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February 6, 1910

"DEAD TO WORLD" IN CAR.

Official Hears First Word Over
'Phone and Sends Coroner.

When Arthur Haskell, motorman on the Wyandotte line in Kansas City, Kas., arrived at Riverview station shortly after midnight this morning he ran his car in on the spur and headed for the nearest telephone office. Calling up the car barn of the Elevated line he notified the man in charge that his conductor was "dead to the world," and requested information as to what to do. The man at the car barn acted immediately.

In a few moments Coroner J. A. Davis was informed that a street car conductor was lying dead in his car at Riverview station. The coroner made a record run to the scene and arrived about the time Daniels & Comfort's dead wagon came rattling up. They found the conductor in the car. He was unable to continue his run, but did not need the coroner nor wagon. He was take to the L barn.

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February 1, 1910

JIM CROW BILL BEATEN.

Two Democrats Vote With Repub-
licans and Kill It.

Two Democratic aldermen, W. C. Culbertson and Isaac Taylor, voted with the Republicans in the upper house of the council last night and defeated an ordinance providing for separate street car seats for negroes.

Mr. Culbertson's reasons for voting against the ordinance were that he feared it to be a trouble maker, and that it was not sufficiently explicit as to how the negroes were to be separated from the whites when the cars and platforms were crowded. Mr. Taylor gave a like reason.

Here is the vote:

For the ordinance -- Steele, Wirthman, Titsworth, O'Malley, Logan, Gregory; total, 6, all Democrats.

Against the ordinance -- Edwards, Havens, Tillhof, Bunker, Republicans; Taylor, Culbertson, Democrats; total, 6.

Absent -- Cronin, Democrat; Thompson, Republican.

Eight votes were necessary to carry the ordinance.

Before the session opened Alderman James Pendergast came over from the lower house and loudly proclaimed opposition to the ordinance. He said that it could not be enforced, that it would be declared unconstitutional and under his breath he told Democrats it would be a bad move politically.

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January 25, 1910

JIM CROW CARS
PLAN REVIVED.

ALDERMEN SHY AT ORDINANCE
AND SPECIAL COMMITTEE
IS APPOINTED.

Success in Southern Cities
and Negroes Approve,
Mr. Logan Said.

When an ordinance was introduced in the upper house of the council last night by Alderman J. E. Logan, making it obligatory on the Metropolitan Street Railway Company to operate cars for negro passengers, or to designate a part of the car for their use if they are to be carried with whites, there was a perceptible dodging of the aldermen to assume responsibility for having a hand in the legislation.

"I'd like to have the ordinance go to the streets, alleys and grades committee," proposed Alderman Logan.

"The streets, alleys and grades committee has all it can attend to now," replied Alderman Wirthman.

"Public improvements committee," suggested somebody.

"That's no place for such an ordinance," pleaded Alderman Baylis Steele. "It should go to the sanitary committee."

DODGING GETS LIVELY.

"The judiciary committee should pass on it," recommended Alderman W. C. Culbertson.

"Alderman Logan is chairman of that committee and he doesn't want it," volunteered Alderman W. A. Bunker.

The dodging began to get livelier.

"How would you like to have me appointed to a special committee, Alderman Logan?" interrogated President R. L. Gregory.

"That would suit me."

"Would you ask that I be put in the committee?"

"Yes, sir."

Gregory took an inventory of the aldermen.

"How do you stand on this proposition?" Gregory asked of Culbertson.

"As I have said before, it looks like a trouble-maker, but," Culbertson was saying when Gregory interrupted.

FAVORS ORDINANCE.

"You have killed yourself," he said, "and I appoint Alderman Thompson, Republican, and Alderman O'Malley, Democrat, and myself on that committee. I'm for the ordinance heart and soul. I think negroes and whites riding on street cars should be separated."

"I'd like to be excused from serving on the committee. I surrender to Alderman Logan," said Alderman Thompson.

"You don't want to serve?"

"No, sir."

"Well, I would like to have a Republican on the committee. How about you, Alderman Bunker?"

"I'm much obliged, but you'll have to excuse me," spoke up Bunker.

"How about you Alderman Tilhoff?"

"What is it you want to know?" innocently asked the alderman.

"We are going to put the negro where he belongs," answered Gregory.

TILHOFF UNWILLING.

"No, I do not wish to serve on the committee," promptly interposed Tillhoff.

"I'll put you on the committee, alderman," addressed Gregory to Alderman Logan. "I had hopes that we should make the committee non-partisan, but I can't get a Republican to serve, so, therefore, I'll draft Alderman Thompson on the committee." Thompson smiled, and did not object to being drafted.

The ordinance was drafted by Walter M. Lampkin, an associate city counselor. He explained its provisions, providing for separate cars for negroes, designation for them in the car if they ride with whites and placing authority in the conductor to seat passengers to fit conditions.

"Suppose passengers will have to stand. How about that?" asked Alderman Culbertson.

TO HAVE MORE CARS.

"That won't happen. We're going to have more cars," replied Counselor Lampkin.

"What's a passenger to do that wants to go forward to the lobby to smoke?"

"I had expected such questions, but I am not prepared to answer them."

"Have you prepared separate straps for negroes and whites?"

Lampkin appeared confused, and Alderman Logan came to his rescue.

"This is no joking matter," said Logan. "No political or racial prejudices should obtain. It is simply intended to facilitate the convenience and comfort of travel in the street cars. It is a success in Atlanta, Birmingham, Jacksonville, Mobile and other Southern cities. Whites as well as negroes vote it a welcome convenience, and if the ordinance is enforced negroes will be grateful recipients.

KANSAS CITY DIFFERENT.

"The purport of the ordinance is the greatest good to the greatest numbers. they have no such law in Northern cities as they they have not the preponderance of negro population that Kansas City has."

Alderman Isaac Taylor asked Counselor Lampkin if the city had a legal right to pass such an ordinance when there is no similar law in force in the state.

Mr. Lampkin answered that his first impression was that the city did not have the right, but upon consulting authorities he found that the city, under the laws of police powers, has the right. He cited the Florida supreme court as giving the cities of that state the authority, under police powers, to enact laws similar to the one proposed for Kansas City, and said that the supreme court of Massachusetts had ruled that school directors could segregate white and negro children attending public schools.

"I can see where good results would obtain by the enforcement of such an ordinance, but it looks like a trouble breeder to me," observed Alderman Culbertson.

LIKE SOUTHERN LAWS.

The ordinance is patterned after the law in force in Southern cities, and provides a fine of $25 for a person refusing to take a seat assigned him by the conductor or after refusal to leave the car for non-compliance of the rule. The company is subject to a fine of $500 if it fails to operate the separate cars, or comply with the required designation.

Should the ordinance become a law the New Orleans plan will be followed. The conductor will designate the seats in accordance with the prevailing conditions. It is proposed to have negroes occupy the front part of the car. Seats for their use will be appropriate labeled, and they must occupy no others. When their allotment of seats becomes filled, and standing in the aisles is necessary, they must keep within the limits of these seats. They must not seat themselves in seats reserved for whites, and any violation of this rule will necessitate the immediate retirement of the offender from the car or his arrest and punishment by a fine of $25 in the municipal court. The same rule applies to whites occupying reservations for negroes.

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November 30, 1909

HORSE OF MORE IMPORTANCE.

When Told Car Hit Employe,
Grocer Asks About the Rig.

At Tenth street and Troost avenue yesterday a man got in the way of a trolley car. He was saved by the motorman lowering the fender. The man fell into the basket. Although considerably shaken up he was not hurt seriously.

Joseph Collingwood, a canvasser for the election commissioners, aided the man to a drug store. There the man requested that his employers, grocers, be told of the accident.

Collingwood called up the firm over a 'phone.

