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February 5, 1910

BLANKETS FOR THE BABIES.

Generous Response to the Appeal for
the Mercy Hospital.

As the result of an announcement in the Journal that babies at Mercy hospital were sadly in need of blankets to keep them warm these cold nights, blankets for the babies were contributed yesterday by the following generous hearted women:

Miss Inez Wagner, 3127 Woodland avenue.
Ruth Beall Smith, 3915 Walnut street.
Mrs. John H. Leidigh, $6 in cash in lieu of blankets.
Mrs. Dreyfoos, 2101 Wabash avenue.
Miss Isidore Westheimer.
Miss Edna Stone.
Mrs. Rose A. Price, 4032 Warwick boulevard.
The Doress Circle, Independence Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church.

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January 28, 1910

THOUGHT LIME DUST POISON.

Woman Believed Enemy Had
Schemed to Kill Her.

Much reading of the Swope mystery stories may have been the reason Mrs. Caroline Goble believed a scheme was on foot to poison her in her home, 1837 East Seventh street.

Mrs. Goble went to the office of Daniel Hawells, assistant city attorney, yesterday, carrying with her seven samples of powder she believed to be some deadly drug, found near her water cooler.

"I am just sure an enemy I know of is trying to kill me like they say Colonel Swope was killed," she declared.

The samples or exhibits were carefully preserved by the attorney and examined by Dr. Walter M. Cross, city chemist. Dr. Cross noticed a lump of "poison" larger than the rest with some paint on it. He tasted it and found lime.

When the anxious Mrs. Goble returned to the city attorney's office to learn the result of the test she was told that the powder was only plaster dust sifted from a small hole in the kalsomine on the ceiling.

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January 19, 1910

ALL GUARDED IN ONE ROOM.

Women Called to Mrs. Swope's Bed
Each Evening, Locking Door.

To the general public, the Swope home in Independence continues to be the "house of mystery." None of the family has been seen on the streets of the little town since the autopsy of the physicians a week ago. Every morning two nurses, driving the Swope phaeton, are seen to leave the home and go to the market. They return immediately. But not a word as to what is happening behind the curtained windows of the Swope mansion, or the bolted doors, ever escapes their lips.

It is known, however, that Mrs. Margaret Chrisman Swope has suffered a collapse and is now in a serious condition. The revelation of the supposed plot to kill Colonel Swope and Chrisman Swope, coming as it did without a moment's warning, has shattered the woman's nerves. The family physician visits her home each day, and he declares that she is not in a critical condition.

Mrs. Swope sleeps little at night. The women in the house are called to her bed room each evening and there, behind bolted doors, and with a watchman guarding on the outside, the family pass the night in the one room.

There is little sleep for any member of the family. The wakeful hours of the night are passed in thinking of the terrible events brought to light last week, and when sleep comes to the eyes of the weary ones it is to dream of things even more horrible than what the members of the family experienced.

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January 17, 1910

KANSAS CITY GIRLS
FOR PICKLE FACTORY.

Plant Will Be Only Stage Affair,
But Beauties Will Handle
Real Pickles.

"Working in a pickle factory" will no longer be a joke with a score of pretty young women from various walks of life in Kansas City who will hold forth at the Orpheum theater this week as employes of a pickle factory in Helen Grantley's sketch, "The Agitator," the top liner on the bill. They will handle real pickles and after a week's training and rehearsals and their participation in the show this week it is predicted they will have no difficulty in getting work as experts in the business, should they so desire.

The sketch is based in part on the female suffrage movement. The scene in which the young women work is one in which Miss Grantley makes her plea for a strike. Of course the girls follow their leader, the strike is called and after the usual trials and tribulations of strikers, is won. The sketch created somewhat of a sensation in New York, the play there being made more realistic by the fact that the girls who counterfeited the pickle trimmers were really striking shirt waist makers.

Miss Grantley came here with her company a week ago ahead of her billing so that she might rehearse the score of young women supers, some of whom will be carried with the company at the close of the week.

An advertisement brought half a hundred replies and out of this number Miss Grantley selected a score of girls. Among those selected were stenographers, two high school girls who were "just dying" to go on the stage even if they had to work in a "pickle factory," a telephone girl who had often wished that she might appear behind the footlights, three art students who wanted the work for the "atmosphere," later to be transferred to canvas, and a couple of girls who had not worked anywhere, but who sought this as a stepping stone to the stage.

It was an ungainly and awkward squad, as they lined up for the first rehearsal. Only one of the girls had ever been back of the scenes, and she was fairly lionized by the others. The turn was not a difficult one, and after the story of the play was told, the girls quickly appreciated the points which it was desired to emphasize.

"A trained chorus direct from New York City could not have done any better," declared Miss Grantley last evening. "They still have another rehearsal, but they are letter perfect now and I am sure that some of them will come with me when I leave the city."

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January 12, 1910

ITS MOST SUCCESSFUL YEAR.

Girls' Industrial Home Cared for
1,927 Persons in 1909.

At the annual meeting of the Industrial Home for Girls Association held at the home, 2940 Highland avenue, it was stated that the year 1909 was the most successful in the seventeen years of the home's existence. During the year it has cared for 1,925 girls, one boy and one old woman.

The Industrial Home, which was formerly the Door of Hope, organized originally to care for wayward girls. A year ago it bought the premises it now occupies for $7,000, of which all but $300 is paid. the report for the year shows receipts of $4581.20 and expenses $4,347.97.

The new officers elected yesterday were:

President, Mrs. E. L. Chambliss; vice president, Mrs. John B. Stone; recording secretary, Mrs. George r. Chambers; corresponding secretary, Mrs. George E. Ragan; treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Moore; board of managers, Mrs. J. W. Stoneburner, Mrs. George A. Wood, Mrs. William Waltham, J. M. Givvons, E. R. Curry, Miss E. Ellis, Miss Ella Albright, Miss W. H. Buls, Mrs. W. Matthews, Mrs. J. Fulton and Miss Foster.

Trustees -- R. D. Middlebrook, Judge J. H. Hawthorne, J. N. Moore.

Advisory board -- I. E. Burnheimer, H. R. Farnam, Porter B. Godard, Rev. W. F. Sheridan, Judge E. E. Porterfield.

House surgeon -- Dr. H. O. Leonard.

Matron -- Mrs. S. E. Dorsey.

The retiring president, Mrs. George A. Wood, expressed her thanks to all who helped to give the girl inmates a merry Christmas.

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December 11, 1910

JUDGE TAKES PART
OF RUNAWAY GIRLS.

Homes Have Been Found for
Ava Jewell and Hattie
Hayes.

"I told them 'If you never do anything worse than sit on a rock pile and crack rock for papa you will be queens on a thrown with jewels in your crowns.' "

T. W. Jewell, 920 Cambridge avenue, Sheffield, made this statement in the juvenile court yesterday afternoon after admitting that he had required his daughter, Ava Jewell, 16 years old, and his stepdaughter, Hattie Hayes, 15 years old, to crack rock in his quarry "because they were useless to their mother in the house."

About three weeks ago both girls ran away from their rock cracking work, Ava going to Kansas City, Kas., and Hattie Hayes getting employment at a cracker factory. For the past week she had been working as a domestic in a Sheffield hotel. She was taken into the juvenile court on the request of her mother and stepfather.

"Why did you put these girls, young women, I might say, to work on a rock pile?" asked Judge E. E. Porterfield earnestly.

"It was honest labor," said Jewell, "nothin' of which they should be ashamed. They might o' done far worse. You tell him how it came about, mamma," concluded Jewell, addressing his wife.

