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February 2, 1910

BOY AFRAID OF AUTOS
KILLED BY BIG CAR.

Frank Smoot, 15, Crushed Under
Overturned Delivery Van --
Had Premonition of
Disaster.
Frank Smoot, Who Was Killed Under a Delivery Van.
FRANK SMOOT.

Frank Smoot, 15 years old, delivery boy for the John Taylor Dry Goods Company, was instantly killed at 7:20 o'clock last night when a new twenty-four horsepower delivery wagon in which he was riding struck a pile of bricks on Baltimore avenue between Thirty-eighth and Thirty-ninth streets and turned over, crushing him.

Frank Limpus, who was driving, works for the company which sold the car and was teaching a man to drive it.

They were just finished making deliveries and were returning when the accident happened. Limpus and J. J. Emmert, who had charge of the deliveries, were on the seat and young Smoot was seated on Emmert's lap.

"We were going north on Baltimore about six or seven miles an hour," said Limpus. "It was rather dark and we did not see the pile of bricks until we were almost upon them. I tried to pull away from them, but did not have time and our right front wheel hit with a crash. The bricks were piled about seven feet high and when the car, which weighs about 3,500 pounds, struck them the corner of the pile was torn away. The force of the collision did not stop us and the wheels on the right side ran up onto the pile until the car was overbalanced and turned over. The three of us were thrown out, young Smoot falling beneath the heavy car, the weight of which crushed his life out, almost instantly.

"It all happened so quickly that we did not realize he was hurt until Emmert and I had picked ourselves up. I saw that the boy was caught under the car and tried to remove him, but was not able to lift the car off him. A crowd of people came up and several men helped me lift the car and we pulled him out."

Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, deputy coroner, had the body removed to the Freeman & Marshall undertaking rooms.

The victim of the accident was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Smoot, 19 East Thirty-first street. Mrs. Smoot was at home preparing supper for her son when she was informed of his death.

"I knew something would happen," she said. "He did not want to go to work this morning. He is not used to automobiles and does not like to be around them. Just before he left for work he said to me, "Mamma, I expect John Taylor's will be getting air ships before long and deliver the packages with a long rope down the chimneys."

Mr. Taylor was notified of the accident and called at the undertaking rooms last night.

The dead boy had had been working for the dry goods company for the past year. He was born in Chicago, but was brought to Kansas City when he was six months old. The father of the boy runs a dress goods sample room at 406 East Eleventh street. Besides the parents, two little sisters, Addie and Edna, survive.

No one responsible for the bricks being piled in the street could be located last night, but several persons who live in the immediate neighborhood of the accident assert that no warning lights were placed.

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January 31, 1910

POPULAR FIREMAN DIES.

"Bob" Hamilton of Kansas City,
Kas., Was "Children's Friend."
'The
LIEUTENANT "BOB" HAMILTON.

" 'Bob' Hamilton is dead." This report yesterday in Kansas City, Kas., brought grief to young and old alike in hundreds of homes in that city, for big, good natured "Bob" Hamilton was the most popular member of the Kansas City, Kas., fire department. His death was due to typhoid fever. Officially he was known as Lieutenant Robert Hamilton of No. 1 hose company, but to the "boys" and to his hundreds of friends he was "Bob." Tributes to his personal bravery and efficiency as a fireman were paid yesterday by his superior officers and the men who worked with him.

Robert Hamilton was 31 years old and had been connected with the city fire department since June, 1906. His record as a fireman is unsurpassed, and his engaging manners and Irish wit won for him hundreds of friends. Little children or women calling at the fire station to inspect the apparatus invariably asked to be conducted about by "Bob" Hamilton. He will long be remembered as the children's friend.

Mr. Hamilton died yesterday at Bethany hospital in Kansas City, Kas. His father, John Hamilton, his mother and immediate relatives were present.

Funeral arrangements have not yet been completed, although it is probable that the burial will take place in Kansas City, Kas.

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January 26, 1910

A HERMIT FORTY-NINE YEARS.

Grinter Dies in White Church Cabin;
Mourned for Wife.

Ambrose B. Grinter, known in Wyandotte county as the "Hermit of White Church," died yesterday morning in the little old frame house he built for his bride in 1859. Had he lived until February 23 he would have been 92 years old. He left no near relatives.

He arrived in White Church in 1859 in a wagon, bringing with him a young wife. They built a little cabin of rough logs. Two years later his wife died. Since that time he had lived a life of seclusion, rarely visiting even the village store and shunning society. The little children of the village used to be afraid of the odd old man and at sundown the hermit could be heard calling his chickens. "Come along, little ones; come in, Wyandottes."

The little children's fears were groundless, though for a year or more before his death he at times chatted with the school children as they passed his door.

Early this winter he sat by a cheerful wood fire in his house and told a story of his life to a friend.

"I was born in Logan county, Ky., February 23, 1818," he said. "My daddy was a farmer and a hunter and he early learned me to use a rifle. When I was a lad of 14 he bound me out to a cabinet maker, William McMullen, who was afterward my 'daddy-in-law," and I learned his trade. I married his daughter, Mary Elizabeth, when I was 22. We lived in Kentucky till 1858, when we started out for Kansas in an old linch-pin wagon, which my 'daddy-in-law' had made for us. We drove two sleek oxen. When we reached Wyandotte county I bought fifty-four acres from the government. We built a little cabin and were very happy until Mary died and since then somehow or another, I don't care for the society of others. I spent my time in the woods with my dog and gun until I became too feeble to get about and now I must sit by the fire and smoke and dream."

Mr. Grinter had suffered with a cancer on his face for many years. About two years ago he went to Bethany hospital for treatment, where he remained for more than a year. While he was gone his neighbors cleaned up the house, which no woman's hand had touched since Mrs. Grinter died. One of these rooms was filled almost entirely with copies of old newspapers, neatly folded. Among these were copies of the Kansas City Journal and the Wyandotte Herald of the '50's. Mr. Grinter has been a reader of both papers for many years.

Another room, apparently that of his wife, was found in the condition it was left many years ago. An old sunbonnet hung on the post of the old-fashioned cord bedstead, the covers of the bed were rumpled and a woman's dress hung over the footboard. Mothers in the little village have long told stories to their little ones of how old Mr. Grinter, with a tender remembrance, had never touched the room since her death and never allowed strangers to look into it.

Funeral services ill be conducted by the Rev. J. W. Payne this afternoon at 3 o'clock at the old Grinter chapel. Burial will be in the chapel grounds.

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January 25, 1910

3 KILLED, 3 HURT
WHEN AUTO SKIDS
OVER CLIFF DRIVE.

MACHINE DROPS EIGHTY FEET
AND IS DEMOLISHED
ON ROCKS.

John Mahoney and Wife and
Thomas McGuire the
Victims.
Wrecked Automobile Plunged Over Cliff Drive.
WRECKED AUTO WHICH PLUNGED OVER EMBANKMENT ON CLIFF DRIVE, KILLING THREE.

Three persons were killed and three, who by a miraculous streak of providence escaped death, were injured yesterday afternoon when a large automobile plunged over an eighty-foot embankment on the Cliff drive, at Scarritt's Point. The dead:

John Mahoney, aged 51, grading contractor, 616 North Seventh street, Kansas City, Kas.
Mrs. John Mahoney, aged 46 years.
Thomas McGuire, 50, a foreman for Mr. Mahoney; resided at 53 South Forest avenue, Kansas City, Kas. Father of six children.

THE INJURED.

John O'Connor, 42 years old, of Fifty-first street and Swope parkway.
Miss Nellie Mahoney, 19 years old, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Mahoney.
Lillian, 6-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Mahoney.

The O'Connors also have two other children, John, age 8, and Anna, age 13, who were in school at the time of the fatal crash which claimed their parents.

The accident is ascribed to a slippery condition of the driveway, water which trickled from the cliff having frozen. The machine, in rounding the curve at Scarritt's point, evidently skidded on the ice toward the precipice at the outer edge of the drive. Mahoney, who was the contractor that had charge of the grading work on this scenic drive, was driving the car. He evidently tried to steer it toward the cliff, with the result that t he heavy rear end of the car was thrown completely around, the rear wheels crashing through a fence and over the abyss.

FORTY-FOOT DROP.