"Your delivery clerk has been hurt by a trolley car," he explained.

"How about the horse? Was it damaged?" Collingwood was asked.

The employers were told that the horse and wagon were not in the wreck. The man at the other end said, "That's good."

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November 21, 1909

BOY JUMPS OFF CAR;
KILLED BY AUTO.

NOT THE HOPPING KIND, JUST
PLAYING, COMPANION SAYS.

Edgar Palin, Aged 12, Dies in Hos-
pital From Injuries Received in
Alighting in Path of Machine
Giving Children Ride.
Edgar Palin, 12-year-old Killed by Automobile.
EDGAR PALIN,
Twelve-Year-Old Boy Who Leaped from Street Car Fender and Was Mortally Injured by Automobile.

As Edgar Palin, 12 years old, 2802 East Sixth street, jumped from the back fender of an eastbound Independence avenue car yesterday afternoon at Prospect avenue, he was run over and fatally injured by a motor car driven by E. T. Curtis, 3338 Wyandotte street. He died at 7 o'clock last night at the German hospital, without recovering consciousness.

With Allen Compton, 400 Wabash avenue, the boy had been playing all afternoon. About 3 o'clock the two lads started northward on Wabash avenue, and at Independence avenue both noticed an approaching street car.

"Let's catch the fender," called Edgar, as he waited along the curbing. The car was moving at moderate speed and the boy ran behind, and caught hold of the fender. His companion, 10 years old, ran behind on the sidewalk. At Prospect avenue Edgar, without looking around, jumped from the fender directly in front of an approaching auto, barely fifteen feet behind him. Curtis attempted to dodge the boy. The left fender of the auto struck the child and he was sent tumbling on the pavement. He was picked up by Curtis. Several children were in the auto. With Curtis was Herman Smith, of 3606 Olive street, whose father owned the car. In a nearby drug store it was found the boy had been injured seriously.

GIVING CHILDREN RIDE.

"I was driving at about fifteen miles an hour," Curtis said. "The auto belonged to young Smith's father and I was running it because I had the most experience. A party of school children were with us. We were taking them for a ride around the block. I noticed the child on the fender and did not have the least idea that he was going to run in my path. I swerved to one side, but the machine skidded and the fender of the auto struck him in the back. I realized at once that he had received a fearful blow."

After the child was given emergency treatment in the drug store by two neighboring physicians, he was taken to his home in the motor car, and after being attended by Dr. Max Goldman, was removed to the German hospital. Dr. Goldman found that the boy's spine was broken and that his skull was probably fractured.

Allen Compton, his playmate, was in a condition bordering on hysterics last night. The two had been gathering old papers during the forenoon and had just been to the paper mill, where they had received a few pennies with which they intended to buy Christmas presents.

"Edgar wasn't no car hopper," Allen said last night, in defense of his friend. "He was just running behind and holding on to the fender. Edgar wasn't that kind."

With Judge J. E. Guinotte, a friend of the family, young Curtis went to police headquarters last night and made a statement to Captain Walter Whitsett. After consulting Virgil Conkling, prosecuting attorney, it was decided not to hold him. He promised to come to the prosecutor's office Monday and make a complete statement. He said that he had been running a car for eight years. He is the son of W. E. Curtis, a live stock commission man.

The injured boy was the son of W. M. Palin, a real estate dealer in the Commerce building. The body will be taken to Gridley, Kas., for burial.

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November 10, 1909

BOYS CHEERED AS
THEY RODE TO DEATH.

MISUNDERSTOOD WARNINGS OF
HORRIFIED PEDESTRIANS.

Coaster Wagon in Which Kelly and
Eugene Clemonds Were Riding
Hits Street Car -- One Boy
Dead, Other Dying.

Death ended a coasting ride which Kelly C. Clemonds, 15, and his brother, Eugene, 11, were enjoying when their little express wagon glided into the path of a streetcar yesterday evening. The boys received injuries, from which Kelly died an hour later, while but little hope is entertained for the recovery of Eugene.

Both boys resided at Grand Summit, Kas., and were here on a visit at the home of Mrs. James W. Roark, 2919 Flora avenue.

The accident occurred a few minutes before 6 o'clock at the intersection of Twenty-ninth street and Lynn avenue.

The boys had a small coaster express and had been running down the grade on Twenty-ninth street west from Woodland. They had made a number of trips and were laughing and shouting.

When they trudged up the hill when darkness was falling one of the boys suggested that they had had enough fun.

"Let's have just one more," said the other, and turning the wagon at the top of the slope they gave a run and boarding it whirled down at a rapid rate.

As they neared Lynn avenue car No. 555 of the Vine street line, in charge of Motorman Powers and Conductor Everhart, northbound, was approaching.

Pedestrians, attracted by the cheers of the boys, gave a warning cry. the boys, however, did not understand and the wagon kept ahead on its deadly course.

Not until they saw the car loom up before them did they realize their danger. They made a futile effort to swerve the wagon from its path, but were struck with terrific force.

An ambulance was summoned from No. 4 police station and hurried them to the general hospital.

Kelly died at 1:30 o'clock from internal injuries. Eugene, the younger brother, suffered a fracture of the skull, a fracture of the left arm and cuts and bruises. An operation was performed on the skull and the boy rallied, but the physicians have doubts about his recovery.

Dr. Czarlinsky will hold an inquest today.

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October 27, 1909

TURNING OVER THE LEAVES.

Metropolitan Train Crews Attach
Sacks to the Car Fenders.
Keeping Leaves Off The Tracks.
BATTLING WITH AUTUMN LEAVES.

"I have seen brooms, brushes and even scoops attached to fenders of street cars at different times in various cities of this country but it remained for Kansas City to give me the jar of my life this morning," said P.O. Vandeventer, an insurance adjuster, who is stopping at the Hotel Baltimore.

"I have a habit of taking a walk after breakfast and when I got down on Main street, I was surprised to see portions of what had apparently been old cement bags and other pieces of duck died to the fenders and dragging along the tracks. After the second car passed I determined that the rags had been placed there by orders of company officials and asked a few questions.

"A motorman suggested that I ride along with him and I would see the object. Half a mile from the business district and and along the streets which have made Kansas City famous because of the beauty of their foliage, the streets were covered with leaves. These leaves, so the conductor told me, fell so rapidly that they could not be cleaned off fast enough by the white wings and when a street car passed over them on the grades that it was just like applying oil to the wheels and track.

"The rags, I was told, provided the most effective plan for ridding the tracks of the leaves."

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October 23, 1909

BOY-HUSBAND OF 19
CRUSHED BY A CAR.

Clyde Bailey, Married But Two
Months, Is Instantly Killed at
Eighteenth and Indiana.

Clyde Bailey, a carpenter, and a bridegroom of two months, who lived with his father-in-law, Andrew Curtis, 2811 Bales avenue, was killed by a southbound Indiana car between Eighteenth and Nineteenth streets at 6:18 o'clock last evening.

Young Bailey, who was only 19 years old, had been working all day with his father and brother on a building at Overland park, and at 5:30 in the evening left them at Thirty-ninth and State line with the words: "Well I'll see you in the morning, kid." He changed cars at that point and eventually transferred to the Indiana avenue car which would take him to his home and supper.

Charles L. Bowman, proprietor of a night lunch wagon at Eighteenth and Indiana, who was a passenger on the car with Bailey, said they got off at Eighteenth. Bailey walked south on Indiana to the center of the block, said Bowman, and seeing a northbound car coming, crossed the west track and tried to catch the car on the inside. He was thrown back on the west track in the path from the southbound car from which he had just stepped and which by that time was going very rapidly. the top of Bailey's head struck the inside rail of the west track and was crushed by the wheels, the motorman being unable to stop the car until it had entirely passed over the body.

