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January 27, 1910

TEACHER ALSO BALL PLAYER.

Banquet for Dr. Gill, Candidate for
White Sox Berth.

Twenty-one members of the Kansas City chapter, Delta Sigma Delta, the members being students at the Kansas City dental college, gave a banquet last night to Dr. Warren Gill, a faculty member, at the Sexton hotel. In a short time Dr. Gill will leave for California to begin practice with the Chicago White Sox, in which team he is a candidate for first baseman. Dr. Gill is well known in baseball. He was first baseman for Minneapolis last season.

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January 18, 1910

IN WAY, MAJOR'S
WIFE GETS DECREE.

Told She Hindered His Army
Progress, Returns From
Islands for Divorce.

When Mrs. Ruby B. Rutherford returned to the Philippines after a visit with her mother at Columbia, Mo., her husband, who is a major in the army, met her at the boat and frankly told her he was sorry she came back to hinder his progress as an ambitions officer. Mrs. Rutherford lost no time in returning to "the States." Yesterday a divorce was granted her by Judge Seehorn in the circuit court.

Mrs. Rutherford lives at the Brunswick hotel, at Eleventh street and Broadway. She introduced as character witness her brother, C. P. Bowling, cashier of the Exchange bank of Columbia, and Judge James E. Goodrich of the circuit court. Her daughter, Dorothy, aged 9 years, was not in court.

CALLS HIM INSOLENT.

The Rutherfords had domestic trouble before they went to the islands, and Mrs. Shepherd, wife of a captain, who often visited them at the Presidio, San Francisco, was a witness. Major Rutherford, she said, was insolent.

Mrs. Rutherford said most of her trouble had been at the Presidio, although she said the major stayed out nights after they went to the Philippines and was sorry when she returned to him after visiting at home.

A highball incident when Mrs. Rutherford gave a party at the Presidio was told in court. She said they ran out of whisky. She thought they had had enough, any way.

ANOTHER BOTTLE GOTTEN.

Another officer insisted, Mrs. Rutherford said, in going out for one more bottle. When he returned Mrs. Rutherford had her highball made "light," and Major Rutherford was angry because it wasn't the same strength as the drinks served the guests.

"When I insisted on a light drink," said Mrs. Rutherford, "my husband became angry because I did not drink as fast as he thought I should and he came and pured whisky into my glass until it ran all over me."

Mrs. Rutherford testified that while she liked to have a clean, neat house her husband, in his insolent manner, always made fun of her tidiness.

PUT FEET ON TABLE.

One of his delights, she said, was to finish his meal before his wife and then "rear" back in his chair and put his feet on the table.

When Major Rutherford, the wife testified, told her she was a "drawback," that she hindered his progress in the army and that he was downright sorry to see her back again, she left him, determined to sue for divorce.

Major Rutherford is connected with the medical corps and has an income of $4,000 yearly. They were married at Columbia, Mo., January 10, 1900, and Mrs. Rutherford left him February 14, 1909.

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January 16, 1910

GREETERS' CARDS FOR GUESTS.

Hotel Patrons Will Be Given List of
Best Business Places.

Members of the Kansas City Greeters' Association, comprising hotel clerks, will be supplied today with cards of introduction which are to be given to guests who ask for information as to the best places in which to make purchases, theaters and offices of various sorts. The cards are intended as an assistance to the hotel guests and also to indicate to the merchant or the person to whom they are addressed that there is such an organization as the Kansas City's Greeters' Association, and that it is through one of the members that the customer or client is sent there. The cards contain the names of the officers of the association.

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January 9, 1910

SEE RAINBOW AND
THE BAG OF GOLD.

Reputed Hiers to Vast Ger-
man Estate Retain Law-
yer to Fight Claims.

Sixty reputed heirs to the estates of Baron Ludwig von Fischer gathered at the Metropolitan hotel in Independence yesterday for the purpose of taking aggressive measures to recover form the German government $80,000,000 said to be awaiting them.

For the past thirty-eight years strenuous endeavors have been made by a number of heirs to obtain title to the property, but it has been hard to establish identity or form a plan which will prove acceptable to the whole. The gathering yesterday filled the hotel dining room, and heirs and their representatives from various states were present.

The story of the estates of Baron Fischer resembles many other similar stories and has bee handed down from generation to generation.

ONE SON FLEES.

Baron Fischer lived in Baden, Germany, in the latter part of the sixteenth century. He had two sons. One of them was a great nimrod and one day entered the forests and by accident got upon the game preserves of the king. He shot a deer there, and the game warden notified him that he had better flee to America. The boy feared the king's wrath and sailed for America, locating in Madison county, Va. The other son remained in the old country and the estates went to him.

Time passed and a search was made for the missing brother, who was found in America. the German estates, he was informed, later, had been left by a will to him as was also a large amount of property in this country. Fearing to return to the old country, the baron allowed the estate to go to the German government for the building of a canal. He died in this country, but he left his estate to his three sons. One of them was educated for the purpose of returning to the fatherland to establish his lineage. After reaching maturity he set sail and en route died of smallpox. The papers and identification documents were buried with him at sea.

EMPLOY A LAWYER.

The heirs in this country took up the fight and all manner of schemes have been formulated. Much money has been expended without result. Some years ago a lawyer was employed to go over to Germany. He went, so the story goes, but came back with nothing to say and plenty of spending money for the balance of his days.

The heirs are now renewing their effort. Yesterday the gathering was for the purpose of entering into a contract with Attorney Emory Smith, of Fort Worth, Tex., for one-third of the amount secured. It took some time to agree upon the carefully worded document which was finally signed.

Fifteen similar gatherings have been held in Independence by the Fischer heirs and when these reunions take place the rainbow with the bag of gold at the end is painted in all of its colors. Some say the estate will amount to $150,000,000. In the United States there are 450 heirs, as far as known.

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January 1, 1910

HILARIOUS DINERS
HAIL THE NEW YEAR.

Thousands at the Hotels and
Cafes Watch Passing
of 1909.

"It's 12 o'clock," said "Billy" Campbell, electrician at the Hotel Baltimore.

Frank J. Dean, manager of the hostelry, whose hand was on one of the big switch levers, gave it a pull, and in an instant the lights in the five dining rooms, the Pompeiian room, the grill room and the lobbies were extinguished. Bands in the dining rooms struck up "Auld Lang Syne," 1,200 diners blew souvenir horns, congratulated one another, and the new year was on.

Capacity crowds filled the dining rooms and cafes of the hotels and restaurants of Kansas City last night. At the hotels the lights were extinguished for a minute at midnight to indicate to the diners that the new year had been born. Special orchestras furnished the music and at most of the hotels the old Scotch refrain was sung.

The crowds this year were larger than last. The hotels began making reservations for last night over two weeks ago. A week ago practically all of the lists had been filled. Even at that, last night found hundreds at the big hotels, who waited in lobbies for an opportunity to get into the dining rooms before midnight.

A check system similar to that used in theaters, in which the tables were numbered and the diners held numbered checks, was inaugurated at the Hotel Baltimore this year. This avoided confusion. After dinner scores of men were put to work on the dining rooms. The tables were arranged for their guests and the decorations were put in place. The favors or souvenirs consisted of horns, in the base of which were bits of confections. The color scheme was red, roses and carnations being used in the decorations.

COFFEE AT MIDNIGHT.

The doors to the dining room were opened at 10:30, but dinner was not served until 11:30. The dinner was timed to last half an hour, with the service of coffee on the tables just at midnight. Orchestras were hidden behind banks of palms and ferns in the dining rooms.

The largest crowd was in the Pompeiian room. It was also apparently the jolliest. Long before midnight hundreds of would-be diners thronged the lobby and pleaded vainly for room in one of the dining rooms. As the midnight hour approached the doorways were crowded by those who would look in, even though they could not cross the portals. The balconies above the marble room and the main banquet hall were crowded early in the evening by those who could only watch the revelers.

