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February 11, 1910

CIRCUS PARADE TOMORROW.

The Rhoda Royal to Pass Through
the Streets in the Afternoon.

A street parade, in which will be seen the entire ensemble of the Rhoda Royal two-ring circus hippodrome and wild west, which opens in Convention hall next Monday night under the auspices of Ararat Temple, will take place tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. The pageant, which will form at Convention hall at this hour, will make a tour of the principal downtown streets, returning to Convention hall within the course of two hours. Rhoda Royal and his entire coterie of circus celebrities will appear, and in addition the Shriners themselves will be seen in circus raiment for the first time in their lives. Besides taking part in this parade the Shriners will take no further part in the series of mid-winter performances other than assist in counting the profits derived from the engagement.

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January 11, 1910

HADLEY ADDRESSES K. OF P.'S.

Local Lodges Will Celebrate Fortieth
Anniversary May 5.

Governor Herbert S. Hadley was the principal speaker at the special meeting of the Knights of Pythias in their hall at 1330 Grand avenue last night. The occasion was the merger of Brooklyn Lodge No. 118 with Lodge No. 1 of this city, and over 500 Pythians attended. Senator Solon Gilmore, ex-senator A. L. Cooper and Joseph Hawthorne also gave brief addresses.

Prior to the speaking plans were discussed for the big celebration of the fortieth anniversary of the local lodge to take place May 5, in Convention hall, where it is estimated that at least 20,000 members under the password will assemble in secret session. This will be one of the most brilliant Pythian functions ever attempted in the United States.

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December 24, 1909

MAYOR'S CHRISTMAS
TREE IS ALL READY.

CANDY AND TOYS FOR THOU-
SANDS OF CHILDREN.

Convention Hall Doors Will Swing
Open at 1 o'clock Today to
Admit the Eager
Youngsters.

Nimble fingers, hastened and made dexterous by kind hearts, effected a transformation in Convention hall yesterday, and today the great auditorium is a Santa Claus land for the poor children of Kansas City. At 1 o'clock this afternoon the doors of the hall will swing open for the mayor's Christmas tree, and at 2:30 they will close, while Santa Claus distributes Christmas presents to at least 7,000 little boys and girls who, by force of circumstances, might otherwise have had no Christmas.

Notwithstanding unceasing efforts, the committees of the Mayor's Christmas Tree Association have been unable to locate all the poor children in the city to give them the tickets which are necessary to entitle them to gifts, and these children who have been overlooked are asked to apply at Convention hall this morning from 8 o'clock until noon. Tickets will be supplied these children any time between those hours.

The Fraternal Order of Moose caught the Christmas spirit in earnest yesterday and notified the Mayor's Christmas Tree Association that it would have twenty-five wagon loads of coal at Convention hall at noon today for distribution among poor families. Each wagon will contain two tons of coal.

WORKED ALL DAY.

Poor families who need fuel are requested to notify the mayor's office by 'phone or in person up to 11 o'clock this morning. These cases will be investigated and if the applicants be found worthy the coal will be delivered at their homes at noon. The offer from the Order of Moose was made by W. A. McGowan, secretary of the local lodge.

That the Convention hall association is heart and soul in the Christmas tree project was shown when Manager Louis W. Shouse and the directors placed the whole Convention hall force at the disposal of the Christmas Tree Association. As soon as the railroad ball was over Wednesday night, Manager Shouse put a force of men to work taking up the dance floor and before 6 o'clock yesterday morning the building was ready for the decorating committees of the Christmas tree.

Steve Sedweek was the first of the association workers to appear on the scene. He arrived at 6 o'clock and within a short time a large force was at work, setting up the Christmas trees, decorating them and packing the gifts into sacks ready for distribution. The committees worked all day and this morning they will have the hall ready for the great event.

That the people of Kansas City may inspect the work of the "best fellows" a general invitation is extended to any who care to do so to stop into the hall during the morning hours, up to noon today.

THE GIFTS IN SACKS.

Among the busy people at the hall yesterday were Captain John F. Pelletier, A. E. Hutchings, Steve Sedweek, Captain W. A. O'Leary, Hank C. Mank, the Rev. Thomas Watts, Gus Zorn and a Mr. Bennett of Wichita, who is here to gain ideas for a similar event to be inaugurated in his city next year.

Among the most valued workers were the members of the committee of twenty. Their duties consisted of the packing and arranging of the gifts in sacks. They worked from early morning till late at night and ate luncheon and dinner in the hall. Mayor T. T. Crittenden was present at the luncheon and sat at the head of the table, commending the women for their work.

The workers were assisted by seven men from No. 6 hook and ladder company, Thirty-first and Holmes, detailed for the duty by Fire Chief John C. Egner. Chief Egner had intended detailing twenty men, but the fire in the Rialto building made it impossible for him to do so.

The giant Christmas trees, which will be among the objects of chief interest to the children, were decorated in magnificent fashion by the employes of the Kansas City Electric Light Company and the Webb-Freyschlag Mercantile Company.

The presents for the children will be arranged in sacks bearing the inscription, "Mayor's Christmas Tree, 1909." The sacks for the boys will be placed on the east side of the arena and those of the girls on the west side. The sacks for children up to 8 years of age are printed in blue and those of children from 8 to 12 are printed in red.

Each child will receive two suitable toys and candy, nuts and fruit, all arranged in Christmas style.

A CLOWN BAND, TOO.

The programme for the mayor's Christmas tree will be a simple one. The doors will open at 1 o'clock, when the children can come in to feast their eyes upon the great Christmas trees and enjoy a fine musical entertainment. The doors will close at 2:30, so that it will be necessary for the tots to be in the hall by that time.

Preceding the distribution of the presents, the Eagles' clown band will give a dress concert on the arena and a large electrical organ will also furnish music. Old Santa Claus, who, it is said, resembles very much in appearance Captain John F. Pelletier, will be present and he will have six assistants with him to mingle among the children. At 2:30 o'clock Santa will introduce Mayor T. T. Crittenden, who will make a short talk, and the presents will then be distributed.

"We have plenty of funds and plenty of gifts for all the city's poor children," said A. E. Hutchings, "and if they do not come and get their share it will not be the fault of the committees, which have labored incessantly to get in touch with every child entitled to the pleasures of the tree."

Although it was announced that no more funds were needed, and that no further cash donations would be received, the financial committee of the association was forced to decline donations yesterday to the amount of several hundred dollars.

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December 21, 1909

ZOO AT LAST HAS OCCUPANTS.

Gus Pearson's Four Lions Transferred
to Swope Park Yesterday.

The four lions that are to form the nucleus for Kansas City's zoo at Swope park were yesterday transferred to the building from the barn they have been kept in at Dodson. Two buffalo, male and female, presented to the park board by A. Weber, arrived from Kansas last night. They will be exhibited for a few days at the store by Mr. Weber on Walnut street, after which they will be sent to the zoo buildings. C. W. Armour has presented several deer and the Elks several elks, but before they can be shipped from the West to Kansas City a permit will have to be secured from the state game warden.

"After we get all the animals and birds together we will have a pretty fair collection," said Gus Pearson, city comptroller and father of the zoo, last night. "Beside the lions and the buffalo, we have three monkeys, a badger, a wildcat and several smaller birds and animals."

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December 18, 1909

CLOWN BAND AND
ORGAN FOR CHILDREN.

LOTS OF MUSIC AND FUN AT
MAYOR'S CHRISTMAS TREE.

A. Judah, Manager of the Grand,
Has a Surprise in Store and It
May Be City's Poor Good Boys
and Girls Will See Theater.

A mammoth organ is to be installed in Convention hall to furnish music for the thousands of little children who will be given presents from the mayor's Christmas tree. The Clown band of the Eagles also will furnish instrumental cheer. The musicians will be dressed in grotesque costumes. A. Judah, manager of the Grand, also has a surprise in the amusement line in store for the tots, and he might repeat this year his generosity of last year by inviting the children who seldom see the inside of a place of amusement to his theater for a performance and a liberal candy distribution.