Fifteen minutes after the accident Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky had the body removed to the Carrol-Davidson undertaking rooms, where it was identified by a book of Overland Park line tickets which he had purchased yesterday morning. His father, Nathan H. Bailey, 4435 Madison street, was notified, and his son, Cal W. Bailey, a brother of Clyde, was the first to arrive at the undertaking rooms.

The streetcar conductor, Jerome Moore, 835 Ann avenue, Kansas City, Kas., and the motorman, William Erickson of 1049 Ann avenue, were arrested by Officer Fields and taken to police headquarters where Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Norman Woodson released them on their personal recognizance for their appearance this morning.

It was at first thought Bailey was Roland Allshire, son of Roy B. Allshire, a contractor living at 2421 Indiana avenue, as Bailey had one of Allshire's cards in his pocket. A verdant young man immediately repaired to the Allshire home, where he threw the family into hysterics with the news. They telephoned to the Loose-Wiles factory, where young Allshire works nights, and he soon appeared on the scene to contradict the story.

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October 22, 1909

BOY KILLED BY CAR;
MILK BOTTLE SAVED.

HE RUNS BEHIND TROLLEY AND
DIES BENEATH ANOTHER.

Stopped Work on Essay With "And
Then I Prepared to Take Some
Rest" to Go on Errand to
Grocery for Mother.

While "running" an errand for his mother, Sidney Crawford, 16 years old, son of Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Crawford, 8247 East Twenty-eighth street, met death beneath the wheels of an Indiana avenue street car, between Twenty-eighth street and Victor avenue, at 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Mrs. Crawford had sent Sidney with an empty bottle to a grocery store for milk.

As the boy reached a point on Twenty-eighth street where he might cross directly over to the store, a southbound car obstructed his path for a moment. When it had passed Sidney ran quickly behind it, and encountered a northbound car.

The momentum of the car carried it about thirty feet before it could be stopped and the body could be extricated from beneath the rear trucks, where it was wedged tightly.

When it was disengaged by a wrecking crew thirty minutes after the accident, the half-pint milk bottle remained unbroken.

The boy was the oldest son of the Crawford family and a junior in Manual Training high school. In the library of the home yesterday afternoon he was writing an essay when his mother sent him on the fatal trip to the store. The title of the thesis was "A Halloween Prank."

As Sidney arose to go he bent over his paper and in a thin, boyish scribble added the sentence: "And then I prepared to take some rest." In less than five minutes a neighbor came running to the Crawford doorstep with news of the accident.

Mrs. Crawford was overcome with grief too acute for tears and medical attention was necessary. Mrs. August Nuss, 3233 East Twenty-eighth street, whose husband is a partner with Mr. Crawford in a trunk store at 425-27 West Sixth street, called the latter over the telephone.

The body of the boy was examined by Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky immediately after the accident. An inquest will be held this afternoon. The motorman and conductor of the Indiana avenue street car which killed him were arrested by Patrolman Joseph Morris and taken to the county prosecutor's office but later were released on their personal bonds.

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September 22, 1909

LIGHTNING HITS STREET CAR.

Blows Out Controller and Gives Pas-
sengers a Scare.

A storm that broke over Kansas City shortly after 11 o'clock last night was accompanied by heavy rolling thunder and vivid lightning flashes that made timid citizens seek the center of feather beds for safety. One misdirected bolt fell into a street car at Eighth street and Woodland avenue, to the consternation of several passengers. Besides burning out the controller and extracting a series of warwhoops from a portly individual in a smoker's seat no damage was done.

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August 27, 1909

DYNAMITE ENOUGH TO
WRECK A SKYSCRAPER.

WHEN ARRESTED MEN HAD
FORTY SIX INCH STICKS.

Joseph Monroe and Edward Sanford
Found in vicinity of New South
Side Apartment House --
Stories Conflict.

In the arrest of two suspicious characters at Thirty-sixth street and Broadway about 10 o'clock last night the police believe they averted what was intended to be by far the biggest, most costly and most destructive job of dynamiting ever pulled off in Kansas City or vicinity.

Shortly after 10 o'clock Patrolman E. C. Krister and D. B. Harrison, plain clothes men working out of the Westport police station, saw two men at the corner of Thirty-sixth street and Broadway. One was lighting a cigarette and the officers noticed a small suit case in the hands of the other. When they began to close up the men began to accelerate their speed and only the command "Halt or we'll shoot," stopped them.

The officers did not know what they had until they got the men to the station house and Lieutenant O. T. Wofford carelessly opened the small, cheap suit case. What he believed to be a wire sticking through a hole in the end of the case attracted his attention. When the package was opened it was found to contain forty six-inch sticks of dynamite. Each was marked 40 per cent nitroglycerin -- Hercules No. 2. The "wire" proved to be a fuse and it was attached to two of the sticks of the explosive, in the center, with a cap imbedded deeply into each stick.

ONE HAD LOADED PISTOL.

The men gave the names of Joseph Monroe and Edward Sanford. The latter had in his possession a 44-caliber Derringer pistol, loaded. Monroe said he was a lineman and Sanford insisted that he was a common laborer.

The stories of the prisoners, who were separated by Lieutenant Wofford and questioned soon after their arrival, differ in many respects as to how they came to be in that neighborhood with such a package. While Lieutenant Wofford was in a room alone with Sanford he turned his head to answer a telephone call. Hearing a noise Wofford looked up and the prisoner had all but reached the club of Sergeant Harry Moulder which hung on an opposite wall. Wofford dropped the telephone and grappled with the man. Sergeant Moulder then entered the room and no further trouble occurred. A door was only a few feet away and had he succeeded in clubbing the lieutenant Sanford could have easily escaped.

When Monroe was questioned he said he, Sanford and a man named Charles Hogan had "bummed" their way from Denver. He claimed they arrived Tuesday morning, while Sanford said Sunday morning. Monroe said that last night he and his partner were walking down Grand avenue when they came upon Hogan at Thirteenth street.

"Do you want to make a piece of money?" Monroe says Hogan asked.

"We told him yes," Monroe went on. "We were both broke, hungry and dry. He then introduced us to a man named Anderson, Charles, I believe he said his first name was. He said he would give us $5 to carry a grip out on the Westport car line. We were to stay on the car until it made the second turn to the left. Then we were to get off and meet Anderson or some man who would be there waiting for us. We got off and had walked down the street a little ways when we were arrested. Anderson said to be careful that there was an explosive in the suitcase . That's all I know and I'm innocent of any wrong."

HOW DYNAMITE WAS TO BE USED.

Sanford, who tried to escape, said they arrived with Hogan two days earlier than Monroe stated.

"We went to the Stag hotel opposite the city hall," he said, "and this morning we met Hogan there. He asked us if we wanted to make a piece of coin and told us to meet him on Grand avenue this evening. He introduced us to Anderson and he was gone a long time after the grip. We met there about 7 o'clock."

"What was the dynamite for?" asked Lieutenant Wofford quickly.

"He said it was to blow up a scab job. No, we were not to do it. That was for the fellow who was to meet us, I guess. Yes, I knew there was an explosive in the grip and I knew I was doing wrong."

Sanford also said, when asked later, that he was to give the derringer to the stranger -- or Anderson -- who was to meet him. Both described the mysterious Anderson after they had been locked up within talking distance as "a man 35 years old, six feet tall, weighing 170 pounds. He wore a black mustache and had black hair and a dark complexion. He was dressed i a dark suite, black derby hat and black shoes."

ENOUGH TO WRECK SKYSCRAPER.

Sergeant Moulder also said he learned from inquiry along Westport avenue, that there had been much talk among the union men about the big apartment being a "scab job," and "a rat job." There appeared to be much discontent on account of the immense job being done by an "open shop," he said he gathered from talks with saloonkeepers.