SING "AULD LANG SYNE."

At the Savoy hotel the dining rooms were thrown together and the orchestra was placed in the hall so that the grill room, with its quota of stags, could be entertained. Dinner was served here at 11 o'clock. At 12 o'clock the lights were extinguished and the familiar Scotch melody was sung.

The Hotel Kupper dining room was crowded an hour before midnight and those who could not gain entrance filled the lobby and joined in the chorus of "Auld Lang Syne" when the lights were turned up after midnight.

At the Sexton hotel the crowds overflowed the dining rooms and were taken care of in the grill room in the basement.

The actors and actresses about the city had their celebration at the Century hotel. Immediately after the curtains were rung down at the various show houses a rush was made for street costumes and the members of the "profession" gathered at the Century hotel. The tables had all been reserved, and an orchestra greeted the crowd from each theater as they appeared.

The cafe of the Coates house held a capacity crowd. It was quieter than those at the other hotels.

At the Densmore, the tables in the dining room had been reserved for several weeks. Scores were turned away last night. Special music was the rule here also.

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December 30, 1909

FOUND DEAD IN A CELLAR.

George Dixon Stricken While at
Work Cultivating Mushrooms.

George Dixon, 66 years old, living in the Metropolitan hotel, was found dead in a cellar under the Last Chance saloon, Bridge street and Broadway, yesterday morning. Dixon, who cultivated mushrooms in the cellar, did not return to his home on Tuesday night, and his wife requested the police to make a search.

Coroner Harry Czarlinsky was summoned and after pronouncing death to be due to heart failure, ordered the body sent to the Carroll-Davidson undertaking rooms.

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December 19, 1909

HURRIES FROM GRAVE
TO LAUGH ON STAGE.

GIRL WIFE SINGS SCOTTISH DIT-
TIES, CHOKING SOBS.

As Orchestra Plays "Hearts and
Flowers" for Next Sketch the
"Two Macks" Mourn Death of
"Danny," Their First Born.

Unknown to the audience of the Gayety theater yesterday afternoon, while the orchestra playing the gladsome tunes suggestive of love and happiness, a drama was being enacted in the dressing rooms behind the scenes. In her room sat a wife of one year, her head buried in her arms and tears streaming down her face. Between sobs she could be heard to say: "My baby, my little boy."

Beside this woman sat a young man, barely out of his teens, trying in his way to console the heartbroken girl. Tears glistened in his eyes. His face was contorted with pain and anguish. He was the picture of despair.

The young man was Douglas McKenzie, 20 years old, of Dundee, Scotland. The girl was Mabel McKenzie, 18 years of age, his wife. The two are known to the stage world as the "Two Macks," and they have been playing a comic sketch in Scotch the last week at the Gayety. The two sat in the dressing room in their plaids and kilts, the same that they had appeared in a few minutes before on the stage.

The orchestra suddenly ceased its playing. The lights were turned low. The next sketch was a love scene and the orchestra in a low key softly began, "Hearts and Flowers." The young wife raised her head and listened. With her sleeve she brushed away the tears.

"I wonder if Danny is in heaven -- I know he is," she said, smiling. "I suppose the angels are now playing the same tune."

Danny was the name of their little boy, only a few weeks old, whom they had buried but two hours before. One year ago Mr. and Mrs. McKenzie were married in Scotland. They came to this country on their honeymoon trip and got a place on the vaudeville stage. They made a tour of Texas and Oklahoma. Two months ago they reached Kansas City.

A baby was born, Danny, they called him. There were doctor bills to pay and room rent. Last Thursday the little boy died. They had no money to pay for its burial. for two days the little body was kept in their rooms at the Wyandotte hotel, the undertakers refusing to take it until the burial expenses were advanced.

Yesterday morning Mr. McKenzie told Tom Hodgeman, manager of the Gayety, of his plight. Mr. Hodgeman immediately went to all the playhouses in the city. He told the young man's story to the actors. When he returned from his trip Mr. Hodgeman had $80, enough to pay the funeral expenses.

HURRY TO THEATER.

Yesterday afternoon the little body was buried. From the cemetery where they had laid to rest their first born the young pair hurried to the theater. They arrived barely in time to dress in Scotch costume for their sketch. The "Two Macks" came out on the stage. They danced the Scotch dances and sang the light and frivolous Scotch ditties. They smiled, they laughed and they joked. Little did the audience realize that behind the mask of happiness were two bleeding hearts, a man and wife who had just come from the cemetery after burying their baby boy.

The curtain was rung down and the two went to their rooms. Mrs. McKenzie broke down in tears. During the long minutes she had been on the stage playing the part of a Scotch lassie the minutes had been torture. "Danny" was dead. He was her first born.

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Decmeber 14, 1909

FAKE MESSENGER ARRESTED.

Two Boys Get Year in Jail After
Delivering Bogus Telegram.

Early yesterday morning a traveling man at the Sexton hotel was awakened by a rap at the door. Answering the summons he opened the door to have a telegram thrust in his hand by a boy in the uniform of the Postal Telegraph Company.

"Prepare for the worst," it read, "an accident has happened to your two sons. Will wire particulars later. -- Dr. Brown."

The traveling man rushed into his clothes and raced in a cab to the Postal office. There he was told that no message had been received from "Dr. Brown."

Harry Norton, 18 years of age, a messenger boy, was arrested on the charge of embezzlement. Alvin Church, the boy who is said to have delivered the telegram, but who is not an employe of the telegraph company, was taken into custody later on the charge of petty larceny.

When arraigned in the criminal court they admitted their offense, and Judge Latshaw gave each one year in jail, the maximum sentence. The boys say they have worked the fake telegram graft in three cities. Norton obtained work at the Postal in order to get telegraph blanks.

Church, they said, would visit the different hotels and take names from the registers. Fake telegrams would be prepared, usually telling that the man's wife or child was seriously ill or dead. The telegrams would be marked "collect."

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December 13, 1909

STODDARD MEETS STODDARD.

Joplin Drummer and Utica Salesman
Akin in Seventeenth Century.

"Mr. Stoddard, I want you to meet Mr. Stoddard," said Clerk George Mong at the Coates house last evening as he introduced Rock Stoddard of Joplin, Mo., to G. L. Stoddard of Utica, N. Y. The latter had just signed the hotel register, and Rock Stoddard was waiting to pay out.

Both Stoddards are traveling men and it developed that back several centuries their forefathers were related closely. In the seventeenth century three brothers crossed the ocean from England. One settled in New York state, the other in Connecticut and the other in Canada. The descendants of the brother who settled in Connecticut and New York fought in the revolutionary war.

G. L. Stoddard, whose home is in Utica, N. Y., said that the brothers who settled in the States finally drifted together in New York state. Several of the descendants have since gone West and South. He is a descendant of the brother who settled in Connecticut. Rock Stoddard, whose home is at Joplin, is a descendant of the brother who went to Canada.

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December 10, 1909

COAL RANGE INTO ITS OWN.

Resurrected, Dust Covered, and
Again Put to Use.

The despised coal range has again been given its place. The big hotels, as well as the smaller hostelries, have pulled the old coal range from out of the dust under which it has lain for a year and the kitchen boys have been kept busy for the last couple of days shoving coal, removing the ashes and keeping the fires clean. The failure of the gas pressure means much to a cook in one of the big hotels, where the orders come fast and where the cooking is timed with mathematical precision. In several of the places the cooks burn gas solely, except for certain classes of chops and steaks, which are broiled over charcoal.

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November 29, 1909

JAYHAWK YELL EFFECTIVE.

Early Morning Cheer of Visiting
Collegian Scares Thieves Away.