"I'm always the happiest when I am doing something for girls and boys that the sun of plenty does not shine upon," said Mr. Judah at yesterday's meeting of the Mayor's Christmas Tree Association. Then he chipped in $25 to the fund, which has now reached the encouraging sum of $3,124.10.

"We'll double that amount when we hear from the people we have asked subscriptions from," declared A. E. Hutchings, who, with other warm-hearted and self-sacrificing men and women, are giving their time and means to provide Christmas cheer and joy for the thousands of poor children in Kansas City. And these faithful workers are going right ahead with their commendable work, regardless of envious and malicious ones who belittle the association by referring to it as the "Public Tree."

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December 10, 1909

HUNDREDS AT SCENE
OF ROSEDALE KILLING.

DEPUTY'S MURDERER HAD BEEN
DRINKING AND DANGEROUS.

Compelled Two Men at Point of Re-
volver to Imbibe, Then Carry
Suit Case of Ammunition --
No Funeral Arrangements.

Hundreds of persons yesterday afternoon in Rosedale went over the route of the running fight of Wednesday night which resulted in the murder of C. Q. Lukens, a Wyandotte county deputy sheriff, and the subsequent killing of Charles T. Galloway, the slayer. The home of M. E. Patterson, 3129 Bell street, Kansas City, Mo., where the besieged man was finally captured after a desperate battle with Missouri and Kansas officers, came in for a good share of attention.

In the investigation yesterday circumstances came to light which, had they been known at the time by Lukens, probably would have prevented the double killing. From many sources it was found that Galloway had been drinking heavily preceding the shooting, and was in a dangerous mood during the day. He had made numerous attempts to find his wife, Mrs. Anna Galloway, with the avowed intention of taking her life. At the point of a revolver he forced W. E. Tompkins and James Creason to drink with him and later to assist in carrying a suitcase full of ammunition.

ENTERED THE LAWYER'S HOME.

About 6 o'clock Wednesday morning he entered the home of Rush L. Fisette, the attorney who had brought divorce proceedings on behalf of Mrs. Galloway. the half crazed man insisted on searching every room in the house in the hopes of finding his wife. He left without causing any trouble, but with threats that he would kill his wife. It was Mr. Fisette who notified the sheriff's office in Kansas City, Kas.

Mrs. Galloway was prostrated yesterday by the events of the night before. The story of her fourteen years of married life included threats by her husband, who beat her and drove her from the house. Always following a hard drinking spell the man became half crazed and in this condition seized a gun or any weapon and attacked his wife. At other times he spoke in the most endearing terms to her. Mrs. Galloway remained yesterday at the home of her sister, Mrs. James L. Connor, 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale.

LUKENS WELL LIKED.

In Kansas City, Kas., and Argentine, where Lukens had been known for years, the man was respected and liked. At the home of his widowed mother in Argentine the aged woman refused to be comforted.

The body of Lukens had been removed to Simmons's undertaking rooms in Argentine. Funeral arrangements have not been completed. Charles Quincy Lukens was a member of the Brother hood of Railway Trainmen in Argentine and also was a member of Aerie No. 87, Fraternal Order of Eagles, in Kansas City, Kas.

POST-MORTEM EXAMINATION.

A post-mortem examination of the body of Galloway, conducted by Coroner Harry Czarlinsky yesterday morning at the Carroll-Davidson undertaking rooms, showed that the bullet entered his right side and taking a downward course pierced the liver and passed out the left side. A coroner's inquest will be held at 10 o'clock Monday morning.

In a letter received by Inspector of Detectives Edward P. Boyle yesterday afternoon from Chief of Police Wiley W. Cook of Kansas City, Kas., the chief said:

"Especially do I wish to express my highest commendation of Detectives Ralph Truman and J. W. Wilkens, who at the risk of their lives led the attack that effected Galloway's capture."

WANTED HIM TO DRINK.

W. E. Tompkins, employed at the Gates undertaking establishment in Rosedale and who lives at 505 Southwest boulevard, Rosedale, said he was passing in front of Galloway's home at 428 College avenue shortly after noon on the day of the double tragedy when he was accosted by Galloway and told to hold up his hands. At the same time Galloway pointed two large revolvers in the face of Tompkins and told him to follow him into the house. Tompkins followed.

When they reached the inside of the house James Creason, an electrician who helped Galloway on electrical work, was sitting there. Galloway insisted that Tompkins take a drink from a large quart bottle of whisky.

FEARED FOR HIS LIFE.

"I finally talked him out of that," Tompkins said, "but during the two hours he kept Creason and me imprisoned in the house Galloway drank at least three-fourths of the quart of whisky. He sowed us a Winchester shotgun and a Winchester rifle and a suitcase full of ammunition. He said to us: 'Do you know what I am going to do with these,' and when we answered negatively he said he was going to 'raise hell tonight.'

"We pleaded with him to let us go, as I was afraid every minute that he would get wild and kill both of us. He finally agreed to let us go if we would carry the guns and ammunition down to Creason's home on Bell street. Creason led two bird dogs and carried the guns, and I carried a heavy coil wire belonging to Galloway, and the suit case fu ll of ammunition. My load got heavy, though, and I left all of the stuff at Young's store at College avenue and Oak street. Creason, I suppose, took his stuff on down to his place, and then Galloway came back up and got what I had left."

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November 29, 1909

FIRST MOOSE FUNERAL.

250 Members of Kansas City Lodge
Honor Departed Brother.

The Kansas City lodge of the Loyal Order of the Moose had its first funeral yesterday afternoon, when it buried in Mount St. Mary's cemetery, Charles Burns, a contracting carpenter of 1316 Walnut street, who died in St. Mary's hospital last Tuesday. Mr. Burns was a charter member of the local order and the first of nearly 1,000 Kansas City Moose to die. Local lodge officials tried for several days to locate relatives of Burns in the East but without success.

Yesterday's funeral procession included 250 members of the order. It was headed by a brass band and started from the Moose club rooms, at Twelfth and Central streets. From there the cortege moved to the Cathedral, where the Catholic ceremonies were held, Father Lyons preaching the sermon.

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November 17, 1909

BODY ON STOVE EIGHT HOURS.

Stone Mason Found Dead Where He
Had Prepared to Cook Noon Meal.

Peter Gilberg, a stone mason, was found dead in his home, 815 East Twenty-second street at 8 o'clock last night by Matt Gleason, proprietor of a saloon at 921 East Twenty-first street, who sent Gilberg home ill yesterday morning. Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, deputy coroner, found that a hemorrhage killed Gilberg.

Gilberg lived alone. He evidently was preparing to cook his noon day meal when he was stricken as uncooked fish and some potatoes were on the kitchen table. One side of the body was cooked from the heat of the gas stove, which had been burning for probably eight hours.

Mr. Gilberg was a member of the Woodmen of the World and carried $1,000 insurance. The secretary of the lodge was called last night but was unable to tell who the insurance was made out to. Mr. Gleason's niece was married about two months ago to a union tailor but whose name was unknown to the uncle. The niece was married in Westport. The body was taken to the Wagner undertaking rooms, Fourteenth street and Grand avenue.

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November 6, 1909

'RED MILL' KIDDIES 'STOLEN.'

Loaded Into Auto and Taken to Ban-
quet at the Elks' Club.

When the "Red Mill" company, which is to play at the Grand next week, came through Kansas City on its way to Leavenworth at 9 o'clock yesterday morning, seven of its members, consisting of the six children who appear as the Dutch kiddies and Jocko, the monkey, who has a place on the programme, were kidnaped for a few hours, loaded into the automobile of City Treasurer William Baehr, which was in waiting, and transported to the Elks' Club. There a breakfast was served, a separate table being provided for the monk. After breakfast the little show folk were shown the sights of the city.