Experts who were called in to examine the package of dynamite said that, properly placed, there was enough to wreck any skyscraper in the city and damage buildings for blocks around.

After the men were locked up they were in a position to talk to each other. William Hicks, a patrolman, sat near the door and heard Monroe upbraid Sanford for being such a dunce as to get his dates mixed on the time of their arrival here and their final meeting with Hogan and the mysterious Anderson. The men are being held for investigation.

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August 25, 1909

PLAY BALL FOR HOME
TOWN, SAYS BECKLEY.

Ball Player Who Has Observed Trac-
tion Lines Throughout Land
Picks Kansas City
for Home.
Famous Baseball Player Jake Beckley.
JAKE BECKLEY.

Jake Beckley, the idol of local baseball fans and one of the most popular men in the profession, has bought a home.

"I bought it here," said the great ball player, "because here is where I want to live. I have had no home for so long that I lived under my hat. 'Buses mostly were my homes, and never in the same town more than a week. Now I can see where I want to light, and it is right here in Kansas City. They say there are other places better. I want to say after being in all that everybody else has been in and more than only myself and the natives have been in, Kansas City has them all skinned. I am narrowing down the years till we catch up with St. Louis. It is a great town."

"They say it is not, Jake, and that its street cars are on the bum," said a fan who, one of a party of half a dozen, had been listening to the player talk shop.

HAS BOUGHT HOME HERE.

"It is not on the bum, and the town is not. Here is where I have fixed to live. I tell you that I have bought a little home here. I have been all over this continent, from the snow up in Canada to where it was hotter than this in Mexico, and right here is where I camp. I do not like to say how big I think Kansas City will be when I get ready to quit it, for I expect to live to be an old man. I am feeling pretty good now, thank you."

Mr. Beckley was then asked how he happened to pick out Kansas City.

"I picked out Kansas City because I have been in the other towns," said Jake. "I was in New York and got lost as soon as I got off Broadway. They have one street there and if you get of of it you are in the residence district. The natives never go on it and the tourist and the grafters never leave it. There is a procession of street cars along it and everybody there thinks they are wonderful. If a man has to stand up, and I never got to sit down, he pats himself on the head and says he is in a big, hustling city. If he has to stand up at home he growls and says the street car system must be on the bum.

"I go out to the ball park in the 'bus. I always watch the street cars. When I see everybody has a seat and nobody is riding on the footrail or the fender, I know we will be playing to the benches that afternoon. When I see them scrapping with the conductor to get on the roof, 'it's a full house for us, I say Jake, my boy,' and sure enough there is good business. I size up a town from the depot and the hotel lobby first, and then from the street cars."

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August 11, 1909

SILVER DOLLAR OF 1798.

Street Car Conductor Gets Rare Coin
Collecting Fares.

Cautiously asking Conductor E. W. Ellis, on the Independence division, if a dollar he was tendering was "good," an old man yesterday paid his car fare with a silver dollar dated 1798. On the date side is a Liberty head with thirteen stars about it. On the other side the spread eagle, with shield in front of the body, thirteen small stars between the tips of the winds and below the level of the head, the whole surmounted by five little billowy clouds.

On this side are the words: "United States of America."

On the rim, in place of the milling is "One door, or unit 100 cents."

The conductor gave the man 95 cents change and put the coin where he would not be likely to pass it out again in making change.

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August 4, 1909

WIPING OUT A CAR LINE.

W. H. Winants Tells of Pioneer
Movement in Electric Railways.

Some idea of the complete way in which the street railway properties are wiped out may be gathered from the fate of the old Northeast electric line. It was only in an accidental way yesterday that the fact was developed that within the last twenty years there was built, operated and wiped out in this city an electric railway. The contractor who was speaking of the line could not recall particulars of it, but remembered that Colonel W. H. Winants, president of the Mercantile bank of this city, had been president of the old company. When Colonel Winants was asked about the road he told a story that was one of pioneering.

"Municipal transportation is a dangerous thing," said the Mercantile bank's president. "So many bright minds are bent upon perfecting the means of rapid transit that great discoveries are made, so great that they destroy all earlier methods. Eight men, including myself, found some twenty years ago that horse cars, dummy engines and cable railways would soon be obsolete and that electricity would be the moving power.

"We raised money for a line and took over the Northeast horse car line. That system ran from the Market square to Woodland avenue by way of Independence avenue. It took care of only that territory, and being a mule line, was not conducive to settlers going beyond. With electricity available we went further. We left Independence avenue and laid rails along the present route, though not so far east as the cars now go.

"When we went out there we went out alone. Our equipment was crude, being then newly invented, and the consequence was the service was not as good as it might be. It would not be accepted today. But we ran electric cars, the people saw how much faster they went than the old mules, and how much farther they could go without coming to a dead stop. Mules would go only so far.

"Poor as our service was, the line began to develop the country, and in an incredibly short space of time there were houses going up all along the route, and thus began the growth of the northeast part of Kansas City. The street cars did it."

Asked what became of the line, President Winants laughed and said that "modern inventions and other things made it necessary to get a bigger company, the Metropolitan, to take it over.

"I had the honor of being the president of the first electric line in Kansas City, and the only 'gravity system' we have had. One morning I arrived at the car line barns at Highland avenue, or near there, and found the trolley had got mixed up with the overhead rigging, and had been torn off the top of the car. It would not do to tie up the system. It was time for people to be getting down town. So I had the trolley pole laid at the curb, closed the doors, told the passengers there would be no stop made till we got to the end of the line, thus giving a chance to any who wanted to get off, and away we went.

"It was a downhill run all the way except past Shelley park, and we gathered enough momentum before reaching that level to carry us on to the next decline. We made the trip all right, and thus began and ended Kansas City's gravity line.

"Seriously speaking," resumed Colonel Winants, "there is a great risk in street car sureties. The lines have to spend vast sums of money pioneering. They do a tremendous amount of good to the city and a new invention may wipe them out."

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August 4, 1909

START ON TROLLEY LINE.

From Kansas City to St. Joseph in
Fifty-Five Minutes.

Former State Senator Ernest Marshall of Saline county, while in Kansas City yesterday, said that within ten days graders will start work upon one of the proposed trolley lines from St. Joseph to Kansas City.

"This is the company which has its headquarters in St. Joseph," said Senator Marshall. "Nearly all the money we want is in sight. We will come into Kansas City over the Winner bridge piers. It will be forty-eight and a half miles from Ninth and Grand avenue here to Francis street in St. Joseph, and we will carry passengers from one street to the other in fifty-five minutes."

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July 24, 1904

"JOY RIDES" FOR CHILDREN.

Youngsters Will Be Given Treat by
Kansas City, Kas., Citizens.

Joy riding will be engaged in next Saturday by 100 children living in Kansas City, Kas., and the automobiles will be furnished by private citizens. The Salvation Army is behind the movement to take the little ones away from the dirt and smoke for several hours and whisk them around the boulevards and parks.

Max Holzmark, a Kansas City, Kas., furniture dealer, has undertaken the task of securing the automobiles for the Army. His friends will be asked to loan machines and drivers for the afternoon. If there are not sufficient automobiles to hold all of the children it is believed some will be given a long street car ride. The Metropolitan has been asked, and tentatively has agreed to furnish two street cars for the occasion.

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July 14, 1909

PICKPOCKET ON
STREET CAR.

Takes Wallet Containing $150 Cash
From A. M. Moore.

In a jostle in the rear vestibule of a street car at Eighth street and Forest avenue, at midnight last night, A. M. Moore of 701 West Sixteenth street was relieved of a wallet containing $150 in cash and a promissory note for $140.

He was returning to his home from Forest park. Mr. Moore believed the man who robbed him was tall and slim, with a light mustache.