Stripped of his Kansas colors, his voice gone, money gone, Charles Stewart, a rooter for the Jayhawkers last Thursday afternoon, headed himself to his hotel at Eighth and Locust streets. It was 2:30 a. m. Friday, when he entered the lower hallway and he stopped to cogitate. He tried to talk the defeat over with himself and found his voice weak; he felt deep into his pockets and found no consolation.

Thinking it all over, Stewart said to himself, "Well I have just one more yell left in me for Kansas, poor old defeated Kansas, and now that I am safe in the hotel and not liable to be bombarded by the Missouri bunch, I am going to give it right here in the hallway."

Bracing himself against the wall he threw back his head and let go "Rock Chalk, Jay Hawk, K. U. ---Kansas!" Then he repeated it, al a head yeller style, real fast.

Being in an inclosed hallway he was surprised at the racket he made. He liked it for it made him believe he had located his lost voice. So he gave the yell again, louder than ever, and went on to his room and to bed.

"You have come here late many times," said the proprietress, the next morning, when Stewart appeared, "both late and early, and you have made divers and sundry noises on your way to your room, but this is the first time your noise has served a valuable purpose."

"What's the matter, cause some Missouri man to have a fit in his sleep?" asked Stewart.

"No," she replied, "better than that for the house. Mr. Blank and his wife room just off the hall near where you stood. Well, your yelling awoke them. Just as Mr. Blank raised up in bed to locate the noise he saw a man entering his bed room window from the porch. Rather the man was in the act of entering, but when you cut loose the second time he turned about and made frantic efforts to get out. He did get out and there was another burglar on the porch. Mr. Blank says he and his wife sleep soundly and certainly would have been robbed of all valuables in the room if it hadn't been for you waking them and scaring away the thieves.

"That's good," replied Stewart, "glad my voice was worth something. That's all I had left after the game and that was worth anything and I nearly lost that."

"But I think your noise did more," continued the woman. "For some time before you came I had been lying half asleep and imagined I could hear some one moving furniture. You know I have just finished furnishing some rooms in the new part back there. I went back to investigate and found a window out in the bathroom and all the new furniture piled near the door. It appeared to have been the intention to make a clean-up here, but your 'Rock Hawk, Jay Chalk," or whatever it is, came at a most opportune time."

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November 22, 1909

DO NOT OPPOSE INSPECTION.

State Inspector Finds Hotel Men
Pleased to Get Certificates.

"It has been a great surprise to me that my deputies have met with as little opposition as they have," said Thomas L. Johnson of Jefferson City, state hotel inspector, at the Hotel Baltimore last night. "We feared when we started out on our tour of inspection that many of the hotel men would fight the new law, but we have been agreeably disappointed. We have found that the hotel men, as a rule, welcomed the inspector and in fact was proud of the certificate of inspection. In most places, having it framed and hung in the most conspicuous position in the house."

Mr. Johnson came here to confer with deputy William A. Osgood and to explain to some of the hotel men some of the provisions of the laws which they did not thoroughly understand. Mr. Johnson will remain in Kansas City until tomorrow evening.

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November 18, 1909

HOTEL MEN IN ARMS
AGAINST 'DEAD BEATS.'

MAY PUT CONTRACT ON EACH
PAGE OF REGISTER.

Meeting of Association Concludes
Today With Lunch at Sexton
and Banquet Tonight at
Excelsior Springs.

If the plans of the Kansas-Missouri Hotel Men's association are carried out, it's not going to be so easy to walk up to the hotel register, sign your name, and then walk out the next morning without paying, giving the simple excuse that you are "broke." The legislators of Kansas and Missouri will be asked at the next session to allow the following brief contract to be printed at the head of each page:

"Any one signing their signature below hereby agrees to pay the bill as charged by this hotel. Failure to do so shall be a violation of this contract and party violating same will be punishable by law. The proprietor of the hotel hereby agrees to fulfill his part of the contract."

Sam B. Campbell of the Sexton Hotel.
SAM B. CAMPBELL,
Clerk at the Sexton. Oldest Clerk in Point of Service in Kansas City.

Though stringent laws have been passed in both states, they are usually evaded. The present law reads that any one securing a room "by fraud or pretext" shall be punishable. In the future, a man will be starting at a contract at the head of each page, and the hotel men think that it will be a more serious matter.

In fact, the whole session, which began yesterday afternoon in the Italian room at the Hotel Baltimore, was one of self-protection. Every speaker dwelt on the fact that the average inn keeper was the most oppressed individual in the community. Means of getting around the wily "bad check man," dead beat," "loafer," and how to get better legislation was discussed, and committees appointed to see that action is taken.

F. P. Ewins of the Savoy Hotel.
F. P. EWINS,
Hotel Savoy.

Yesterday's session was opened with an address of welcome by Mayor Crittenden. He complimented the men on their general appearance. T. L. Barnes, president of the association, made a short reply.

There was a general feeling that the meeting would like to face a hotel inspector, and Thomas L. Johnson, state hotel inspector, was asked to be present and, in fact, had agreed to come and discuss the laws regulating hotels. At the last moment Johnson failed to appear.

C. L. Wood of the Sexton.
C. L. WOOD,
Secretary of the Association and Manager of the Sexton.

Last night's gathering was purely social. A Dutch lunch was served in the grill room of the Sexton hotel, which is managed by C. L. Wood, secretary of the association. A ride over the boulevards will be taken this morning, and after the report of committees this afternoon the entire association will take the train to Excelsior Springs, where a banquet will be held tonight at the New Elms.

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November 17, 1909

HOTEL MEN'S YELL
HAS NO RAH! RAH!

"SOMETHING DIFFERENT" TO
BE HEARD IN RIDE TODAY.

Kansas-Missouri Association Mem-
bers Here for Annual Meeting.
Local Officers Elected.
Banquet Tonight.

"Kansas -Missouri hotel me are we,
Enjoying ourselves in old K. C.
Kansas Citee, in the state of old Mizzoo,
With plenty to eat, and other things, too.
How do you do, and how are you?"


To show that the collegians who come to Kansas City on Thanksgiving are not the only ones who can boast of yells, a few of the advance guard of hotel men who are assembling for the annual meeting of the Kansas-Missouri association, composed of the above yell last night at the Hotel Sexton.

"You notice that we cut out the 'Rah, Rah, Rah,'" said C. L. Wood, the secretary of the association. "We want something to distinguish it from the college yell. You will get a chance to hear its carrying power when we take our trip over the boulevards Thursday morning."

That the meeting, which commenced today at the Hotel Baltimore and ends tomorrow night with a banquet at the Elms in Excelsior Springs, is going to be the biggest in the history of the association, is the belief of the officers. More than half of the delegates were in the city last night visiting friends. When Mayor Crittenden delivers his address of welcome today, it is expected that more than 100 members will be present.

WAR ON BAD CHECK MEN.

At the two days' session especial attention will be paid to some form of mutual protection against bad check men.

C. D. Tisdale of the Western Hotel Men's Protective Association, will discuss a proposed detective agency to be established in each city and do nothing but look out for hotel "dead beats." It is estimated that there are 1,500 hotels in Missouri and Kansas, and each loses about $250 a year in bad bills. The total loss, $100,000, would maintain a fair detective agency, the hotel men say.

A meeting of the local hotel proprietors was held yesterday afternoon at the Sexton and plans for the coming interstate association were discussed. A permanent organization also was planned.

Though Kansas City has been prominent in the large gatherings, very little attention has been paid to a local association. F. P. Ewins of the Savoy was elected president and James Ketner of the Densmore was elected secretary of the local society.

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November 7, 1909

BLED TO DEATH WHILE ALONE.

Tries to Scrawl Note, but Strength
Ebbs Away Too Soon.

