purdy last night. "It may take a few years, but she has the advantages and just look at the territory that is dependent on this city for supplies. A score or more years ago the wildest dreamer of the then boom days of this city could not have predicted the advances it has made. It is wonderful. There is a hustle and a bustle about this city that does not exist in other cities in this country and although I am across the river from St. Louis I will say that unless St. Louis gets a move on itself and that in a hurry, Kansas City will soon leave it behind."

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January 25, 1910

3 KILLED, 3 HURT
WHEN AUTO SKIDS
OVER CLIFF DRIVE.

MACHINE DROPS EIGHTY FEET
AND IS DEMOLISHED
ON ROCKS.

John Mahoney and Wife and
Thomas McGuire the
Victims.
Wrecked Automobile Plunged Over Cliff Drive.
WRECKED AUTO WHICH PLUNGED OVER EMBANKMENT ON CLIFF DRIVE, KILLING THREE.

Three persons were killed and three, who by a miraculous streak of providence escaped death, were injured yesterday afternoon when a large automobile plunged over an eighty-foot embankment on the Cliff drive, at Scarritt's Point. The dead:

John Mahoney, aged 51, grading contractor, 616 North Seventh street, Kansas City, Kas.
Mrs. John Mahoney, aged 46 years.
Thomas McGuire, 50, a foreman for Mr. Mahoney; resided at 53 South Forest avenue, Kansas City, Kas. Father of six children.

THE INJURED.

John O'Connor, 42 years old, of Fifty-first street and Swope parkway.
Miss Nellie Mahoney, 19 years old, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Mahoney.
Lillian, 6-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Mahoney.

The O'Connors also have two other children, John, age 8, and Anna, age 13, who were in school at the time of the fatal crash which claimed their parents.

The accident is ascribed to a slippery condition of the driveway, water which trickled from the cliff having frozen. The machine, in rounding the curve at Scarritt's point, evidently skidded on the ice toward the precipice at the outer edge of the drive. Mahoney, who was the contractor that had charge of the grading work on this scenic drive, was driving the car. He evidently tried to steer it toward the cliff, with the result that t he heavy rear end of the car was thrown completely around, the rear wheels crashing through a fence and over the abyss.

FORTY-FOOT DROP.

At the point where the machine went over the cliff there is a sheer descent of probably forty feet, with probably forty feet more of steep hillside ending in an accumulation of boulders. Tracks in the roadway showed where the rear wheels of the car had backed over the precipice and the entire car was precipitated upon the rocks below, alighting on its side and crushing two of the victims. The others either landed on the rocks or were caught in the wreckage.

The scene of the accident is just above and a little to the southeast of the Heim brewery and the men who witnessed the tragedy, or who were attracted by the piteous cries of the victims, rushed to the place and gave first aid to the injured. Police from No. 8 station, who were notified, carried the injured down the cliff, which owing to the slippery condition of the ground, is almost impassable even for pedestrians, placed them in the police ambulance and hurried them to hospitals. The dead were removed later to undertaking establishments, the bodies of Mr. and Mrs. Mahoney being taken to the Leo J. Stewart parlors and that of Mr. McGuire to Carroll-Davidson's.

BODIES UNDER CAR.

The scene following the tragedy was a sickening and pitiable one. the first persons to arrive found pinioned under the wreckage of the big motor car the mangled bodies of Mr. Mahoney, Mr. McGuire, Mr. O'Connor and the two girls. Mrs. Mahoney lay on the rocks at the rear of the machine unconscious, but still alive. She expired within ten minutes. Mr. Mahoney and Mr. McGuire were killed outright evidently.

The younger daughter of the Mahoneys still grasped a doll which she had carried in her arms in the machine and, gazing upon the forms of her parents as they lay still puon the frozen ground she cried piteously:

"I want my papa, I want my mamma."

It was with difficulty that she was induced to leave the spot and her childish grief brought tears to the eyes of every bystander. Miss Mahoney was dazed badly. She talked little, though seeming to partially realize what had happened, and just before she was placed in the police ambulance she was prostrated. Mr. O'Connor also was dazed, though he walked about and declared he was not hurt.

TWO SEE ACCIDENT.

Daniel Ferhnback, 19 years old, of 28 Bigelow street, just below Scarritt's Point, with Thomas Nelligan, 10 years old, were eye-witnesses to the accident. Ferhnback was chopping wood in his yard and the Nelligan boy was with him when they glanced up and saw the machine go over the brink of the hill.

"It was terrible," said Ferhnback. "The rear end went over first and the whole thing fell down into the hollow. It was done so quickly I hardly knew what had happened, but it seemed to me that the machine partly turned over. The noise sounded like a bunch of sewer pipe falling and hitting something."

For a moment, Ferhnback said, he scarcely knew what to do. Then he heard a cry, "O, God! O, God! " It was Mr. O'Connor pinioned under the car.

Ferhnback and his boy companion at once started up the hill but Nelligan, being more nimble, arrived at the top first. The boy took one look at the mass of twisted iron and wood and at the blood covered bodies under and about the machine and he ran back the winding path to where Ferhnback was hurrying up.

"It's awful," said the boy, covering his face with his hands as if to shut out the sight.

CRASH IS HEARD.

About the time that Ferhnback and Nelligan were horrified to see the machine plunge over the cliff, M. G. Givson, of 2026 Charlotte street, was walking along the Chicago & Alton tracks, far below the Cliff drive. He hears a crash but paid no attention to it and was startled by the screams of a woman, evidently one of the Mahoney sisters. He also rushed up the hill, arriving about the time that Ferhnback reached the top.

Mr. Gibson picked up the little Mahoney child and bandaged her head with handkerchiefs. Mrs. Mahoney lay free of the car, and Mr. Gibson said that she still breathed when he arrived. He took one of the cushions which had been hurled from the automobile and placed it under the woman's head, but within ten minutes she was dead.

Miss Nellie Mahoney was carried to one side by the two men, who made her as comfortable as possible. Mr. O'Connor lay with one leg pinioned under a rear wheel of the car, a short distance from the body of Mrs. Mahoney. Mr. Gibson and Mr. Ferhnback managed to lift the rear portion of the car enough to extricate the man and Mr. O'Connor immediately got up and walked about, declaring that he had no pain and that he was all right.

POLICE NOTIFIED.

The accident happened at 3:15 o'clock. It was not so very many minutes later that Mr. Gibson, having done everything he could to help the injured, ran to No. 8 police station, 3001 Guinotte street. Sergeant Edward McNamara, Patrolman Gus Metzinger and Motorcycleman George A. Lyon responded at once. They were joined later by Park Policeman W. F. Beabout and the police carried the two Mahoney girls and assisted Mr. O'Connor down the cliff to the ambulance.

Coroner B. H. Zwart went in peerson to view the bodies, and he summoned undertakers. It was 5 o'clock before the bodies finally were removed, the conditions in the vicinity of the scene of the horror making it difficult to carry the bodies out.

Even the coroner, accustomed as he is to such things, was moved at the horror of the scene. Mr. Mahoney lay crushed under the car and a piece of the spokes of the machine was found to have penetrated his adbomen.

The Point, which is the highest on the Cliff drive, lies under the shadow of the north side of the cliff. the sun does not strike there, save during a small portion of the day, and water which runs down the hill is frozen, as it trickles across the roadway, into a mass of treacherous ice, making it difficult for motor cars without ice clutches to round the curve at that point without skidding.

Mr. Mahoney, who was driving the machine, sat in the front seat with Mr. McGuire, and the others sat in the rear seat. The car was a seven-passenger Pierce-Arrow. The tracks in the driveway show that the machine came round the curve well within the middle of the roadway and away from the precipice. It is probable that Mahoney had noticed the slippery condition of the pavement and purposely kept away from the brink.

When the fatal stretch of ice was reached, however, the auto was shown to have skidded greatly toward the chasm and the theory is that Mahoney, in order to avoid the very thing which happened, headed his car toward the inside of the road. If he did, he miscalculated terribly, for this swung the heavy rear of the car around over the edge of the cliff and the ill-fated occupants were hurled down up the rocks. The wooden fence, through wh ich the auto smashed, was erected as a warning to daring motorists. It went out as if made of egg shell.

That the machine did not take fire and add to the horror is believed to have been due to a final effort of Mr. Mahoney. the engine was found to have been shut down entirely, and it is believed that Mr. Mahoney automatically pulled his lever as the machine shot backward over the precipice.