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July 10, 1909

CUT IN TWO ON CAR TRACK.

Body of Unidentified Man Discov-
ered at Walnut and Second.

While rounding the curve in the old Holmes street cut on Second street between Walnut street and Grand avenue at midnight last night, J. A. Franklin, the motorman of a Vine street car, noticed that his car bumped slightly at one particular place. He stopped the car, got off and went back to investigate.

In the middle of the track was the body of a man which had evidently been lying there for several hours. More than a dozen cars had passed over the body before any one noticed it. Dr. Harry Czarlinsky was notified and ordered it taken to an undertaker.

From papers found in the dead man's pockets it was presumed that his name is Walter A. Rosh of Enid, Ok.

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July 6, 1909

CHILD HURT TRYING
TO SAVE HER SISTER

ETHEL AND NORINE AINS-
WORTH INJURED BY CAR.

When 6-Year-Old Girl Was Caught
by Fender, Sister, 9 Years Old,
Grabbed Her -- Both
Will Recover.

ETHEL AND NORINE AINSWORTH.

In an effort to save her sister, Norine, 6 years old, from impending death beneath the wheels of a street car at Eighth street and Tracy avenue, yesterday afternoon, Ethel Ainsworth, 9 years old, was struck by the fender and knocked several yards away on the asphalt pavement. The younger girl was rolled beneath the car, and when it was stopped was found wedged under the motor casing of the forward truck. The child was taken from beneath the car after about five minutes' hard work, during which operations were directed by T. P. Wood, a passenger.

Norine's injuries are serious. The child's head was cut, her right arm dislocated, her abdomen injured and the skin torn from her limbs. Ethel's injuries were not so serious. She suffered a slight concussion of the brain, a scalp wound and injuries to her side, arms and limbs.

TRIED TO SAVE SISTER.

Norine and Ethel are the children of Mr. and Mrs. William A. Ainsworth of 1312 East Ninth street. About 5:30 o'clock they left a store at Eighth street and Tracy avenue. Ethel carried the bundles and Norine led the way.

In crossing the street they avoided a westbound street car, but Norine failed to see eastbound car No. 142 on the Independence avenue line, manned by Motorman L. A. Towhouser and Conductor W. H. Donahue. Norine did not hear the warning cry of the motorman, but her sister Ethel did. Norine was struck by the fender and felled. The fender was forced up and the child rolled beneath it. Dropping her parcels, Ethel grabbed for her sister. Just then the front end of the car struck the elder girl, hurling her unconscious into the street.

Motorman Towhouser applied the air and reversed the power, coming to a quick stop. Women in the car fainted when they heard the child's cry.

Volunteers were many in the effort to rescue the imprisoned child. She lay in one of the sunken spots in the paving and it is believed this had much to do with preventing her hips being crushed. She did not lose consciousness, and did much to assist her rescuers in extricating her. The child was seized by the frantic father and carried to her home a block away, where doctors attended her injuries.

DAZED CHILD FORGOTTEN.

Half an hour later neighbors took Ethel home. She was dazed from the shock, but the first question she asked was as to the condition of her baby sister. When told that she would recover, she smiled her satisfaction. The girl had been lost sight of in the excitement which followed the accident, and it was not until neighbors found her wandering about in a dazed condition that it became generally known she had been injured.

"I did not see the car until it was right on us," said Ethel last evening. "Sister was in front of the car, and I knew the motorman could not stop it. I tried to grab her, and then felt something strike me. I do not remember how I got home."

Motorman Towhouser declared that the accident was unavoidable. He said that if his car had not been running slowly the child probably would have been killed.

"I managed to stop the car within ten feet, and this I think saved the child's life," he said.

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July 6, 1909

SERVED SANDWICHES AND TEA.

Street Car Men Were Too Busy to
Lay Off for Supper.

Twelve hundred ham sandwiches were distributed among the employes of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company at supper time last evening, and each man had copious draughts of iced tea to wash down the food.

The lunching places were Fairmount park, where 500 sandwiches were distributed; Electric park, where an additional 500 sandwiches were given the men, and Forest park, where 200 were eaten. The lunches were in lieu of supper.

The company found employment for all of their men yesterday, and as none were left for relief work, it was found necessary to furnish them with lunch. This was done through the office of General Manager W. W. Wheatley.

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June 28, 1909

DROP OF 22 DEGREES.

Downpour of Rain Accompanied by
Fall in Temperature.

Thousands of park-goers who were busying themselves eating ice cream cones and other frozen delectables at the amusement parks about 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon noticed a sudden fall in temperature as dark thunderclouds rolled up from the west and spread across the sky. In less than twenty minutes the thermometer showed a drop from 90 to 72 degrees, and in another hour the upper end of the tiny mercury column pointed to 68 degrees.

With the first cool wave regiments of women with dainty outing hats and dresses remembered they had not taken the precaution of bringing their umbrellas and followed closely by the male straw hat brigade charged upon the street car landings.

Word to the effect that more cars than usual were needed at the parks was met promptly by the street car officials. Cars with trailers were rushed to the rescue. Many of the pleasure-seekers found shelter in them before the real downpour came.

According to the local weather bureau 1.16 inches or rain fell.

The storm occasioned some apprehension yesterday evening in Kansas City, Kas. Telephone wires suffered, and numerous accidents of a minor character were reported.

The home of Horace Chandler, 627 State avenue, was struck by lightning. The chimney was demolished, and about an inch of soot was spread over the carpets and furniture in two rooms. Mr. Chandler was asleep in a chair opposite the chimney when the lightning struck, but was unhurt.

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June 17, 1909

FARE LIFE OF CAR
ENDED BY SUICIDE.

RUNS AWAY AND DASHES IT-
SELF AGAINST POLE.

Deliberately Leaves Barn and Makes
Wild Run Down Ninth Street
Until It Jumps Track at
Wyandotte Street.

Roanoke car No. 604 committed suicide last night at 7:30 o'clock by running down Ninth from Washington street and dashing itself against the trolley pole at the southeast corner of Ninth and Wyandotte streets. So carefully was the act committed that no one was hurt and the tracks were left clear, but the car was smashed to kindling.

No. 604 returned from a hard day's work and was put into the car barn at Ninth and Wyandotte streets by Motorman Floyd Dyer, 809 West Twenty-first street. It was raining and there was a despondency in the air, but the car manifested no signs of the deep design it was nursing within its breast.
INTENT ON SUICIDE
Fifteen minutes later, when none of the street car men was looking, it poked its nose out of the barn and started, gathering speed as it progressed. A girl clerking at a laundry agency across the street from the barn saw it start.

"There was no one on or near the car," she said. "It came out deliberately like a living thing, and ran away before anyone had time to stop it."
Two street car men saw the runaway after it had gone half a block and ran after it. Fortunately there were no cars on the track in front and the rain had driven pedestrians from the streets.
Detective Andy O'Hare, who was waiting for a car at Ninth and Wyandotte streets, saw the car bearing down upon him. The trolley was threshing wildly although it had been on the wire when 604 left the barn.
DASHES ITSELF TO PIECES.
Grinding the speed limit beneath its wheels, the suicide leaped the track at Wyandotte steret, instead of making the turn, and precipitated itself sideways against the granitoid walk at the west side of the Boston Drug Company, on the southeast corner.
It was brought to a stop by an iron trolley pole, and the bed of the car left the trucks and fell sideways on the walk, completely blocking passage. Only two windows in the drug store were damaged. Every window in the car ws broken, the front end was ripped open and a few solid planks were left.
The wreck was entirely clear of the tracks and traffic was not delayed. Dyer, the motorman, is positive that he set the brake before leaving the car.
"Clear case of suicide, probably due to despondency brought on by the whether," was the verdict of the wreckers who cleared the debris away.