An autopsy held yesterday on the body of William O. Thornton, found dead in a pool of blood in a room in the Occidental hotel, 24 East Third street, late Friday night, and who was at first supposed to have been a victim of foul play, showed that death was due to the bursting of an artery in the left leg.

Deputy Coroner Czarlinsky made the investigation, and said that the man had bled to death after the artery, which had been wasted by disease, burst.

How long it required for Thornton to die is not known, but investigation at the rooming house disclosed the fact that the man realized when the artery burst that he was on the precipice of eternity and beyond aid of any kind.

A pencil and a small piece of paper which were found in the room yesterday showed that he had attempted to scrawl a note. Finding his strength was waning too fast with the ebbing of his life blood to accomplish this task, Thornton turned to the squalid cot, for which a few hours before he paid 10 cents for the purpose of sleeping on, and in the grimy darkness of the room he knelt and began to offer a prayer.

The body was found in this kneeling posture. Whether the prayer was completed or whether he died while his mind was trying to form words will never be known.

Thornton has a son living at Greenville, Mo., and a sister at Southwest City, Mo. The son called at the Carroll-Davidson undertaking rooms yesterday and said he would probably take charge of the remains, but has as yet made no definite arrangements for the funeral.

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November 5, 1909

CITY'S UNEMPLOYED
TO HAVE NEW HOME.

HELPING HAND INSTITUTE AC-
QUIRES ADKINS HOTEL.

With Aid of Four Story Building
1,000 Men Can Be Cared For --
Plenty of Light, Baths --
Has Disinfecting Room.
New Helping Hand Institute Building.
NEW QUARTERS AT FOURTH AND WYANDOTTE STREETS.

With the acquisition of the old Adkins hotel at the southeast corner of Fourth and Wyandotte streets, the Helping Hand Institute has solved the problem of taking care of the city's unemployed. Carpenters are now at work overhauling the four-story structure and by the beginning of cold weather it is believed that the building will be ready for occupancy.

With the old building at 408 Main street, where the main offices are located, the Helping Hand institute will be prepared to take care of more than 600 men without the least crowding. In extremely cold weather little difficulty will be experienced in caring for 1,000 men.

Current Helping Hand Location.
PRESENT HOME OF THE INSTITUTE.

But the new building will have many features not possessed by the old quarters on Main street. Plenty of light, the best of ventilation, high ceilings, a laundry, shower baths and disinfecting room will make it very little inferior to the municipal lodging house in New York city. On the north side of the building are forty-one windows which makes the light and ventilation problem easy.
INSTALLING SHOWER BATHS.

But the main feature is the shower baths and disinfecting room. On the lower floor the plumbers are at work installing baths that will accommodate twenty-five men at one time. No one will be allowed to go to bed without first taking a bath and allowing his clothes to be placed in the disinfecting room, where they will remain over night. The laundry in the basement will keep the linen clean and eventually save the institution hundreds of dollars. Particular care will be exercised in guarding against tuberculosis. Before the year is over it is hoped that a physician will examine every man who applies for a bed.

Without doubt Kansas City will have as good a system for taking care of her unemployed as any municipality in the country. It is true that many of the large cities in the East, particularly New York and Philadelphia, have larger municipal lodging houses but they suffer disadvantages. In most cities bread lines are formed and the man without employment does not feel obliged to work for a night's lodging. In Kansas City, however, the city and county have made the Helping Hand an official charity institution.

WORK IS PROVIDED.

Men are not allowed to sleep in saloons or in other public places where the conditions are not sanitary. There is no other avenue for the unemployed man but to go to the Helping Hand institute, where he is given a chance to work for his meals and lodging. The mere fact that he must work keeps the professional "moocher" from making his headquarters in Kansas City.

The credit for the acquisition of the Adkins building belongs mainly to William Volker, one of the directors of the institute. Mr. Volker clearly recognized the need of more room for the institute, and believing that the employment system is the best, he used his influence in getting the building. E. T. Brigham, superintendent of the Helping Hand, is directing the work.

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November 2, 1909

SUFFERS SO SHE CAN
LIVE WITH A THIEF.

WOMAN'S DIARY TELLS OF
HARDSHIPS AND ROBBERIES.

Pair Disappear From Couch Hotel,
Where They Had Been Befriend-
ed, Taking New Clothes
and $90 in Money.

A diary, which had been written in plaintive words the sufferings of a woman who loved well, but not wisely, is the only memento Mrs. J. W. Couch, proprietress of the Couch hotel, 1711 1/2 Grand avenue, has of Early Elbridge and his wife, Edna, whom she befriended when they needed help, and who repaid her by robbing her.

There are only two dates in the diary, which was discovered after the couple had departed from the hotel, where Mrs. Couch had given them employment, after hearing their pitiful tale of destitution. They took with them a lot of wearing apparel and $90 in money, belonging to Mrs. Couch.

The writing reveals Bill Sykes and Nancy in real life; a life of theft on the part of one, hunger and suffering on the part of the other, and yet the woman evidently is contented with the love which she seems to think the man holds for her.

The first date is April 18, and the last July 1. In one instance only is it possible to tell where the events recorded occur.

The opening paragraph reads:

"I am sorry to leave this town, but Earl thought we had better get out. As the train started I said to Earl: "We had better get off and go back, so that woman won't suspect we stole her $20," but just then the train started and Earl said it was too late."

HAD BEEN IN ST. JOSEPH.

The next was:

"We have been in St. Joseph now three months, the longest we have been anywhere. Earl split a man's head with a meat cleaver today, though, and I suppose we will have to go away for good."

The next showed some of the hardships she endured with the man she loved and was as follows:

"We haven't had any food for twenty-four hours, and we are nearly starved. We slept last night in an orchard, not being able to get bed or shelter."

Evidently there had been a silver lining to the black clouds of the last paragraph for the next one read:

"Earl is better to me every day. I love him so much. He treats me better than I deserve, I know."

Misfortune and despondency were evidently again knocking at her heart when she wrote the next one:

"I wonder what that woman, Mary, will think of us, we left so abruptly last night. I guess we will always be on the move."

The next one evidenced that the hard luck of the couple was continuing:

"Arrived in the big city yesterday, dead broke and awfully hungry. This is another starving period. If we only could get a job."

STILL LOVES THIEF.

The last paragraph was the most important from a police standpoint. It shows that the hardships have in no wise cooled the ardor of her affections for the man who caused it all. It reads:

"Earl is five feet, eight inches in height and weighs about 145 pounds. He has dark hair and eyes. My love for him grows every day. Isn't it funny we are both 21 years old and there is only a few days difference in our ages."

Mrs. Couch informed the police that the couple came to her house a week ago and related a pitiful tale of suffering. She took them in, nad they had since been working around the place in return for their board.

Saturday night when Mrs. Couch left the couple at home to go to market, they informed her they were going right to bed, and she need not awaken them on her return. Sunday morning when Mrs. Couch went to call them she discovered two dummies, made of old clothes, in the bed.

Further investigation showed that $90 had been taken, together with Mr. Couch's best suit of clothes and Mrs. Couch's entire new fall outfit including shoes, hat, lingerie, etc. Mrs. Couch notified her husband, who was in Baldwin, Kas., and he will arrive here this morning.

Mrs. Couch also learned that Elbridge had failed to pay $15, with which she had entrusted him, to a butcher and furniture dealer to whom she owed some money.

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October 31, 1909

RAZING A LANDMARK
MADE FAMOUS BY
WASHINGTON IRVING.

Oldest Building on Fifth Street
Meets Its End.
The Old Brevoort Hotel, West Fifth Street, Kansas City.
THE OLD BREVOORT HOTEL IN WEST FIFTH STREET.