At the emergency hospital, whither the two Mahoney girls and Mr. O'Connor were removed, it was stated last evening that Mr. O'Connor's case is the least serious of any of the injured. He sustained a wound on the back of his head and some bruises. He probably will recover.

After being removed to the hospital, little Lillian Mahoney lapsed into a coma and Miss Nellie Mahoney became hysterical. It was stated that neither of the girls knew that their parents are dead. It was feared neither could stand the shock.

The condition of both the girls is regarded as serious. Miss Nellie sustained a dislocation of one of the shoulders, a fracture of the right arm and bruises about the body.

The younger girl received a bad cut about the back of the head and bruises about the body. Both girls are suffering terribly from nervous shock, and this is what makes their cases so grave.

It was said at St. Margaret's hospital at midnight that Lillian Mahoney is probably fatally injured. The child is under the effects of opiates. It is belived her skull is fractured.

BUILT THE DRIVEWAY.

Mr. Mahoney executed the grading work on the very driveway where he, with his wife, met death. It is said that he was familiar with every foot of the ground along the roadway and that because of the pride which he took in the work he particularly liked taking a spin in his machine along the course.

John Mahoney, One of the Victims of the Cliff Drive Motor Car Accident.
JOHN MAHONEY.

The ill-fated machine was purchased by Mr. Mahoney from the estate of Mrs. Mary S. Dickerson, who died. It is said that Mr. Mahoney paid $3,500 for the car.

FRIENDS SHOW SYMPATHY.

A telegram telling of the death of Mr. Mahoney was dispatched late last night to his old schoolmate and business partner, Justice Michael Ross, who is now visiting in Jacksonville, Fla. Mrs. Ross went to the residence of the dead contractor last night and arranged to take charge of the children.

"My husband and Mr. mahoney were lifelong friends. I know if Michael were here he would want me to take care of the children and and give them a temporary or even a permanent home," Mrs. Ross said.

Annie and Johnny Mahoney heard about the catastrophe at 4:30 o'clock in the afternoon. They were overwhelmed with grief.

CHILD PREDICTED ACCIDENT.

"Oh, I told papa not to buy that auto. I told him all along it would lead to some accident," sobbed the girl.

The boy, four years younger, soon quieted himself and began to assure his sister. The children were taken last night to the Ross home, where they may stay permanently.

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January 24, 1910

PENSION FOR POLICE.

Kansas City, St. Joseph and St.
Louis Department Officials
In Conference Here.

Police officials from St. Louis and St. Joseph were in conference with Captains John J. Casey and John J. Ennis of the Kansas City department at police headquarters yesterday afternoon to formulate plans for the passage of a police pension fund bill through the state legislature.

The meeting was held in the private office of Commissioner Ralph B. Middlebrook, the commissioner himself being present. No definite line of action was decided upon. The rough draft of the bill already formulated requests that all cities in the state of Missouri with a population of 100,000 be allowed to set apart a percentage of their yearly income for the maintenance of a pension fund for the support of police officers, who, by reason of illness or injuries, may be incapacitated. Commissioner Middlebrook stated that he thought that it was a humane idea and worthy of success.

The visiting officers are Inspector Major Richardson McDonald, Lieutenant T. J. Donegan and Sergeant James Healey of St. Louis, and Chief of Police Charles Haskell, Sergeant Martin Shea and Patrolman Joseph O'Brien from St. Joseph. Another meeting will be held this morning.

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January 7, 1910

SHOUTS MURDER IN YIDDISH.

Smitzle's Drop Into Salt Barrel
Calls Out Police.

Charles Smitzle, who sells kosher meat to his co-religionists under the careful supervision of the rabbi in a store at 1603 East Eighteenth street, is undersized, so he stood on a salt barrel last night when he went to light the gas lamp. If he was just short there would never have been a feature to this simple act in a thousand years. However, he is also fat and just as he stood on tiptoe to apply the match to the jet the barrel collapsed.

It happened that Smitzle was alone in his store at the time of the accident, but two of his patrons were in the act of coming in and heard the crash coupled with an exclamation in Yiddish.

"Something has gone wrong with Smitzel," said one of them.

They pushed the door in and saw Smitzel arise out of the debris with a bloody nose. They took note of the wrecked condition of the store and thought they remembered that the word Smitzle had used was "murder." They then rushed out in search of a telephone.

Report that on top of several holdups and assaults that had occured earlier in the day a lone Hebrew was killed by highwaymen in his place of legitimate business produced a sensation in No. 6 police station. Sergeant Michael Halligan immediately dispatched a patrol wagon loaded with officers. When they arrived at the address on Eighteenth street Smitzel had succeeded in lighting the lamp. He had used the meat block and it had held. The blood on his nose and been washed away and the treacherous barrel converted to kindling.

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January 3, 1910

DID NUDE VISITOR
BECOME SENATOR?

KANSAS CITY DETECTIVE TELLS
OF EDITOR-POLITICIAN'S
HUNT FOR CRIME.

Covered With Mud, He Broke
Into Station, but Later
Showed Big Roll.
Detective Joe Halvey Narrates a Tale.
HALVEY SMOKES UP.

Murder was in the air in the detective bureau rooms of Central police station -- murder, along with other things, particularly tobacco smoke. This is said to be the atmosphere of a police secret service department the world over.

It is stronger when there is a story telling contest on and the sweating of a murder suspect in an adjoining room. Detective Joe Halvey had elected to while away the time until the end of the secret conference. His audience consisted of newspaper men, Inspector of Detectives Edward Boyle and Detectives Robert Truman and Dave Oldham.

"It was a late spring night three years ago," said Detective Halvey. "One of those chilly early mornings when reporters love to sit about the 'phone in the lobby and call up instead of going out after their stories," he added, with a ponderous wink.

A SCRIPTURAL WIND.

"It was a very cold night and a wind like the one spoken of in the scriptures was blowing down Missouri avenue."

"What kind of a thing was that scriptural wind?" inquired the reporter.

"I don't see why you intellectual cubs never seem to have had a religious bringing up," scornfully broke in Inspector Boyle, who prides himself in having maintained a Bible in his home since his marriage twenty years ago. "I think it is in Psalms where a March wind is spoken of that blows the straw hat wherever it listeth while many a good man and strong sweareth thereat."

The silence which followed the inspector's quotation was profound. The narrator took advantage of the lull.

"Well, it was getting along toward the second owl car. Michael O'Brien had just brought in a 'drunk' and booked him under the charge of investigation and Pat O'Brien and I were toasting our shins by a warm fire in this same office. I remember every detail, you see, just as though it was yesterday.

YELL AND A SOB.

"Suddenly there came from somewhere on Fifth street near the Helping Hand institute, a blood curdling yell ending in a sort of a sob, as though some man was being choked.

"There were twelve good men in different parts of the station, wherever there was a heating stove, and all jumped at once. There had been a good many holdups during the winter months and of course the first thing we thought was that some villain had made a touch under the eaves of the station. We were not going to stand for that, no sir-e-e-e.

"I was about the first of the officers to reach the big folding doors in the north end of the station. My six shooter was in my hand and there was blood in my eye, I can tell you. If there was something going on I wasn't bound to let the blue uniformed mutts with the brass buttons do the pinch act to the discredit of the detective department.

"Just as I had reached the last step the doors flew open in my face. There was just enough time for action and no time for thought. A lean white streak had started to unwind itself up the stairway when I dropped on it like a thousand bricks.

NAKED, SHIVERING MAN.

" 'Look out below!' I yelled, grabbing it by the neck and bearing it to the linoleum. Then I made a careful analysis. what I was holding was a naked man shivering with the cold and dirtier than any tramp from having been dragged in the mud. 'Great thunder,' said I, 'this must be Adam returned to look after his Eden interests. Who are you, anyway?'


THOUGHT IT WAS ADAM.

"It didn't take much tugging and hauling after I got up off of him to get him in front of the desk sergeant and it took still less time for the entire force to see that he was in the last stages of destitution. He didn't have a finger ring left and his clothing was mud.

" 'What's your name?' the sergeant asked.

" 'You can put me down John Smith,' said 'Adam' with a groan. 'I ain't got any other name, for political reasons. Gentlemen, what I want is clothes, clothes, clothes.'

CLOTHES OBTAINED.