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June 13, 1909

KANSAS CITY'S CROSSING SQUAD.

A Fine Appearing Body of Men.

CROSSING SQUAD OF THE POLICE DEPARTMENT.

It doesn't take the oldest inhabitant to remember the time when the crossing squad, which now numbers twenty-nine men, was limited to one or two members. At one time Sergeant James Hogan was the whole squad himself with the exception of a patrolman who has been stationed at the Junction for more than twenty years. Kansas City cannot boast of the largest squad in the country, but its members are noted for their general efficiency.

In the mind of the ordinary person the crossing man leads a life of ease. In fact, the majority of the police department envy the crossing men until they have been given a trial. Then it is found that a man must know the location and name of all the office buildings, the streets in every section of the city, the routes of the different street cars and most of the public men.

"Can you tell me the way to the depot?" is a question heard every five minutes.

"Where is the nearest shoe store?" asks a woman.

"Do you know Charley Smith?" asks a farmer who feels hurt when the crossing man shakes his head. "You see he was a great feller to make acquaintances in our town, and I was sure you would know him."

Answering questions, directing the careless drivers who persist in driving on the wrong side of the street and dodging street cars on his own account, are only mere incidents. The constant strain on the system is generally the cause for a man's departure from the squad. Some men ask to be relieved in less than a week.

When the cable cars formerly ran on Ninth street and when some one was injured nearly every week as the cars swept around the corner at high speed, a patrolman was always stationed at that particular spot. The second patrolman to be placed at a crossing was James Hogan, who commenced patrolling the corner at Eleventh and Walnut streets, just eleven years ago.

Four years ago the crossing squad was increased from eight members, who worked from 8 o'clock in the morning until about 7 o'clock in the evening. Patrolman Hogan on account of his seniority and his general knowledge was made a sergeant of the squad.

Two years ago the squad was increased to fourteen members and more crossing were included in the list. But the hours were long and the men asked to be relieved. At last the problem of long hours was solved by Sergeant Hogan, who recommended that the squad be doubled and the hours shortened. Fourteen of the men now go to work at 8 o'clock in the morning and are relieved at 1 o'clock in the afternoon by the other division. After six hours of rest they report at police headquarters and are assigned to the parks and theaters. On the following day the second squad are given the same hours and report at 8 o'clock in the morning, as did the opposite squad on the previous day.

Sergeant Hogan, who has been on the force for nineteen years, probably has a better general knowledge of Kansas City than any other man. One glance through an information guide can tell him whether the pamphlet is up to date or not.

"I don't see the name of the Sharp of finance building," he informed a book dealer the other day when his opinion was asked in regard to the reliability of a guide recently issued. He also knows the name of every street in both Kansas Citys and places of general interest. With such a leader it isn't any wonder that the crossing squad is rated as highly efficient.

Names of the officers, from left to right:

First row -- Crowley, Kennedy, Quayle, Darnell, Rogers, Kincaid.
Second row -- Kearns, Keys, Madigan, Harkenberg, Doman, Nichols.
Third Row -- Lillis, O'Roark, Noland, McCormick, Briden, Jackson.
Fourth Row -- Roach, Coffey, J. T. Rogers, Ryan, McFarland, Hoskins.
Fifth Row -- Hodges, Koger, Sergeant Hogan, Zirschky, Wilhite.

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June 5, 1909

MADE A ROBBED MAN RUN.

"Stick-Ups" got a Conductor's $11,
Then Urged Him to "Beat It."

As D. D. Porter, a Fifteenth street car conductor, got off a car at Fifteenth street and Quincy avenue about 11 o'clock Thursday night, after the day's work was over, he was followed by three men. A block north on Quincy avenue they caught up with Porter and held him up. Two of the men were armed with revolvers.

After taking the contents of his pocketbook which amounted to about $11, they told Porter to run. To accelerate his progress, several shots were fired in the air.

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June 3, 1909

SOUTHERN COLLEGE GIRLS
MAKING A TOUR OF WEST.

President of Nashville Institution
Makes Yearly Trip Educa-
tional Feature.

Kansas City underwent an invasion of college girls yesterday. They are from Radnor college, in the suburbs of Nashville, Tenn., and are on a tour through the West, personally conducted by President A. N. Esham, head of the institution, who has made these educational trips a yearly feature of the curriculum.

The special train with 210 girls aboard came in over the Missouri Pacific at 7 o'clock yesterday morning and was here until 10 o'clock when it left for the Pacific coast over the Santa Fe. Three Metropolitan cars were chartered and a trolley trip was taken through Kansas City. thee cars went out Independence avenue and returning, went south over the Troost line to Forty-seventh street, thence back to the Union depot by way of the Rockhill line.

From Kansas City the route lies over the Santa Fe to Los Angeles, thence over the Southern Pacific through San Francisco to Salt Lake, from Salt Lake to Denver over the Denver & Rio Grande and Colorado Midland and from Denver back to Kansas City over the Union Pacific. The return to Nashvilile from Kansas City will be made via the Frisco to Memphis and from there over the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis to Nashvile. The excursionists will be in Kansas City again June 16.

President Eshain gave a check for $12,000 to W. M. Hunt, railroad agent in Nashville, in payment for tickets and sleepers for the excursionists. This was the largest sum ever paid for private passage in Nashville. Only the government has paid more, for the transportation of troops.

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June 2, 1909

15-CENT TICKETS ON SALE.

One Hundred Dollars Worth Quickly
Taken by Early Buyers.

The new 15-cent rate tickets between Kansas City and Independence were placed on sale yesterday by the Metropolitan Street Railway Company and $100 worth were quickly taken by early buyers.

It is expected that several hundred dollars worth will be disposed of within the next few days.

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June 2, 1909

ELECTRICAL STORM
A VIVID SPECTACLE.

LIGHTNING STRIKES HOUSES
AND DISABLES STREET CARS.

Hundreds Drenched Before They Can
Reach Shelter -- Freak Bolt Turns
Dresser Completely Around.
Severe Shock for Woman.

Kansas City was visited by an electrical storm shortly after 8 o'clock last night which for vividness and intensity while it lasted eclipsed anything seen here in years. For three quarters of an hour almost constant lightning flashes, followed immediately by claps of thunder like a volley of rifles close at hand, made a terrifying spectacle. many houses were struck, chimneys dismantled and street cars disabled. No serious accidents were reported.

Beginning about 2 p. m. heavy showers followed one another at intervals until about 5:30 o'clock. Then the sun came out and all looked well, but both barometer and thermometer indicated there was trouble in the air, and it burst in all its fury two and one-half hours later.

When the storm arrived it came so suddenly that hundreds who had been deceived by the evening sunshine and left their umbrellas at home were drenched before they could reach shelter. Even those in street cars, where the windows were down, got their share of the rain which had no direct course, seeming to come from all directions at once.

STREET CARS SUFFER.

The street car system suffered for a time, many of the cars being put out of commission by lightning, and wires were down in several places. At Eighth street and Troost avenue cars were burned out by an electrical shock.

A Westport and a Prospect avenue car suffered similarly while in the vicinity of Fifth street and Grand avenue, an Indiana avenue car was put out of commission at Eighteenth street and Walrond avenue, and a Minnesota avenue car was treated in the same manner at Nineteenth and Walnut streets. The smoke from the burning controllers caused some excitement among the passengers.

The lightning cut some peculiar pranks, possibly the oddest being at the home of George Miller, 4100 Belleview avenue. Here a stone chimney which his built on the outside of the house was struck. Holes were torn in the chimney near the top, and the bolt passed into an upper room and had an engagement with a big dresser which had been standing with its back toward the wall.

DRESSER IS TURNED AROUND.