With the razing of the old Breevort hotel at 118 West Fifth street, to make way for a modern building which will be erected shortly, the oldest structure on Fifth street will have been a memory. Long before the '60s the hotel was known as an old building, and no one seems to know the exact date of its erection or its builder.

Standing on an eminence directly opposite Kansas City's first Methodist church, the "Cannon house" as it was called then, was one of Kansas City's most elite boarding houses. The owners of the building rarely rented the rooms to transients, but were content with making it a fashionable boarding house. The rates after the war were $1 and up. In the '70s the building became known as the "Morgan house" and fifteen years ago it was christened the "Breevort."

When Fifth street was graded in the '60s to its present level, the cellar of the Breevort house was on a level with the street. The proprietor immediately arched up the windows, painted the cellar walls and had a three-story building. A week ago, before the structure was being torn down, the old cellar walls were clearly discernible and indicated that at one time Kansas City's hills were much steeper than at present.

"The hotel was an old building when I was a boy," said Dr. W. L. Campbell of 504 Olive street, one of the recognized authorities on early Kansas City history. "I don't think there is anyone living who knows the exact time that it was built or the builder. There used to be a report that Washington Irving stayed there when he made a visit to Kansas City, but I think that the report is generally discredited."

Fred Seewald, who runs a grocery store at 317 West Fifth street, is confident that the building must have been about 60 years old.

"It was by far the oldest building on Fifth street," he said.

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October 30, 1909

BACK FROM WORLD TRIP.

Kansas City Boy Went Around Globe
With U. S. Fleet.

Bronzed, athletic and clear-eyed Stanley Presbury, 21 years old, returned to Kansas City last evening after an absence of three years and three months in the United States navy, a fully developed man. He was met at the Union depot by his mother, Mrs. T. E. Presbury of the Hotel Moore. He will make his home in Kansas City.

Young Presbury was one of the lucky boys who enlisted from Kansas City several years ago to make the trip around the world. He was assigned to the Connecticut July 16, 1906, and was transferred to the Panther, in July, 1908, serving the balance of his time on that ship.

"I am glad to get back to old Kansas City. I was glad to leave it, and I had a trip such as few ever get," said young Presbury at the Hotel Moore last night, "but there was no place like home especially when it is Kansas City.

"There was only one country we all liked well and that was Australia. I guess it was because that country is populated with Anglo-Saxons like ourselves."

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October 12, 1909

WIDOW AFTER MINING STOCK.

Court Order Necessary for Her to
Get $7,260,500 Shares.

The county coroner has $7,260,500 in mining stock locked up in his vault. There are 72,605 shares in a Mexican mine with a par value of $100. They were found in the suit case of Thomas Stables, who was found dead September 24 in a bathroom at the Sexton hotel.

Mrs. Stables was in the city yesterday. She came all the way from Stables, La., her home, to get this stock. The coroner was powerless to act. A court order must be obtained by Mrs. Stables's attorneys before these securities can be given up. Meanwhile the county keeps millions in mining stock locked in the vaults at the court house.

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September 25, 1909

CATTLEMAN KILLS
PARTER IN HOTEL.

SEXTON BAR TRAGEDY FOL-
LOWS QUARREL OVER RANCH.

Eugene Hayes of Elgin, Kas., Puts
Three Bullets Into Brain of
Edward Hayes of Paw-
huska, Ok.
Eugene Hayes, Kansas Cattleman Accused of Murder.
EUGENE HAYES.
Kansas Cattleman Who Killed Edward
Hayes, His Partner, in the Barroom
of the Sexton Hotel Last Night.

Following a quarrel concerning the affairs of their 40,000 acre ranch in Osage county, Oklahoma, Eugene Hayes of Elgin, Kas., a cattleman reputed to be worth half a million dollars, shot and killed his partner, Edward Hayes of Pawhuksa, Ok., in the bar of the Hotel Sexton at 7:45 o'clock last night.

Edward Hayes was shot three times, almost in the center of the forehead. He died instantly Eugene Hayes, who is held at police headquarters, says he shot in self defense.

The shooting was witnessed by Edward Lewis, and Lewis Weisenbacher, bartenders; Lee Russell, a millionaire cattleman from Ft. Worth and Lee Rogers, a Kansas City real estate dealer who is an ex-cowman.

L. C. Thompson, another Kansas City real estate man and former cattle raiser, was in the crowd, but says he did not see the shooting.

The five men entered the hotel together about 7:30 o'clock last night, and sat around a table in the front end of the saloon. About fifteen minutes later Eugene and Edward Hayes went to a table in the rear and against the wall opposite the bar.

THREE BULLETS INTO BRAIN.

Before dinner was served they began quarrelling about business affairs, but the conversation was not overheard by anyone unless it was Lee Russell, who is said to have been standing near the small table at which the partners were sitting.

Suddenly Eugene Hayes, who was facing north, leaped from his chair and running around the end of the table began firing. The first shot struck Edward Hayes in the forehead. Two more were effective, almost in the same spot.

Edward Hayes fell back in his chair, dead, and Eugene, taken in charge by a friend, walked towards the front door after placing his pistol, an automatic gun, in his hip pocket. As he rounded the glass screen at the end of the bar Patrolman Arthur Kennard arrested him.

Edward Lewis, the bartender who saw the shooting, said Edward Hayes reached towards his hip pocket first. As he did so, Lewis said, Eugene got up and pulled his pistol, and began firing as he stepped toward Edward. Edward Hayes did not succeed in getting his revolver out of his pocket. The coroner removed it, and took charge of it until an inquest is held. It was a Luger rapid fire gun, the magazine holding seven cartridges.

"I BEAT YOU TO IT."

"I beat you to it," the witness declared Eugene Hayes said as he put away his revolver.

Inspector E. P. Boyle sent Detectives Ralph Trueman and Denver D. Mitchell to the hotel as soon as he was informed of the killing. Detectives Keshlear and McGraw followed.

Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky was notified, and after viewing the body had it removed to Stewart's undertaking rooms, where he performed a post mortem.

Immediately after the shooting the hotel management called Dr. A. L. Porter, who lifted the dead man out of the chair and laid him on the floor.

Eugene Hayes was taken to police headquarters by Patrolman Kennard. He gave the patrolman his pistol while on the street car.

When taken before Lieutenant James Morris to be booked for investigation Hayes was recognized by Patrolman "Jack" McCauley, who asked him what he was arrested for.

"Just killed my partner, Ed Hayes, up at the Sexton hotel.

"What for?" asked Lieutenant Morris.

QUARREL OVER RANCH AFFAIRS.

"Well, he was going to kill me if I didn't. I had to do it. That's all."

To Captain Walter Whitsett, and Norman Woodson, assistant prosecuting attorney, Hayes made no attempt to conceal anything except details of the shooting. He refused to say anything more until he could see John Hayes, former chief of police.

"He's a relative of mine, you know," he kept saying during the conversation. "I'm a ranch owner in Oklahoma," began Hayes. "I'm a pretty well known man, and John Hayes, who was formerly chief of police, is a cousin of mine, and he comes down to the Territory and hunts on my place. This man Ed Hayes is no kin of mine. I simply took him into a partnership wit me and he owes me $5,000. He didn't pay anything into the place.

At police headquarters last night the police took off of Eugene Hayes a diamond ring which is valued at $1,000. Deputy Coroner Czarlinsky took possession of a gold watch, a gold pen, $5.50 in money, and a a revolver taken from Edward Hayes. He wore a Knights of Pythias watch charm.

Ex-Chief John Hayes denied last night that he was any relative of the prisoner. "He is not even distantly related," Hayes said. "I have known him for years and have hunted on his place down in Oklahoma. I don't know why he should claim to be some relative of mine."

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September 20, 1909

CAPTAIN BRANHAM
QUITS OCTOBER 1?

VETERAN POLICE OFFICER ON
THE FORCE 35 YEARS.