"The nude wonder somehow looked respectable and we could see that he was right about what he wanted. Half a dozen of us took him into the sink room and gave him a bath, while the rest of the shortstops went in search of clothes. He was not a very tall man and very slim, while the officers we had to draw from were all big, so when we got done with dressing him he looked like a Populist of the short grass country the year of the drought.

"I can't help but laugh when I think of him sitting there in the detectives' room with the waist band of the sergeant's extra trousers drawn up under his arm and his feet in shoes the size of four-dollar dictionaries.


LOOKED BETTER CLOTHED.

"But for all his togs he couldn't help but look respectable. Every time he opened his mouth he emitted an idea by the double handful, which was strange considering his appearance when we first saw him. He was no ordinary man, that was a cinch. He was a genius.

ASKS FOR REPORTERS.

"About the time we were settling back into the humdrum of waiting until morning the unknown quantity took a hitch on himself and asked: 'Where are the reporters? Seems like there ought to be one or more around. It isn't time for the second mail edition yet.'

"We told him there was a little reporter named Billings in the room allowed for the use of newspaper men and that he was probably at that moment writing a story of how a naked, insane man had broken into the police station with the intent to murder the captain.

" 'I'll risk it,' he said with a laugh, 'send him to me.'

"We sent for Billings and it was evident that the two would be kindred spirits. The very first thing the stranger said to the reporter was what he refused to tell the sergeant, and that was how he had come to be naked. We had set him down to be a sort of a crank with spells of lucidness who had undressed and run into the station on a bet, but now we knew better.

HELD UP AND ROBBED.

" 'I was held up and robbed because I got into bad company trying to have a good time when I ought to have been decent,' he told Billings. 'I am sure none of this I tell you will get into the papers because I am a fellow newspaper man.

" 'Now what I want is clothes. I haven't got a cent but plenty of credit. I can get $10,000 anywhere when the banks open. I want you to strike some second-hand clothing store where the proprietor sleeps in the rear and get me a complete suit. I'll pay you when pay day comes.'

"Billings did not answer at once, and we could see he was studying hard. He had the money, for it was Saturday, the day he got paid, but he appeared not to like the idea of lending so much on such a short acquaintance. Finally an idea seemed to come to him. He looked sharply at the stranger and asked rather quick: 'What's thirty?' Now 'thirty' is a newspaper term that few people understand, but this one answered in a second, grinning from ear to ear: 'It means to chuck work and go home,' he answered.

REPORTER BUYS SUIT.

"Well, sir, the reporter did just as he said and got a whole outfit for $14.50 and the stranger left at daybreak telling us all to stick around until he could get another and better rig and return.

"In three or four hours he was back. He had on a brand new suit of the best ready-made clothes in town, patent leather shoes and a plug hat. Also he had a roll of $100 bills so large that they wouldn't go into his inside coat pocket without a special effort. He was showing us that he had the credit he had boasted about.

"This time when we saw him he was feeling better toward the world and would talk more about himself, but he wouldn't tell his name, although I have since suspected the reporter knew it. He told us, though, that he was a prominent Missouri editor with aspirations to the United States senate.

"He had been in politics for years with his paper and never wanted anything so bad as that Senate plum. His platform from the start, he said, had been the cleaning up of the state morally.

WANTED TO FIND TRUTH.

" 'I have preached against immorality so much," he explained, 'that I just had to get out and find the truth about the other side. If my political enemies get hold of last night's caper it will be my undoing.'

"After he had gone the reporter looked at me and said: 'Well, we have promised never to mention this and it is safe, I guess. But my! what a story it would be for some newspapers I know.'

"The reporter is out of town now. By the way, Billings wasn't his name, either. I wonder which United States senatorial candidate that was?"

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December 29, 1909

AEROPLANE BOWLS
OVER A CONSTABLE.

OFFICER GETS IN TRACK OF CUR-
TISS AIRSHIP AND PREVENTS
ITS DESTRUCTION.

Grabs Machine and Holds On,
Though Dragged for
Thirty Feet.

The several hundred people who attended the airship exhibition at Overland park yesterday afternoon and were treated to some genuine thrillers, and although Aviator Charles K. Hamilton succeeded in making only two flights in his Curtiss aeroplane, no one could complain because there was not enough excitement.

In his first attempt to fly Hamilton gave a pretty demonstration of the feasibility of the machine for aerial navigation until he tried to land in front of the grandstand. Just as the supporting wheels reached the ground a strong gust of wind caught the planes and despite the fact that the aviator had all the brakes on the machine fairly skidded across the field at a rate of about twenty miles an hour.

SAVES MACHINE; IS HURT.

It seemed inevitable that the aeroplane would crash into the grandstand and accomplish its own complete destruction, but Homer Breyfogle, constable of Johnson county, Kas., was standing near by and before he could get out of the way, the machine struck him and knocked him about fifteen feet. Officer George A. Lyons, a member of the motorcycle squad of the Kansas City police force, rushed to the rescue, but when he grabbed the swiftly moving machine he was hurled into the air and dragged to the ground. However, he "stayed with the ship" and was dragged fully twenty feet before the machine came to a standstill.

With the exception of a few bruises about the limbs, Officer Lyons was uninjured, but Constable Breyfogle sustained a painful cut on his neck and severe bruises on the face. Aviator Hamilton wrenched his foot in an effort to stop the airship.

HARD LUCK AGAIN.

The plane with which Breyfogle collided was so badly damaged that it required an hour to repair it, but at about 5 o'clock Hamilton was again soaring down the field majestically, and for a few seconds it appeared that he was at last to make a record-breaking trip, but after he had t raveled over a mile and was trying to turn for the homeward stretch, the engine suddenly stopped and the machine landed in a snowbank.

"I simply can't conquer that wind," said Hamilton after his last flight. "One can't imagine how strong this wind is until you get a few feet in the air and then it seems to be twice as fierce. It was all I could do just to keep the machine from capsizing just now, because the wind twisted me in every shape in a cyclone fashion. Dangerous business on a day like this, but I always hate to disappoint the crowds, and if there is any flying to be done, I'll do it no matter what kind of weather prevails.

"Aren't there too many trees and hay stacks around here to make aerial travel very safe?" asked a spectator.

HIGH WINDS HIS ENEMY.

"Yes, there isn't hardly enough room on this field, but if the wind would only go down for one day, I'd make some surprising flights. We may get some ideal weather yet. How's that? No, I don't imagine the North Pole district affords any desirable aviation fields. Anyway, we're not going to attempt any emulation of the Dr. Cook stunt. I am heading for sunny California, where I expect to carry off some prizes in the contests to be pulled off next month."

Hamilton will make the usual flights this afternoon at the park, and he promises to avoid any further attempted "assassinations" of police officers.

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December 26, 1909

"BURGLAR" SAVED
AS POLICE COME.

Guest Mistaken by Roomers
for Robber, Imprisoned
in Guarded Closet.

"Come to 912 East Ninth street immediately," came a call late last night to police headquarters. "We've got a burglar locked in a closet."

The patrol wagon made a record run, but when it arrived only a crowd of badly frightened men and women roomers were found. There was no burglar.

"It was just one of the roomers," explained one of the crowd. "A man came out here tonight to visit a friend. He stepped out into the hall to look for a water cooler. The man had been drinking, and in his wandering through the dark halls stepped by mistake into a closet. A roomer, seeing the prowler, slipped up behind him and slammed the closet door."

The cry of "burglars" aroused the roomers. While the men rushed about in search of lodge swords and the women went for hat pins, one of the roomers stood guard with a revolver.

"Come out and I'll shoot," warned the guard in night robe, peering around his fortification, a chimney.

The prisoner took a drink. His courage restored, he shouted, "Help," thinking that he himself was the one being held up.

SOLID PHALANX.

The cohorts of the besiegers were now ranged in solid phalanx in front of the closet. There were all sort and manner of weapons. The men felt the edges of their lodge swords, and the women jabbed at supposed burglars, their forms outlined on the wall. The man with the revolver formed the advance line of attack. The rear was brought up by a boarder with a battle ax, used at a masquerade ball in the '60s.

"Help, burglars," came more audibly from the closet.

The friend in a nearby room was attracted by the noise. He came to the hall armed with a .44, not knowing that his guest was in trouble. He lined up behind the rear guard.

"Help, I'm suffocating," came another cry from the closet, this time more insistent and appealing.

GUARD CALLED OFF.

The roomer recognized the voice as that of his guest. The guard of nightie-clad roomers was called off. The guest with the jag was released.