The "Red Mill" company played at the Soldiers' home last night and the kiddies were there in time for the performance. The feature of their day's outing was a ride to Leavenworth in the motor car.

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October 12, 1909

JANITOR WORRY KILLS HIM.

Real Estate Man Falls Dead Upon
Inspecting Apartment House
Employes Had Neglected.

Heart disease made acute by worry over the janitor service in an apartment house on West Thirty-fourth street, for which he was the agent, is said to have caused the death of Dr. Ammon Kuns, a real estate man of 805 East Fourteenth street, who expired suddenly in front of the apartments at 6 o'clock last night.

Dr. Kuns, who seven years ago retired from dentistry in order to handle realty, had been suffering from pulmonary trouble for more than a year. He left his home yesterday morning in good spirit and apparently in excellent health, remarking to his wife that he would go to the flat on Thirty-fourth street before supper and see about hiring a new janitor.

"Everyone leaves the rooms in a worse condition than the last," he said. "It is about the only worry I have."

Mrs. Kuns said last night that she had learned that conditions at the apartments were not even as good as her husband had expected when he arrived there. She believed that his dismay at finding that some of his instructions had been neglected caused the undue excitement that hastened his end.

Mr. Kuns was 57 years old. He was born in Illinois, went to Jewell City, Kas., 27 years ago to practice dentistry, and lived there continuously up to seven years ago when he moved to Los Angeles, Cal. Four years ago he came to Kansas City.

Besides the widow, he is survived by four daughters, Mrs. Stella Mayhue, San Francisco; Mrs. Theodore Conley, Los Angeles; Mrs. O. E. White, of Jewell City, and Miss Helen, living at the home.

Kuns was a member of the Odd Fellows, Masonic and Woodmen of the World, local lodges. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky ordered the body sent to the Wagner undertaking rooms.

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October 9, 1909

SWOPE LAID TO REST
WHILE CITY MOURNS.

THOUSANDS BRAVE RAIN TO
VIEW FUNERAL CORTEGE.

Procession Longest Ever Seen in
Kansas City -- Casket Temporari-
ly Placed in Vault at
Forest Hill.

Thomas Hunton Swope, for fifty-two years a resident of Kansas City, and its greatest benefactor, was laid to rest late yesterday afternoon in a vault in Forest Hill cemetery.

Following his request only the Episcopal service for the dead was said. It is the same service which has been said in that church for 500 years, and is used for the burial of both great and lowly, rich and poor.

There was no oratory, no eulogy. The service reminded many of the life of the man for whom it was said -- simple, quiet, impressive.

At Grace Episcopal church, Thirteenth and Washington streets, Bishop E. R. Atwill officiated, assisted by Rev. J. A. Schaad, the rector, and his assistant, Rev. E. B. Woodruff.

As the funeral cortege entered the edifice it was headed by the bishop, who repeated a portion of the service as he walked down the aisle. Chaplin Woodruff bore the staff. Following came the immediate family.

Stuart Fleming, a nephew from colonel Swope's old home in Kentucky, was with Mrs. Logan Swope, a sister-in-law of the dead philanthropist. Then came Dr. B. C. Hyde and wife, a niece of Colonel Swope's and all of the relatives from Independence.

The entire center of the church was reserved for the pallbearers, honorary pallbearers and civic bodies and commercial and fraternal organizations.


SERVICE IS SIMPLE.

Bishop Atwill read the service at the church, and the Rev. Mr. Schaad read the lesson. Mr. Frank B. Fisk presided at the organ and rendered a dirge as the body was carried into the church. Mrs. Darnell, contralto, sang "One Sweetly Solemn Thought." Then a hymn, "O Paradise, O Paradise," was sung by the choir, the audience assisting. At the close of the church service the choir rendered the anthem, "I'm a Pilgrim and a Stranger."

During the service at the church the creed was said, and the Lord's Prayer repeated.

It was 3:30 before the cortage reached the church and after 4 o'clock before it got under way, leaving. When it reached the vault in Forest Hill cemetery it was almost dark and raining hard. Here the services were just as simple as at the church. Bishop Atwill read the committal service and Rev. Mr. Schaad the lesson.

The casket was placed in a large vault, made especially for its reception, and sealed. There it will remain until some future date when it will be removed to its final resting place in Swope park, beneath a monument erected by the people of Kansas city.


AN HOUR IN PASSING.

The funeral cortege was the largest ever seen in Kansas City. Besides the military, civic, commercial and fraternal organizations in line, there were seventy-five carriages, not counting the private vehicles. It took over an hour to pass a given point.

It was nearly 2 o'clock before the mounted police, followed by the Third Regiment band at the head of the regiment, started south on Walnut street from the city hall. Then, in order, came police and firemen on foot, Battery B and band, Uniform Rank, K. of P., Modern Woodmen, Turner society, Elks lodge, park board employes, lodge of Eagles, United Confederate Veterans, labor organizations, Board of Trade and Commercial Club and city officials in carriages. The active and honorary pallbearers preceded the immediate family and citizens in carriages.

As the procession left the public library where Colonel Swope's body has been in state since Thursday morning it passed through a double line of school children, each a "part owner" in the beautiful park which he gave the city. They stood uncovered, their hats and caps over their hears, all the long time the cortege was passing. Children lined both sides of the street all the way down Ninth street to Grand avenue and to Tenth street on Grand.

After the procession had crossed Main street it passed through another double line of children formed on Eleventh street from Baltimore avenue to Broadway, and down Broadway to Thirteenth street. Here again every boy stood uncovered, at attention, while the cortege was passing.


THOUSANDS VIEW PROCESSION.

It has been estimated that between 10,000 and 15,000 school children were out. Besides the children, the streets were packed with people along thee entire line of march as far out as Twentieth street and Grand avenue. The windows in every building also were filled with people all the way through the main portion of the city and spectators filled the verandas and windows of every home passed by the cortege entirely to the cemetery. Possibly no fewer than 100,000 people saw the procession.

When Twentieth and Grand was reached all of those in the parade on foot dropped out, the distance to the cemetery being too far for them to walk. At this point the Third regiment, the Uniformed Rank, K. of P., the Modern Woodmen of America, police and firemen were formed in company front along the west side of Grand avenue. It made a solid line of uniformed men for two blocks.

It was intended from this point for the procession to make better time, but the rain had rendered Gillham road very slippery and the procession to make better time, but the rain had rendered Gillham road very slippery and the procession got beyond Thirty-first street on Gillham road before it left a walk.


FLORAL GIFTS BEAUTIFUL.

Between Thirtieth and Thirty-first streets one of the lead horses in the fourth section of Battery B, commanded by Sergeant Cloyse Jones, fell and was injured. The team was taken out and this portion of the battery proceeded with only one team. This caused but a slight delay. Just this side of the cemetery the battery dropped out and returned to the city. The mounted police, however, commanded by Chief Frank F. Snow, acted as convoy throughout the entire procession to the cemetery.

Following the hearse was the most beautiful floral piece ever seen here. It was a remembrance from the city, and represented a white column ten feet high. It was composed of 3,000 white carnations. At the top of the column was a white dove with spread wings. A wreath of American beauty roses and lilies of the valley wounded about the column of the base, which was embedded in autumn leaves. The leaves were gathered in Swope park. "Kansas City Mourns" was the inscription on the column.

Covering the foot of the casket was the Swope family piece, composed of roses and lilies of the valley. A basket of lilies of the valley was sent by the Yale alumni of Kansas City, of which Colonel Swope was a member. Flowers sent by local organizations and friends of the family completely covered the massive state casket.

The sky began to cloud just before the head of the line left city hall, and it passed through a slight shower before reaching the library. After that the sun came out and it appeared as if the rain had passed over. After the services at Grace church, however, the clouds again formed and while the procession was passing the uniformed bodies, standing in line on Grand avenue and Twentieth street, there came the first hard shower. this lasted but a few minutes, and there was a lull until the cemetery was reached, when a downpour started. This continued until the services at the vault were concluded.