Too Old to Drill, He Told Friends.
Resignation Said to Follow
Interchange with Mem-
ber of the Board.
Captain J. S. Branham of the No. 3 Police Station.
CAPTAIN J. S. BRANHAM, 35 YEARS A POLICEMAN.

Following a recent exchange of letters between himself and Police Commissioner Thomas R. Marks relative to police matters in the No. 3 district, the resignation of Captain John S. Branham, for thirty-five years on the police force, and its oldest member in point of service, it is said, was received at police headquarters yesterday, effective on October 1. The captain before had told friends that he was too old to drill, and intended leaving the force.

Several weeks ago the police raided the Cordova hotel and arrested several men who were charged with selling beer on Sunday. The liquor was sold only to guests of the hotel. As the raid was made by special officers from headquarters the police of No. 3 district did not get credit for it. Commissioner Marks at a board meeting complained because Captain Branham had not stopped the sale months before. An official letter, dictated by Mr. Marks, was sent to the captain, calling for an explanation.

Captain Branham replied by saying that an officer in uniform could not make the arrest, as the hotel people only sold to its guests and there had never been a flagrant violation of the law.

OLDEST IN POINT OF SERVICE.

The reply was not satisfactory to Commissioner Marks, who said that Captain Branham was like many other old officers incapacitated for duty. The captain is 63. The captain chafed under the inference of the commissioner which were repeated to him. Then on Friday night Commissioner Marks informed all of the officers that they must drill.

"If you do not like the regulations laid down by this board or the instructions given by the commissioners you can quit," Commissioner Marks told the assembled officers.

Captain Branham's resignation yesterday is believed to be the outcome of the drill instructions and the Cordova matter.

In point of service Captain Branham holds the record. He was appointed to the force in May, 1874, and has been in continuous service since. He was long stationed at headquarters, but of late years he has been in command of the No. 3 station. He was born in Columbia, Boone county, Missouri, February 15, 1846. In 1871 he was deputy sheriff of Sedgwick county, Kansas, and in 1873 filled a similar position at Ellsworth, Kas.

WOULDN'T NAME THE CAPTAIN.

Some time ago Captain Branham was granted a thirty days' leave of absence by the board. At that time Commissioner Marks said, after the station was put under the command of Lieutenant George Sherer, that the captain was on vacation which might be made permanent. Mr. Marks last night refused to say that Captain Branham had resigned.

In speaking of the new uniforms and the manner the clubs were carried in the belt Mr. Marks remarked that if any patrolman was not satisfied with the new regulations he could quit. He said the officers were told the same thing, and that one had taken advantage of the advice. Asked which one he refused to give out the name, saying it would be made public later.

He said that there were no charges of any kind against the captain who had resigned, and that he had not been asked for his resignation.

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September 16, 1909

OLDEST KANSAS LANDLORDS?

Distinction Claimed for Emporia
and Downs Bonifaces.

Colonel H. C. Whitley, 75 years old, of Emporia, Kas., and Colonel J. H. Lipton, 82 years old, of Downs, both veterans of the civil war and two of the three honorary members of the Kansas-Missouri Hotel Men's Association, were the guests of C. L. Wild of the Sexton hotel yesterday. Colonel Lipton claims the distinction of having operated a hostelry in Kansas for a longer period than any other man in the state. He has been in the business for half a century. Colonel Whitley claims to be the next oldest in the business.

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August 27, 1909

DYNAMITE ENOUGH TO
WRECK A SKYSCRAPER.

WHEN ARRESTED MEN HAD
FORTY SIX INCH STICKS.

Joseph Monroe and Edward Sanford
Found in vicinity of New South
Side Apartment House --
Stories Conflict.

In the arrest of two suspicious characters at Thirty-sixth street and Broadway about 10 o'clock last night the police believe they averted what was intended to be by far the biggest, most costly and most destructive job of dynamiting ever pulled off in Kansas City or vicinity.

Shortly after 10 o'clock Patrolman E. C. Krister and D. B. Harrison, plain clothes men working out of the Westport police station, saw two men at the corner of Thirty-sixth street and Broadway. One was lighting a cigarette and the officers noticed a small suit case in the hands of the other. When they began to close up the men began to accelerate their speed and only the command "Halt or we'll shoot," stopped them.

The officers did not know what they had until they got the men to the station house and Lieutenant O. T. Wofford carelessly opened the small, cheap suit case. What he believed to be a wire sticking through a hole in the end of the case attracted his attention. When the package was opened it was found to contain forty six-inch sticks of dynamite. Each was marked 40 per cent nitroglycerin -- Hercules No. 2. The "wire" proved to be a fuse and it was attached to two of the sticks of the explosive, in the center, with a cap imbedded deeply into each stick.

ONE HAD LOADED PISTOL.

The men gave the names of Joseph Monroe and Edward Sanford. The latter had in his possession a 44-caliber Derringer pistol, loaded. Monroe said he was a lineman and Sanford insisted that he was a common laborer.

The stories of the prisoners, who were separated by Lieutenant Wofford and questioned soon after their arrival, differ in many respects as to how they came to be in that neighborhood with such a package. While Lieutenant Wofford was in a room alone with Sanford he turned his head to answer a telephone call. Hearing a noise Wofford looked up and the prisoner had all but reached the club of Sergeant Harry Moulder which hung on an opposite wall. Wofford dropped the telephone and grappled with the man. Sergeant Moulder then entered the room and no further trouble occurred. A door was only a few feet away and had he succeeded in clubbing the lieutenant Sanford could have easily escaped.

When Monroe was questioned he said he, Sanford and a man named Charles Hogan had "bummed" their way from Denver. He claimed they arrived Tuesday morning, while Sanford said Sunday morning. Monroe said that last night he and his partner were walking down Grand avenue when they came upon Hogan at Thirteenth street.

"Do you want to make a piece of money?" Monroe says Hogan asked.

"We told him yes," Monroe went on. "We were both broke, hungry and dry. He then introduced us to a man named Anderson, Charles, I believe he said his first name was. He said he would give us $5 to carry a grip out on the Westport car line. We were to stay on the car until it made the second turn to the left. Then we were to get off and meet Anderson or some man who would be there waiting for us. We got off and had walked down the street a little ways when we were arrested. Anderson said to be careful that there was an explosive in the suitcase . That's all I know and I'm innocent of any wrong."

HOW DYNAMITE WAS TO BE USED.

Sanford, who tried to escape, said they arrived with Hogan two days earlier than Monroe stated.

"We went to the Stag hotel opposite the city hall," he said, "and this morning we met Hogan there. He asked us if we wanted to make a piece of coin and told us to meet him on Grand avenue this evening. He introduced us to Anderson and he was gone a long time after the grip. We met there about 7 o'clock."

"What was the dynamite for?" asked Lieutenant Wofford quickly.

"He said it was to blow up a scab job. No, we were not to do it. That was for the fellow who was to meet us, I guess. Yes, I knew there was an explosive in the grip and I knew I was doing wrong."

Sanford also said, when asked later, that he was to give the derringer to the stranger -- or Anderson -- who was to meet him. Both described the mysterious Anderson after they had been locked up within talking distance as "a man 35 years old, six feet tall, weighing 170 pounds. He wore a black mustache and had black hair and a dark complexion. He was dressed i a dark suite, black derby hat and black shoes."

ENOUGH TO WRECK SKYSCRAPER.

Sergeant Moulder also said he learned from inquiry along Westport avenue, that there had been much talk among the union men about the big apartment being a "scab job," and "a rat job." There appeared to be much discontent on account of the immense job being done by an "open shop," he said he gathered from talks with saloonkeepers.

Experts who were called in to examine the package of dynamite said that, properly placed, there was enough to wreck any skyscraper in the city and damage buildings for blocks around.