A clanging of bells was heard in the front of the house. A squad of blue-coats came rushing in at the front door.

"Saved," cried the joyful man, emerging from his prison, mopping his brow.

"Stung," answered the chorus of nighties.

The police returned to headquarters empty-handed.

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December 26, 1909

"LEAN" CHRISTMAS FOR COPS.

Only One Exception Was Made to
Order Prohibiting Gifts.

Yesterday, in the annals of the police department, went down as a lean Christmas. It was owing to the order issued by the board of police commissioners shortly after the members went into office last April.

On the official records it reads, "No member of the police force shall give or receive presents." Short and to the point it caused clouds of gloom to settle right around the city hall. This year the patrolman on the beat was forced to wave aside all offers of boxes of cigars, black bottles, etc., and the family turkey was bought from the officer's monthly stipend.

One exception to the rigid rule of the police commissioners was made yesterday, however, and the officer in question is not likely to be called upon to answer for infringement.

On "Battle Roy," known officially as Beat 7 and the roughest beat in the central district, an old shoe string peddler plies his trade. Worn and bent, the old man walked into headquarters last night and asked for Officer Herman Hartman who, for the past five years, has patroled out of headquarters.

"Yes, he saved my life once," he stated to the desk sergeant, Robert Smith. "He pulled me out of the way of a runaway team. I haven't got any money but I would like you to give him this half dozen pair of shoe laces."

The sergeant took the gift and placed it in an envelope for the officer, who is at present a member of the traffic squad and stationed at Eleventh and Walnut streets.

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December 25, 1909

8,000 KIDS YELL
SANTA GREETINGS.

POLICE IN BATTLE ROYAL WHEN
GIFTS ARE ANNOUNCED AS
READY FOR CHILDREN.

Officials of Mayor's Christ-
mas Tree Well Pleased
With Its Success.

Santa Claus, the magnanimous patron saint of good will, was the hero of the hour in Convention hall yesterday afternoon when 8,000 needy, little children were happy objects of his unbounded generosity.

For the second time the mayor's annual Christmas tree was brought forth loaded with playthings and goodies for the poor youngsters, who otherwise would not know of the joys of the giving spirit of the Yuletide. Every child, irrespective of color or race, was made the recipient of a sack filled with things that gladden the juvenile heart.

By 2 o'clock the bill hall was crowded with boys and girls from every portion of the city, and for fully an hour the expectant thousands were entertained by a band organ, furnished by the Hippodrome, and a clown band which marched about the hall playing the most tuneless tunes imaginable, but doing antics that amused all.

Mayor T. T. Crittenden was slated for a speech, but in the attempt failed, owing to the impossibility of inducing the anxious auditors to desist in their yelling. However, the mayor was able to yell "A Merry Christmas" occasionally during the distribution of presents, and this laconic well-wishing accomplished all that could be asked, for every child left the hall with smiling faces which revealed the joyousness they were experiencing.

MAYOR SATISFIED.

"Isn't this going some?" smiled the mayor as he took a view of the remarkable scene. "Just so every one of these poor children get something, I will be satisfied. It is a grand sigh and a gloriouis manifestation of the great Kansas City spirit, which we all love to see.

"It's a greater success than ever," declared Steve Sedweek, a member of the executive committee. "It is one of the biggest charitable undertakings in the country to care for so many needy children, and I am sure the whole committee feels gratified in noting the remarkable demonstrations in evidence here this afternoon."

At times during the big event it was not an easy task to keep the guests properly marooned for their own safety and comfort. Every child present wanted to get his or her present first and the police, under the direction of Sergeant Charles Edwards, had their troubles, but handled the crowds well. Most of the officers present were attired in Santa Claus make-up. In fact, Saint Nick was there six times strong in the persons of Jack Darnell, S. F. Cox, James F. Campbell, A. D. Royer, Joe McCormick and Elvin Gray.

The idea of having a mayor's tree for the poor children every Christmas was conceived by Steve Sedweek, who outlined his plan at an Eagle banquet over a year ago. Mayor Crittenden forthwith promulgated the scheme, and now the affair is to be annual and of increasing success, no doubt.

Yesterday afternoon there were representatives from twelve different cities of the Middle West present to witness the distribution of gifts to the poor. These men came with the view of seeing how Kansas City made its needy ones happy on Christmas and to take the idea back home in the hopes of starting the same kind of wide-spread charity. The mayor's tree is strictly a Kansas City institution and bids fair to be in vogue in many other cities ere many years.

POLICE WERE BUSY.

It was no easy matter even for a dozen military policemen under the careful personal direction of their drill master, Sergeant Charles Edwards, to keep the 8,000 children in their places in the hall yesterday when the line was formed for the distribution of presents. Between boxes, in which the visitors sat, and the gallery seats, where those really interested in the affair were penned in, was a four-foot fence of iron. It did not look very high to the boys, but it looked even smaller to the cops. To the latter it looked infinitely long, however, for at the first call for gifts a scrambling mass of children swept over it, inundating the boxes below and surging out into the hall. For a space of a minute the line seemed actually in danger. The policemen rushed forward, brandishing their clubs and shouting. A dozen members of the reception committee joined hands and formed a wall near the threatened quarter. The mayor raised his deep bass voice in mild disapproval.

Just then, at the crucial moment, the reserves threw their ponderous weight into the fray and the regiments of insurgents broke for cover like the old guard in the rout of Waterloo. The victorious newcomers were the six big officers doing duty as Santa Claus close to the Christmas trees and their tinsel had a better moral effect than the regulation uniforms or the white committee badges. There were no youngsters in that host who wanted to endanger their good standing with St. Nicholas and his assistants. Not much!

There was just one way in which gifts were classified according to the age of the child receiving them yesterday. The presents were in flour sacks, each bearing the label, "Mayor's Christmas Tree, 1909." On the sacks containing gifts calculated for older children the letters were printed in blue, while on the others they were in red. There were eighteen persons at each "gift bench" handing out the sacks.

MOURNER'S BENCHES FOR THE LOST.

A great number of visitors at the mayor's Christmas party wondered why two long benches ere arranged alongside the trees. They were told by ushers that these were the mourners' benches. This was proved to be true later in the day when children who had somehow got lost from their parents or elders lined up from one end to the other. Two little girls, Edith Shoemaker, 2311 Euclid avenue, and Menie Marcus, who said she lived near Eighteenth and McGee streets, were prominent among the mourners.

Edith's tear-stained face and Menie's extraordinary composure seemed to attract the attention of everyone. They had never seen each other before, but they were two lost little girls whose ages were on the tender side of 10 years, and in that circumstance there was union. With arms locked about each other's neck, they sat for an hour until Mayor Crittenden personally took charge of Edith, and Jacob Billikopf of Menie, and sent them home, loaded with presents.

Two wagon loads of toys arrived at the hall after the crowd had been treated and were only partially disposed of. The sum of the donations for the tree amounted to $4,880. It was announced last night by Albert Hutchins, chairman of the finance committee, that $200 of the money has not been used. The presents remaining after yesterday will be distributed at the Grand theater Monday night.

Several instances of highway robbery, in which large boys despoiled smaller ones of their trinkets or tickets were reported to the committee of distribution during the afternoon.

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December 22, 1909

WENT WITHOUT HIS MEALS.

That's a Traffic Policeman's Allega-
tion in Suit for Divorce.

William F. Heckenberg, a traffic policeman, has filed suit for divorce against Grace E. Heckenberg, alleging violent fits of temper and occasional absence from home when the officer went without meals.

The Heckenbergs have been married twenty years and have three children, a boy of 19, a girl of 8 and a boy of 5 years. The officer asks for the custody of the younger ones. He alleges that the older boy is kept at home assisting with the housework while his wife insists on working down town, against his will, thereby keeping her away from home much of the time. The case is set for the January term of the court.

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December 19, 1909

COP'S SPEED LIMIT IS WALK.

Threatens to Arrest Autoists, They
Say, If Machine Goes Faster.

Formal protest was made last evening by Mrs. Victor Bell and her son, Dr. Charles Bell, to A. J. Dean, president of the park board, alleging that park policeman No. 14 on Cliff drive was unduly harsh yesterday afternoon in threatening them with arrest if their automobile was driven faster than he could walk on the Cliff drive. Mr. Dean will take up the matter at the next meeting of the park board.