At the point where the machine went over the cliff there is a sheer descent of probably forty feet, with probably forty feet more of steep hillside ending in an accumulation of boulders. Tracks in the roadway showed where the rear wheels of the car had backed over the precipice and the entire car was precipitated upon the rocks below, alighting on its side and crushing two of the victims. The others either landed on the rocks or were caught in the wreckage.

The scene of the accident is just above and a little to the southeast of the Heim brewery and the men who witnessed the tragedy, or who were attracted by the piteous cries of the victims, rushed to the place and gave first aid to the injured. Police from No. 8 station, who were notified, carried the injured down the cliff, which owing to the slippery condition of the ground, is almost impassable even for pedestrians, placed them in the police ambulance and hurried them to hospitals. The dead were removed later to undertaking establishments, the bodies of Mr. and Mrs. Mahoney being taken to the Leo J. Stewart parlors and that of Mr. McGuire to Carroll-Davidson's.

BODIES UNDER CAR.

The scene following the tragedy was a sickening and pitiable one. the first persons to arrive found pinioned under the wreckage of the big motor car the mangled bodies of Mr. Mahoney, Mr. McGuire, Mr. O'Connor and the two girls. Mrs. Mahoney lay on the rocks at the rear of the machine unconscious, but still alive. She expired within ten minutes. Mr. Mahoney and Mr. McGuire were killed outright evidently.

The younger daughter of the Mahoneys still grasped a doll which she had carried in her arms in the machine and, gazing upon the forms of her parents as they lay still puon the frozen ground she cried piteously:

"I want my papa, I want my mamma."

It was with difficulty that she was induced to leave the spot and her childish grief brought tears to the eyes of every bystander. Miss Mahoney was dazed badly. She talked little, though seeming to partially realize what had happened, and just before she was placed in the police ambulance she was prostrated. Mr. O'Connor also was dazed, though he walked about and declared he was not hurt.

TWO SEE ACCIDENT.

Daniel Ferhnback, 19 years old, of 28 Bigelow street, just below Scarritt's Point, with Thomas Nelligan, 10 years old, were eye-witnesses to the accident. Ferhnback was chopping wood in his yard and the Nelligan boy was with him when they glanced up and saw the machine go over the brink of the hill.

"It was terrible," said Ferhnback. "The rear end went over first and the whole thing fell down into the hollow. It was done so quickly I hardly knew what had happened, but it seemed to me that the machine partly turned over. The noise sounded like a bunch of sewer pipe falling and hitting something."

For a moment, Ferhnback said, he scarcely knew what to do. Then he heard a cry, "O, God! O, God! " It was Mr. O'Connor pinioned under the car.

Ferhnback and his boy companion at once started up the hill but Nelligan, being more nimble, arrived at the top first. The boy took one look at the mass of twisted iron and wood and at the blood covered bodies under and about the machine and he ran back the winding path to where Ferhnback was hurrying up.

"It's awful," said the boy, covering his face with his hands as if to shut out the sight.

CRASH IS HEARD.

About the time that Ferhnback and Nelligan were horrified to see the machine plunge over the cliff, M. G. Givson, of 2026 Charlotte street, was walking along the Chicago & Alton tracks, far below the Cliff drive. He hears a crash but paid no attention to it and was startled by the screams of a woman, evidently one of the Mahoney sisters. He also rushed up the hill, arriving about the time that Ferhnback reached the top.

Mr. Gibson picked up the little Mahoney child and bandaged her head with handkerchiefs. Mrs. Mahoney lay free of the car, and Mr. Gibson said that she still breathed when he arrived. He took one of the cushions which had been hurled from the automobile and placed it under the woman's head, but within ten minutes she was dead.

Miss Nellie Mahoney was carried to one side by the two men, who made her as comfortable as possible. Mr. O'Connor lay with one leg pinioned under a rear wheel of the car, a short distance from the body of Mrs. Mahoney. Mr. Gibson and Mr. Ferhnback managed to lift the rear portion of the car enough to extricate the man and Mr. O'Connor immediately got up and walked about, declaring that he had no pain and that he was all right.

POLICE NOTIFIED.

The accident happened at 3:15 o'clock. It was not so very many minutes later that Mr. Gibson, having done everything he could to help the injured, ran to No. 8 police station, 3001 Guinotte street. Sergeant Edward McNamara, Patrolman Gus Metzinger and Motorcycleman George A. Lyon responded at once. They were joined later by Park Policeman W. F. Beabout and the police carried the two Mahoney girls and assisted Mr. O'Connor down the cliff to the ambulance.

Coroner B. H. Zwart went in peerson to view the bodies, and he summoned undertakers. It was 5 o'clock before the bodies finally were removed, the conditions in the vicinity of the scene of the horror making it difficult to carry the bodies out.

Even the coroner, accustomed as he is to such things, was moved at the horror of the scene. Mr. Mahoney lay crushed under the car and a piece of the spokes of the machine was found to have penetrated his adbomen.

The Point, which is the highest on the Cliff drive, lies under the shadow of the north side of the cliff. the sun does not strike there, save during a small portion of the day, and water which runs down the hill is frozen, as it trickles across the roadway, into a mass of treacherous ice, making it difficult for motor cars without ice clutches to round the curve at that point without skidding.

Mr. Mahoney, who was driving the machine, sat in the front seat with Mr. McGuire, and the others sat in the rear seat. The car was a seven-passenger Pierce-Arrow. The tracks in the driveway show that the machine came round the curve well within the middle of the roadway and away from the precipice. It is probable that Mahoney had noticed the slippery condition of the pavement and purposely kept away from the brink.

When the fatal stretch of ice was reached, however, the auto was shown to have skidded greatly toward the chasm and the theory is that Mahoney, in order to avoid the very thing which happened, headed his car toward the inside of the road. If he did, he miscalculated terribly, for this swung the heavy rear of the car around over the edge of the cliff and the ill-fated occupants were hurled down up the rocks. The wooden fence, through wh ich the auto smashed, was erected as a warning to daring motorists. It went out as if made of egg shell.

That the machine did not take fire and add to the horror is believed to have been due to a final effort of Mr. Mahoney. the engine was found to have been shut down entirely, and it is believed that Mr. Mahoney automatically pulled his lever as the machine shot backward over the precipice.

At the emergency hospital, whither the two Mahoney girls and Mr. O'Connor were removed, it was stated last evening that Mr. O'Connor's case is the least serious of any of the injured. He sustained a wound on the back of his head and some bruises. He probably will recover.

After being removed to the hospital, little Lillian Mahoney lapsed into a coma and Miss Nellie Mahoney became hysterical. It was stated that neither of the girls knew that their parents are dead. It was feared neither could stand the shock.

The condition of both the girls is regarded as serious. Miss Nellie sustained a dislocation of one of the shoulders, a fracture of the right arm and bruises about the body.

The younger girl received a bad cut about the back of the head and bruises about the body. Both girls are suffering terribly from nervous shock, and this is what makes their cases so grave.

It was said at St. Margaret's hospital at midnight that Lillian Mahoney is probably fatally injured. The child is under the effects of opiates. It is belived her skull is fractured.

BUILT THE DRIVEWAY.

Mr. Mahoney executed the grading work on the very driveway where he, with his wife, met death. It is said that he was familiar with every foot of the ground along the roadway and that because of the pride which he took in the work he particularly liked taking a spin in his machine along the course.

John Mahoney, One of the Victims of the Cliff Drive Motor Car Accident.
JOHN MAHONEY.

The ill-fated machine was purchased by Mr. Mahoney from the estate of Mrs. Mary S. Dickerson, who died. It is said that Mr. Mahoney paid $3,500 for the car.

FRIENDS SHOW SYMPATHY.

A telegram telling of the death of Mr. Mahoney was dispatched late last night to his old schoolmate and business partner, Justice Michael Ross, who is now visiting in Jacksonville, Fla. Mrs. Ross went to the residence of the dead contractor last night and arranged to take charge of the children.

"My husband and Mr. mahoney were lifelong friends. I know if Michael were here he would want me to take care of the children and and give them a temporary or even a permanent home," Mrs. Ross said.

Annie and Johnny Mahoney heard about the catastrophe at 4:30 o'clock in the afternoon. They were overwhelmed with grief.