PALLBEARERS.

Active pallbearers -- Mayor Crittenden, R. L. Gregory, president upper house; F. J. Shinnick, speaker lower house, A. J. Dean, president of the park board; W. P. Motley, president of the hospital and health board; Frank S. Groves, president fire and water board; William Volker, president pardon and parole board; John T. Harding, city counselor; John C. Paxton, S. W. Spangler.

Honorary pallbearers -- C. O. Tichenor, J.V. C. Karnes, William Warner, R. T. Van Horn, Adriance Van Brunt, Honorable Herbert S. Hadley, D. J. Haff, William Barton, J. C. James, Leon Smith, E. L. Scarritt, R. W. Hocker, R. E. O'Malley, J. C. Wirthman, James Pendergast, M. Cunningham, M. J. O'Hearn, E. E. Morris, R. A. Long, George M. Myers, F. C. Crowell, Wallace Love, W. S. Dickey, J. F. Downing, E. F. Swinney, H. C. Flower, Llewellyn Jones, George W. Fuller, Charles Campbell, W. S. Woods, Ralph Swofford, J. H. Slover, O. H. Dean, James A. Reed, Jay H. Neff, H. M. Beardsley, W. S. Cowherd, George M. Shelley, Lee J. Talbott, J. J. Davenport, R. J. Ingraham, J. W. Wagner, James Gibson,E. R. Crutcher, Cusil Lechtman, Bernard Corrigan, C. F. Morse, L. M. Jones, George H. Edwards, J. H. Hawthorne, J. C. Ford, Rev. Father W. J. Dalton, Homer Reed and John C. Gage.

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August 28, 1909

HALTED A NEGRO PARADE.

Laundry Wagon Driver Was Rough-
ly Handled by Negroes.

During the parade of the negro Knights of Pythias yesterday morning at Twelfth and Central streets a small race riot took place when W. S. Jarboe, a driver for the Fern Laundry Company, accompanied by his wife, tried to drive his wagon in the direction that the procession was marching. His horse was seized by several negroes and others drew the wagon to one side. The excitement subsided of its own accord before the arrival of police from headquarters. Sergeant Robert Smith, in command of the squad, decided that the trouble had been magnified and returned to the station without making any arrests.

After the trouble had subsided and the parade had passed, Jarboe and his wife drove to police headquarters and made a complaint to Daniel V. Howell, assistant city attorney. A warrant was issued for the arrest of George Thompson, a negro lawyer who was leading the parade, and who first seized the horse which Jarboe was driving. The warrant was served last night and the case will be tried in the municipal court this morning.

"I'm not injured -- except my feelings," said Mrs. Jarboe, as she told her trouble to Attorney Howell.

Spectators, both whites and negroes, agree that Jarboe used considerable indiscretion in trying to drive his horse up the line of the parade. Even after the police had arrived and the horse had been rehitched to the wagon, Jarboe had to be restrained from whipping his horse into the mob of persons that were lined along the curbing.

There was very little excitement, considering that it was purely a racial affair, and the parade did not stop. There was no interference on the part of the "armed knights." Mrs. Jarboe was not injured, aside from her feelings, as she admitted to Mr. Howell.

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August 24, 1909

WITH 5,000 NEGRO DELEGATES.

SUPREME LODGE WILL OPEN
THIS MORNING.

Every State in Union Wil Be Rep-
resented on Roll Call -- Recep-
tion at Second Bap-
tist Church.

With a delegation of 5,000 negro men and women from every state in the Union, the supreme lodge of negro Knights of Pythias opens this morning in Ivanhoe hall, Nineteenth street and Tracy avenue, and continues until Friday night. It is the largest gathering of its kind ever held in Kansas City. Among the delegates are doctors, lawyers, bankers, merchants, clerks, porters, barbers, teachers, editors, farmers and every other profession, trade and business followed by negroes.

A reception was held last night at the Second Baptist church, Tenth and Charlotte streets. Grand Chancellor A. W. Lloyd of St. Louis presided and music was furnished by the choir of the Second Baptist church.

Nelson C. Crews, chairman of the local committee, made an address of welcome.

A solo by Miss Ennis Collins followed.

Welcome to the state was extended by Professor W. W. Yates, who represented Governor Hadley. His address was short and cordial. A selection by the Calanthian choir then followed.

S. W. Green of New Orleans, supreme chancellor, responded to this address.

S. C. Woodson represented Mayor Crittenden in an address of welcome.

There was a solo by Wiliam J. Tompkins and a selection by the choir, "The Heavens Are Telling." Other addresses were made by Prof. J. R. Jefferson of West Virginia; Dr. J. E. Perry, E. D. Green, of Chicago; Dr. W. P. Curtiss, St. Louis; Dr. J. A. Ward, Indianapolis; Mrs. Janie C. Combs and A. J. Hazelwood.

The Supreme Court of Calanthe will be presided over by John W. Strauther of Greenville, Miss. The session will be held at the Hodcarrier's hall. In this meeting every phase of the negro's home life will be discussed. Strauther is one of the most noted men of his race in the country.

At 2 o'clock this afternoon a band concert will be given at Cap Carrouthers by the Bixton, Ia., band, and dress parade at 5:30 p. m. by the entire uniform ranks.

Rev. B. Hillman of Terra Haute, Ind., made the opening prayer last night.

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July 17, 1909

THEIR NEW HOME IS OPENED.

Knights of Columbus Hold House-
warming at 3200 Main Street.

More than 500 guests were present at the opening of the new home of the Knights of Columbus, 3200 Main street, last night. The big stone house which the order has recently acquired was thrown open from attic to basement. A musical programme was rendered.

The building was purchased last fall from H. C. Flower. It had been his home until that time. The house is of stone, and contains twenty-two rooms. The Knights of Columbus paid $22,500 for the place. The house has been redecorated. It is planned to build an addition to cost $25,000, for a lodge hall and a gymnasium.

The local order has over 500 active members. Joseph C. Jordan is the grand knight.

At the reception last night, which was informal, only the knights and their ladies were invited. The lodge members were assisted in entertaining by the following:

Charles O'Lauglin, Misses May and Frances Kelly, Roderick and John McQueeny, Louis Schnier, J. D. Barker, Frances Welch, Miss May Brangan and J. Donelly.

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July 16, 1909

FINISHING SWOPE PARK ZOO.

Building Probably Will Be Turned
Over to City August 1.

The zoo buildings at Swope park are receiving the finishing touches, and it was said yesterday at the offices of the park board that in all probability they will be turned over by the contractors August 1.

"A large force of men is now busy grading the approaches to the buildings," said W. H. Dunn, general superintendent, "and this work should be completed by the time the contractors are ready to turn over the buildings. We are daily in receipt of offers of animals for the exhibits, but as yet have been unable to accept them on account of there being no provision for their care."

An important matter in connection with the zoo is the appointment of a head keeper and assistants. These positions, to a great extent, will have to be filled by men who are experienced in the care and treatment of the animals that will comprise the collection. So far as known the park board has not considered any applications for these positions.

Gus Pearson, city comptroller, and one of the moving figures in the zoological society says that just as soon as the buildings are made ready for the reception of them, he has promises of elk from the Elks' lodge, a big eagle from the Eagles' lodge, a camel from the Shriners and lions and other animals of the jungle from private contributors.

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July 4, 1909

NEGRO CEMETERY CHAPEL.

Cornerstone Will Be Laid at High-
land Today.

The cornerstone of the new chapel in Highland cemetery, a burying ground for negroes at Twentieth street and Blue Ridge boulevard, will be laid this afternoon at 3 o'clock. M. O. Ricketts of St. Joseph, grand master of the negro Masons of Missouri, will be in charge of the services. The building committee is composed of: C. H. Countee, Dr. J. E. Perry, A. T. Moore, L. A. Knox, T. W. H. Williams and T. C. Unthank.