Mrs. Bell and her sons, Dr. Charles Bell and Harold Bell, were halted in their big 60-horse landaulet in about the middle of Cliff drive. They were taking their usual afternoon ride when park policeman No. 14 shouted to them to halt. The chauffeur stopped.

"We were traveling very slowly," said Dr. Bell, who lives at the Hotel Baltimore, last evening, "when the policeman stopped us. At first we were threatened with arrest. Then we were told we might proceed, but that if the policeman ever caught us driving faster than he could walk that he would arrest us without further notice. We objected to this threat because a man's walk is certainly too slow a pace for an automobile. Our driver is familiar with the speed laws. Yesterday the driver took extra precautions because of the ice and snow. This in itself is sufficient for any driver to remain well within the speed limit. I know that we were not running faster than we do in Petticoat Lane.

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December 11, 1909

FATHER AND BROTHER DEAD.

Now Patrolman Ganzer's Mother Is
Dying at Lee's Summit.

In the last ten days Charles Ganzer, a police patrolman, has lost his father and brother, and his aged mother now lies at the point of death at Lee's Summit, Mo. The father, George Ganzer, died ten days ago. Yesterday morning William Ganzer, a brother, 24 years old, died on his farm near Hickman Mills. At last reports the officer's mother was reported very low. The funeral of the brother will take place at the Lee's Summit cemetery this afternoon. He will be buried in the family lot.

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December 10, 1909

KNIFE THRUST ENDS SPEECH.

Soldier, Fatally Wounded, Unable to
Make a Statement.

As the result of a fight between privates of Troop F, Fifteenth United States cavalry, which occurred at Twelfth and Central last night, Frank McFadden is at the general hospital with a knife wound below his heart which may prove fatal, and John Chrobel is suffering from a badly gashed back. George Pease, who is supposed to have done the stabbing, was arrested by Patrolman J. J. Lovell and is held at police headquarters.

McFadden was hurried to the emergency hospital. Dr. H. A. Pond, seeing that the man was probably fatally injured, sent for Assistant Prosecutor Norman Woodson. Further examination of the man showed that the vagus nerve had been injured, affecting the vocal chords and rendering him in capable of speech, and the prosecutor could take no statement.

The troops at Fort Leavenworth, where the Fifteenth cavalry is stationed, were paid off yesterday and McFaddden, Chrobel and Pease came to Kansas City together. They spent all day in the North end of town and were on the way to a theater when the quarrel occurred.

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December 9, 1909

TWO KILLED AND
ONE WOUNDED IN
RUNNING BATTLE.

Charles Lukens, Wyandotte County
Deputy Sheriff, Shot Through
Heart by Charles Galloway, Drink
Crazed Rosedale Electrician, He
Tried to Serve With Injunction.

SLAYER HAD THREATENED
WIFE WHO SOUGHT DIVORCE.

After Killing Lukens, Galloway
Carried on a Retreating Fight
With Other Officers Until
Brought to Bay at 3129
Bell Street.

SHOT BY DETECTIVES, DIES
IN EMERGENCY HOSPITAL.

Double Tragedy Direct Result of
Domestic Difficulties of the Gal-
loways -- Wife, Who Sued for Di-
vorce, Feared for Her Life, Which
Husband Had Threatened -- Re-
straining Order Was to Keep Him
From Further Terrorizing Her.
Murderer of Peace Officer, Who Was Slain as He Fled From Posse.
CHARLES T. GALLOWAY.

Two men are dead and another wounded as the result of an attempt by Charles Quincy Lukens, a deputy sheriff of Wyandotte county, Kas., to serve a restraining order upon Charles T. Galloway, a drink crazed electrician of 428 College avenue, Rosedale, Kas., late yesterday evening.

Lukens was shot above the heart and instantly killed during a running fight with Galloway.

Galloway was later brought to bay in a house at 3129 Bell street, and after a desperate resistance was mortally wounded, dying at 11:30 o'clock last night as he was being placed upon the operating table at Emergency hospital.

JUST BACK FROM OKLAHOMA.

Deputy Sheriff Lukens left the Wyandotte county court house yesterday afternoon about 4 o'clock with an order from the district court restraining Galloway from annoying or in any way interfering with his wife, Mrs. Anna Galloway. The Galloways had been having trouble for several months, and November 23 Mrs. Galloway, through her attorney, Rush L. Fizette, 1255 Kansas City avenue, Rosedale, filed a suit for divorce, alleging cruelty, drunkenness and ill-treatment.

Since the filing of the divorce petition Galloway had beaten his wife and threatened her life. She then applied for an order restraining him from bothering her. The order was granted several weeks ago, but Galloway had been in Oklahoma during that time. Yesterday word was received at the sheriff's office that he was in town, and Lukens was sent to serve papers on him.

QUARTER-MILE RUNNING FIGHT.

Mrs. Galloway has been staying for the past few days at the home of her sister, Mrs. J. L. Connor, at 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale. The deputy sheriff and Marshal Drew thought perhaps they might find Galloway hanging around there, as he had visited the Connor home earlier in the day and made demands to see his wife and children.

The officers reached Kansas City avenue and Washington street about 5:30 o'clock, and met Galloway shortly after they stepped off the car. Marshal Drew spoke to Galloway and shook hand with him. Lukens then shook hands with Galloway, and told him that he had some papers to serve.

Almost instantly Galloway drew a revolver and opened fire on the officers, who, unprepared for such an emergency, had to unbutton their overcoats before they could get at their weapons. They at last got hold of their revolvers and opened fire on Galloway. A running fight was kept up for more than a quarter of a mile.

The fleeing man turned into alleys, turning back every few steps to fire upon the pursuing officers. He finally reached Rosedale avenue, and turning south ran toward the tracks of the Frisco railroad. When the officers reached the tracks he turned and fired at Lukens, hitting him directly over the heart.

LUKENS FALLS DEAD.

Lukens staggered, and after grasping a telegraph pole with both hands fell to the ground dead. Galloway then ran south, and after a vain attempt to make his escape on a horse, abandoned the horse, and fled to the woods on the hills around Gray's park.

Officer Drew ran to Lukens's assistance, but finding him dead, started to pursue Galloway. He fired the last shell from his gun, and then finding himself without ammunition sent a boy after some. A large crowd of persons had been attracted by the firing, and a number of them assisted in taking the body of Lukens to a barber shop at Kansas City and Rosedale avenues. The coroner was notified, and he ordered the body taken to the Gates undertaking rooms in Rosedale, where he performed a post mortem. It was found that the bullet had pierced the heart and lungs, and had gone entirely through the body, coming out near the middle of the back.

GALLOWAY BROUGHT TO BAY.

The sheriff's office was notified in Kansas City, Kas., and Under Sheriff Joseph Brady, deputies William McMullen, Clyde Sartin and George Westfall jumped into an automobile, driven by George E. Porter, an undertaker at 1007 North Seventh street and rode at break neck speed to Rosedale. The Kansas City, Kas., police were also notified and Chief W. W. Cook led a large force of uniformed men and detectives to the scene of the murder. The citizens of Rosedale also turned out in large numbers and the hills around Rosedale glittered with the lights as these posses scoured the woods in an effort to find the murderer.

At 9 o'clock last night Galloway was cornered in the home of M. E. Patterson, 3129 Bell street, Kansas City, Mo., which he took possession of forcibly.

Barricading himself in a closet upstairs he held his pursuers at bay for over two hours. A posse consisting of nearly 100 men guarded the house on all sides. the air was tense with tragedy, and the bitter cold of the winter night added to the unpleasantness of the whole affair. Every man knew that a desperate fight was inevitable and that Galloway would have to be taken either dead or helplessly wounded.

MISSOURIAN LEADS CHARGE.

A delay was occasioned by the fact that the Kansas officers were outside of their jurisdiction, and did not feel that they had a right to enter the house, which is built on Missouri soil. Missouri officers were summoned and arrived at about 10 o'clock. The plans were laid and great precaution was taken in every step taken, for the officers realized that they were at a great disadvantage in forcing their way into the house, which they knew held a man who had already killed one officer and who would not hesitate to kill others should they press him too hard.

Finally the attack was planned and at 11:30 o'clock a squad of detectives consisting of Joe Downs, Billy McMullin, Harry Anderson and J. W. Wilkens, the latter a Missouri officer, leading, forced their way into the house, and after cautiously searching all the downstairs rooms without finding Galloway, rushed up the narrow stairs to the second floor.