"Well, they just wouldn't do the housework right," said Mrs. Jewell. "It kept me continually following them about doing the work over again. I knowed somethin' had to be done to keep 'em busy, so I asked papa if he could use 'em in the quarry on the rear of our lot. 'Yes,' says he, 'I can use 'em breakin' up the small stones. Then he put 'em to work down there. That's all.'

"They was there about two or three weeks," said Jewell, "not over three at the outside, and all the work they done could be did in ten to twenty hours. I built 'em a nice platform on which to work. All they had to do was gather the small rock, carry it to the platform and break it. It sells for $1 a yard, judge. It's valuable."

"You know what they done, judge?" asked Jewell in apparent surprise, "they hammered holes in their skirts and kept me busy putting handles in the stone hammers. They would strike over too far and break the handles, just for meanness. Why, there mamma used to come down there just to encourage them, you know, an' she would crack more rock in an hour than they'd crack in a whole day. Mamma liked to crack rock, didn't you mamma? All the time them girls was a complainin' and talkin' o' runnin' away, an' one day both of 'em up and run away."

"I am surprised that they waited so long," said Judge Porterfield when Jewell had finished his explanation. "They should have gone the first day you put them there. A stone quarry, using a hammer and a drill, as this girl says she had to do, is no place for young women."

It was at this point that Jewell delivered himself of the tender sentiment about "jewels in your crowns."

"That sounds nice," suggested the court, "but it doesn't go with me. Any place on earth for a girl or woman but the rock pile, whether it be for papa or in jail. I do not approve of it. this girl will be made a ward of the court and a place secured for her. Working promiscuously in hotels and factories is not the best place for her, either, so long as she is not remaining in the home."

Hattie, who was 15 in October, was turned over to Mrs. Agnes O'Dell, a juvenile court officer, who will secure a place for her in a private family. Her stepsister, Ava Jewell, has a place as a domestic in Kansas City, Kas.

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January 7, 1910

CURED OF ILLS
OVER THE PHONE?

ABSENT TREATMENT PUT MRS.
MOSTOW UNDER SPELL,
WITNESSES SAY.

Spiritualist Seeks to Prevent
Heirs From Depriving
Him of Bequests.

That by giving her absent treatment over the telephone for rheumatism and in other ways, John H. Lee, said to be a spiritualist, won the confidence of wealthy Mrs. Victoria Mostow, 71 years old, and thus influenced her to bequeath him property worth $35,000, was the substance of testimony given yesterday in Judge J. G. Park's division of the circuit court.

The occasion was the trial of a suit by which Lee seeks to have set aside deeds transferring to James P. Richardson, principal of the Prosso school, and nephew of Mrs. Mostow, the property left to Lee by will. The heirs have a suit pending to set aside the will.

The story told by witnesses in substance follows:

Mrs. Mostow was the wife of the late Randolph Mostow, and a sister of the late Dr. De Estaing Dickerson. From the latter she inherited a large amount of property. Mr. Mostow died in the summer of 1908. During his last illness, he summoned Lee and was given treatment. In this way Mrs. Mostow became acquainted with the spiritualist.

TREATED BY PHONE.

After her husband's death, Mrs. Mostow became a believer in spiritualism. Through the medium of spirits and mesmeric powers Lee claimed that he could cure every known ill. Mrs. Mostow put in a telephone at her home, at Thirty-fourth and Wyandotte streets, and when she became troubled with rheumatism, Lee would give her absent treatment over the phone. At this time he lived near 4800 East Eighth street, several miles across the city from his patient.

In January, 1908, Mrs. Mostow made deeds to property at 817 Main street, and her home on Wyandotte, to her only surviving heir in Kansas City, James P. Richardson, owner of the Prosso Preparatory school. This was done to escape the payment of the collateral inheritance tax, and to prevent the heirs in Chicago from securing any of her property. The deeds were not to be recorded until after her death.

LIVED WITH HER.

In the summer of 1908, it is charged, Lee secured so great an influence over Mrs. Mostow that he secured permission to move himself and family into her home. Here they have lived since. The taxes are said to have been paid by the Mostow estate, and during her lifetime all the household expenses were met by Mrs. Mostow.

After Lee had been living in the Mostow home a few months, it is charged, it was seen that he gained an influence over the aged woman, and she began deeding small pieces of property to him.

Mr. Richardson, seeing the trend of affairs and fearing that he might lose the property that was to be his at the death of his aunt, immediately recorded the two deeds. When Mrs. Mostow died, it was found that she had bequeathed the same two pieces of property to Lee.

Suit was brought in the circuit court by Lee to set aside the deeds, charging undue influence. A similar suit was also brought by Richardson and the Chicago heirs to set aside the will.

The evidence was all submitted yesterday in Judge Park's court. The final arguments will be heard some time next week.

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December 30, 1909

FIND WOMEN IN A SALOON.

Italian Promises Police Board to
Bar Them in Future.

The board of police commissioners is having a hard time impressing upon the Italians of "Little Italy" the fact that their women must not frequent saloons. In the past some Italian women have b een as much at home in the saloon as in the home; in fact, many of them used to tend bar while their husbands were at meals.

Yesterday Mattaeo La Salla, who has a saloon at Missouri avenue and Cherry street, was before the board for permitting his wife and mother to frequent his saloon. It was some time before Judge Middlebrook could impress La Salla with the fact that there was a law in this state which prevents women from frequenting saloons. The Italian looked worried, puzzled, but he promised that his women folks would keep out of his saloon in the future.

Salino Defeo, 600 East Fifth street, and his bartender were seen twice, it is alleged , to serve a woman with a bucket of beer. Commissioner Marks was closing Defeo's saloon for two days, but, being Christmas week, Judge Middlebrook thought the board should be more lenient and a reprimand was given.

For having a man not in his employ in his saloon at 1:20 a. m. last Friday, John Honl, a saloonkeeper at 7306 East Fifteenth street, was ordered to close his place Friday and Saturday.

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December 27, 1909

DREAMS HER STRONG HOBBY.

Mrs. Virginia Gentry, Who Pre-
dicted Steamship Disaster, Is Here.

A woman who says she is the founder of a new sect called the Divine Scientist Healers and predicted the Vallencia disaster in San Francisco in 1906 recently arrived in this city and is living at 1327 Troost avenue. She is Mrs. Virginia Gentry, widow of the late Colonel R. T. Gentry, who commanded a regiment in General Price's army in Missouri and was well known in state politics a score of years ago.

"When my husband died three years ago he left an estate in this vicinity and I am here looking after it," said Mrs. Gentry. "I will probably reside here permanently.

"Most of the talk we hear of people being cured by the laying on of hands is rot. I think Madame Palladino is a faker and I doubt that she can do what she claims she can without pulling wires in one way or another. Maybe that is because her theory of life and things generally differs from mine. My strong hobby is dreams.

"The day before the Vallencia sailed on its fatal cruise I was in San Francisco with my late husband and the captain of the ship was our guest. He told me a dream he had about being stuck in the sand of a desert. Like a flash the inspiration came to me that it was all up with the captain and I told him so. He believed my warning and tried to be excused from the trip."

Mrs. Gentry has the Vallencia flag, an immense piece of woolen bunting. The captain had jokingly promised her that if his ship went down it should be hers and she obtained it from the steamship company by proving that she made the prediction that the good ship would come to grief.

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December 26, 1909

BEST OATS BRING
BIG HORSE LAUGH.

NEW MEANING GIVEN PHRASE
AT CHRISTMAS FEED FOR
POOR "COBS" AT HALL.

Rules Given Masters and "Black
Beauty" Books Also Distri-
buted by Humane Society.