When the lightning left the room, breaking out a window across from where it entered, the dresser had been turned completely around and faced the wall. The mirror was shattered and scattered all over the room. The family was below when the shock came and no one was injured.

At the home of W. R. Hall, 628 Freemont avenue, Sheffield, the lightning completely dismantled a brick chimney and passed into the house. Mrs. Hall, who was standing in the room, was thrown down and severely shocked.

While the council was in session at the city hall lightning came in contact with an electric light wire supplying the upper house chamber and burned out a fuse, putting all of the wall lights out of commission. One circuit only was involved.

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May 30, 1909

VISIT ARRESTED BY DEATH.

Admiral John Crittenden Watson
Came Here to Meet Late Gov-
ernor, His Cousin.

Unaware of Governor Thomas T. Crittenden's death, Admiral John Crittenden Watson, a cousin of the governor, arrived in Kansas City yesterday afternoon for brief visit. The first he learned of his cousin's death was while riding on a street car to the Crittenden home. A man with whom the admiral was sitting held a paper which contained an account of the governor's death. As he turned the page the admiral stopped him:

"What's that," he exclaimed. "Governor Crittenden dead?"

"Yes, he died early this morning," replied the man.

"I am his cousin, and I have just arrived in the city for a visit with him and his family. This is the first I've heard of his death."

Admiral Watson, who succeeded Dewey in command of the fleet at Manila, had been attending the convention of the Presbyterian general assembly in Denver. He was there as a delegate from Louisville, Ky., his him, and stopped off in Kansas City upon his return. He had been on the train for more than a day and consequently had missed the newspaper accounts of Mr. Crittenden's condition.

At the Crittenden home, the governor's half brother, Logan C. Murray of Kentucky, is expected today. Governor Crittenden and his brother and cousin had planned a family reunion to be held June 18, at the Crittenden home in Shelby county.

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May 15, 1909

SCORES INJURED IN A
STORMSWEPT SUBURB.

TORNADO STRIKES MOUNT
WASHINGTON.

Many Homes Wrecked or Demol-
ished -- Trees and Poles Razed,
Air Line Train in the
Twister's Path.

Sweeping across the country just east of Kansas City, a tornado tore down many buildings and injured more than twenty persons about 6 o'clock last night. The greatest damage was done in the neighborhood of Mount Washington and Fairmount park. The storm originated near the intersection of the Blue Ridge road and Fifteenth street, and crossed the country to the northeast.

Little damage was done by the tornado until it reached the street car line at Mount Washington, and from there until it reached the Missouri river it left only wreckage in its path. It moved some houses from the foundations, demolished others, and razed trees and telegraph poles. Many persons were injured by flying timbers. Several of the injured are not expected to live, and quite a number not bruised suffered from nervous shock.

ROOFS 200 FEET IN AIR.

Wreckage was blown high in the air, and witnesses say that roofs were seen at an altitude of 200 feet. Timbers carried onto the street car and railroad tracks delayed transportation, and made it dangerous for traveling. Flying timbers threatened injury to all those who braved the storm to go the the assistance of the unfortunates whose homes were demolished. Immediately after the force of the tornado had passed, men and women gathered to the aid of those needing it and surgeons were sent for from Independence.

Many miraculous escapes were recorded and the storm played havoc with everything in its path. Trees several feet in diameter were uprooted and then broken off, while telephone and telegraph wires and poles were blown down which tended to make the work of rescue the harder. As fast as the injured persons were found friends and neighbors carried them to their homes and summoned medical aid.

TRAIN IN TRACK OF STORM.

The Air Line train, which is due to leave Independence at 5:45, was directly in the path of the tornado, and at Mount Washington narrowly escaped being wrecked. A roof whirling in the air 200 feet high passed over the rear coach, and the end of the roof tore a hole in the top of the car. A timber was driven into the roof of the coach, and was sticking there when the train pulled out.

The concrete and steel bridge of the Chicago & Alton crossing the electric line leading to Fairmount park was moved four inches from its foundation. Residences on the hill were blown down and the wreckage strewn along the Chicago & Alton and Missouri Pacific tracks.

The storm struck the ground at various places, and where it did any damage its path was estimated to be about 150 feet wide. Many persons saw its approach and attempted to avoid it by running across the country or retiring to the cellars of their homes. One woman who ran into a barn was left unconscious on the ground, while the barn was whipped off the ground and carried away. What became of it was not known last night.

LIKE A LURID DUST CLOUD.

Those who noticed the storm as it approached their neighborhood, said that it seemed to gather velocity and destructiveness as it neared Mount Washington. The cloud, looking like a reddish dust cloud, twisted and whirled with rapidity. It would travel high in the air and then swoop down to earth, smashing and damaging everything it struck.

Throughout and preceding the tornado there was a heavy rainfall. Shortly after the crest of the storm had passed the wind swept territory, the work of rescue was well under way. Later the rain continued, and delayed the recovery of property which had been blown away.

CAUGHT UNDER WRECKAGE.

The low hanging cloud, as it swept around Mount Washington cemetery, took on a funnel like shape when it neared the Metropolitan tracks. The home of George Ogan at 915 Greenwood avenue was the first in the path of the storm. Mr. and Mrs. Ogan, with their daughter, Mrs. J. Jenkins, were in the house, which was lifted from its foundation. After it passed the Ogan home the storm redoubled its fury.

John Archer, a Metropolitan motorman, who was working on a new house near the street car tracks, was struck by a flying timber. Dr. Gilmore, who treated him, found that he was suffering from a severe scalp wound.

At the barn of A. J. Ream not enough timbers were left to show that it ever existed. Mr. Ream's large house, fifty feet to the east, was not damaged. Across the street car spur to Fairmount park, Orli Can's home was blown to pieces. No one was at home.

Next to the Cain home was a new building being erected by C. L. Green, an insurance man, who is in Cleveland, O., at the present time. In the rear was a small cottage in which the family lived. When the storm struck Mrs. Greer and the two sons attempted to reach the cellar. The mother was not injured, but the boys were caught by the house as it ripped from the foundation. A. J. Ream rescued the boys from under the wreckage.

CHRISTIAN CHURCH DESTROYED.

Adjoining the Greer home was the residence of Will McCay, a decorator for Emery, Bird, Thayer Dry Goods Company. Mrs. McKay and her 8 year old daughter, Grace, were in the dining room. The roof was carried fifty feet away. Both were hurt.

Next in its path the storm destroyed two large residences belonging to H. D. Jett, a commission man. Mrs. Jett and three children were in the smaller of the two houses. The building was completely destroyed. None of the four were injured.

At the southwest corner of Independence and Overton avenues the storm did its worst. The Christian church, a building erected four years ago, was wrecked beyond recognition. Not a wall was left standing. Had the windstorm struck two hours later, the building would have been occupied, as revival services are held every night.

J. S. DeBernardi's home, directly south of the church, was shifted from its foundation, and Forest, his 10-year-old son, was slightly injured. Charles F. Miller's residence, fifty feet to the west, was shifted from the foundation, but no one was injured, though the family were at home.

Mr. and Mrs. J. S. DeBernardi, the parents of J. S. DeBernardi, lived directly across Overton avenue from the Christian church. The five room cottage was literally blown away, and Mrs. DeBernardi was dangerously injured. Her left arm was broken and she was later taken to Independence for treatment. A new house belonging to J. S. DeBernardi, fifty feet away, was also blown away.

HOUSE TOPSY TURVY.

In its course, the storm next struck the home of W. B. Rich. The house was shifted form its foundation. Steele Byrd's new residence was also shifted from its foundation. The Kefferly home, adjoining the Rich's, had its roof blown away.

Fortunately no one was at home when the storm struck the home of J. Peak, the proprietor of the Fairmount Lumber Company. The house was turned completely over and deposited upside down in the cellar. A new residence belonging to G. R. Baker was next, and was totally destroyed. No one was living in the building.