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June 24, 1909

WANT A MILE OF QUARTERS.

Masons Solicit for New Home.

A unique collection ins being made by Mason just now, who have set about raising funds for building and furnishing a new temple at Ninth and Harrison streets.

Strips of perforated card have been sent to the places of business of all members, on which are places for twelve coins, and printed on them the legend: "We Want One Mile of Quarters."

There are places for twelve silver quarters on each one foot strip. when the mile of quarters is measured up it will be found to contain $15,840.

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June 22, 1909

MAJOR J. M. HADLEY IS DEAD.

Father of Missouri Governor Long
a Prominent Citizen of John-
son County, Kas.

DE SOTO, KAS., June 21. -- Major John M. Hadley, father of Governor H. S. Hadley of Missouri, died here at 2:35 o'clock this afternoon from the effects of a stroke of apoplexy which he suffered June 9. For several days he had lain in an unconscious condition, and the end came quietly. His son and daughter, Mrs. J. W. Lyman, came yesterday and were with their father to last night.

The funeral services, conducted by Rev. W. J. Mitchell, pastor of the M. E. church at this place, an old soldier and personal friend, will be held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Snyder at 1:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, after which the body will be taken to Olathe and interment made in the family lot.

The active pallbearers here will be Dr. W. M. Marcks, B. S. Taylor, C. S. Becroft, Zimri Gardner, C. K. Dow and B. F. Snyder. At Olathe they will be chosen from the Masonic lodge.

The G. A. R. and the Masonic orders, both of which Major Hadley was an active member, will have charge of the services at Olathe. The honorary pallbearers at Olathe will be Colonel Conover of Kansas City, Major I. O. Pickering, Colonel J. T. Burris, J. T. Little of Olathe, Frank R. Obb and William Pellet of Olathe, all of whom have been personal friends.

The governor reached Kansas City from the capital on a special train Sunday, after receiving word of the critical condition of his father. He was met at the station by a motor car, and made the remainder of the trip to De Soto overland, arriving at the bedside of his father at 1:30 Sunday afternoon.

The elder Hadley was one of the most prominent citizens of De Soto, president of the De Soto State Bank., and connected with many of the institutions of Johnson county, of which he was a pioneer resident.

Major Hadley located at Shawnee Mission in 1855. In October, 1861, he enlisted in the Eighth Kansas Infantry, being rapidly promoted to the rank of second lieutenant, in which capacity he served for fifteen months.

He was later made lieutenant and then captain of the Ninth Kansas Cavalry, and in May, 1865, was promoted to the rank of major, which title clung to him until death. At the close of the war Major Hadley was elected sheriff of Johnson county and served until 1870, when he was made clerk of the district court. He was also head of the extensive flouring mills at De Soto. In 1877 Major Hadley represented his district in the state assembly as senator, being re-elected in 1879.

He was one of the largest land owners in Johnson county. Mrs. Hadley died in 1875.

EXECUTIVE OFFICES CLOSED.

JEFFERSON CITY, MO., June 21. -- Acting Governor Humphreys said tonight that as a mark of respect to the governor whose father, Major John M. Hadley, died at De Soto, Kas., this afternoon, the governor's office and those departments in the state house grounds which come under the appointment of the governor would be closed tomorrow. This, he said, was as far as he would go, and that he was governed by the governor's wish in the matter, having talked with him by telephone.

No formal proclamation will be issued, however, as Major Hadley was not a resident of the state.

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May 31, 1909

MEMORIAL DAY PLEASURE
SEEKER CALLED TRAITOR.

Person Who Attends Ball Game Then
Should Be Branded, Says
Rev. James Schindel.

"Tomorrow will be Memorial day, a holy day, not a holiday. If it were in my power I would gather every man in Kansas city who goes to a baseball game or other amusement on that day, into some public concourse and brand him as a traitor."

With these words the Rev. James C. Schindel, pastor of the First English Lutheran church, last night denounced everything that would tend to desecrate the day when America pays grateful tribute to her soldier dead. At nearly all of the churches yesterday, mention was made of the day.

Various G. A. R. posts of Kansas City will visit the cemeteries today and decorate the graves of the fallen and at Independence the Pythians will remember their departed members.

Mr. Schindel's sermon was to members of the Grand Army of the Republic, Women's Relief Corps, Confederate Veterans Army of the Philippines, Ladies' Auxiliary, Society of the Porto Rican Expedition, United Spanish war veterans, the Third Regiment of the Missouri national guard and the Lincoln circle of the G. A. R. The church was crowded.

When Mr. Schindel made his denunciation of persons who seek amusement on such an occasion as Memorial day, the veterans could not withhold suppressed applause.

Paul's words: "I have fought a good fight," furnished the pastor his text.

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May 25, 1909

READY IN SIXTY DAYS.

Work Being Rushed on Zoo Build-
ings at Swope Park.

Work is being pushed with vigor on the completion of the zoo buildings at Swope park. It is thought they will be far enough advanced within the next sixty days to admit of the reception of several fine specimens of animals, of which donations have been promised. C. W. Armour will contribute five buffaloes, the Elks' lodge three elks, the Shriners two camels and Emery, Bird, Thayer Dry Goods Company a lion and a lioness.

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May 23, 1909

"OLD MEN'S QUARTETTE"
BROKEN AFTER 40 YEARS.

Death of F. M. Furgason Changes
Probably Oldest Musical Organ-
ization in the City.

A new "Old Men's Quartette" will have to be organized after nearly forty years' association. When the body of the late F. M. Furgason was buried last Thursday the quartette became a trio. The G. A. R. quartette, over thirty years in commission, has just taken in a new member. The double bass singer, C. W. Whitehead, died within the year, and the famous old organization recruited Comrade Edwin Walters.

It is not often that one city can boast two quartettes, in which all the members have pulled together so long. The old soldiers were young soldiers when C. W. Whitehead, W. F. Henry, E. J. McWain and O. H. Guffin organized to sing "Tenting the Old Camp Ground," and the other army songs, and this was not much of a burg when Professor F. M. Furgason of the Franklin school, E. R. Weeks, one of his pupils, A. Holland, the shoe man, and H. J. Boyce, with C. W. Whitehead as a substitute, organized a quartette of their own. For thirty years the Whitehead-Henry-McWain-Guffin party sang at the grand army celebrations, and it looks like quartette singing was good health exercise, for Mr. Whitehead lived all these years, and his three companions are all hale and hearty, and actively in business. In the civilian quarters, Mr. Weeks, Mr. Holland and all but Mr. Furgason, who died this week, are all well.

"It seems strange that there should be any of us turn up missing," said Mr. Weeks yesterday. "We have been singing together such a long time that it does not seem natural that one of us would not be on hand for another 'sing' as we call it.

"I was only a boy, about 15, when Professor Furgason met me one day nearly forty years ago and told me he was getting up a quartette. We organized about 1870, and have pulled together ever since.

"Professor Furgason is the first to go of the regular quartette. He used to be our chorister at the Baptist church, Eighth and May, and a very good one. That was where we first started singing. We knew the G. A. R. quartette very well, for one of its members, Mr. Whitehead, used to fill out for us occasionally."

Ben Warner of the local grand army, had to think a long time before he could remember when the veterans started their quartette going.

"It has gone so long that I could not think of the posts without thinking of Charlie Whitehead and the other boys," he said. "Walters has taken Whitehead's place, so we are getting along, but it seems strange. Forty years rather makes a man accustomed to seeing a fellow, you know, and we never meet without we having our quartette along to furnish the singing."

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May 16, 1909

GOV. RIDDLE'S FUNERAL TODAY.

Body Passed Through Kansas City
Escorted by Delegation.