A new meaning was given yesterday to the "horse laugh." From 1,000 to 1,500 horses in Kansas City not accustomed to a square meal stood in their stalls, free from work and protected from the weather, and munched full portions of the best oats the market affords.

And these horses laughed. It was Christmas day and they were enjoying a Christmas celebration planned especially for them.

The "feed' for poor work horses was given by the Kansas City Humane society as the result of a plan evolved by Mrs. E. D. Hornbrook and Mrs. E. H. Robinson, members of the board of the society.

For the purpose of carrying joy to the hearts of the poor animals which struggle under burdens on the streets of Kansas City every day and which are indifferently fed and kept, largely because of the poverty of their owners, the Humane society purchased a half dozen tons of the best white oats and did the grain up in five and ten pound sacks, giving out these packages to owners of horses whose cases had been investigated by the society and to whom tickets previously had been given.

THOUSAND TICKETS.

About 1,000 of these tickets were given out and sacks of the grain were also given to others who had not received tickets. Provision was also made for still other cases and an automobile furnished by the Kansas City Rapid Motor Transfer company will take "feeds" to the cases which were reported too late to be cared for as were the others.

It was at Convention hall that the Christmas dinners for the poor horses were given out and the committee in charge of the distribution was composed of Mrs. F. D. Hornbrook, J. W. Perkins and E. R. Weeks, president of the Humane Society.

The sacks containing the oats were placed on long tables and when horse owners applied for the "feeds" they were required to present their tickets, give their names and the names of their horses. They were then given the sacks of feed, a tag which they promised to read and a copy of "Black Beauty." Where owners had sick horses they were also given blankets for the disabled animals.

RULES FOR MASTERS.

The tag which each owner promised to read contained this "horse" talk:
"What is good for your horse is good for his master.
Your horse needs good care as well as good food.
Never work your horse when he will not eat.
Water your horse often. Water should always be given fifteen minutes before feeding grain.
Daily grooming will improve the health as well as the looks of your horse.
Give your horses rock salt, and head shelter from the heat.
Economize by feeding good oats and good hay.
Good drivers are quiet, patient and kind, and have little use for a whip..." and so on.

EXAMPLE IS SET.

"This horse dinner means a great deal more than most people think," said Mrs. Hornbrook. "It is intended to show the horse owners that their animals must be cared for and to set an example for them to follow. Some of the papers have made a humorous affair out of it, when it is anything but humorous and has a most humane object.

"It is not intended simply to fill the empty stomach of some poor animal for the time being," said Mr. Weeks, "but is to create a kindly sentiment for dumb animals. We show the horse owners what a sample meal is and that is something some of them know very little about. The ten pounds of oats we give them is a double portion of a standard feed. The owners of all the big fine animals we see hitched to drays on the streets feed their horses five pounds of the best oats at a meal. Along with the oats we give out, we also give the horse owners a copy of 'Black Beauty' and the tag containing advice about the care of horses an d we hope your Christmas dinner for the horses will do good."

To many horse owners, who called for feed at Convention hall between 9 a. m. and 6 p. m., Mr. Weeks, Mrs. Hornbrook and other workers agents of the Humane Society gave good advice. Some of the callers were persons with whom agents of the society had come in contact in their work and there were scores of promises, such as "well, we'll take better care of our horses from now on."

Posted about the corridor in Convention hall yesterday, were copies of new cards issued by the Humane society. They read, "Be kind to your horse. Do not forget his water, feed and shelter."

Christmas day was the most notable day for the poor work horse in the history of Kansas City. No wonder a new meaning was given to the slang expression, a "horse laugh."

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December 25, 1909

MISS MARGARET MENET DEAD.

End Comes to Former Kansas City
Writer in Washington.

Miss Margaret Menet, formerly of Kansas City, died yesterday at the home of her mother in Washington, D. C. Miss Menet came to Kansas City from Lawrence, Kas., in 1900, to work for The Journal, where she remained until 1905. Miss Menet in that year went to the Washinton Post, remaining in the national capital until the time of her death. She was a pleasing writer, with a graceful literary style. During her connection with The Journal she made many friends to whom the news of her untimely death comes as a distinct shock.

The body will be sent to Lawrence, Kas., and will be buried in the family lot Sunday. Miss Menet's father, who died several years ago, wsa a pioneer resident of Lawrence, Kas. She is survived by a mother and one sister, Mrs. W. J. Frick, wife of Dr. Frick, 812 Benton boulvard, this city.

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December 17, 1909

CHRISTMAS FEED FOR
CITY'S POOR HORSES.

NEGLECTED COBS AND FALLEN
THOROUGHBREDS INVITED.

Humane Society to Be Host at Con-
vention Hall Where Equine
Event Will Show Sufferings
to Local Philanthropists.

The poor horses of the city will be fed to satiety at least once this year. By arrangement with the directors of Convention hall yesterday, the Humane Society, in conjunction with Mrs. Emma W. Robinson, 3208 East Tenth street, and Mrs. E. D. Hornbrook, 3229 East Eleventh street, will give a feast of oats, bran and ground corn, with trimmings of real hay, to the neglected cobs and fallen thoroughbreds of all sections in the big Auditorium Christmas day.

"It will not be an equine quality event," Mrs. Hornbrook said yesterday, "but it will be on invitations, anyway. This is to prevent spongers from feeding a team at our expense. The money will be raised by subscription. We are asking the wholesale houses to donate enough feed for several hundred animals."

The invitations are being printed today. They read:

"Christmas dinner for the workhorse,
Given by the Humane Society,
Call at Convention hall Christmas day between 9 a. m. and 6 p. m .

The plan of giving one good meal to the horses is original with Mrs. Robinson. She always has been interested in the dumb animals, and is a member of long standing of the Humane Society. She said last night:

"Someone has got to take up the horse's end of this charity proposition. It is not right that people should go on year after year giving alms to the human derelicts and entirely ignoring man's best friend, his horse. The scheme to give old work horses at least one square meal has been carried out to perfection in Norway, and someone should try it here. I suppose it will be scoffed at by some, but that is because it is new. In a few years, when through such humble means the attention of the world is directed toward the old horse and his suffering, it will be looked upon in a different light."

Edwin R. Weeks, president of the Humane Society, is in favor of the "banquet."

"Not for itself," he said yesterday, "but merely as a means to bring the suffering of our four-footed friends before local philanthropists. The Chicago idea of tagging the horses that are misused or underfed is not a poor one, but this one will get emaciated subjects of charity together by the hundred, in one hall, and let people see them."

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November 26, 1909

WILLING TO BUY CIGARS.

Postal Telegraph Girl Operator Glad
Missouri Won.

"Give me six cigars," said Miss Jessie Wadley, the petite Postal operator at the Hotel Baltimore, yesterday afternoon as she laid a silver dollar on the cigar counter.

"I don't believe in betting," she explained, "but I told some of my friends that if Missouri won this time that I would buy each of them a good cigar. I just felt all the time that Missouri would win."

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November 19, 1909

MURDERESS GROWS THIN.

Mrs. Meyers Sighs for Freedom -- Did
Not Write Governor.

Mrs. Aggie Myers, the Kansas City woman serving a life sentence in the state penitentiary for the murder of her husband, says that prison life does not agree with her. In fact, she has grown thin and emaciated, and the hard work at the penitentiary is beginning to tell on her.

"She looks to be in poor health, worn and haggard by the drudgery and work in prison," said County Marshal Joel R. Mayes yesterday. Mr. Mayes returned yesterday from Jefferson City, where he took fifteen prisoners from the county jail. While at the penitentiary he had a talk with Mrs. Myers.

"Mrs. Myers," said the marshal, "denies having written the letter to the governor asking for a pardon. She says she does not know who wrote it. The first she heard of the letter, she told me, was when she read it in a Kansas City newspaper."