CHILD PREDICTED ACCIDENT.

"Oh, I told papa not to buy that auto. I told him all along it would lead to some accident," sobbed the girl.

The boy, four years younger, soon quieted himself and began to assure his sister. The children were taken last night to the Ross home, where they may stay permanently.

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January 24, 1910

BOY ACCIDENTALLY
KILLS STEPSISTER.

Carries Dying Child Into House
and Runs Mile and a Half
for a Doctor.

Sobbing with grief and carrying in his arms the unconscious form of Elizabeth Baumgarten, his little sister, who was bleeding form a bullet hole in her forehead, Willam Mudder, 16 years old, staggered into the home of his stepfather, Marten Baumgarten, Kansas City, Kas., yesterday afternoon.

Baumgarten, a carpenter, sat by the side of his wife, who is confined to her bed with a 2-weeks-old baby by her side in the bedroom of their little home. A number of old acquaintances were also in the room. It was while they were talking and laughing the boy entered with his burden.

"I didn't mean to do it papa," he shrieked. He hurriedly explained that he had shot the little girl accidentally with a .22-caliber target rifle. Bolting from the room, the boy ran a mile and a half to the office of Dr. David W. Thompson at Nineteenth street and Quindaro boulevard.

"Doctor, I shot my little sister accidentally, and I want you to come to her quick," he shouted as he entered the doctor's office.

Dr. Thompson hurried with the boy to the home. The bullet had entered the middle of the child's forehead and lodged near the base of the brain. She died about twenty minutes after the doctor arrived. Dr. Thompson notified Dr. J. A. Davis, coroner of Wyandotte county, who decided that an autopsy would be unnecessary.

The Mudder lad works during the week for his aunt, Mrs. John Smith, who runs a grocery at Twenty-seventh street and Bell avenue in Kansas City, Mo. He went home yesterday and began a romp with his four brothers and three stepsisters. He took a little target rifle belonging to the step father and, calling the children, started out in the back yard to shoot at a mark. All seven of the children walked down the back stairs from the porch. Elizabeth, 4 years old, was the last. Just as she reached the bottom step, by some unknown means which the lad himself cannot explain, the gun was discharged, the bullet entering the little girl's forehead.

Mrs. Baumgarten was prostrated over the little girl's death. The father, too, was grief-stricken. The Mudder boy was affected more than either. He could not be comforted and paced the rooms of the house back and forth. Dr. Thompson said last night that the boy was nearly crazed when he came to his office.

Martin Baumgarten, the boy's stepfather, said last night that William was absolutely blameless. "I am confident that the shooting was purely accidental," he said. "The boy loved his little stepsister just the same as if she had been his own sister. It was just one of those unfortunate, unavoidable accidents.

Funeral services for the little girl will be held tomorrow morning at the Church of the Blessed Sacramet in Chelsea place. Burial will be in St. John's cemetery.

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January 24, 1910

DEAD MAN'S HOARD
HIS LAST PILLOW.

FIFTEEN THOUSAND DOLLARS
IN SECURITIES IN CASHBOX
UNDER HIS HEAD.

Body of Oscar Schoen, Aged
70, Found Amid His
Savings.

With his head pillowed on a cash box containing $15,000 worth of negotiable securities, mostly government bonds and money orders, Oscar Schoen, a retired shoemaker, 70 years old, was found dead in bed in a squalid room at Missouri avenue and Main streets yesterday morning.

The old man's hand clutched a half emptied phial of morphine tablets while at his side lay a loaded 38-caliber revolver. One of the cartridges had been snapped but had failed to ignite.

Coroner Harry Czarlinsky, who was summoned, stated that death was due to morphine poisoning, whether taken as an overdose or with suicidal intent he was unable to state. He ordered the body taken to Freeman & Marshall's undertaking establishment.

MONEY ALSO IN ROOM.

Although Schoen had occupied the same room in which he was found for over two years, little or nothing was known about him by the owner of the rooming house. He was last seen alive on Thursday morning by Guy Holmes, the janitor of the premises. He told Holmes that he was feeling sick and that if it were not for the expense he would visit a doctor. He used to retire regularly at 6 o'clock every evening and rise at 8 in the morning, when he would go out and buy the daily papers, return and stay in his room. Rarely he made trips up to town.

Police headquarters was notified of the old man's death and Patrolman John P. McCauley, who was sent to investigate, made a further search of the room. Concealed behind an old stove in which Schoen had done his cooking was found $60 in bills and silver, and in an old carpetbag apparently discarded and thrown under the bed, the officer located several abstracts and deeds to Kansas City property in the vicinity of Thirty-first and Troost avenue, which are supposedly of considerable value.

WILL IN POCKETBOOK.

Schoen's last will and testament was also found in an old pocketbook. By its provisions all his property is bequeathed to relatives by the name of Goetz living in Kempsvile, Ill. Charles A. Schoen, a brother at Darlington, Ind., was named as executor. The police have telegraphed to all parties concerned.

One of the witnesses of the will was the manager of a local real estate firm, through whom Schoen had conducted his business. He stated that he know that the old man owned a great deal of property. Schoen at one time conducted a cobbler's shop at 2442 Broadway, but left there about four years ago, giving his reason for selling out and moving the fact that robberies were too common in that part of town.

Naturalization papers dated 1872 and taken out at Darlington, Ind., were found among Schoen's effects, together with several applications to different German provident associations.

Schoen had lived in Kansas City about twenty-two years. He has a sister, Mrs. Bertha H. Goetz, at Kempsville, Ill., and a niece, Mrs. Agnes Yak Shan, residing in Alaska.

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January 20, 1910

OLD FIRE CAPTAIN DIES.

James O'Sullivan Was Member of
Department Twenty Years.

James O'Sullivan, captain of hose company No. 21 of the city fire department, died at his home, 6616 Independence avenue, at 4:45 o'clock yesterday morning. A widow and four children survive. Captain O'Sullivan was born in Ireland in 1865 and came to America when only a few years old.

On May 18, 1990, he was appointed to the Kansas City fire department and assigned to No. 2 hose company. One year later he was transferred to No. 5 hose company, where he served as hoseman until the establishment of hose company No. 21 in March, 1904 to which he was transferred and promoted to captain, which position he held with a splendid record until his death. He was a member of the Knights of Columbus.

Captain O'Sullivan was the inventor of the combination spanner and life-saving belt which was adopted by the department about two months ago.

The funeral services will be in St. Stephen's church, corner of Eleventh street and Bennington avenue, at 9:30 o'clock Friday morning. Interment will be in Mount St. Mary's cemetery.

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January 17, 1910

BOTH DIE OF PNEUMONIA.

George Fox's Death Occurs Just
Week After Wife's Demise.

One week from the day his wife died of the same disease, George A. Fox, a foreman for the Faultless Starch Company, died yesterday morning at his home, 1417 Belleview avenue, of pneumonia. He was 59 years old.

A week ago Sunday Mrs. Eugenia Fox died after a short illness and her husband displayed symptoms of the same disease at the time. She was buried, and at once Mr. Fox's illness became serious. Six children survive. They are George A. Rhode, Hill, Henry H. and Eugenia Fox, and Mrs. J. W. Lane.

Mr. Fox lived in Kansas City twenty-five years in the employ of the Faultless Starch Company. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

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January 10, 1910

SON OF ACTRESS IS BURNED.

Father Dead, Mother Away, Boy
Hurt Fatally Playing Indian.

While playing with some other boys in a vacant foundry at Nicholson and Prospect avenues yesterday morning at 11:30 o'clock, Eddie Campbell, aged 8 years, was so badly burned that he died four hours later at the University hospital.

The lad was attempting to make an Indian fire with some logs, and as the timber would not ignite readily he poured some kerosene on the heated portion. An explosion followed and young Campbell's clothes caught on fire. His playmates made frantic efforts to extinguish the flames, but did not succeed until after the boy had sustained fatal injuries. The body was taken to Stewart's undertaking rooms.

Eddie Campbell had been living with an uncle, Albert Campbell, at 728 North Chestnut street, for some time. His father is dead and his mother, Stella S. Campbell, who is an actress, is touring Michigan.

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January 9, 1910

LIVED HERE FIFTY YEARS.

Mrs. Elizabeth Tobener, Widow of
Henry Tobener, Is Dead.