When the officers reached the second floor a volley of shots rang out. Another volley followed. Breaking glass and a great commotion could be heard in the street below.

LAST WORD FOR HIS WIFE.

Then a husky voice was heard to shout:

"We got him."

In entering a dining room the officers were reminded of the presence of Galloway by three shots fired in rapid succession. The officers responded with a dozen shots and bullets went whizzing in every direction, embedding themselves in the walls. One bullet passed through the sleeve of Detective Wilkens's overcoat and lodged in the thumb on the left hand of Harry Anderson, a Kansas City, Kas., detective.

Within a twinkling a bullet entered the abdomen of Galloway and he fell to the floor, rolling into a dark kitchen adjoining the dining room. Writhing in his great pain, the man rolled frantically about the floor.

"Oh my dear wife, my own wife, my darling wife," he moaned time and again. Then he pleaded for ice water, clutching his parched throat madly.

An ambulance was called and Galloway was taken to emergency hospital, where he died just as they were lifting him to the operating table.

ANOTHER WOMAN'S LETTER.

Drs. Harry T. Morton and C. A. Pond, who were in attendance, pronounced death due to a wound from several buckshot that had entered the left side of the abdomen and after penetrating the intestines came out of the right side.

His pockets were searched while on the operating table. The contents consisted of a pocket-book containing $55 in cash, a gold watch and chain, a pack of business cards, several boxes of revolver cartridges, a bank book on the Fort Worth, Tex., State bank, and a letter.

The letter, which was written in lead pencil, was so blood soaked that it was barely legible. As far as it could be deciphered it ran as follows:

"Dear Friend -- I hear that you are getting a divorce from Mrs. G. ----- she is selling all your things and ---- I don't see where Mrs. G. or the boys is at. They act disgraceful, never coming home. --- Good luck, your loving Nan."

Lukens, whom Galloway shot down, was one of his best friends and so was Marshal Billy Drew, whom he fired at time and again in an effort to kill.

ASKS FOR FOOD.

The house where the shooting occurred is a two-story frame structure containing four apartments. The front apartment is occupied by Cecil Patterson and his family, and the rear apartment of four rooms by J. E. Creason, his wife and their little daughter.

"It was about 8 o'clock when Galloway came to the house," said Mr. Creason. "He was greatly excited and told me he had been in a shooting scrape and had shot a man. He said that they, meaning the officers, were after him and he did not know what to do. I told him that the best thing for him to do was surrender. He said: 'No, I'm not ready yet.'


Mr. and Mrs. Creason, Who Fed Galloway and Tried to Persuade Him to Surrender.
MR. AND MRS. J. E. CREASON,
In Whose Home Galloway Took Forcible Possession and Held Out Against a Posse Until Forced to Run for His Life When a Bullet Ended His Career

" 'Give me something to eat first and I will think about it,' he said. I have known Galloway for several years and worked for him at my trade as an electrician. He had always been a good friend and I saw no wrong in giving him something to eat and told my wife to fix him something. She fried some chops and potatoes and made some coffee for him. He tried to eat, but he was nervous and he could hardly swallow.

THE POSSE COMES.

"All this time my wife and I tried to find out just who he had shot and what the shooting was about, but he would put us off with the one answer, 'I will tell you when I am ready.' After supper he sat in a corner and seemed to be in a deep study. He paid no attention to our little girl, who seemed to annoy him by her childish prattle.

"I did not know what to do, so thought I would take a walk in the fresh air. I had hardly gotten 100 feet from the house when I met some people from Rosedale. They told me that Galloway had killed the undersheriff and that they were after him. I told them that he was in my house, but warned them not to go after him, as I feared he might use one of the weapons he had there. I told the crowd that I would endeavor to get him to surrender. I went back to the house. Galloway was still sitting in the corner, but jumped up w hen I came into the room.

" 'They know where you are,' I told him. 'Why don't you surrender?' 'I am not ready yet,' he said. I could get nothing more from him. Half an hour later some of the officers came into the ho use. I went downstairs and told them that Galloway was upstairs, but that he was armed and that it would be dangerous for them to go up there at that time. My family was up there, too, and I did not want my wife or daughter to be shot in case Galloway or the officers started shooting.

REFUSES TO SURRENDER.

This turned the posse back for a while and I made another effort to get Galloway to surrender. He still refused and I called to my wife and daughter and we went to the front of the house in Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Patterson's rooms. We left the gas burning in the dining room and the hall. The bedroom, in the closet in which Galloway took refuge, opened from the dining room by big folding doors as you see. The gas mantle on this lamp was broken and it was not lighted. We all remained in the front room until the posse called to us to come out of the house. As we went out I again told Galloway to surrender; that the house was surrounded and he could not get away, or if he did that he would have to jump to the house next door and climb down the side of the house.

" 'I am not ready yet,' were the last words he said to me. I felt as if the officers would not take Galloway alive and I feared that several might be killed. I was so nervous I did know what I was doing or saying. All I thought of was to prevent any more bloodshed.

"After we left the house we went into Griffin's home next door. We had hardly gotten inside when the shooting began. I put my fingers to my ears so that I would not hear the shots.

SURE HE WAS CRAZY.

"Galloway must have been out of his mind. He could have escaped from the house several times after he knew that the officers had him spotted and he could have held that staircase with his guns against 100 policemen. Why he refused to surrender and then retreated into the clothes closet where he was caught like a rat in a trap can only be explained by my opinion that he was crazy.

"Galloway brought the rifle and the shot gun over to the ho use this afternoon. He also brought a suitcase full of ammunition. This was before he did the shooting. He told us that he was going hunting and he wanted to leave his guns at our house. We had no objections to this as we had always been the best of friends. After we left the house he must have taken his rifle and gone into the closet. He left his shotgun in a corner in the kitchen."

THREATENED TO KILL WIFE FOR YEARS.

Mrs. Anna Galloway, wife of Charles Galloway, has been living with her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Connor, at their home, 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale, ever since she instituted divorce proceedings against her husband. For over forty-eight hours she has been a prisoner in that home, fearing even to step out, lest Galloway be near, ready to fire at her, as he had repeatedly threatened to do.

When seen last night after the killing of Deputy Sheriff Lukens, she was nearly in a state of nervous prostration. She had witnessed the start of the tragic escapade from a window in her room . She saw the officer attempt to serve papers on her husband. She heard the ensuing shots and then fell in a swoon.

"Oh, I knew it would come to this terrible end -- I knew it, I knew it," she moaned, as she paced nervously up and down the floor. "Charlie has had murder in his heart for thirteen years and I have always realized that it would only be a matter of time until the impulse would control him. He wasn't sane; he couldn't have been.

"Five times since Priests of Pallas week he has threatened to kill me, and from one day to another I never knew if I would see daylight again. Today some stranger 'phoned from a saloon to be extremely careful, as he had heard Charlie say that this would be the last day I could live. Marshal Drew remained with me to protect me and he has been in our house here all day.

"The first time Mr. Galloway ever threatened me was thirteen years ago. I should have left him then, but I thought he would get over his insane notions and I wanted to make a success of our married life if at all possible. He did reform and was better to me for some time, but when our two children, Harvey and Walter, were old enough to run around a great deal he began abusing me terribly and many times told me he would kill me. He became a harder drinker every year and would get in such a condition that no one could manage him at all.

"Many times as he choked me, and more than once has the end seemed so near that I could not possibly escape, but God has been with me for my children's sake I guess."

VICTIM WELL KNOWN IN WYANDOTTE.

Charles Quincy Lukens was 33 years old. He lived with his widowed mother, Mrs. Sarah Lukens, 336 Harrison street, Argentine. He was unmarried. He was appointed deputy sheriff by Sheriff Al Becker about one year ago. Before his appointment Lukens was constable and later marshal of Argentine for several terms. He had also served on the Argentine fire department. "Charley" Lukens was known by everyone in Argentine, both old and young, and also had a wide acquaintance thorugout the county. He was regarded as a very efficient officer, and had a reputation for fearlessness.

Besidses his mother he is survived by four sisters and four brothers. The sisters are: Mrs. Lydia Jones of Girard, Kas., Mrs. Beulah Robinson of 1108 East Twenty-fourth street, Kansas City, Mo., Mrs. C. A. Hare of Faircastle, O., Mrs. Leonard Eshnaur of Terminal Isle, Cal. The brothers are J. R. Lukens of Oklahoma City, Ok., and L. B, J. E., and F. D. Lukens of Argentine.