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November 19, 1909

WOMAN BALL PLAYER DEAD.

Former Bloomer Girl Will Be Buried
in Potter's Field.

Miss Daisy Hoover, for ten years a professional baseball player, died destitute in the city hospital November 11 and was be buried in the potter's field yesterday.

Miss Hoover was for several years second baseman on the Boston Bloomer Girls, but for the past two seasons had been playing in the East with the Star Bloomers, making her home during the winter in Kansas City. Last winter she had charge of one of the concessions in the Hippodrome. She returned to Kansas City about a month ago and three days later was taken sick and wsent to the hospital. She is survived by a sister, Mrs. George Johnson, Navarre, Ohio.

Claud East, manager of the cafe at 307 East Twelfth street, formerly manager of the Boston Bloomer Girls, says that Miss Hoover was one of the best women ball players that ever threw a ball.

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November 19, 1909

MOTHER CORNELIA DIES.

Assistant to Superioress at House of
Good Shepherd Passes Away.

Mother Cornelia, assistant to Mother Elizabeth, superioress of the House of Good Shepherd, died yesterday at the home, Twentieth street and Cleveland avenue.

Mother Cornelia had been ill for months, but continued with her work at the House of Good Shepherd until last Thursday. Mother Cornelia was Cornelia Thompkins of St. Louis. The family is one of the most wealthy and widely known in St. Louis. A sister, Mrs. Philip Scanlon, died several weeks ago in St. Louis.

The body of Mother Cornelia will be taken in a special car to St. Louis this morning by her parents, who are in Kansas City. In taking up her work among the inmates of the House of Good Shepherd, whose lives the sisters try to correct, Mother Cornelia gave up her family and prospects for a life of personal help and self-abnegation.

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November 18, 1909

MOTHERLY HEART STILLED
WHEN "PEGGY" HEALY DIED.

AGED WEST BOTTOMS SQUATTER SPENT
MUCH OF HER LIFE IN WORK FOR
OTHERS.

A motherly old heart was stilled last night when Margaret Healy died in St. Joseph's hospital. She was a charity patient and left no money with which to bury herself. But in life that thought never troubled her.

"I always have friends," she used to say. "Sure, haven't I always been friendly?"

And she had been. Her friendship for all that was human was shown in her adoption of a parentless family of boys and raising the two youngest from her scanty earnings as charwoman and washwoman. It was shown, too, in her working half the night doing washing and household work for neighbors, when the mothers of families were ill, in the many acts of kindness when the stork visited neighbors or when death crossed their thresholds.

A simple, artless old woman she was, who passed her last days in the companionship of a woman who befriended her and gave her shelter. No one who knew her ever heard her moan at fate. She was as full of laughter at 75 years of age as many women in their teens, with the same keen enjoyment of life and interest in the small things of the town and her neighborhood.

Mrs. Healy was about 78 years old. She came to Kansas City several years after the war. She was twice married. Her second husband, John Healy died a year after their marriage. Never in her life had the income of her family been more than $10 a week, but she saw only rosy prisms. Her first husband was a laborer. So was the second. But there always was a bit of meat and bread for the hungry to be found in the family larder and a bit of heart left for the weak and sometimes the undeserving.

Until the flood of 1903, Mrs. Healy was a "squatter" in a shell of a home near the Loose-Wiles factory at Eighth and Santa Fe streets.

She and Mr. Healy were married in the Church of the Annunciation by Father Dalton. They lived in several places in the West Bottoms. Years after his death, Mrs. Healy became one of the great colony of "squatters," whose huts were scattered on unused ground from the Armour packing plant to the West bluffs. Mrs. Healy was known from one end of the bottoms to the other.

Mrs. Healy's home in the West bottoms was destroyed in the flood of 1903. She was forced to leave and found a home with Mrs. Ellen Hughes, a widow, at 630 Bank street, a mere lane down upon which the rear of huge factory buildings on Broadway frown. She lived with Mrs. Hughes until seven weeks ago, when Mrs. Hughes found her in her room unconscious and ill. She was taken to St. Joseph's hospital.

"Mrs. Healy was very happy here," Mrs. Hughes said last night. "We two lone women became great chums. She was great company. We used to go to 5 o'clock mass Sundays and sometimes we would walk up the hill again to the chapel at St. Joseph for high mass. I went to call her one Sunday and she didn't answer. Her door was locked, but she had left the window open. I crawled in and found her. She had fallen in a wood box.

"All the Irish knew Mrs. Healy; the McGowans, the Burnetts, the Moores, the Walshes, the Pendergasts, all of them. She'll never lack decent burying. From the time she came into my house dripping to the arms with flood water, she never lacked friends and I know she won't lack them now."

In younger days, Mrs. Healy was called "Peggy," a nickname usually given only to Irish girls of vivacious temperament. She looked on her deathbed little like that stout, buxom "Peggy" Healy that the West Bottoms knew at St. Joseph's, but the still, warn face wears the calm of good deeds done. She will rest in Mount St. Mary's cemetery at the side of her adopted son, George Traynor. The funeral arrangements are still to be made.

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November 18, 1909

PROPOSE $14,000 HOME FOR
THE CRITTENTON MISSION.

Fireproof Building at Thirtieth and
Woodland Will Be Ready by Next
Summer.

Captain J. H. Waite, at the head of the Florence Crittenton mission and home, located in an old dwelling at 3005 Woodland avenue, made the statement last night that by next summer the institution hopes to be in a new fireproof building. It is to be erected, he said, on the corner of Thirtieth street and Woodland avenue, where they own 156 feet fronting on the latter street.

"The foundation should be laid within the next ninety days," said Captain Waite, "so that work on the super-structure may begin in the spring. We have planned a building to cost between $10,000 and $14,000. As we want to make it absolutely fireproof and of reinforced concrete, we anticipate that the cost will be nearer $14,000. It is a grand institution and has done and is doing the noblest kind of work."

The Florence Crittenton Mission and Home for unfortunate girls was started in this city on February 4, 1896, with an endowment of $3,000 from Charles N. Crittenton, the millionaire philanthropist of New York, who died suddenly in San Francisco Tuesday. It first was situated on the northeast corner of Fourth and Main streets in a large three-story brick building which now has been torn down to make space for a city market.

After being at the original location for a short time it was decided to abandon the downtown mission work and establish a home. The institution then moved to Fifteenth street and Cleveland avenue into rented property. In June, ten years ago, the property at the southeast corner of Thirtieth street and Woodland avenue was purchased for the home.

"A debt hangs over our heads for some time," said Miss Bertha Whitsitt, superintendent of the home yesterday, "but now we have 156 feet frontage on Woodland avenue on which we expect soon to erect our new building.

"Since the beginning of the mission and home," continued Miss Whitsitt, "we have cared for 582 young women, the majority of them with children. Just during the last year we cared for twenty-eight young women and twenty-three children. When totaled the number of days spent in the home by all of them amounts to 4,612, which we record as so many days of charity work."

Captain J. H. Waite, who has been at the head of the home for many years, said that Mr. Crittenton had given the home and mission $3,000 to start on. When the property at 3005 Woodland was purchased the National Florence Crittenton Home at Washington gave about $1,500 toward buying and improving the property.

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October 31, 1909

"ADAM GOD'S" WIFE IS
GIVEN HER LIBERTY.

AFTER ELEVEN MONTHS MRS.
SHARP GOES FREE.

Doubt as to Her Sanity Leads
Prosecutor to Dismiss Indict-
ment for Riot of De-
cember 8, 1908.