Mrs. Elizabeth Tobener, 73 years old, the widow of Henry Tobener, who operated a plug tobacco factory at Fifteenth street and Grand avenue for thirty three years, died late Friday night at her home, 2826 Woodland avenue, of acute pneumonia. She was born in Germany and had lived in Kansas City fifty years.

Mrs. Tobener is survived by four sons, Robert H., Frank W., William C. and Edward F. Tobener, and two daughters, Mrs. Dr. B. W. Lindberg and Mrs. Edward Oberholz. Burial will be in the family vault at Elmwood cemetery. The details of the funeral had not been made last night.

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December 30, 1909

FOUND DEAD IN A CELLAR.

George Dixon Stricken While at
Work Cultivating Mushrooms.

George Dixon, 66 years old, living in the Metropolitan hotel, was found dead in a cellar under the Last Chance saloon, Bridge street and Broadway, yesterday morning. Dixon, who cultivated mushrooms in the cellar, did not return to his home on Tuesday night, and his wife requested the police to make a search.

Coroner Harry Czarlinsky was summoned and after pronouncing death to be due to heart failure, ordered the body sent to the Carroll-Davidson undertaking rooms.

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December 29, 1909

DIES IN GROCERY STORE.

Nebraska Visitor Had Just Pur-
chased Cigars When Stricken.

While handing the clerk a dollar to pay for some cigars he had just purchased, Isaac N. Mothershead, 57 years old, a farmer of Niponee, Neb., died of heart disease in Edward Kendall's grocery store, at Fourteenth and Harrison streets, yesterday morning. Mr. Mothershead and his wife had been spending the Christmas holidays at the home of their daughter, Mrs. O. P. Haslett, 1420 Tracy avenue.

The body was taken to the Stine undertaking rooms in the police ambulance. A widow and five daughters survive him.

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December 27, 1909

WHO KNOWS MRS. ALICE CONN?

Relatives Wire That Her Mother Is
Dead in Wichita.

"Try and locate Mrs. Alice Conn, wife of Fred Conn. Mother is dead. EDNA K. YOUNG."

This telegram was received last evening from Wichita, Kas., by Chief of Police Frank Snow. But Mrs. Alice Conn is nowhere to be found, either in the directories of the two Kansas Citys or in Argentine. Consequently Chief Snow has asked the papers of the city to assist in the matter and help find the daughter.

If any one knows where Mrs. Alice Conn, or a Fred Conn, live they may confer a great favor on both the young woman and also on the relatives in Wichita.

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December 25, 1909

MISS MARGARET MENET DEAD.

End Comes to Former Kansas City
Writer in Washington.

Miss Margaret Menet, formerly of Kansas City, died yesterday at the home of her mother in Washington, D. C. Miss Menet came to Kansas City from Lawrence, Kas., in 1900, to work for The Journal, where she remained until 1905. Miss Menet in that year went to the Washinton Post, remaining in the national capital until the time of her death. She was a pleasing writer, with a graceful literary style. During her connection with The Journal she made many friends to whom the news of her untimely death comes as a distinct shock.

The body will be sent to Lawrence, Kas., and will be buried in the family lot Sunday. Miss Menet's father, who died several years ago, wsa a pioneer resident of Lawrence, Kas. She is survived by a mother and one sister, Mrs. W. J. Frick, wife of Dr. Frick, 812 Benton boulvard, this city.

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December 23, 1909

FOR 27 YEARS A HOTEL MAID.

Death Ends Margaret Sullivan's
Long Service at Coates House.

Margaret Sullivan, 65 years old, maid in charge of the parlor floor of the Coates house for twenty-seven years, died at St. Joseph's hospital yesterday morning of pneumonia.

Among her effects in the room at the Coates house which she occupied almost continuously while employed there, were found some papers indicating that she left a considerable estate. It is known about the hotel that she lost a large sum of money in a bank failure ten or twelve years ago. At that time sh e told the housekeeper that she would not deposit another cent in a bank, but this resolve was forgotten, for it developed yesterday that she had a certificate of deposit in the National Bank of Commerce for several hundred dollars. Just what her estate amounts to will not be known until the arrival of her two sisters, Mrs. C. R. Helbing of Grand Crossing, near Chicago, and Miss M. Sullivan of Ogdensburg, N. Y. Mrs. Helbing wired the hotel people yesterday afternoon that she would arrive this morning.

Quiet and unassuming, Miss Sullivan worked steadily day after day, never allowing herself a vacation and making herself a veritable fixture in the first big hotel of Kansas City. She would not allow an y of the other maids to assist her and was on duty regularly.

"It is supposed that Miss Sullivan had some money when she came here," said Manager Firey of the Coates house yesterday afternoon. "She received $25 a month and her board, room and laundry. She was of simple tastes and I suppose saved much fore than her salary, for the parlor floor is supposed to be worth something in the shape of gratuities to the maids, as well as to the bellboys. Her death is regretted by everyone attached to the hotel who knew her."

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December 19, 1909

HURRIES FROM GRAVE
TO LAUGH ON STAGE.

GIRL WIFE SINGS SCOTTISH DIT-
TIES, CHOKING SOBS.

As Orchestra Plays "Hearts and
Flowers" for Next Sketch the
"Two Macks" Mourn Death of
"Danny," Their First Born.

Unknown to the audience of the Gayety theater yesterday afternoon, while the orchestra playing the gladsome tunes suggestive of love and happiness, a drama was being enacted in the dressing rooms behind the scenes. In her room sat a wife of one year, her head buried in her arms and tears streaming down her face. Between sobs she could be heard to say: "My baby, my little boy."

Beside this woman sat a young man, barely out of his teens, trying in his way to console the heartbroken girl. Tears glistened in his eyes. His face was contorted with pain and anguish. He was the picture of despair.

The young man was Douglas McKenzie, 20 years old, of Dundee, Scotland. The girl was Mabel McKenzie, 18 years of age, his wife. The two are known to the stage world as the "Two Macks," and they have been playing a comic sketch in Scotch the last week at the Gayety. The two sat in the dressing room in their plaids and kilts, the same that they had appeared in a few minutes before on the stage.

The orchestra suddenly ceased its playing. The lights were turned low. The next sketch was a love scene and the orchestra in a low key softly began, "Hearts and Flowers." The young wife raised her head and listened. With her sleeve she brushed away the tears.

"I wonder if Danny is in heaven -- I know he is," she said, smiling. "I suppose the angels are now playing the same tune."

Danny was the name of their little boy, only a few weeks old, whom they had buried but two hours before. One year ago Mr. and Mrs. McKenzie were married in Scotland. They came to this country on their honeymoon trip and got a place on the vaudeville stage. They made a tour of Texas and Oklahoma. Two months ago they reached Kansas City.

A baby was born, Danny, they called him. There were doctor bills to pay and room rent. Last Thursday the little boy died. They had no money to pay for its burial. for two days the little body was kept in their rooms at the Wyandotte hotel, the undertakers refusing to take it until the burial expenses were advanced.

Yesterday morning Mr. McKenzie told Tom Hodgeman, manager of the Gayety, of his plight. Mr. Hodgeman immediately went to all the playhouses in the city. He told the young man's story to the actors. When he returned from his trip Mr. Hodgeman had $80, enough to pay the funeral expenses.

HURRY TO THEATER.

Yesterday afternoon the little body was buried. From the cemetery where they had laid to rest their first born the young pair hurried to the theater. They arrived barely in time to dress in Scotch costume for their sketch. The "Two Macks" came out on the stage. They danced the Scotch dances and sang the light and frivolous Scotch ditties. They smiled, they laughed and they joked. Little did the audience realize that behind the mask of happiness were two bleeding hearts, a man and wife who had just come from the cemetery after burying their baby boy.

The curtain was rung down and the two went to their rooms. Mrs. McKenzie broke down in tears. During the long minutes she had been on the stage playing the part of a Scotch lassie the minutes had been torture. "Danny" was dead. He was her first born.

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December 14, 1909

BOY COASTER IS KILLED.

Collision on Thorp Hill, Kansas City,
Kas., Fatal to Harry Wollen-
berg, 14 Years Old.