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December 6, 1909

LONG AND SHORT MEN BUSY.

Victims of Highwaymen Report to
Police the Loss of More Than
$300 on Sunday.

J. S. Hubert, a member of the United Brewery Workers of America, living at 2518 Charlotte, was felled by a blow from behind and robbed of five $20 bills, ten $10 bills and five $5 bills at Twenty-first and Locust at 9:30 o'clock last night by two men, one of whom, he says was very tall and the other extremely short. He says he saw the same men in a saloon at Nineteenth street and Grand avenue Saturday night. Hubert immediately reported the case to police and he was taken to his home by Officer Sherry. Upon examination of his head no signs of where he had been slugged could be found.

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December 1, 1909

CHANGE ON "TOUGHEST" BEAT.

"Hoboes' Friend" Transferred From
"Battle Row" to Traffic Squad.

"Battle Row," adjoining police headquarters and generally conceded the "toughest" beat in town, owing to the number of cheap saloons and the rough element, will be patrolled by a new man today. It is the first change in five years.

Patrolman Herman Hartman, "the hoboes' friend," has been transferred to the traffic squad and will be stationed at the intersection of Eleventh and Walnut streets. Hartman is the heaviest officer on the force, tipping the scales at 330 pounds.

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November 25, 1909

TO WATCH PICKPOCKETS.

Special Details of Police Will Pro-
tect Football Crowds.

Extra precautions are being taken by the police department for rounding up the many pickpockets and sneak thieves attracted to Kansas City in the hope of reaping a harvest from today's football crowds. An extra detail of plain clothes men will be on duty at the football grounds besides uniformed officers, and after the game will be detailed to downtown work until late at night.

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November 20, 1909

POLICE QUIT TOBACCO HABIT.

Independence Force Follows Chief's
Lead -- Want to Grow Fat.

Since the Independence police have secured their new uniforms and caps, another reform has started and the police force has sworn off the use of tobacco.

Chief of Police Combs and Sergeant Price have grown thinner during the past few months. Chief Combs decided that tobacco was the cause of it and stopping its use would help his health.

Whatever the chief does, the other officers follow suit and all of them took the pledge to stop the use of the weed for a term of sixty days. If the uniforms fill out in the allotted time tobacco and its use will not be known on the Independence police force.

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November 15, 1909

WOOLF TOOK NO CHANCES.

Didn't Even Take Cigars Until
Board Gave Permission.


A box of cigars was handed to the board of police commissioners yesterday with a written request from Patrolman J. L. Woolf that he be permitted to accept it. Counselor Cromer explained that he had recently sent Woolf out to stand guard at a wedding.


"When he left," said Cromer, "the host handed Woolf a cigar. He noticed that a bill was folded beneath the band. Woolf refused the cigar. The man asked Woolf to call at his place and gave him this box of cigars, which he is asking permission to accept."

"Good," shouted Commissioner marks, "I wish there were more men on the force like this one. Let him have the cigars. That's what all the men should do when they receive a present -- but they don't."

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November 15, 1909

CRIES OF MURDER FROM
A HACK THAT VANISHED.

Patrolman's Shots Fail to Stop Car-
riage on Main Street - Near Po-
lice Headquarters.

Cries of murder and help, from an owl hack, and a chase by the police, with shots fired at the jehu of the four-wheeler, caused considerable excitement ont he streets of the downtown district early yesterday morning, and has given the police a mystery outrivaling that famous old query as to "Who hit Billy Patterson?"

The trouble started about 3 o'clock when police headquarters was disturbed by cries apparently of a woman for help. The shrieks were punctuated by a bass voice yelling murder. A half dozen police and other attaches dashed from the station to the street and as they reached the sidewalk a cab driven at breakneck speed went south on Main street.

Patrolman Kartman opened fire when no attention was paid to the command to halt, but the officers were soon outdistanced by the carriage. A general alarm was sent out to various stations to watch for the driver, his vehicle and its occupants, but no trace has been found.

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November 9, 1909

While the Police Drill in Convention Hall...
Police Drilling in Convention Hall

Crime Runs Rampant Kansas City

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November 7, 1909

HELD IN CHAIR AND SHAVED.

Customer Does Not Want Other Side
Finished, Barber Objects, Has His
Way, Then Stabs Defending Self.

As a result of a fight which took place in the barber shop at 902 East Fifth street, James Morley was stabbed five times in the back with a pair of scissors, and slashed once in the left arm with a razor and was then locked up in the police station, charged with disturbing the peace, while Mike Raffles, the barber who inflicted the wounds, escaped.

Morley, who is 20 years of age, but who wouldn't tell his residence, had been drinking when h e entered the barber shop at which Raffles is employed, wanting a shave. When Raffles had shaved one side of his face, Morley decided that he would let the other side go. Raffles remonstrated with him, and finally thourgh force managed to complete the job. As soon as Morley was released from the chair he attempted to start trouble. In self defense, Raffles grabbed a pair of scissors and in the melee which followed, stabbed Morley five times in the back. Morley still showed fight, and raffles slashed him with a razor.

Morley was taken to the emergency hospital in an ambulance, but fought with the doctor all the way to the hospital. When in the hospital he tried to fight everyone with whom he came in contact. Patrolman Miller was sent to quiet the belligerent patient, and Morley again wanted to fight, but one good healthy slap ended the trouble, and Morley was locked up on a charge of disturbing the peace.

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October 29, 1909

NEGRO COP SHOOTS A NEGRO.

Victim, With Shattered Leg, Falls
at Wife's Feet in Kitchen.

His right leg shattered by a bullet from a negro policeman's pistol which struck him as he stood in his own kitchen door, Martin Young, also a negro, fell at the feet of his wife as she was eating supper last evening.

Young, who lives at 1126 Highland avenue, was playing poker earlier in the day near Tenth street and St. Louis avenue, it is claimed, and the game was raided, but he managed to escape. Patrolmen Gray, Tillman and Campbell, all negroes, in plain clothes, surrounded his home. Tillman went inside while Campbell guarded the front of the house and Gray the rear.

Wilson went out of the back door and seeing the officer standing behind a fence started back. Gray shouted at the ma but as he made no attempt to stop, immediately shot him down.

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October 24, 1909

CAT, PET FOR 10 YEARS, MAD.

Pussy Left in Possession of House
While Police Are Notified.

There were lively doings around the home of Mrs. M. Richardson, 813 East Eighteenth street, yesterday morning when the house cat, which had been the pet of the family for the last ten years, was seized suddenly with an attack of hydrophobia.

The family left pussy to rampage around the house to her heart's content, while they notified police headquarters, Patrolman Adams was detailed to shoot the animal.

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October 22, 1909

TRYING WIG AS POLICE CAME.

Intruder, on Stairs, in Possession of
Other Female Garments.

Mrs. Mabel Stone, 1335 Central street, heard a man roaming through the hallway of her residence yesterday evening and promptly telephoned the police.

Patrolman Rogers appeared on the scene and arrested Fred Coyle, who he found sitting at the foot of the stairs trying on a woman's wig. He had other female garments in his possession.

Coyle stated that he was a female impersonator and that he was merely seeking a boarding house. He was held for investigation.

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October 15, 1909

JACK, THE FOLLOWER,
SCARES THE WOMEN.

PURSUES MISS ESTELLA STORIE
TO HER HOME.

Walks Right in and Turns Around
When She Screams and Walks
Right Out Again -- Has Fol-
lowed Others.

Closely followed by a stranger who did not halt when she reached her home but pursued her into the hall when she opened the door, Miss Estella Storie, daughter of Thomas C. Storie, a contractor, who lives at 2443 Wabash avenue, aroused the family last night with her frightened cries. The man, without showing much alarm, deliberately walked out and disappeared in the darkness as Mr. Storie came bounding down the stairs.

The girl, her nerves unstrung, sank into a chair and was hardly able to talk for several minutes. She had alighted from a Prospect avenue car at Howard avenue and had started to walk west one block to Wabash and then north to her home. She noticed that a man stepped out of the shadows and followed her as she hastened down Howard avenue.

"He didn't hurry," the girl said, "just walked in that same even pace that frightened me more than if he had said something. But I knew that he was gaining on me and by the time I reached the walk that led up to the house he could have grabbed me.