After spending almost eleven months in the county jail, Mrs. Melissa Sharp, the wife of "Adam God," who was sentenced to twenty-five years in the penitentiary for the shooting of Patrolman A. O. Dalbow on December 8, 1908, will be given her liberty today on the recommendation of Virgil Conkling, county prosecutor.

"I won't prosecute any one when I have a reasonable doubt as to their sanity," he said. "I'm going to dismiss the case against her."

It lacked a few minutes of midnight last night that Mr. Conkling made known his decision. The case was promptly dismissed and Marshal Joel B. Mayes was notified to liberate Mrs. Sharp this morning.

For many weeks Mr. Conkling has had this step under advisement. Many persons expressed doubt as to the woman's sanity. She would have faced the jury on November 15. She will not even be taken before a lunacy commission.

"She will be absolutely free," Mr. Conkling said last night.

When it was hinted in her presence that she might be turned loose on the grounds of insanity, she resented the insinuation, but when she was told last night by Deputy Marshals Joe McGuire and E. S. Dudley that she was free, she began crying for joy.

"Free, did you say? I can't believe it, I'm so glad," she said.

She sat down on the edge of the bed and began to weep hysterically, while the deputies filed out quietly. The other women prisoners were awakened and before midnight it was generally known that Mrs. Sharp was free.

During her stay in the county jail Mrs. Sharp has made friends of everyone who made her acquaintance. Her patient demeanor and her solicitation for the women prisoners has made her universally liked. During the last few weeks she has admitted that her husband, whom she trusted so blindly, was wrong.

"It all seems like a dream," she has said many times. "I was following my husband on that day thinking that he could do no wrong. Now I know better."

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October 30, 1909

CLEAN POLITICS SAFE
IN WOMAN'S HANDS.

MORE CAPABLE TO VOTE THAN
THE AVERAGE MAN.

Ten Years to See Nation-Wide Equal
Sufferage Says Mayor Critten-
den to Woman's Ath-
letic Club.

"I believe the average woman is more capable of clean, honest politics than the average man, and should vote on all local issues. The matter of keeping a city's life clean physically and morally should be entrusted to a woman's hands. It is my firm conviction that within the next ten years this country will have woman suffrage from one end to the other."

These were some of the remarks of Mayor Crittenden before the regular business meeting of the Kansas City Women's Athletic club, in the gymnasium at 1013 Grand avenue, yesterday afternoon. The speech was made on the invitation of Mrs. S. E. Stranathan, president of the club.

"I know that a great many women, as well as the majority of men, are against a suffrage movement or any other movement which would lead the gentler sex into the ungentle game of politics. It has been customary for men to assume that a woman could never understand the tariff; that the value of ship subsidies and river navigation would floor her, and that she is far too impulsive to be of value as a factor in our national government.

"These great issues, however, are not necessarily local. It might take time for the average matron or maid to grasp their details, but give them a few years of experience in town and city or perhaps state politics and it is my opinion that their vote would be as honest and as intelligent as any deposited in the box election day.

"There was a time when I did not believe in women voting, but that was before I held public office and dealt with committees of both sexes."

About seventy-five women, members of the club, heard Mayor Crittenden's remarks and applauded him at his conclusion.

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October 29, 1909

NO MORE "RATS" FOR
THE POSTAL GIRLS.

DISTRICT SUPERINTENDENT'S
ORDER EFFECTIVE NOV. 1.

One Will Declare Hair Real, Will
Take Such Commands Only
From Husband and Dares
Investigation.

"On and after November 1, all lady clerks and employes must discontinue the wearing of 'rats' in their hairdress. Please govern yourself accordingly. -- A. B. R., Supt. Dist."

Will the Postal Telegraph Company whose district manager issued the above order, insist that it be obeyed, or will it hearken to the murmurings and declarations of their female employes and forget it?

This is the question which is bothering the girls ever since they received copies of what is declared to be the most famous order ever issued by the local office. That the officials of the company will have no easy time enforcing his order goes without saying. In fact, one of the pretty wire girls declared last evening that she, for one, would resign, and that in a hurry, before she would permit the manager or superintendent to dictate to her the sort of headdress she would wear.

"Why, the first thing we know they will have us in blue uniforms with brass buttons, a la messenger boy style," she said.

TAKEN AS JOKE AT FIRST.

The order was issued Wednesday. The girls, when they received it, took it for a joke, but yesterday when they discovered that it really was in earnest, and that the order meant what it said, there was excitement in plenty. If the ears of Superintendent Richards did not burn and buzz all day yesterday and until well into the night, it was not because the girls were not talking.

More than a score of operators are affected by the order. Half a dozen of these operate keys in various public places about the city, the principal branches being in the Hotel Baltimore, Coates house, Savoy hotel, New York Life building and the Chamber of Commerce. Then there are almost a score of girls employed in the main office of the company.

What objection to the wearing of "rats" can be is known only to Superintendent Richards and as one of the girls expressed it yesterday, "He won't tell because he doesn't know."

"It's nobody's business what is meant by the issuance of that order," said Richards last evening.

"I guess 'A. B. R.' will buy us all new hats. He will have to if he insists on us taking the rats out of our hair," said one of the operators as she adjusted a handsomely plumed beaver.

NOT TO BE COMMANDED.

"Why, we never would be able to wear a stylish-looking hat and I know that I, for one, am not going to let any man dictate to me for a while, yet, as to the sort of hat I wear. Of course, if I get married I may change my mind, but I am still single."

"I threw my order in the waste basket," said another operator,"but on second thought I fished it out and took it home. I may have it framed, or I may send it to a friend in Chicago. I only wish I could say things like a man can. I would certainly talk to 'A. B. R.' "

"Lots of foolish orders are issued at times, but this is the worst I have ever heard of," said another operator. "I wear a rat and have to in order to wear a hat which is in style. If 'A. B. R.' or anyone else thinks that he is going to tell me how to wear my hair he will be disillusioned. If he asks me I will tell him my hair is natural and if he tries to get familiar and ascertain for himself there will be something doing, in which I will not get the worst of it."

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October 16, 1909

HOMES FOR WORTHY WOMEN.

Depot Matron Has Half Dozen Offers
but Not One Applicant.

"For two weeks I have not had a request for a home from a woman who was willing to work," said Depot Matron Ollie Everingham yesterday, "although during that time I received letters from half a dozen persons who offered to care for worthy women, and some have offered to pay a small salary. I am holding these letters and offers, for it will not be long now until I will be burdened with requests for homes by women who are anxious and willing and able as well to do housework for their keep."

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October 14, 1909

"MURDER" IS A BOOK AGENT.

Woman Wanted Quick Police Action
in Getting Rid of Him.

In response to a murder call last night, Sergeant Harry Moulder of the Westport police station grabbed his club and gun and ran to 1000 East Forty-ninth street.

"Where was the murder?" demanded Moulder as Mrs. Edward Harris answered the door bell.

"Why, there isn't any murder," she answered sweetly. "You see I had ordered a book agent out of the house and at his refusal to move I called the police. I knew you would hurry if I turned in a murder call. But the scamp has gone now and I don't need you."

Sergeant Moulder turned away.

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October 9, 1909

IS THIS FAINTING BERTHA?

Young Woman Robs a Sympathetic
Kansan at Depot.

A young woman who faints in a crowd, falls in the arms of one of the gallant sex, and then relieves him of his pocketbook for his pains, is operating in Kansas City. The police recall the time when "Fainting Bertha" worked the same ruse, and though it was five or six years ago when she was sent out of the city, they believe she has returned.