The first coasting accident of the season in Kansas City, Kas., occurred lsat night when Harry Wollenberg, the 14-year-old son of Martin E. Wollenberg of 1137 Locust street in that city, was struck and fatally injured by a loaded bob sled on the long steep Thorp street hill. Harry was coasting down Thorp street, north from Central avenue, and is supposed to have been struck by a sled coming down the same street, south from Grandview. He was picked up by some of the coasters and taken to a house nearby.

Dr. H. P. Clark of 1215 Central avenue was called and found that the boy had received severe internal injuries. Emergency treatment was given and the boy taken to Bethany hospital in a police ambulance, where Dr. Clark and Dr. C. M. Stemen performed an operation. All efforts to save the boy's life proved fruitless, however, and he died at 12:10 o'clock this morning. The body was taken to the undertaking rooms of Joseph Butler.

The accident occurred about 9:30 o'clock, but it was nearly two and one-half hours later when the ambulance reached the hospital. The delay was caused by the icy condition of the streets. Dr. Clark and Patrolman Thomas Shay, who were with the ambulance, were forced to hold the rear wheels to prevent the vehicle from skidding and turning over.

At the hospital the boy said he did not know who ran into him, and inquiry at the scene of the accident did not divulge this information. Harry Wollenberg was in the Seventh A Grade at the Prescott school. His father, Martin Wollenberg, is employed in the tank room at the Swift Packing Company's plant. He has four other children.

The street where the boy was injured was covered with coasters last night. The hill on Thorp street affords one the longest and steepest slides in the city.

Immediately after the accident to the Wollenberg boy, Sergeant P. H. Peterson ordered his men to stop all coasting on hills if the coasters would not content themselves with coasting in one direction. Last winter several young people were badly injured in the northern part of the city in a collision between two bob sleds which were going in opposite directions.

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December 12, 1909

CITY HALL CANARY KILLED.

"Elizabeth," Pet of Water Depart-
ment, Crushed by Door.

"Elizabeth," the canary that had a record of raising a family of eighteen birds since April 15 last, and which always attracted so much attention because it was given its freedom in the city hall offices of Tom Gregory, auditor of the water department, was accidentally killed yesterday. The little warbler was perched on top of a door when a sudden gust of wind closed the door. The bird was caught in the jam of the door case, and its life crushed out. Mr. Gregory and his office force are inconsolable.

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December 11, 1909

FATHER AND BROTHER DEAD.

Now Patrolman Ganzer's Mother Is
Dying at Lee's Summit.

In the last ten days Charles Ganzer, a police patrolman, has lost his father and brother, and his aged mother now lies at the point of death at Lee's Summit, Mo. The father, George Ganzer, died ten days ago. Yesterday morning William Ganzer, a brother, 24 years old, died on his farm near Hickman Mills. At last reports the officer's mother was reported very low. The funeral of the brother will take place at the Lee's Summit cemetery this afternoon. He will be buried in the family lot.

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December 7, 1909

BOILER KILLS FOUR,
RIPS BUILDING OPEN.

DRIVER THROWN FROM PASS-
ING WAGON, DIES.

Explosion Occurs While Steamfitters
Are at Work -- Other Men In-
jured -- Pickets Blown Off
Fence Across Alley.
Results of a Boiler Explosion at 908-10 Broadway.
EXPLOSION WHICH COST FOUR LIVES.

By the explosion of a boiler in the basement of the six-story building at 908-10 Broadway at 11 o'clock yesterday morning, Michael Frawley and James Cox were killed outright, and Andrew Meyer and Essie Williams, a negro porter, so badly burned and otherwise injured that they died before nightfall. Two others were badly hurt, and three stories of the rear portion of the building were wrecked. Considerable damage also was done to adjoining structures.

Within two minutes business men and pedestrians in the neighborhood ventured to enter the front door of the building bent on rescuing those who were hurt. The flooring on the first and second stories had been splintered and a heavy partition in the middle of the building had toppled over. Every window glass on two stories had been blown out. Heavy timbers, torn from their places, hung over overhead, and for a time a general collapse of the rear section of the interior of the structure was feared.

The cause for the explosion is not known. Steamfitters employed by Val Wagner & Co., 3918 Main street, were adjusting a steamcock on the boiler, and were preparing to clean out the pipes. They had started to work last Saturday and yesterday morning they put fire under the boiler in order to do the cleaning. There was no forewarning of anything being wrong with the apparatus, and when the explosion occurred Michael Frawley, one of the steamfitters, was on top of the boiler. The boiler had not been in use for some time, and it is supposed that this is accountable for the very bad condition it was in when the workmen began the repairing.

ONE DRIVER IS KILLED.

James Cox, a driver for the Stewart Peck Sand Company, happened to be driving through the alley and had just reached the building when the explosion occurred. He was thrown bodily from the wagon and dashed to death against the brick pavement. C. R. Misner, another driver in the employ of the same firm, sat beside Cox. He too was hurled from the seat, but escaped with a fractured shoulder. Essie Williams, a negro porter, was in the boiler room at the time of the accident, and he was scalded from head to foot by the escaping steam. H e was hurried to the General hospital and died at 3:45 o'clock yesterday afternoon.

Andrew Meyer and W. H. Straubmeyer, plumbers, were at work on the boiler. Both seemed at first to have received minor injuries but Meyer was suffering from shock so he was sent to St. Mary's hospital. He did not rally, and it later developed that he was internally injured. He died at the hospital at 5:40 o'clock.

WHO THE DEAD MEN ARE.

Michael Frawley, 2040 Madison avenue, was unmarried, an orphan, and 28 years old. He has lived in this city all his life. Two brothers, John and Emmett and two sisters, Mary and Kate Frawley, survive. His body was taken to the Wagner undertaking rooms.

Meyer, Forty-third and Hudson streets in Rosedale, was well known in Atchison, Kas., where he had worked as a steamfitter off and on for many years. He came to Kansas City recently and went to live with a brother at the Hudson street address in Rosedale. He was 45 years old and unmarried. His body was also taken to the Wagner undertaking rooms.

If James Cox, 1416 Central street, has relatives living they were not found last night, and it is almost certain they do not live in this city. He was about 35 years old. It is said he was single, but there is another rumor that he has a wife and child somewhere.

Edward Booker, business manager of the local steamfitters' union, said last night that none of the men killed or injured bore union cards. Frawley, he said, was merely a steamfitter's helper. He had once applied for a card in the union, but did not keep up with the requirements, and his membership was finally cancelled.

Essie Williams, 505 East Sixth street, the negro porter, was also a fireman. The whereabouts of his survivors have not yet been ascertained. His body was taken to the Countee undertaking rooms.

The wrecked building is the property of the Homestead Realty Company and is in the charge of David Bachrach, who as the agent, had the renting of the rooms. The block had been unoccupied recently, but the H. K. Mulford Company of Philadelphia was preparing to move its stock in on the third floor.

"It was a terrific shock which seemed to shake the foundation of our building from under us," said C. M. Lyon, president of the Lyon Millinery Company, which occupies the building adjoining on the south. "Several plate glasses crashed and I ran to the front door and out on the street fearing that possibly a second explosion might occur. the damage we suffered was comparatively small, but the fright we were given was large."

The picket fence surrounding the home of Mrs. Thomas E. Moran, 916 Bank street, just across the alley from the wrecked building, was partly demolished by the concussion and many pickets were torn from the fence and blown several feet away.

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November 29, 1909

FIRST MOOSE FUNERAL.

250 Members of Kansas City Lodge
Honor Departed Brother.

The Kansas City lodge of the Loyal Order of the Moose had its first funeral yesterday afternoon, when it buried in Mount St. Mary's cemetery, Charles Burns, a contracting carpenter of 1316 Walnut street, who died in St. Mary's hospital last Tuesday. Mr. Burns was a charter member of the local order and the first of nearly 1,000 Kansas City Moose to die. Local lodge officials tried for several days to locate relatives of Burns in the East but without success.

Yesterday's funeral procession included 250 members of the order. It was headed by a brass band and started from the Moose club rooms, at Twelfth and Central streets. From there the cortege moved to the Cathedral, where the Catholic ceremonies were held, Father Lyons preaching the sermon.

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November 25, 1909

OLD RIVER MAN IS DEAD.

Isaac Smith, Also Civil War Veteran,
Dies Alone.