Escorted by the widow and a delegation of five men, representatives of five secret orders of which he was a member, the body of former Lieutenant Governor A. P. Riddle, editor of the Minneapolis Messenger, who was killed in an automobile accident near Salina, Kas., May 13, was taken through Kansas City last night on the way from Minneapolis to Girard, Kas. "Governor" Riddle, as he was known, was 63 years old.

It was while on a pleasure tour with four of his friends going form Minneapolis to Salina, Kas., that the accident which resulted fatally for Governor Riddle occurred. The car was running at high speed when they lost the main road and struck an obstacle, the editor being thrown from the machine to the ground, striking on his head and causing concussion of the brain which resulted in his death an hour later while being carried in the car to the nearest doctor. Those in the car at the time of the accident were John L. King, Samuel Kreager, Charles Thomas and Charles Richmond.

With the body last night were S. J. Agnew, representing the Elks; C. N. Miller, Knights of Pythias; John Hartley, Sons and Daughters of Justice; J. C. McCrum, Odd Fellows, and Dr. J. C. Brewer of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. All are from Minneapolis, Governor Riddle's home. The funeral will take place today at Girard.

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April 26, 1909

JUDGE M. A. PURSLEY DEAD.

End Came at Hot Springs, Where
He Went for Health.

Judge Marshall A. Pursley of Kansas City died in Hot Springs, Ark., Saturday night where he went in search of health ten days ago. The remains will be brought here for burial. Judge Pursley was born in Farmland, Ind., and was 45 years of age. He is a son-in-law of E. Stine and survived by a widow and two daughters, Helen and Emma, also two brothers and a sister. Judge Pursley came to Kansas City twenty-three years ago, and was prominent in politics. He was elected justice of the peace and for the past eight years was auditor of the Kansas City postoffice. He was a member of the board of directors of the Brotherhood of American Yeomen; judge advocate general of the Missouri Brigade Uniform Rank of Knights of Pythias, a member of No. 3, Uniform Rank Sicilian Lodge No. 39, Knights of Pythias; Albert Pyke Lodge, A. F. and A. M. Modern Woodmen, and Royal Neighbors. Arrangements for the funeral will be announced later.

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April 20, 1909

NEW HONOR FOR OSCAR SACHS.

Appointed Imperial German Con-
sular Representative for K. C.

The unprecedented growth of Kansas City has presumably been noticed by the German government and more direct commercial relations between Kansas City and Germany are desirable. Oscar Sachs was offered the post as representative of the Imperial German consular service and the office was readily accepted by him. Mr. Sachs came to Kansas city from Berlin in 1881 but never lost interest in his old fatherland. He has been for many years an officer of the Elks club, secretary and director of the German hospital since its foundation twenty-three years ago, a member of the City Club, secretary of the German-American Fraternal Alliance and member of other charitable institutions. Although he never held public office, he always took great interest in municipal and civic affairs.

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April 15, 1909

SPEAKER C. B. H AYES
DIES OF PNEUMONIA.

FATAL ILLNESS FOLLOWS COLD
CAUGHT ON CHICAGO TRIP.

Double Pneumonia Sets Up and End
Came in Less Than a Week.
Business and Public
Career.

After an illness of less than a week with double pneumonia, C. B. Hayes, speaker of the lower house of the city council, peacefully met death this morning at 1 o'clock in St. Joseph's hospital. Relatives were at the bedside.

Last Thursday morning Mr. Hayes sat on the board of equalization at its meeting. At noon he was taken ill and went home. By night he was confined to his bed and the next morning taken to St. Joseph's, where his condition as found to be critical and remained so up to the time of his death.

The pneumonia was complicated by an affect of the heart. Yesterday afternoon he began to sink rapidly and members of his family were sent for. They remained with him all night until the end came.

Last Sunday morning at the Church of the Annunciation Rev. Father William J. Dalton asked for the prayers of his congregation for the speedy recovery or happy death of the stricken councilman.

EXALTED RULER OF LOCAL ELKS.

Mr. Hayes was born in Chicago July 20, 1865, and had been a resident of Kansas City since September 1, 1896. At the last municipal election he was elected alderman of the Eighth ward on the Democratic ticket, and was later chosen speaker of the lower house of the council as a compliment from his associates in that branch of the council.

Two weeks ago he was chosen exalted ruler of the local lodge of Elks. He was a member of the Manufacturers and Merchants' Association, the Currant Club, Turners, Knife and Fork Club, Third regiment, and secretary of the Missouri River Wholesale Grocers' Association.

Prior to coming to Kansas City, Mr. Hayes had held important positions with the Bliss Syrup Refining Company of Chicago, and as an appreciation of his services the company made him manager of its Kansas City branch.

HAD NO TIME TO MARRY.

He held this position for five years, resigning to organize the C. B. Hayes Merchandise Brokerage Company, a commercial concern with headquarters in the West Bottoms. Mr. Hayes always took a lively interest in the upbuilding of Kansas City.

He was active in negotiations for the building of the Union passenger station and freight terminals. He was unmarried, saying that he could "never find time to marry."

Mr. Hayes was a member of the council committee considering the building of the Twelfth street west trafficway, and the foundation for his fatal illness was contracted in Chicago when eh went with the committee to inquire into the Chicago plan as applied to the street railway companies. He caught a severe cold on that trip.

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April 10, 1909

CHARLES C. YOST DIES
AFTER BRIEF ILLNESS.

FUNERAL SERVICES WILL BE
HELD SUNDAY AFTERNOON.

Was Prominent Politician and Busi-
ness Man and Member of Many
Orders -- Had Lived in Kansas
City Thirty-Seven Years.
Charles C. Yost, Dead at 47.
CHARLES C. YOST.

Charles C. Yost, prominent Republican politician and partner in the Smith-Yost Pie Company, died last night at his home, 3032 Park avenue, after an illness of a week. His trouble was inflammation of the brain.

Mr. Yost was born 47 years ago in Rochester, Ind. Charles was only 10 years old when his parents brought him to Kansas City. He received a common school education and graduated from the Kansas City High school at the age of 16 years. He was only 19 years old when he became a clerk in a grocery store, a position which he held for two years and a half. At the end of that time he had accumulated enough money to go into the grocery business with L. M. Berkeley as a partner. Unfortunately, during the boom years of 1885-6-7 the firm invested heavily in real estate and went down with a large number of other business houses when the boom burst. The partnership made an assignment.

It wasn't long, however, before Mr. Yost was on his feet again. He organized the Yost Grocery Company and operated it for four years, selling out in 1894. After that he became the owner of a novel concern called Yost's Market. A short time later he went into the business of manufacturing pies, and rapidly built up his business. In 1902 he consolidated his interests with those of Howard Smith.

Mr. Yost was an ardent Republican all his life. He was appointed city assessor by Mayor Webster Davis in 1895, and reappointed for two terms by Mayor Jones. He was chairman of the Republican county committee for several years and a member of many republican clubs.

He was married to Miss Hattie M. Beedle of Johnson county, Kas., in 1883. Six children survive. They are Leroy, Charles, Joseph, Mrs. Pearl Yost Dietrich, Miss Nina and Miss Jeannette. All of them live in this city.

Mr. Yost was a mason, a member of the Knights of Pythias, Woodmen of the World, Order of American Mechanics and several other societies.

Funeral services will b e held from the home Sunday at 3:30 p. m. The Rev. E. C. Smith, pastor of the Linwood Methodist church, will officiate. Burial will be in Mount Washington.

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March 12, 1909

HOSPITAL PATIENTS
TELL THEIR STORIES.

COUNCIL COMMITTEE BEGINS ITS
INVESTIGATION.

Statement Is Made That One Munici-
pal Doctor Was Brusque -- Patients
Feared Being Operated
On Needlessly.