"He didn't turn as I expected, but followed me right up the walk and entered the house behind me. Then I screamed for help. When I screamed, he deliberately walked out without even closing the door."

Mr. Storie called up the Flora avenue police station at once and Sergeant John Duer dispatched Patrolman John C. Riner to the Storie home. He investigated the premises carefully but there was no trace of the stranger.

Other cases of men following women have been reported at the Flora avenue police station. Last week a woman who lives near Twenty-third and Olive street reported to the police that a man followed her but she was unwilling to give her name as she wished to avoid notoriety. The description of the man she gave the police tallied with the stranger who followed Miss Storie last night. It is believed that the one man has been responsible for the scares given to the women of the district.

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October 9, 1909

SWOPE LAID TO REST
WHILE CITY MOURNS.

THOUSANDS BRAVE RAIN TO
VIEW FUNERAL CORTEGE.

Procession Longest Ever Seen in
Kansas City -- Casket Temporari-
ly Placed in Vault at
Forest Hill.

Thomas Hunton Swope, for fifty-two years a resident of Kansas City, and its greatest benefactor, was laid to rest late yesterday afternoon in a vault in Forest Hill cemetery.

Following his request only the Episcopal service for the dead was said. It is the same service which has been said in that church for 500 years, and is used for the burial of both great and lowly, rich and poor.

There was no oratory, no eulogy. The service reminded many of the life of the man for whom it was said -- simple, quiet, impressive.

At Grace Episcopal church, Thirteenth and Washington streets, Bishop E. R. Atwill officiated, assisted by Rev. J. A. Schaad, the rector, and his assistant, Rev. E. B. Woodruff.

As the funeral cortege entered the edifice it was headed by the bishop, who repeated a portion of the service as he walked down the aisle. Chaplin Woodruff bore the staff. Following came the immediate family.

Stuart Fleming, a nephew from colonel Swope's old home in Kentucky, was with Mrs. Logan Swope, a sister-in-law of the dead philanthropist. Then came Dr. B. C. Hyde and wife, a niece of Colonel Swope's and all of the relatives from Independence.

The entire center of the church was reserved for the pallbearers, honorary pallbearers and civic bodies and commercial and fraternal organizations.


SERVICE IS SIMPLE.

Bishop Atwill read the service at the church, and the Rev. Mr. Schaad read the lesson. Mr. Frank B. Fisk presided at the organ and rendered a dirge as the body was carried into the church. Mrs. Darnell, contralto, sang "One Sweetly Solemn Thought." Then a hymn, "O Paradise, O Paradise," was sung by the choir, the audience assisting. At the close of the church service the choir rendered the anthem, "I'm a Pilgrim and a Stranger."

During the service at the church the creed was said, and the Lord's Prayer repeated.

It was 3:30 before the cortage reached the church and after 4 o'clock before it got under way, leaving. When it reached the vault in Forest Hill cemetery it was almost dark and raining hard. Here the services were just as simple as at the church. Bishop Atwill read the committal service and Rev. Mr. Schaad the lesson.

The casket was placed in a large vault, made especially for its reception, and sealed. There it will remain until some future date when it will be removed to its final resting place in Swope park, beneath a monument erected by the people of Kansas city.


AN HOUR IN PASSING.

The funeral cortege was the largest ever seen in Kansas City. Besides the military, civic, commercial and fraternal organizations in line, there were seventy-five carriages, not counting the private vehicles. It took over an hour to pass a given point.

It was nearly 2 o'clock before the mounted police, followed by the Third Regiment band at the head of the regiment, started south on Walnut street from the city hall. Then, in order, came police and firemen on foot, Battery B and band, Uniform Rank, K. of P., Modern Woodmen, Turner society, Elks lodge, park board employes, lodge of Eagles, United Confederate Veterans, labor organizations, Board of Trade and Commercial Club and city officials in carriages. The active and honorary pallbearers preceded the immediate family and citizens in carriages.

As the procession left the public library where Colonel Swope's body has been in state since Thursday morning it passed through a double line of school children, each a "part owner" in the beautiful park which he gave the city. They stood uncovered, their hats and caps over their hears, all the long time the cortege was passing. Children lined both sides of the street all the way down Ninth street to Grand avenue and to Tenth street on Grand.

After the procession had crossed Main street it passed through another double line of children formed on Eleventh street from Baltimore avenue to Broadway, and down Broadway to Thirteenth street. Here again every boy stood uncovered, at attention, while the cortege was passing.


THOUSANDS VIEW PROCESSION.

It has been estimated that between 10,000 and 15,000 school children were out. Besides the children, the streets were packed with people along thee entire line of march as far out as Twentieth street and Grand avenue. The windows in every building also were filled with people all the way through the main portion of the city and spectators filled the verandas and windows of every home passed by the cortege entirely to the cemetery. Possibly no fewer than 100,000 people saw the procession.

When Twentieth and Grand was reached all of those in the parade on foot dropped out, the distance to the cemetery being too far for them to walk. At this point the Third regiment, the Uniformed Rank, K. of P., the Modern Woodmen of America, police and firemen were formed in company front along the west side of Grand avenue. It made a solid line of uniformed men for two blocks.

It was intended from this point for the procession to make better time, but the rain had rendered Gillham road very slippery and the procession to make better time, but the rain had rendered Gillham road very slippery and the procession got beyond Thirty-first street on Gillham road before it left a walk.


FLORAL GIFTS BEAUTIFUL.

Between Thirtieth and Thirty-first streets one of the lead horses in the fourth section of Battery B, commanded by Sergeant Cloyse Jones, fell and was injured. The team was taken out and this portion of the battery proceeded with only one team. This caused but a slight delay. Just this side of the cemetery the battery dropped out and returned to the city. The mounted police, however, commanded by Chief Frank F. Snow, acted as convoy throughout the entire procession to the cemetery.

Following the hearse was the most beautiful floral piece ever seen here. It was a remembrance from the city, and represented a white column ten feet high. It was composed of 3,000 white carnations. At the top of the column was a white dove with spread wings. A wreath of American beauty roses and lilies of the valley wounded about the column of the base, which was embedded in autumn leaves. The leaves were gathered in Swope park. "Kansas City Mourns" was the inscription on the column.

Covering the foot of the casket was the Swope family piece, composed of roses and lilies of the valley. A basket of lilies of the valley was sent by the Yale alumni of Kansas City, of which Colonel Swope was a member. Flowers sent by local organizations and friends of the family completely covered the massive state casket.

The sky began to cloud just before the head of the line left city hall, and it passed through a slight shower before reaching the library. After that the sun came out and it appeared as if the rain had passed over. After the services at Grace church, however, the clouds again formed and while the procession was passing the uniformed bodies, standing in line on Grand avenue and Twentieth street, there came the first hard shower. this lasted but a few minutes, and there was a lull until the cemetery was reached, when a downpour started. This continued until the services at the vault were concluded.

PALLBEARERS.

Active pallbearers -- Mayor Crittenden, R. L. Gregory, president upper house; F. J. Shinnick, speaker lower house, A. J. Dean, president of the park board; W. P. Motley, president of the hospital and health board; Frank S. Groves, president fire and water board; William Volker, president pardon and parole board; John T. Harding, city counselor; John C. Paxton, S. W. Spangler.

Honorary pallbearers -- C. O. Tichenor, J.V. C. Karnes, William Warner, R. T. Van Horn, Adriance Van Brunt, Honorable Herbert S. Hadley, D. J. Haff, William Barton, J. C. James, Leon Smith, E. L. Scarritt, R. W. Hocker, R. E. O'Malley, J. C. Wirthman, James Pendergast, M. Cunningham, M. J. O'Hearn, E. E. Morris, R. A. Long, George M. Myers, F. C. Crowell, Wallace Love, W. S. Dickey, J. F. Downing, E. F. Swinney, H. C. Flower, Llewellyn Jones, George W. Fuller, Charles Campbell, W. S. Woods, Ralph Swofford, J. H. Slover, O. H. Dean, James A. Reed, Jay H. Neff, H. M. Beardsley, W. S. Cowherd, George M. Shelley, Lee J. Talbott, J. J. Davenport, R. J. Ingraham, J. W. Wagner, James Gibson,E. R. Crutcher, Cusil Lechtman, Bernard Corrigan, C. F. Morse, L. M. Jones, George H. Edwards, J. H. Hawthorne, J. C. Ford, Rev. Father W. J. Dalton, Homer Reed and John C. Gage.

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