Sitting in a chair, wrapped in a bed quilt, his head hanging over on his chest as if he had but fallen asleep, Isaac Smith, an old soldier and Missouri river navigator 76 years of age, was found dead in a room at 1820 Union avenue about 8 o'clock last night. The old man had been placed in the room about 10 a. m. by his son, William Smith, an employe of the Bemis Bag Company. the coroner said life appeared to have been extinct five or six hours . The body was sent to the Carroll-Davidson undertaking rooms, where an autopsy will be held later.

The son was taken in charge by an officer and taken to No. 2 police station where he made a statement. He said that his father's condition was such about 10 a. m. that he should not be on the street. In taking him to the room, which the old man previously occupied, he fell on the stairway, making a slight abrasion on the nose and causing the nose to bleed freely for a time.

Washing off the blood, the son said, he placed his father in the chair, covered him securely with the bed quilt and left. When he returned at 8 p. m. the old man was in the same position in which he had been left, but life had flown. The dead man had been an inmate of the National Soldiers' Home at Leavenworth, Kas. The coroner does not think an inquest will be necessary.

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November 22, 1909

FUNERAL IN CEMETERY HOME.

Services for L. B. Root, Who Died on
Wedding Anniversary, Wednes-
day, Two Years After Daughter
Was Buried.

Louis B. Root, superintendent of Mt. Washington cemetery, died yesterday morning at St. Mary's hospital folowing an operation performed last Wednesday for intestinal trouble. The funeral will be Wednesday from the home of Mr. Root in the cemetery.

Mr. Root was the first superintendent of parks in Kansas City. He had lived here twenty-two years. He was graduated from Cornell college in 1875. He taught school for several years and was for four years county surveyor of Elkhart county, Indiana.

In 1893, he began contracting work, planned by George E. Kessler, landscape architect for the park board. In 1898 he made a survey of Swope park and a year later was made superintendent of the park. He has been superintendent of Mt. Washington cemetery since 1901 and his work did much to make it the finest burial place in the West.

Mr. Root died on his thirty-fourth wedding anniversary, and will be buried two years to the day from the time his only daughter, Mrs. D. C. Wray, was buried. The widow and one son, Louis P. Root, survive him. The son is engaged in mining in Salvador, Central America.

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November 21, 1909

BOY JUMPS OFF CAR;
KILLED BY AUTO.

NOT THE HOPPING KIND, JUST
PLAYING, COMPANION SAYS.

Edgar Palin, Aged 12, Dies in Hos-
pital From Injuries Received in
Alighting in Path of Machine
Giving Children Ride.
Edgar Palin, 12-year-old Killed by Automobile.
EDGAR PALIN,
Twelve-Year-Old Boy Who Leaped from Street Car Fender and Was Mortally Injured by Automobile.

As Edgar Palin, 12 years old, 2802 East Sixth street, jumped from the back fender of an eastbound Independence avenue car yesterday afternoon at Prospect avenue, he was run over and fatally injured by a motor car driven by E. T. Curtis, 3338 Wyandotte street. He died at 7 o'clock last night at the German hospital, without recovering consciousness.

With Allen Compton, 400 Wabash avenue, the boy had been playing all afternoon. About 3 o'clock the two lads started northward on Wabash avenue, and at Independence avenue both noticed an approaching street car.

"Let's catch the fender," called Edgar, as he waited along the curbing. The car was moving at moderate speed and the boy ran behind, and caught hold of the fender. His companion, 10 years old, ran behind on the sidewalk. At Prospect avenue Edgar, without looking around, jumped from the fender directly in front of an approaching auto, barely fifteen feet behind him. Curtis attempted to dodge the boy. The left fender of the auto struck the child and he was sent tumbling on the pavement. He was picked up by Curtis. Several children were in the auto. With Curtis was Herman Smith, of 3606 Olive street, whose father owned the car. In a nearby drug store it was found the boy had been injured seriously.

GIVING CHILDREN RIDE.

"I was driving at about fifteen miles an hour," Curtis said. "The auto belonged to young Smith's father and I was running it because I had the most experience. A party of school children were with us. We were taking them for a ride around the block. I noticed the child on the fender and did not have the least idea that he was going to run in my path. I swerved to one side, but the machine skidded and the fender of the auto struck him in the back. I realized at once that he had received a fearful blow."

After the child was given emergency treatment in the drug store by two neighboring physicians, he was taken to his home in the motor car, and after being attended by Dr. Max Goldman, was removed to the German hospital. Dr. Goldman found that the boy's spine was broken and that his skull was probably fractured.

Allen Compton, his playmate, was in a condition bordering on hysterics last night. The two had been gathering old papers during the forenoon and had just been to the paper mill, where they had received a few pennies with which they intended to buy Christmas presents.

"Edgar wasn't no car hopper," Allen said last night, in defense of his friend. "He was just running behind and holding on to the fender. Edgar wasn't that kind."

With Judge J. E. Guinotte, a friend of the family, young Curtis went to police headquarters last night and made a statement to Captain Walter Whitsett. After consulting Virgil Conkling, prosecuting attorney, it was decided not to hold him. He promised to come to the prosecutor's office Monday and make a complete statement. He said that he had been running a car for eight years. He is the son of W. E. Curtis, a live stock commission man.

The injured boy was the son of W. M. Palin, a real estate dealer in the Commerce building. The body will be taken to Gridley, Kas., for burial.

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November 19, 1909

WOMAN BALL PLAYER DEAD.

Former Bloomer Girl Will Be Buried
in Potter's Field.

Miss Daisy Hoover, for ten years a professional baseball player, died destitute in the city hospital November 11 and was be buried in the potter's field yesterday.

Miss Hoover was for several years second baseman on the Boston Bloomer Girls, but for the past two seasons had been playing in the East with the Star Bloomers, making her home during the winter in Kansas City. Last winter she had charge of one of the concessions in the Hippodrome. She returned to Kansas City about a month ago and three days later was taken sick and wsent to the hospital. She is survived by a sister, Mrs. George Johnson, Navarre, Ohio.

Claud East, manager of the cafe at 307 East Twelfth street, formerly manager of the Boston Bloomer Girls, says that Miss Hoover was one of the best women ball players that ever threw a ball.

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November 19, 1909

MOTHER CORNELIA DIES.

Assistant to Superioress at House of
Good Shepherd Passes Away.

Mother Cornelia, assistant to Mother Elizabeth, superioress of the House of Good Shepherd, died yesterday at the home, Twentieth street and Cleveland avenue.

Mother Cornelia had been ill for months, but continued with her work at the House of Good Shepherd until last Thursday. Mother Cornelia was Cornelia Thompkins of St. Louis. The family is one of the most wealthy and widely known in St. Louis. A sister, Mrs. Philip Scanlon, died several weeks ago in St. Louis.

The body of Mother Cornelia will be taken in a special car to St. Louis this morning by her parents, who are in Kansas City. In taking up her work among the inmates of the House of Good Shepherd, whose lives the sisters try to correct, Mother Cornelia gave up her family and prospects for a life of personal help and self-abnegation.

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November 18, 1909

MOTHERLY HEART STILLED
WHEN "PEGGY" HEALY DIED.

AGED WEST BOTTOMS SQUATTER SPENT
MUCH OF HER LIFE IN WORK FOR
OTHERS.

A motherly old heart was stilled last night when Margaret Healy died in St. Joseph's hospital. She was a charity patient and left no money with which to bury herself. But in life that thought never troubled her.

"I always have friends," she used to say. "Sure, haven't I always been friendly?"

And she had been. Her friendship for all that was human was shown in her adoption of a parentless family of boys and raising the two youngest from her scanty earnings as charwoman and washwoman. It was shown, too, in her working half the night doing washing and household work for neighbors, when the mothers of families were ill, in the many acts of kindness when the stork visited neighbors or when death crossed their thresholds.

A simple, artless old woman she was, who passed her last days in the companionship of a woman who befriended her and gave her shelter. No one who knew her ever heard her moan at fate. She was as full of laughter at 75 years of age as many women in their teens, with the same keen enjoyment of life and interest in the small things of the town and her neighborhood.