The people making charges of alleged cruelty at the general hospital had an inning with the council investigation committees yesterday, and will have another at 2:30 o'clock next Wednesday afternoon in the chambers of the lower house of the council. Later the defense, which is represented by Attorneys Frank Lowe and T. A. J. Mastin, will be heard. W. O. Cardwell, an attorney, appears for some of the complainants and Attorney J. J. McLain is on hand in the interests of the homeopathic medical fraternity which, too, has a grievance against the hospital administration. The complaint of the homeopathists is that they are not on an equality with other medical schools at the hospital.

The proceedings opened with the reading of a letter by Mr. Cardwell from Miss Carrie M. Carroll of Independence, in which she reviewed the treatment received at the hospital by Miss Josie Pomfret of that city. Miss Pomfret was sent there as a ward of the county court, and was to have a private room. Instead of that, the girl, Miss Carroll claims, "was taken to a public ward, was treated in a brusque manner, and was addressed in loud and threatening language by the doctors because she would not remove her jewelry."

CALLS IT A BUTCHER SHOP.

"You are no better than a pauper and will get treatment as such," Miss Carroll alleges was said to Miss Pomfret, who became excited because she feared that an operation would be performed. She declared that Dr. J. Park Neal, the acting superintendent, had been very discourteous. The next day Miss Carroll called at the hospital to get Miss Pomfret.

"Do you consider you have authority to operate upon patients without notifying friends and relatives of the patients?" Miss Carroll says she asked Dr. Neal.

"Yes, I am in full authority here, and if I consider it necessary I can operate on a patient without asking anybody," Miss Carroll says was Dr. Neal's reply.

Miss Carroll claims that she was treated with much inattention when she called to take her friend from the hospital back to Independence, and concluded the letter by making this allegation: "The general hospital is a butcher shop with a madman at its head."

Miss Carroll explained that she was sending the letter as she could not attend the hearing, having been called to New York. Her affidavit, as well as that of Miss Pomfret, will be demanded by the committee.

Dr. Charles E. Allen, family physician to F. A. Wolf, a patient, who was to be operated on for hernia against his protest, testified that he did not consider an operation necessary and he had Wolf removed to Wesley hospital to prevent the threatened operation. Wolf had been sent to the hospital to be treated for a nervous breakdown.

SHE FELT HUMILIATED.

Mrs. F. A. Wolf testified that her husband was sent to the hospital by direction of Dr. R. J. Wolf, who did not tell her what was the matter with him. She said that he was very much excited, a nervous wreck. Three different times she visited the hospital, and was allowed to remain with him five minutes each time. On the third visit her husband was very much excited because he was to be operated on for hernia. She told Dr. Neal she did not want the operation performed. She called up Camp 2002, Modern Woodmen, of which her husband is a member, and they moved him to another hospital.

Mrs. Wolf said she felt humiliated because her husband had been put in a ward with dope fiends, and had been strapped to the bed. She thought the strapping to the bed was unnecessary, although she had not seen him on the occasion he was strapped to the bed.

Asked by Alderman J. G. Lapp: "Did you see him strapped to the bed?"

Mrs Wolf -- "No, sir; I did not. My husband told me about it."

F. A. Wolf, the patient, said that he had been working night and day seven days a week at his trade of hat cleaner, and last fall became a nervous wreck. He was surprised when Dr. Wolf called and ordered him to the hospital. He rode to the hospital on the seat of the ambulance. At the hospital they made him take a bath, and put him in the insane ward. One of the patients in the ward chained him to the bed by one of his legs.

"I was not violent," continued Wolf. "Next morning an attendant came along and told me that if I would fix up an old hat for him, he would take the chains off my legs. I agreed to fix his hat, and the chains were taken off. Then they made me do work that was objectionable. That night they moved me to another ward, and put me in with a noisy fellow. The doctor gave the noisemaker an injection which kept him sick all night. In the morning I told an attendant that the noisy fellow had a sick night, and the doctor replied, 'That's nothing; they get used to that after they are here a while."

PROTESTED AGAINST OPERATION.

"I saw welts on the legs of an other patient who had been whipped because he had asked for something to eat between meal hours. The Saturday following my arrival at the hospital three doctors told me I would have to be operated on for hernia.

"I protested against an operation. They told me that all of my troubles would be over after the operation. Sunday they removed me to another ward, the surgical ward, it is called, and at supper time the nurse informed me that I didn't want much to eat as I was to have an operation performed. Later that day my wife took me to Wesley hospital in an ambulance. I was weak and exhausted. No operation was performed at Wesley.

Wolf claims that his friends were denied admittance to him while he was at the general hospital, and he thought it wrong for the attendants to chain him to the bed. The night before he was sent to the hospital he acknowledged he had been picked up at the depot, and he could not tell how he got there. He didn't want to go to the hospital. The strap with which the patient was flogged, Wolf said, was about three feet long and two inches wide. The patient was chained during the flogging process, according to Wolf.

W. O. Cardwell, an attorney, swore that on December 14, 1908, he went to the hospital to get the record and affidavit of death of a young man who had died there, as he wanted to get a claim in before the Modern Woodmen. Dr. Neal said he could make the affidavit.

THE AFFIDAVIT RULE.

" 'You know our rule out here,' said Dr. Neal.

" 'What is that rule?' I asked

" 'That a fee of $2 accompany the application for the affidavit,' " Cardwell said Neal said to him.

" 'I never had to do that before,' I told Neal, but on advice of the secretary of the Woodman camp I paid the $2."

"Is the rule of the hospital to charge for furnishing affidavits of death?" Alderman J. D. Havens asked Dr. Neal.

"It is not. I always exact it, as I consider it a professional personal service.," replied the doctor.

In answer to Attorney Frank Lowe, Cardwell would not say for certain whether Dr. Neal "had said it is a rule of the hospital or our rule," but he was quite positive that former administrations at the hospitals had not exacted a fee for supplying affidavits of death.

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February 23, 1909

CHILDREN'S PARTY AT ELKS.

Washington's Birthday Celebration a
Success, as Usual.

Senior Elks took back seats in favor of their little Elklets at the club house yesterday afternoon, when the annual children's party, in celebration of Washington's birthday, was given. Hundreds of the youngsters came, and some of the mothers were there, too.

The programme opened with the singing of "The Star Spangled Banner." Dr. C. J. Morrow made an address on the life of Washington, and entertainment was added with a Punch and Judy show. Dancing and refreshments ended the party.

Miss Glendora Runyan and Chauncey Bowlus were attired as the grown-up Martha and George Washington, while the junior pair were Miss Fleeta Jagodnigg and Master Charles Sweetman were senior and junior Uncle Sams, respectively.

Dr. C. J. Morrow, Oscar Sachs and Thomas P. Watts made up the committee in charge.

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February 17, 1909

GENERAL HOSPITAL IS
TO BE INVESTIGATED.

EX-PATIENTS MAKE CHARGES
AGAINST MANAGEMENT.

Cruel Treatment Alleged in Affida-
vits Read Before Council -- Com-
mittee Is Appointed to
Sift Complaints.

The lower house on the council last night named Alderman W. P. Woolf, C. J. Gilman and J. G. Lapp to a committee to investigate charges of inhumane treatment towards patients at the new general hospital.

The investigation was made upon the request of Alderman Darious Brown, who read a number of affidavits said to have been signed by patients.

Alderman Miles Bulger openly asserted that the move was a political one to embarrass the administration.

"I do not believe that Alderman Brown is any more sincere in this than he has been with his moves for a gas pressure regulation," declared Bulger.

Alderman brown denied with emphasis the charge of insincerity in wanting the alleged cruelties investigated. He added that it was impossible for him to believe that the prominent men comprising the health and hospital board would want such aspersions cast upon their management of the institution without having to falsity or correctness of them established.

FOUGHT AGAINST OPERATION.

Affidavits outlining complaints of patients who claimed to have been abused were read by Mr. Brown.