William Sheppard, cashier of the National Bank of Olathe, Kas., was the victim Thursday night in the Union depot. He was standing near one of the ticket windows when he noticed that a young woman standing near showed signs of illness. She began to sway and would have fallen to the floor had not the chivalrous cashier caught her in h is strong arms. He carried her to the fresh air out on Union avenue, when she revived, thanked him, and disappeared up the street.

When Sheppard went inside he found that he had lost $50 in currency, a draft for $210, and three railway tickets to Olathe. He reported the matter to police.

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October 9, 1909

DEATH OF MRS. E. CORRIGAN.

WELL KNOWN KANSAS CITY WOMAN
SUCCUMBS TO LONG ILLNESS.
Mrs. E. Corrigan
MRS. E. CORRIGAN.

Mrs. Edward Corrigan, one of the best known women in Kansas City in earlier years, died Monday at the home of a sister in Sandy Hill, N. Y., after an illness of eight months. She was 64 years old. The body will reach Kansas City at 7:16 this evening and will be taken to the home of Mrs. Matt Kinlen, a relative, at 3312 Flora avenue.

Funeral services will be from Mrs. Kinlen's residence at 10:30 Sunday morning, and from St. Vincent's Catholic church, thirty-first street and Flora avenue, at 11 o'clock Burial will be in Mount St. Mary's Cemetery.

Mrs. Corrigan lived in Kansas City for about twenty years, during which time she was at the forefront of almost all Catholic charities and was associated with others in non-sectarian undertakings. She was prominent in church work, one of her munificence being the high alter in St. Patrick's church. Since leaving Kansas City the home of Mrs. Corrigan has been in Chicago, but she has paid frequent visits to her friends here.

Mr. and Mrs. Corrigan had no children. A brother of Mrs. Corrigan, Daniel Quinn, lives in Kansas City. Mr. Corrigan is a brother of Bernard Corrigan, president of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company, and Patrick Corrigan, a retired business man.

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September 28, 1909

SHOT A NEIGHBOR, THEN
ACTED GOOD SAMARITAN.

German Woman Gardner Attempted
to Frighten Victor Marten With
Gun That Wasn't Loaded.
Mrs. Mary Wilsdorf, Who Shot Gardener.
MRS. MARY WILSDORF.

After emptying the contents of a shotgun into the left thigh of Victor Marten, a gardener, Mrs. Mary Wilsdorf, 46 years old, wife of a gardener at Seventy-seventh street and Walrond avenue, yesterday afternoon got on a Marlborough street car and came to the city and gave herself up to Chief of Police Frank F. Snow.

Before leaving her home she gave the wounded man a glass of water and left him lying on the ground near her house in charge of her husband, Carl Wilsdorf, who was later arrested by Mounted Patrolman E. B. Chiles.

Mrs. Wildorf and Marten are neighbors, each owning a ten acre tract of land.

From the facts elicited from the woman through Dr. George Ringle, surgeon at the Emergency hospital, who acted as interpreter for the police, the shooting followed a quarrel, about Marten's horses getting into the truck garden of the Wilsdorf's.

She said the horses frequently trampled the vegetables. One of them wandered over from the Marten field yesterday to the Wildorf land and was locked up in the barn.

When Marten went to the Wilsdorf house to get his horse he was asked to pay a small amount of money for alleged damages. A dispute arose and Mrs. Wilsdorf said that Marten held aloft a potato digger and threatened to kill her.

She said she then ran into the house and got her husband's shotgun, and returned to the yard. When within five feet of Marten the gun was discharged and the contents of one barrel entered the left thigh of Marten. He fell to the ground and asked for a drink of water which was given to him by Mrs. Wilsdorf.

Her husband told her she had better go to town and give herself up to the police, which advice she took. when she first entered police headquarters she was a little excited, and, not being able to speak good English, was misunderstood. The patrolman she met believed her to say a man shot her in the leg, so he directed her to the Emergency hospital. At the hospital Dr. Ringle took her in charge, and, learning that she was the person who did the shooting, took her back to the police station. She was turned over to Chief Snow.

Mrs. Wilsdorf informed the police that the man was still lying in the yard at her home and needed medical attention. Dr. George Todd, 4638 Troost avenue, attended to the man's injuries. Dr. Todd called an ambulance from Freeman & Marshall's and had the man taken to the University hospital.

The woman told Captain Whitsett that she had never before handled a shotgun and did not know exactly how to use it. The one she got in the house was broken at the breech and as she was running with it toward Marten she was trying to replace it. Suddenly the gun snapped into place and was discharged. She said she really did not think it was loaded, but was only trying to scare Marten. She was locked up in the matron's room.

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September 20, 1909

SUPERSTITIOUS? NOT MUCH.

But Mrs. Whitney Carried Rabbit's
Foot When Near Stepladders.

Mrs. Carrie Westlake Whitney, librarian of the public library, is the possessor of a rabbit's foot these days. About twenty five painters have been at work on the library building for the past six weeks, painting the interior, and there are so many step-ladders around that Mrs. Whitney always pauses before entering the building to see if she has her rabbit's foot with her.

"I wouldn't dare go under one of those ladders without my rabbit's foot," she said yesterday. "My charm is the left hind foot of a rabbit that was killed in a graveyard by a red-headed negro at midnight."

Miss Bishop, assistant librarian, has no rabbit's foot, because she is not superstitious, she says.

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September 18, 1909

MARRIES A MILLIONAIRE.

Miss Florence Oakley Received Stage
Training in Kansas City.

A romance which began over a year ago in the Auditorium theater, Los Angeles, Cal., culminated Thursday at San Rafael, just out of San Francisco, when Miss Florence Oakley, leading woman at the Liberty theater, Oakland, was married to Percival Pryor.

Miss Oakley is a Kansas City girl, and off the stage was known as Miss Florence McKim. Mr. Pryor is the only son of Judge J. H. Pryor, a millionaire of Pasadena, Cal.

While the engagement has been announced for some time, the young couple slipped away form the theater in Oakland in the afternoon and drove to San Rafael in a motor car where they were married. Mr. Pryor is 24 years old and his bride 20.

When Florence McKim, now Mrs. Pryor, was but 10 years old she appeared here in "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and made such a hit that she attracted the attention of Miss Georgia Brown, who has a dramatic school. From that time until her first engagement with the Carlton Macy stock company of Cleveland, O., she was a protege of Miss Brown. The young woman had talent and her rise was rapid. While under contract with David Belasco in New York and waiting to be placed, Miss Oakley received an offer of $225 a week from the Blackwood Stock company of Los Angeles to become a leading woman and accepted. It was her guiding star that sent her there, as through that engagement she met, loved, became engaged to and now has married the only son of a millionaire, and "Father" is said to be very fond of her.

"Florence was a dear little girl and a born actress," said Miss Georgia Brown, her instructor, last night.

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August 28, 1909

IT TOOK THREATS TO
MOVE THIS WOMAN.

FEAR OF IMPRISONMENT HER
LAST THOUGHT.

"We Shall See," Said Mrs. Mary
Baughman, When the Juvenile
Court Took Her Grand Child-
ren From Her.

It took threats of imprisonment to move Mrs. Mary Baughman, who was born McCormick, from the juvenile court room yesterday afternoon. Even in parting she was not subdued.

"It will break my heart to part with the children and I will have them, court or no court," was her defy as she rose to go.

"If you make trouble we shall have to put you in jail," said Judge E. E. Porterfield.