Mrs. Healy was about 78 years old. She came to Kansas City several years after the war. She was twice married. Her second husband, John Healy died a year after their marriage. Never in her life had the income of her family been more than $10 a week, but she saw only rosy prisms. Her first husband was a laborer. So was the second. But there always was a bit of meat and bread for the hungry to be found in the family larder and a bit of heart left for the weak and sometimes the undeserving.

Until the flood of 1903, Mrs. Healy was a "squatter" in a shell of a home near the Loose-Wiles factory at Eighth and Santa Fe streets.

She and Mr. Healy were married in the Church of the Annunciation by Father Dalton. They lived in several places in the West Bottoms. Years after his death, Mrs. Healy became one of the great colony of "squatters," whose huts were scattered on unused ground from the Armour packing plant to the West bluffs. Mrs. Healy was known from one end of the bottoms to the other.

Mrs. Healy's home in the West bottoms was destroyed in the flood of 1903. She was forced to leave and found a home with Mrs. Ellen Hughes, a widow, at 630 Bank street, a mere lane down upon which the rear of huge factory buildings on Broadway frown. She lived with Mrs. Hughes until seven weeks ago, when Mrs. Hughes found her in her room unconscious and ill. She was taken to St. Joseph's hospital.

"Mrs. Healy was very happy here," Mrs. Hughes said last night. "We two lone women became great chums. She was great company. We used to go to 5 o'clock mass Sundays and sometimes we would walk up the hill again to the chapel at St. Joseph for high mass. I went to call her one Sunday and she didn't answer. Her door was locked, but she had left the window open. I crawled in and found her. She had fallen in a wood box.

"All the Irish knew Mrs. Healy; the McGowans, the Burnetts, the Moores, the Walshes, the Pendergasts, all of them. She'll never lack decent burying. From the time she came into my house dripping to the arms with flood water, she never lacked friends and I know she won't lack them now."

In younger days, Mrs. Healy was called "Peggy," a nickname usually given only to Irish girls of vivacious temperament. She looked on her deathbed little like that stout, buxom "Peggy" Healy that the West Bottoms knew at St. Joseph's, but the still, warn face wears the calm of good deeds done. She will rest in Mount St. Mary's cemetery at the side of her adopted son, George Traynor. The funeral arrangements are still to be made.

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November 17, 1909

BODY ON STOVE EIGHT HOURS.

Stone Mason Found Dead Where He
Had Prepared to Cook Noon Meal.

Peter Gilberg, a stone mason, was found dead in his home, 815 East Twenty-second street at 8 o'clock last night by Matt Gleason, proprietor of a saloon at 921 East Twenty-first street, who sent Gilberg home ill yesterday morning. Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, deputy coroner, found that a hemorrhage killed Gilberg.

Gilberg lived alone. He evidently was preparing to cook his noon day meal when he was stricken as uncooked fish and some potatoes were on the kitchen table. One side of the body was cooked from the heat of the gas stove, which had been burning for probably eight hours.

Mr. Gilberg was a member of the Woodmen of the World and carried $1,000 insurance. The secretary of the lodge was called last night but was unable to tell who the insurance was made out to. Mr. Gleason's niece was married about two months ago to a union tailor but whose name was unknown to the uncle. The niece was married in Westport. The body was taken to the Wagner undertaking rooms, Fourteenth street and Grand avenue.

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November 13, 1909

"MAJOR," FIRE DOG, DEAD.

Mascot of Number 6 Station Killed
While on Duty.

"Major," the mascot of No. 6 fire station in Kansas City, Kas., is dead. He was only a dog, was "Major," a little white bulldog of uncertain pedigree, but he had bee the constant companion and playfellow of the boys at "Six" since the days of his puppyhood, and his tragic death yesterday under the wheels of the fire wagon he loved so well, cast a gloom over the station. "An ordinary dog with perhaps a little more than the ordinary intelligence," you would have said, had you seen him plying about the station. Had you carried your investigation farther eager friends would have imparted to you many wonderful tales of the sagacity and almost human intelligence displayed by the mascot.

The ordinary trick dog seen on the stage would have died of envy could he have witnessed the "stunts" performed by "Major" for the edification of his friends, the firemen. Long hours of patient training had perfected him in every trick known to "dogdom," but it was as a shortstop on the baseball diamond that "Major" gained the greatest laurels.

"The greatest dog shortstop in the world," he has been called on numerous occasions. Hundreds of boys and girls, yes, and grown folks too, have watched "Major" as a ball was batted or thrown from some distant part of the field, only to find a lodging between the jaws of the mascot who judged the ball with the accuracy of a major league star.

Always the first to respond to an alarm of fire, sometimes running by the side of the wagon, at other times riding on the footboard or in the basket, Major was a familiar figure at all the fires in the Armourdale district. About a year ago a can of acid was overturned an d some of it burned the mascot's foot. Since that time he has been unable to run any considerable distance and accordingly has ridden on most of the "runs."

It was while returning from a fire yesterday that in some unaccountable manner he was caught under one of the wheels and his hip crushed. Every attention was paid to him and when it was found that he could not live the fire boys brought chloroform and administered it in the hopes of alleviating his sufferings. Later it was found necessary to shoot him in order to end his misery, and an officer was called from No. 3 police station.

Passersby may wonder at the little mound in the rear of the fire station and smile when told that it is the grave of a dog, but to the fire boys, who knew his love and devotion, it marks the resting place of a friend.

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November 12, 1909

THOMAS G. BEAHAM
SUCCUMBS AT 68.

FAULTLESS STARCH FOUNDER A
KANSAS CITY BUSINESS MAN
FOR 22 YEARS.

Veteran Army Man Made This City
the Scene of His Many Ac-
tivities -- Became Ill
Last Summer.
Thomas G. Beaham, Faultless Starch Founder & President
THOMAS G. BEAHAM.

Thomas G. Beaham, for twenty-two years a Kansas City business man, died at his home, 2940 Troost avenue, at 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Mr. Beaham had been ill since last summer, while on a hunting and fishing trip on the Nipegon river in Canada.

Mr. Beaham was born in Cambridge, O., the only child of John and Harriett Beaham. His boyhood was spent in Muscatine, Ia., where he enlisted September, 1861, in the Union army as a commissary sergeant of the Second Iowa volunteer cavalry in the Civil war. He was appointed second lieutenant December 1, 1861, and promoted to first lieutenant a month later. Mr. Beaham was detached from his regiment in April, 1862, and assigned to duty as aide-de-camp on the staff of General Gordon Granger, commanding a cavalry division in Mississippi, until August, 1862. On November 19, 1863, he was appointed and commissioned major and aide-de-camp of United States volunteers and assigned to the staff of General Granger. While in the department of the Cumberland, in the military division of the West, he participated in the advance and siege of Corinth; occupation of Corinth and pursuit to Boonville; pursuit of Van Dorn to Duck river and defense of Franklyn against Van Dorn's attack. He was in the battle of Chickamauga, Orchard ridge and Missionary hill, and many other historic battlefields. He resigned September 12, 1864, and was honorably discharged from the service. Mr. Beaham was a lifelong friend of Captain Gordon Taylor of Cincinnati, O., who was on the staff of General Granger.

Shortly after the war he went to Cincinnati, O., where he engaged in the wholesale paint and glass business. In 1878 he moved to Zanesville, where he lived until 1887, when he came to Kansas City and entered into partnership with E. O. Moffatt in the whlesale coffee, tea and spice company. The company was formerly Smith and Moffatt, but Mr. Smith was killed in the cyclone of that year and the firm was started anew under the name of Beaham & Moffatt. At that time Mr. Beaham was living with his family in Independence, Mo.

It was early in the history of the firm of Beaham & Moffatt that the Faultless Starch was originated as a specialty. Shortly afterwards Mr. Moffatt returned to the grain trade and the business was conducted as the Beaham Manufacturing Company. Owing to the growth of the starch department the coffee, tea and spice business was disposed of and for several years the business was conducted as the Faultless Starch Company, unincorporated, Mr. Beaham being the sole owner. In 1900 he moved to Kansas City from Independence and in 1903 the business was incorporated as the Faultless Starch Company with Mr. Beaham as president and Gordon T. Beaham as secretary.

Mr. Beaham is survived by a mother, Mrs. Harriett Beaham, 91 years old. Mrs. Beaham has been living with her son for the past seventeen years. His wife, one son and two daughters also survive him. Gordon T. Beaham, the only son, was named after his lifelong friend, Captain Gordon Taylor of civil war fame. Two daughters, Edna and Helen, reside at home.