After the men were locked up they were in a position to talk to each other. William Hicks, a patrolman, sat near the door and heard Monroe upbraid Sanford for being such a dunce as to get his dates mixed on the time of their arrival here and their final meeting with Hogan and the mysterious Anderson. The men are being held for investigation.

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August 19, 1909

GUESTS TAKE TO THE ROOF.

The Coates House Equal to Occasion
During Hottest Spell.

Three shower baths and thirty cots placed on the roof of the Coates house yesterday gave guests of that hostelry al fresco sleeping and bathing accommodations last night. Although the comfort attached to sleeping on a cot is small, the thirty were filled long before 10 p. m. last night.

The idea of cots on the roof occurred to the hotel men Tuesday. Several were put on the roof Tuesday evening. The experiment was successful and yesterday thirty cots were placed there. this news spread rapidly, and by the time dinner was over the cots had all been spoken for. The guests on the roof are confined to the masculine population of the hotel for the present, although it is probable that if the heated spell continues arrangements will be made for hte women. the matter of arranging the three shower baths was the hardest, and plumbers were kept busy until evening.

The guests who use the cots sleep in the open. They do not have a mosquito netting over them and about midnight last night those who had retired in their pajamas and bathrobes were summoning bellboys for blankets. Practically all left calls for about 5 a. m. at the latest. It is planned for the roof guests to take a shower in the early morning and then go to their rooms to finish their sleep.

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August 18, 1909

THOSE PESTIFEROUS BUGS.

Countless Numbers of Them Made
Life Miserable Last Night.

The fat man who lolls in front of hotels in the style of chair large enough to sleep in, discovered a fine breeze last night. He was out in unusually large number. The breeze was fine. The fat man was reading a paper under a glow of large electric lights and puffing away on a huge black cigar.

Then the bugs came, the pestiferous, clinging, crawly green bugs that hot, dry weather brings out. They crawled into his ears and slimed their way across his perspiring neck. They attacked him cheek and jowl. The fat man retreated, back to the super-heated, but screened, lobby of the hotel.

The fat man was not alone in his misery. His brother of the rolled up sleeves and a few of his sisters who affect that kind of raiment also had their troubles. The bugs had an ugly habit of climbing in under the roll of the sleeves, and crawling over the bare skin with much the sort of feeling one has when a bum prima donna hits a punk note. Under the electric lights and close to show windows, the green bugs held undisputed sway. They flew about in trillions, more or less, but sufficiently more to make it much more than less.

Their entry called for heartfelt swats and biffs, and they got 'em, but the survivors came back gallantly to the charge. At a late hour this morning, the green bugs held their vigil 'neath the twinkling lights, ready, ever ready to pounce down and crawl over and along and about any wayfarer who chanced their way.

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August 16, 1909

WHY 9-FOOT SHEETS? SHE ASKS.

Hotel Housemaid Says Present Ones
are Long Enough for Men.

"I'll bet my week's salary that the majority of the men who voted for the nine-foot sheet bill were raised in places where if sheets were used at all they were changed but once a week, and then they were so short that they only covered the mattress," petulantly declared a pretty hotel housemaid as she discussed the nine-foot sheet law which goes into effect today.

"I'll go still farther, and wager that where they were raised that they were lucky to sleep on a sheet and that they never did have the luxury of sleeping between them. Sheets nine feet long are in the way. We cannot make up the beds so that they look like anything at all.

"Of course it is easy enough to handle the long sheets for the bottom sheet, but when it comes to turning them down over the counterpanes in the little ruffles which delight the eye of the guests, it will be no joke.

"The seven and one-half foot sheet is just the proper length. Those legislators say that they fear that germs and diseases may be communicated from bedding protected by sheets less than nine feet in length, but I want to tell you that a sheet seven and one-half foot long is plenty. That gives you a foot down over the covers and leaves plenty of spare sheeting so that his toes will not be left out in the cold."

Kansas City can lay claim to having the most expensive linen room in the country. A room in the Moore hotel, the walls of which are decorated with oil paintings and the floor laid with Italian encaustic tile will be the reposing place for the nine-foot sheets and other linen used at the hotel. The room, when it was decorated for a cafe a year ago, cost Mr. Moore $2,700. It was used as a cafe for a while.

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August 13, 1909

JAMES MORAN SHOT
BY JACK O'DONNELL.

POLITICS SAID TO HAVE CAUSED
THE QUARREL.

After Shooting, O'Donnell Disap-
peared, but Later Surrendered
to Police -- Moran Not Dan-
gerously Wounded.

Enmity said to have grown out of a factional fight in the Democratic party in the Second ward last night culminated in a quarrel between Jack O'Donnell, a cigarmaker, who lives at the Century hotel, and James Moran, formerly proprietor of a saloon in the Washington hotel, in which Moran was shot in the neck and painfully injured by O'Donnell. The shooting occurred in the Century hotel about 8:30 o'clock.

Moran with several friends was standing at the bar in the hotel saloon when O'Donnell and Joseph Donnegan, manager of the Century theater, entered the place.

Moran and O'Donnell began quarreling and Harry Friedburg, who was with the Moran party, endeavored to quiet them. He told O'Donnell that there would be trouble if he stayed int he saloon and that it was best that he leave. O'Donnell went into the lobby of the hotel and was followed by Moran, who again started to upbraid O'Donnell. According to witnesses Moran threatened O'Donnell.

BULLET LODGED IN NECK.

"I'll just get you before you have a chance to do anything to me," is the reply credited to O'Donnell, who drew a revolver and fired at Moran, who had turned and was running from the lobby. As Moran dodged into the bargershop from the lobby, O'Donnell, who was following, fired a second and third time. One bullet struck the fleeing man in the back between the shoulders and ranged upwards and to the left, lodgining in the neck. One bullet lodged in the wall and the third went through the door.

Moran ran out of the barger shop and fell on the sidewalk in front. He was carried into the hotel and Dr. J. D. Griffith was summoned. O'Donnell was caught by Friedberg and John Campbell. A police ambulance with Dr. H. T. Morton from the emergency hospital removed the injured man to St. Joseph's hospital. H is wound is not dangerous and he will be out of the hospital in a few days.

COULDN'T LOCATE O'DONNELL.

The police were notified but when they arrived on the scene O'Donnell had disappeared and they were unable to locate him. Inspector of Detectives E. P. Doyle detailed Detectives Kinney and Jennings on the case. After going to the hotel the men went to the hospital to see Moran, who refused to tell anyone who s hot him. The detectives telephoned the inspector that they could not find O'Donnell, but that Joseph Donnegan informed them that O'Donnell would give himself up the first thing int he morning.

Another officer was informed that O'Donnell was in the Century hotel and would give himself up in the morning. His reason for delaying was said to be because Captain Walter Whitsett disliked him and would place him in the holdover without a chance of securing bond. When Captain Whitsett heard that O'Donnell was at the hotel he instructed Lieutenant M. E. Ryan to send Sergeant Robert Greely to arrest him.

FOLLOWED ANOTHER FIGHT.

The quarrel last night followed one in the afternoon during which O'Donnell struck Moran in the mouth and further bruised the ex-saloonkeeper. This fight occurred in Wisman's saloon, Twelfth and Oak streets. Bert Striegel, a deputy constable named Caulfield, Joseph Donnegan and Moran were in the saloon when Jack O'Donnell came in. The men had a drink together and then Moran, it is claimed,, accused O'Donnell of throwing down politically Michael O'Hearn. Other charges were made by Moran and finally, it is said, he called Edward O'Donnell, a policeman and brother of Jack, a name which Jack resented. The men engaged in a fight. Wisman separated them and put the crowd out, as he said he would not allow a fight in his place.

SURRENDERED TO POLICE.