"Yes, we shall see," retorted the irate grandmother. "It doesn't become a judge to talk that way to a woman who is asking nothing but the right to care for her children," and she swept from the room.
"It's my own fault for running to those probation officers with my troubles," said Mrs. Baughman afterward. "Pearl and Frances Harmiston, my grandchildren, have had me as their only support since they were small. Lately I have had them in St. Agnes home. Their mother, my daughter, Mrs. Charlsie Wiggons, 214 East Missouri avenue, is doing better now than she did and I thought she ought to help a little to support the girls. So I asked the probation officers what I could do to make her help me. Instead of this, they bring them into court and send to them to St. Joseph's home, where the little ones have to wash and scrub floors. I have always worked hard, but it wasn't 'till I was a woman grown and had the strength. I was born a McCormick, and I will have the children."

The Harmiston children were sent to St. Joseph's home during the morning session of the court, over the grandmother's protest.

The records show that they were in court as neglected children, on complaint of their mother.

In the afternoon Mrs. Baughman returned and sat patiently until 4 o'clock, when she asked the court again to give her the children. The threat to send her to jail followed.

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August 19, 1909

Y. W. C. A. GIRLS GUESTS
OF PROMINENT BANKER.

GIVEN A RIDE OVER BOULE-
VARDS IN HIS MOTOR CAR.

Regular Daily Programme Is Being
Carried Out by Devoted Father at
Daughter's Request -- Moth-
ers as Chaperones.

Three pretty young women, members of the Y. W. C. A., with one of their mothers as a chaperone, enjoyed a ride over the boulevards of Kansas City last evening in one of the most luxurious touring cars in the city. Their ride was through the generosity of a prominent banker of Kansas City who is greatly devoted to his daughter. She departed for a several weeks' visit North and when she left she asked that he arrange to take some of the Y. W. C. A. girls out in the machine.

Tonight another set of girls will be taken for a ride. This will continue each evening until the return of the daughter. The names and addresses of the young women to be taken on these rides will be furnished by Miss Ida Wilson, the desk secretary of the society.

That the idea will be a popular one and will be followed to a great extent by wealthy citizens who do not use their machines much while their families are away during the summer, developed last evening. Henry C. Lambert, cashier of the German American bank, said he thought that the idea should be taken up by the automobile club. "My machines can be placed at the disposal of such a cause at least once a week," said Mr. Lambert; " and I think there are probably a dozen other men in town who would loan their machines an evening or two a week."

"Some of our members have enjoyed the pleasure of auto rides while others have not," said Miss Ida Wilson yesterday afternoon. "Of course, to the majority of those who have not ridden in one of the big touring cars, such an invitation would hardly be refused. I believe that if other citizens hear about our banker friend they too will proffer their machines. If they do, I think we will have no trouble in furnishing the girls to ride. Our idea in this is, of course, to give the girl the full pleasure of the ride. The name and address of each girl and the chaperone will be given to the gentleman who drives the machine or his driver and the girls will be called for at their homes and returned there. In this way they will get the full pleasure of the auto ride.

"While we are not in any way soliciting automobiles for this purpose, I believe that as soon as this fact becomes known we will have several proffers of machines."

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August 18, 1909

DRIVEN FROM HOME
BY NEIGHBORS' SCORN.

MAN SOUGHT TO GIVE AWAY
UNBORN BABY.

Public Sentiment Toward C. F. Mor-
ris So Unpleasant in Nevada and
Chillicothe He Leaves -- Mis-
understood, He Says.

Practically driven from Chillicothe and Nevada, Mo., towns in which he formerly lived, C. F. Morris, the father who wanted to give away his unborn baby, has come to Kansas City. He was at the Detention home yesterday afternoon and saw Mrs. Agnes O'Dell, probation officer, with regard to putting Mrs. Morris in a hospital.

"I was misunderstood," said Morris, who last week wrote to Mrs. O'Dell that he wanted her to find a home for the child. "Doctors advised me wrongly and I did not know well enough to disregard their advice. Of course I want the child now.

"After my letter to the probation office here was published, things were made so unpleasant for me that we left Chilllicothe and went to Nevada, where we were married September 1 of last year and where we lived until four months ago. The unpleasant story was repeated in Nevada and I decided to come here."

SURELY MISUNDERSTOOD.

Morris has written a letter to Mrs. O'Dell explaining his side of the matter, but she has not yet received it. Following is a copy as Morris gave it out to the Chillicothe papers:

"Mr. Dear Friend -- I received your answer Sunday morning and will say in regard to same you do not know what sadness has come over our home. You surely misunderstood. I never wanted you to take the child before it was born. My wife has always wanted a babe and I have never censured her or hinted to her that I didn't.

"And she wouldn't give it up for the world. We have always lived such a happy life and have never done anything to harm anyone. But, Mrs. O'Dell, through your kindness, I see my mistake. If I could only have had some kind of woman like you to advise me instead of the doctors I would never have thought of such a thing. We have always made so many friends wherever we have lived. It was all my fault. Kindly forgive me and write to Chillicothe if you wish to see if our reputations isn't of the best. The only reason in the world I had for giving up the babe, Mrs. O'Dell, was that I never wanted one.
WILL WORSHIP BABE.

"But I assure you that I do want one now and I will worship this one as long as I live. You know the public is always ready to tramp a man when he is down, but I know you are not of this kind. Won't you please write my wife and encourage her? She is so worried I am afraid she will never stand it. I thank the papers very kindly for not signing any names and some day I may be able to do them a favor. Now Mrs. O'Dell, thank you once more for this letter and assuring you our baby will be welcome in our home. I beg to remain your best friend, asking you to forgive me and if you can help me in any way. Your kindness will never be forgotten.

"P. S. -- We have received a dozen letters today from people who wanted to adopt our baby for a money consideration. I did not answer any of these letters. If I had I would have said to each of the parties, 'No, our child is not for sale.' It will be the happiness of our lives now."

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August 10, 1909

PENNY ICE DISTRIBUTION
SAVES LIVES OF BABIES.

Ensign Heazlitt of Salvation Army
Tells of Good That Is Being
Accomplished.

It was stated yesterday by Ensign Blanche Heazlitt of the Salvation Army, who has charge of the penny ice fund, that more than 400 poor families are now being supplied by that means. The ice distributed in two sections of the city is donated. In the East Bottoms it is donated by the Kansas City Breweries Company through the Heim brewery. In the West Bottoms the Interstate Ice Company gives five tons each day for distribution in that section.

"For the North End, the McClure flats, Warden court and for the homes of many needy intermediate families," said Ensign Heazlitt, "ice is purchased out of the penny ice fund. We are still able to give ten pounds for a penny, and on Saturday we allow them to purchase twenty pounds, as there is no delivery on Sunday.

"The ice so delivered is not to be cracked up and used in drinking water. There are babies at most of the homes and it is used to keep their milk cool and sweet and to preserve what little else perishable the family may have. At first many of the mothers were wasteful, not knowing how to preserve ice, but I made a trip through the penny ice district and taught the mothers how to keep it by means of plenty of old newspaper and sacks.

"Some of them have made rude ice boxes which enables them to keep the ice longer than before. By next year we hope to have depots distributed throughout the district where ice may be secured.

"I have often wished that the subscribers to the fund could have gone with me on my trip. They would be delighted to see the good their money is doing. We consider penny ice the best thing that has ever been done for the unfortunate of this city. Many of the mothers cannot speak English but they all show their gratitude in their worn, wan faces.

"The arrival of the penny ice wagon in a neighborhood is always greeted by the children, who shout, 'Penny ice, penny ice!'

"Next year we want to be able to start out the wagons in time to supply the unfortunate just as soon as warm weather arrives. There is no doubt that the distribution of ice has saved the lives of many helpless little ones this year."

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August 9, 1909

FORMAL FUNERAL FOR
ENGLISH GIRL'S CANARY.

Bird Victim of Hardships Was
Buried in Depot Matron's
Back Yard.