Mr. Beaham was a member of the University, Country, Midday and Commercial Clubs; also a member of the Loyal Legion. He was very fond of fishing and hunting and was a member of several shooting clubs. For a number of years he spent his summers in Lake Miltona, Minn.

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November 10, 1909

BOYS CHEERED AS
THEY RODE TO DEATH.

MISUNDERSTOOD WARNINGS OF
HORRIFIED PEDESTRIANS.

Coaster Wagon in Which Kelly and
Eugene Clemonds Were Riding
Hits Street Car -- One Boy
Dead, Other Dying.

Death ended a coasting ride which Kelly C. Clemonds, 15, and his brother, Eugene, 11, were enjoying when their little express wagon glided into the path of a streetcar yesterday evening. The boys received injuries, from which Kelly died an hour later, while but little hope is entertained for the recovery of Eugene.

Both boys resided at Grand Summit, Kas., and were here on a visit at the home of Mrs. James W. Roark, 2919 Flora avenue.

The accident occurred a few minutes before 6 o'clock at the intersection of Twenty-ninth street and Lynn avenue.

The boys had a small coaster express and had been running down the grade on Twenty-ninth street west from Woodland. They had made a number of trips and were laughing and shouting.

When they trudged up the hill when darkness was falling one of the boys suggested that they had had enough fun.

"Let's have just one more," said the other, and turning the wagon at the top of the slope they gave a run and boarding it whirled down at a rapid rate.

As they neared Lynn avenue car No. 555 of the Vine street line, in charge of Motorman Powers and Conductor Everhart, northbound, was approaching.

Pedestrians, attracted by the cheers of the boys, gave a warning cry. the boys, however, did not understand and the wagon kept ahead on its deadly course.

Not until they saw the car loom up before them did they realize their danger. They made a futile effort to swerve the wagon from its path, but were struck with terrific force.

An ambulance was summoned from No. 4 police station and hurried them to the general hospital.

Kelly died at 1:30 o'clock from internal injuries. Eugene, the younger brother, suffered a fracture of the skull, a fracture of the left arm and cuts and bruises. An operation was performed on the skull and the boy rallied, but the physicians have doubts about his recovery.

Dr. Czarlinsky will hold an inquest today.

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November 7, 1909

BLED TO DEATH WHILE ALONE.

Tries to Scrawl Note, but Strength
Ebbs Away Too Soon.

An autopsy held yesterday on the body of William O. Thornton, found dead in a pool of blood in a room in the Occidental hotel, 24 East Third street, late Friday night, and who was at first supposed to have been a victim of foul play, showed that death was due to the bursting of an artery in the left leg.

Deputy Coroner Czarlinsky made the investigation, and said that the man had bled to death after the artery, which had been wasted by disease, burst.

How long it required for Thornton to die is not known, but investigation at the rooming house disclosed the fact that the man realized when the artery burst that he was on the precipice of eternity and beyond aid of any kind.

A pencil and a small piece of paper which were found in the room yesterday showed that he had attempted to scrawl a note. Finding his strength was waning too fast with the ebbing of his life blood to accomplish this task, Thornton turned to the squalid cot, for which a few hours before he paid 10 cents for the purpose of sleeping on, and in the grimy darkness of the room he knelt and began to offer a prayer.

The body was found in this kneeling posture. Whether the prayer was completed or whether he died while his mind was trying to form words will never be known.

Thornton has a son living at Greenville, Mo., and a sister at Southwest City, Mo. The son called at the Carroll-Davidson undertaking rooms yesterday and said he would probably take charge of the remains, but has as yet made no definite arrangements for the funeral.

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November 7, 1909

BOY DIES OF HYDROPHOBIA.

Does Not Attempt to Injure Rela-
tives, but Bites Self, Foams at
Mouth When Face Is Washed.

John Benson Willets, 3 years old, whose parents live in the Missouri river bottoms north of Kansas City, Kas., died at 10 o'clock last night of hydrophobia caused by the bite of a dog, believed to have been mad, which was inflicted last September.

The father, A. M. Willets, was forced to move last summer by high water in the Missouri river. The family made its home at 2516 North Fifth street, Kansas City, Kas. While the boy and his sister, Grace, 14 years old, were playing, September 9, in front of their home, a dog attacked the boy. The animal's teeth went trough the child's hands. He was also bitten on the forehead. when the dog was beaten off by the sister the boy was badly lacerated.

Dr. T. C. Duncan, who lives in the neighborhood, treated the boy. The wounds healed, leaving only scars. Wednesday the father took the boy to a hay field on his place. That night the child began scratching his face and hands. Mr. Willets thought that it was caused by irritation of scratches the child had received in the hay field. When an attempt was made to wash his face to ease his pain the boy began to foam at the mouth.

Later he exhibited symptoms declared to be the infallible ones in hydrophobia cases. He would stand rigidly on his heels, and, with his body forming a bow, would touch the floor with his head. The boy did not attempt to bite members of the family in the paroxysms of the rabies, but inflicted wounds upon himself with his teeth.

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November 4, 1909

SAMUEL LIEBERMAN DEAD.

The End Comes to The Journal's
"Sammie, the Office Boy."

Samuel Lieberman, 15 years old, son of Rabbi Max Lieberman, pastor of the Kenneseth Isreal congregation, died at 7 o'clock yesterday morning at the German hospital, after an illness of one day. The cause of his death was arterial sclerosis, or hardening of the arteries -- a disease that rarely attacks persons in their youth. The funeral will be at 2 o'clock this afternoon from the family home, 1423 Tracy avenue.

Samuel Lieberman was known to readers of The Journal as "Sammie the office boy." Small of body, quick of wit and cheerful to a degree rarely encountered even in hopeful youth, he became a favorite with editors and reporters, who encouraged him to write the small news stories he occasionally picked up on his daily rounds. At first the stories he wrote were given to the copy readers to be edited, but one night one of his stories was published just as he had written it, and credited to "Sammie, the Office Boy." Mr. Taft felt no greater elation when the wires conveyed to him the information that he had been elected president of the United States than did Sammie, the office boy, when he saw his first signed story in print. He became a frequent contributor to The Journal's columns and numerous inquiries were received at the office as to whether "Sammie, the Office Boy" really was an office boy or a reporter concealing his identity under the pseudonym.

Never strong in body, Sammie taxed his physical strength to the uttermost. He kept the same hours as the reporters, though it was not necessary for him to do so, and on election nights when the men were on the "long stunt," from noon to dawn, he stayed with them and it was useless to try to get him to go home. He liked the atmosphere of the local room. He said he hoped, one day, to become a great editor.

Once he ran away. He visited and worked in Milwaukee, Chicago, Cleveland, Buffalo and other places. He was at home in the larger cities. He had early learned that the peregrinating reporter always gravitates to Central police station, where the "dog watch" men from the various papers hold out. Sammie could talk shop like a veteran who had worked "with Dana of the New York Sun." Whenever a group of reporters gathered in the local room Sammie could be found lurking on the outskirts. He learned the reporters' distinction between a "good story" and a "bad one" and on occasions aired his knowledge with the positiveness of a managing editor.

Not many months ago a veteran reporter, after hearing Sammie talk about newspapers and newspaper making, removed his pipe from between his teeth, pointed a long finger at the door through which the boy had just passed out and said:

"That boy isn't long for this world. He's going to die young. He's smart beyond his years -- too smart. Why, he's a man, almost, already. He thinks and reasons better than lots of men I know. And there's a peculiar brightness in his eyes that doesn't look good to me. Mark my words, that boy isn't long for this world, and it's a pity, too, for he would be heard from if he should live to manhood."

The random observation of the veteran soon came true. Sammie was at the office Sunday. "I don't feel very good," he told one of the boys, "but I'll be all right when I rest up a bit." There was a hopeful smile on his face Tuesday afternoon as he lay on a cot at the hospital. "I'll be back to the office soon. I hurt awful at times. I ain't going to stay here long."

Soon after dawn of the following day his final words were verified. "Sammie, the office boy," had heard the fateful "Thirty" that, in newspaper offices, signifies the end.

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