It was midnight before the police could locate O'Donnell and then he voluntarily gave himself up. He rode by himself in a carriage to police headquarters and surrendered to Lieutenant M. E. Ryan. He was not asked about the shooting by the officers in charge and was placed in the matron's room. He did not mention the shooting nor offer any explanation for it.

The trouble between the men, it is alleged, grew out of the fact that O'Donnell and Donnegan were out of the town on the last election day and Moran and his friends accused the two of being faithless to O'Hearn. The breach between the men was widened more by O'Donnell's brother arresting a barber on election day.

The shooting scrape of last night is not the first in which O'Donnell has figured. He was shot in the back by J. D. Cosby, proprietor of the Cosby hotel, following a fight in the hotel. At the same time J. P. Hayes, who was with O'Donnell, was shot twice in the back. The shooting was in February, 1908.

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August 13, 1909

HOTEL MAIDS OBJECT TO
HANDLING 9-FOOT SHEETS.

In Preparing to Comply With New
Law, Hotelkeeper Runs Into
Bunch of Trouble.

If John Moore, proprietor of the Moore hotel, insists on using the regulation nine-foot sheets as will be provided by law after August 16, he will have trouble with the maids in his employ. If he does not he will get into trouble with the state authorities. At present he does not know just where he stands.

The trouble started yesterday morning and the first round ended in favor of the maids of whom there are a score. Headed by Miss Dora McClure who was the spokeswoman, they declared that they could not use nine-foot sheets to advantage, that it was too much trouble to turn them under the mattresses and over the covers and that if the "boss" insisted on using sheets of this length, they would find situations elsewhere.

As a result of the first round, Mr. Moore told the girls to use the old sheets until he had more time to think about it.

Some time ago Mr. Moore received a notice that after August 16 sheets nine feet in length would be required by law. This law was to be strictly enforced and it was intimated that inspectors would be around at most any time to see that the law was complied with. An inspection fee was also to be charged.

About that time Mr. Moore needed new linen and he ordered sheets of the nine foot length. The shipment arrived Wednesday and yesterday morning he directed the housekeeper to tell the housemaids to use the new length linen when they made up the beds. The trouble followed.

"I don't believe the girls understand the thing thoroughly," said Mr. Moore. "I will read the law to them and then they will understand what they must do in any other hotel."

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August 9, 1909

FINDS A CITY TRANSFORMED.

F. S. MacJohnstone Tells of Kansas
City 25 Years Ago.

"Kansas City was a mud hole when my wife and I left it for the West a quarter of a century ago," said F. S. MacJohnstone of Colorado Springs, Col., at the Hotel Moore last night. "Its transformation as we viewed it today from an automobile which whirled us over the magnificent boulevards is wonderful. Twenty-five years ago there were huge, ugly hills with rocks jutting out on every side, steep walks, poor sewerage, hilly paved streets and no park system. Now you have the opposite. In Colorado we have beautiful drives and parks for our natural mountain scenery gives us an unrivaled background.

"Neither my wife nor I deemed it possible that Kansas City could make the strides it has since we left it. We have read of the growth of the city but did not realize its extent. We drove this afternoon through Roanoke. We used to go nutting in what is now one of the prettiest residence districts in the city. At that time it was occupied by a few shacks.

"Although my father and I furnished locks and hardware for the Old Missouri Valley buidling which was located somewhere near Fifth and Delaware streets, the only familiar sight we met of any conssequence was the old Blossom house, opposite the Union depot. The hotel was built before we left Kansas City."

Mr. MacJohnstone is a former alderman of Colorado Springs. With his wife he came to Kansas City to attend the wedding of a cousin, Fred MacJohnstone of Chicago, to Miss Lydia Dunning of Rochester, N. Y. Miss Duning was the guest of the MacJohnstones at Colorado Springs and came to Kansas City with them. The bride and groom departed yesterday for Chicago.

Mr. and Mrs. MacJohnstone left last evening for Denver.

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August 7, 1909

UNEARTHED MYSTERIOUS BOX.

Contained Skeleton of a Dog,
and Not a Bomb.

While excavating in the basement of the old Southern hotel at Tenth and Wyandotte streets yesterday afternoon, a workman unearthed a suspicious looking box. Fearing an infernal machine, police headquarters was notified and Detective Charles Lewis was sent to investigate the matter.

Lewis used a pick. One or two vigorous blows was sufficient to break the hinges, and the skeleton of a dog was disclosed.

Then someone recalled the fact that a woman who once lived at the hotel had owned two white house dogs and that on the death of the favorite, the animal was buried in the cellar with much ceremony.

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July 21, 1909

AGED BRIDEGROOM DIES.

Veteran of 65 Married Woman of
27 Last May.

Broken alike in health and spirit without his bride of just two months, Henry C. Porter, the lame Civil war veteran, who at the age of 65 married Miss Carrie Clements, 27 years old, in the Moore hotel here May 10, returned to the scene of his nuptials July 10 last and found surcease from sorrow in death at the St. Mary's hospital Friday. On his advent in Kansas City, Porter pawned his watch for $9 in order to pay his room rent at the apartment house of Mrs. Mary A. Millichif at 1231 Walnut street.

"I am a broken down old man and the worst kind of a fool," Porter told Mrs. Millichif as he paid her the money. "I don't want pity; all I want is a little rest and time to think."

The body was taken to Wagner undertaking rooms. Attempts made by the proprietors of the establishment to locate Mrs. Porter have failed. Two brothers of the dead man, R. M. Porter of Williamston, Mich., and F. C. Porter of Englewood, Col., were notified by telegraph and they have replied to the effect that Porter had plenty of money and a pension of $45 a month. Had he lived until August 4 $138 would have been coming to him in accumulated pensions.

The old soldier first appeared here in the early part of last May when he broke into print with the announcement that although 65 years old, with his right leg missing and his right arm paralyzed, he was to marry Miss Clements, lately of Colorado Springs, who was fully a generation his junior.

The ceremony took place in the Moore hotel, Ninth and Central streets. The couple then departed on a tour of the East and were to sail around the Horn of San Francisco later.

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July 20, 1909

MUTE GUEST HARD TO AWAKEN.

Proprietor and Employes of Sexton
Thought J. G. Barnes Dead.

Believing J. G. Barnes of Chicago dead, C. L. Wood, proprietor of the Sexton hotel, his clerks and employes broke into Barnes's room yesterday morning only to discover why he did not answer the call bell or the bell boy when he rapped at the door to awaken him was that he was a mute.

Barnes is a horse dealer. He visited the stock yards yesterday, departing last evening. He arrived in Kansas City from Chicago Sunday evening, and registered at the Sexton. He wrote a call for 8 o'clock on a slip of paper which he handed to Clerk George Brown. Brown forgot that the guest was a mute, and placed the call with the others. He said nothing yesterday morning when relieved by Day Clerk Jacobs.

About five minutes past 8 o'clock the telephone girl told Mr. Jacobs that No. 310 did not answer. Five minutes later a bell boy was sent to the room. He returned and reported that he could get no answer. Jacobs then sent the porter with the bell boy, declaring himself that the telephone was out of order and that the bell boy had "soldiered." Both porter and bell boy returned with the information that the key was inside the door, and that they were unable to arouse the occupant of the room.

Clerk Jacobs notified Mr. Wood, and the quartette made their way to the room. They were joined by others.

Barnes's covers were deranged and one leg hung out of the bed. Mr. Wood took hold of Barnes's knee. As he did, Barnes turned his head and, gazing at the frightened faces around the bed, smiled.

"My, but you are a hard sleeper," declared Mr. Wood when he recovered from the surprise.

Then it was that the mute wagged the message that he could neither hear nor speak. Mr. Barnes told Mr. Wood that as a rule the vibration caused by the ringing of a bell or a hard rapping on the door of his room was sufficient to awaken him.

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