F. A. Wolf, 4237 Tracy, was taken to the hospital December 1, he affirmed, suffering from a nervous complaint, but declares the house physicians said he had a hernia and should be operated on. He says he fought being taken to the operating room and succeeded in escaping an operation until his wife could be communicated with. She called Dr. Charles E. Allen, the family physician, and Wolf was removed to Wesley hospital.

Wolf charges cruelty to other patients, declaring he had seen a patient whipped with a leather strap for asking for something to eat after regular meal hours, and had seen a man suffering from pneumonia die after being forced into a tub filled with cold water.

MODERN WOODMEN INTERESTED.

Wolf claims to be a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, and a local lodge of the order is supporting him in his charges.

Frank E. Jefferson made affidavit that on October 22 he underwent an operation at the hospital, and the incision was not dressed until the 25th. Later he was moved to Hahneman Medical college.

Arthur Slim, a brick layer, declared that while he was in the hospital with an ulcerated leg and suffering much pain, a doctor ordered him to the kitchen to work. He replied "that if he had to work, he might as well be laying brick."

SLIM ACCUSES PHYSICIAN.

Then the doctor repeated his order that Slim must either work in the kitchen or leave. Slim says he left, and limped to the emergency hospital and asked they physicians there to dress his sore leg. They refused, he avers, because he had left the general hospital.

Then Slim went to the University hospital, where his leg was dressed, and he was ordered back to the general hospital.

"December 23 I went back to the hospital," claims Slim, "and when the doctor saw me, he told others he would 'fix' me. He poured a quart bottle of acid over my sore leg."

EAGLES TOOK HIM AWAY.

Signor Friscoe was a trapeze performer. He swears that on January 16, 1909, he fell from a trapeze at the Hippodrome, breaking five ribs and paralyzing his lower limbs. He complains that he was roughly handled both in the ambulance and at the hospital, and that when he asked to be allowed to communicate with the Benevolent Order of Eagles, of which he is a member, his request was denied. Finally, he got into communication with officials of the Kansas City aerie, and was removed to another hospital.

W. O. Cardwell asserts that Walter Gessley died at the hospital, and that a doctor refused to state the cause of death or furnish a death certificate until he was paid $2.

An attack on the hospital management came up in a different form in the upper house of the council. The board asked for authority to spend $5,000 for surgical instruments, an X-ray machine and fitting up a laboratory.

DR. NEAL WILL NOT DENY.

Dr. J. Park Neal, house surgeon at the general hospital, said last night:

"Neither I nor any member of the hospital staff care to deny the charges made against the hospital. We simply ignore them. They are too absurd to make a denial necessary."

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December 23, 1908

MONEY AND GIFTS
FOR MAYOR'S TREE.

EACH CHILD WILL GET A BIG
CHRISTMAS BAG.

And It Will Be a Big Bag, too, big
as a Sack of Flour -- Many
People Are Giving
Liberally.
Gift Bags From the Mayors Christmas Tree, as Big as a 20-Pound Bag of Flour.
Markings on the Sacks to Be Distributed
From the Mayor's Christmas Tree.

Three automobiles which left the city hall at 10:30 o'clock yesterday morning and were out only two hours collected $233 for the mayor's Christmas tree. The machines contained Mrs. J. F. Whiting, Mrs. L. H. Gaskell, Mrs. George F. Pelletier, Mrs. Mead W. Harrian, Mrs. Harry C. Wing, Mrs. A. L. Stocker, Mrs. Jule J. Levy, Mrs. Lee Lyon, Mrs. Albert S. Cahn, Mrs. Jules Davidson, Mrs. B. L. Sulzbacher, Mrs. Clarence D. Babb and Miss Lorena Whiting. A policeman went with each auto and one of them carried a one-legged newsboy and as a mascot.

"We did not have time to get over all the ground we wished," said A. E. Hutchins, chairman of the auto committee, "ans we did not realize what a sacrifice the women were making in giving their time to the project right at this time. The machines will be out again Wednesday, however, and the stock yards, the packing houses and those big office buildings which have not been covered will be visited. We will start earlier and stay longer next time."

The women, who were out yesterday, the policemen, the chauffeurs and the one-legged newsboy were given a luncheon at the Elks club at 1:30 p. m.

CALLING ON GROCERS.

Three big transfer wagons started out yesterday morning calling on the retail grocers. A policeman was with each wagon. In soliciting the first few loads the police failed to get a list of the donors of goods. The committee wants all those who gave and whose names were not taken to send their names and addresses to Steve Sedweek at Convention hall, that they may be enrolled with the others.

Louis F. Shouse yesterday turned Convention hall over to the committee, and from now on all donations will be received at the main entrance. The bags, just the size of a twenty-five pound flour sack, were delivered in the afternoon and the work of filling them with candies, nuts, fruits and appropriate presents will begin at once.

At a meeting of the Musicians' union yesterday it was decided to furnish two concerts for the children, afternoon and evening. A big orchestra will be under the direction of Professor W. E. Devinney. Besides this, Alexander Christman will have a big mechanical organ in the hall which will play while the orchestra is resting. Music all the time, is the idea.

LOOKING FOR 6,000 CHILDREN.

At a meeting of the committee yesterday it was decided to make preparations for 6,000 children at the hall Christmas day. If any more appear they will be cared for. A unique scheme has been decided upon to prevent repeating by those who would do such a thing. The committee will not divulge what the scheme is.

All of the gifts of groceries gathered by the wagons yesterday are being stowed away separate from the children's goods. This will be delivered to unfortunate families by wagons the day after Christmas. All letters received are now being carefully sorted and classified by districts for that purpose. No one is to be overlooked. Poor families who want anything of this kind can get it by writing to "Santa Clause, Care of Mayor Crittenden, Convention Hall," giving correct names and addresses.

5,000 TOYS IN A BUNCH.

Steve Sedweek, H. C. Manke, president of the eagles, and four firemen found plenty of work at Convention hall yesterday, real labor it was, too. One of the first loads to arrive was a box of 5,000 assorted tops, a gift from the employes of the Jones Dry Goods Company.

"We have toys for the children whom we expect at the hall on Christmas day," said Mr. Sedweek, "so these will be laid aside and put up in packages to be delivered to little ones who, through sickness or any other reason, cannot come to the hall.

"I have lots of Santa Claus letters here now and a package will be prepared for each child mentioned in them, and besides that the parents will get something substantial."

Among the articles gathered by the wagons yesterday canned goods led the list. Then there was flour, meal, potatoes, apples, oranges, bananas, jellies, bacon, ham, butter in bulk and otherwise, eggs, soap -- both toilet and laundry -- crackers, matches, breakfast foods of all kinds, in fact everything that may be found in a grocery store. Candies in buckets, baskets and boxes were donated along with dried fruits of all kinds on the map. There is plenty of salt and pepper, if it could be evenly divided, and a few cocoanuts, with all kinds of small nuts.

The candy, nuts and fruit will be used by the committee in filling the children's sacks, but the groceries will be delivered by wagon to the homes the day after Christmas.

KNIVES FOR THE BOYS.

One package received yesterday was found to contain a rat biscuit. One paper sack contained about three dozen boys' knives. Another package contained a half-dozen lamp chimneys. Then there are several boxes of decorations for the trees, along with an assorted lot of fancy vases with which to decorate a little home.

A little package wrapped in newspaper yesterday was found to contain a pair of gloves, two little mirrors and two leather purses. One package labeled "place on the tree" contained a beautiful baby hood, all white, soft and fluffy.

Among other things received yesterday was a lot of pretty pictures in frames, some of them in special boxes. A lot of clothing has also been donated and the committee wants more. Several tons of coal have been given and will be delivered on direction of the committee.

The committee says it wants nothing but the children at Convention hall on Christmas day. It will be too great a task to try and handle the adults then. They will be seen to later.

Arrangements have been made with a local photographer to have a big flashlight picture taken of the children as they mingle beneath the five big trees, with the five corpulent Santa Clauses.

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