In the yard in the rear of the home of Mrs. Ollie Everingham, the matron at the Union depot, is a little mound. Beneath it in a tin box lies the cotton encased body of a little canary bird, the sole companion and pet of Miss Ethel McFarland, an English girl, who immigrated to this country just seven weeks ago. Bobbie, the bird, died yesterday morning, just after Miss McFarland had stepped from a Wabash train from St. Louis, where she had been looking for employment. Miss McFarland, who is Mrs. Everingham's protege, was her guest last night.

A little more than two months ago Miss McFarland, a clerk and bookkeeper in London, left her home for this country. She had read much of the United States and believed her future lay here. When sh e departed she had, besides her clothing, her pet canary bird, which she had reared from a nestling. The little fellow, whom she named Bobby, was attached to her as she was to him. A charge of $2.50 was made for carrying the bird on the ship, and when Miss McFarland reached this side she discovered that she owed the steward $1 more for caring for it en route.

Seven weeks ago a ruddy faced girl with a decided English accent, carrying two suit cases and the cage containing the canary bird, got off a train at the Union depot. Mrs. Everingham's attention was attracted to the girl and from that time on, Miss McFarland declares, he one best friend was the matron.

Mrs. Everingham secured lodgings for the girl, and the next day got her a position in a household.

"I don't want to work at books; I want to learn to keep house as they do in America," she told the matron.

Two weeks ago the family with whom Miss McFarland lived departed for the North. She heard of a position in St. Louis and a friend whom she had met through Mrs. Everingham offered to assist her in securing the position.

St. Louis was not to the liking of the English girl and she started back to Kansas City Friday night, arriving here yesterday morning. The ride was too much for the bird, which was dead when Miss McFarland arrived at the depot.

With tears streaming down her face and almost heartbroken at the loss of her little companion, Miss McFarland sought Mrs. Everingham. The sympathetic depot matron had a tin box in her desk. Some cotton was secured and the little bird was wrapped in the cotton, placed in the box and given a ceremonious burial in the back yard of the matron's home.

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July 27, 1909

SEPARATE CHUTE FOR WOMEN.

Central Station Holdover to Be Re-
modeled Along Modern Lines.

If the plans of Walter C. Root, a member of the tenement commission, are carried out, the holdover and "chute" will not be so uninhabitable in the future. Accompanied by Commissioner Thomas R. Marks, Mr. Root visited the holdover yesterday. He will superintend its remodeling.

The plans call for a separate chute for female prisoners while police court is in session and they are awaiting trial.

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July 26, 1909

THOUGHT SHE HAD A MILLION.

Miss Jessie Pomfret, Writer and
Pomfret Estate Claimant, Dies.

Miss Jessie Pomfret died yesterday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock in Independence from consumption. She had been ill for the last two years.

No arrangements have been made for the funeral, but the body will be taken to her home in Daviess county. Miss Pomfret, while a resident of Independence, was engaged in newspaper work. She went to Rock Island, Ill., and then to Chicago, afterwards to Cincinnati, where she became interested as one of the heirs of an English estate of $17,000,000. She spent considerable money in investigating the Pomfret millions of which she expected to get a share of $1,000,000.

The Pomfret estate consists of an establishment in Red Lion street, London, and cash in the Bank of England. With it goes either a coloneley in the British army or a seat in the house of commons.

Lemuel Pomfret, brother of William Pomfret's father, induced the family to change the spelling of the name from Pomfrey to Pomfret. William Pomfret was the lineal descendant of Colonel Pomfrey, w ho held a commission from King George. He deserted the British army and joined Washington's forces.

The estate reverted to the crown, but was afterward restored to the family.

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July 16, 1909

BURNED CHECK DUPLICATED.

Substitute Teacher's Tears Are
Turned to Smiles.

Miss May Bolshaw's tears when she discovered a week ago that she had inadvertently burned her pay check for $25 were all for naught. Last night the board of education authorized the issuance of a duplicate check, and Miss Bolshaw, who had counted on this money to assist her in whiling away vacation hours, will be disappointed.

The check was for work performed as a substitute teacher. Miss Bolshaw received it early this month. She did not need the money, and so did not cash it. In the meantime she cleaned her desk and when she burned the old papers she burned the check.

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July 9, 1909

SAVED FROM DEATH
BY GIRL'S QUICK WIT.

ELECTRICIAN GRABBED JUST IN
TIME BY MARY JOHNSON.

Was Suspended From Guy Rope Over
Flood Waters of Missouri With
High Tension Current
Paralyzing Body.

Suspended over the waters of the Missouri river from a guy rope on the discharge pope of the new pump in the East Bottoms, while a high tension current coursed through his body, paralyzing him and burning his flesh, A. J. Winnie, an electrician, was saved from death yesterday afternoon by Miss Mary Johnson, who, at the risk of her own life, grabbed his body and broke the short circuit. She was severely shocked as was her brother, Dan Johnson, but between them they rescued the lineman without serious injury to either.

The accident occurred in the early part of the afternoon. Miss Johnson is a daughter of A. D. Johnson of 334 Olive street, the contractor who built the pumping station, and she has been greatly interested in seeing the big centrifugal pump work. With a friend, Mrs. J. Dixon, she visited the pumping house yesterday afternoon. Her brother, Dan, was awaiting them and rowed them to the pump house, which stands some distance in what is now part of the Missouri river. The pump had been turned over to the city Wednesday night but Mr. Johnson remained there to render any assistance that might be needed by J. Nepher, the city inspector, and A. J. Winnie, the electrician who was given charge of the plant.

CLIMBS ON DISCHARGE PIPE.

A test of the pump was favorably commented on by the women and when the big motor was stopped, Winnie worked at the incandescent lights about the room. The pump house is ten feet above the present height of the river and it was planned to place clusters of electric lights on river and shore sides of the building. These would be over openings in the building eight feet in width. To place the lamps on the river side, Winnie found it necessary to get on the roof. To reach that place he clambered out on the big discharge pipe and then with his left arm over the steel guy rope he threw his right arm over the conduit which centered the big opening in the pump house.

Miss Johnson was about to compliment him on his agility, when his body suddenly became rigid, his face took on a look of agony and smoke curled up from his right hand and arm. Miss Johnson had studied electricity. She realized that Winnie had formed a connection with a high tension current, and that it was shocking him to death, having completely paralyzed him so that he could not help himself.

Without a thought for her own safety, she leaned forward and grasped him about the body. Her brother Dan, who was standing a few feet away, grabbed at her at the same time and the current passed through the trio. The force of the hold which Miss Johnson took a Winnie was sufficient to break his grasp of the charged conduit, and he swung helpless from the guy rope.

HEROINE IS MODEST.

The shock which Miss Johnson and her brother received stunned them, but they quickly recovered and, taking hold of Winnie, helped him into the pumphouse.

Winnie was badly burned. It took some time before he recovered sufficiently to realize how he had been saved. The skin was burned from his right hand, and his left arm was seared in several places where the current had passed through his body to the guy rope from which he was suspended. Miss Johnson applied oils to his burns and Winnie announced after thanking her that he would remain on the "job" until his time was up in the evening.

It was not until an hour after the incident that Mr. Johnson or his sister realized how close to death Winnie had been or the risk Miss Johnson had taken when she grasped his swinging body.

Miss Johnson modestly disclaimed any special credit for her part in saving Winnie from death.

"I knew enough about electricity to realize that he was grounded, and the first thing I thought of was to break the connection. To do this I made a grab at him, but did not think that I would get the shock that I did. Brother Dan grabbed me at the same time, or perhaps I would have fallen in the river. As it was, we both received severe shocks, but they did not injure us."

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