The storm then jumped the deep ravine between Mount Washington and Fairmount addition. John Robinson's cottage was the first struck and was completely demolished. Mrs. Robinson and her 1-year-old daughter were dangerously injured. J. W. Ferguson's cottage was next destroyed. Mrs. Ferguson was injured, but the two children were not touched.

HELD TO FENCE POST.

Fred McGrath's home, directly north, was also destroyed, and Mrs. McGrath was dangerously injured. Directly north of the McGrath home Mr. and Mrs. John Reed were living in a tent. Mr. Reed was not at home, and when Mrs. Reed saw the cloud she started to run. Finding that it would be impossible to get away, she seized a piece of fence post and managed to cling to it until the wind was over. Her arms were badly lacerated.

A block north the two-story residence of Alexander Harness was demolished. Mrs. Harness received several scratches. A new dwelling across the street in the course of construction was demolished. The one-room home of James Patterson, a laborer, was blown away. Patterson escaped with slight injuries.

From Patterson's home the tornado lifted and no further damage was reported. Sugar Creek, directly in line with the tornado, only experienced a strong wind.

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May 15, 1909

STORM STOPS STREET CARS.

Traffic on Many Lines Delayed by
Water, Broken Poles and Ob-
structed Tracks.

The service of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company suffered severely from yesterday's storm. Mud and stones on the track at many places on all lines held up cars for 20 minutes at a time. Although all help available was hurried to such places to clear away the impending debris, most of the cars on the long lines, like the Quindaro boulevard line, were from half an hour to a full hour late in arriving at their terminals.

It was said at the general office at Fifteenth street and Grand avenue at 8 o'clock that three-quarters of a mile of trolley wires was down near Fairmount park, and that twelve poles had been broken off at this point. Also it was said service was temporarily suspended on the West Side line in Kansas City, Kas., because of debris across the tracks in the vicinity of Riverview.

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May 10, 1909

GOT OFF CAR BACKWARDS.

T. J. Kennedy of Le Loup, Kas.,
Killed by Fall on the Asphalt.

Stepping from a moving car between Tenth and Eleventh street in Grand avenue, T. J. Kennedy, 55 years old, a farmer from Le Loup, Kas., fell with the back of his head on the asphalt yesterday afternoon about 5 o'clock and was killed. Kennedy had attempted to alight from the car with his back in the direction it was going.

The old man was on his way to surprise his only son, Rufus Kennedy, who lives at 109 East Sixteenth street, with a visit, the first one he had paid him since December 22, 1908. The son did not know of his intention, the first news of it coming with the announcement of his death.

Kennedy had lived in the vicinity of Le Loup for twenty-seven years, being the owner of a farm one and one-half miles east of that place. His wife is dead, but his daughter, Victoria, kept house for him. The son is a wagon driver for the City Ice Company.

Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky was notified and ordered the body taken to Carroll-Davidson's undertaking rooms. A post-mortem examination will be held this morning.

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April 24, 1909

SENATE BILL FOR JIM
CROW STREET CARS.

WAS ORIGINALLY FRAMED TO
APPLY TO STEAM ROADS.

May Pass Senate, but Is Sure of
Defeat in the House -- Senator
Wilson Framed the
Amendment.

JEFFERSON CITY, April 23. -- A street car Jim Crow bill has been introduced in the senate. This is the Oliver bill, which in its original form was to have applied to steam railroads only. The bill turned up this morning amended so as to apply to street cars.

The street car amendment was put on it by Senator F. M. Wilson of Platte, a personal and political friend of the mayor of Kansas City, Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., the mayor having loaded the senator from Platte up with reasons why the street cars of Kansas City should be arranged to segregate the races.

The amendment was not put on without much maneuvering, and while the bill may pass the senate in this form it is absolutely certain to be defeated in the house.

When asked for his reason for making the bill apply to street cars Senator Wilson said:

"If it is desirable the races should be separated on the steam cars, they ought to be separated in the street cars. Kansas City, so I understand, has something like 30,000 negroes living there. Without advancing any reason for providing separate places for them I merely refer to the state's reason for providing separate schools, the Kansas City park board excluding them from the public bath house and the church custom of letting them flock by themselves.

"The negroes prefer to be to themselves, as shown by their church habits. Accordingly, they must want to be by themselves in the street cars."

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April 20, 1909

STREET CAR A DAY NURSERY.

Unusual Duties Devolve Upon Mem-
bers of Twelfth Street Crew.

T. J. Randall, 522 Elmwood avenue, a conductor on the Twelfth street line of the Metropolitan street railway, and his motorman, were yesterday forced into temporary custodianship of a 2-year-old baby girl.

"When I helped a number of women to alight from my car at Twelfth street and Grand avenue about noon yesterday I didn't know that one of them was making a nursemaid of me," said Randall last night, "or I would surely have set up a longer and larger howl than the baby did a few minutes later.

"About the time I jingled the bell to get away from McGee street, and began to feel good about the light load I had aboard, with lunch looking strong at me after the next trip, I heard that wail. It was long and plaintive. At first I paid no attention to it, and as it persisted I looked into the car and saw the youngster was alone.

"I went to the little one and asked what was the matter. 'Mamma,' was all the answer I could get. 'Where is your mama?" I asked her, and the saddest, sorriest, most doleful and altogether hopeless 'gone,' from the baby, told the story. It was up to me and I made the best of it. I rocked her and talked to her and carried her up and down the car in an effort to quell the riot that was evidently going on within the breast of my diminutive and unwilling passenger.

"At the end of the line I made Allen, my motorman, take the kid, and he had his troubles for about five minutes while I got some candy. The trap back was really pleasant. The candy was good and the kiddy was better. Not another sound aside from the occasional smacking of tiny lips was heard all the way in. At Grand avenue, where the mother got off, there was a delegation waiting for me; mamma remembered her baby, and say, she was tickled to get that kid back in her arms again. But she wasn't any more tickled to get her than I was to get rid of her. Babies are all right at home, but a conductor's job was never calculated to include nursing."

Crossing Patrolman Heckenburg got the story a few minutes after the car left Grand avenue. The mother was almost frantic for nearly an hour, and stayed close to the bluecoat, anxiously inspecting every car that passed the corner until the right one came along.

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April 14, 1909

THREATENED WITH A
KNIFE, WIFE'S PLEA.

CLAIMED ILL TREATMENT LED
TO KILLING OF PETERSON.

"I Shot Him Because He Slapped
Me," One Witness Testified Ac-
cused Woman Said -- Mother
Overcome in Court.
Rose Peterson, On Trial for the Murder of Her Husband.
MRS. ROSE PETERSON.

Facing a charge of murder in the second degree, Rose Peterson, 19 years old, was on trial before Judge Ralph Latshaw in the criminal court yesterday afternoon. Throughout the proceedings she did not once look at the twelve men who are to decide her fate. She is accused of killing her husband, Fred Peterson, on the night of December 22, by shooting him three times while the two were returning home from a dance.

The defendant was neatly gowned in a plain dress of black and wore a turban hat trimmed with black lace. A gold bracelet and two small rings were the only display of jewelry. With her left arm thrown over the back of a chair, Mrs. Peterson buried her face on her arm and sat in that position all afternoon. She constantly trembled and every now and then sobbed aloud when Frank M. Lowe, her attorney, mentioned the name of her husband.

CLAIMS LIFE WAS THREATENED.


Following I. B. Kimbrell, who in assisting the state in the prosecution, outlined what the state would attempt to prove. Mr. Lowe made a brief resume of what the defense would how in justification of the shooting. He said the defendant practically would be the only witness and would testify that she was induced to go to St. Joseph with Fred Peterson, who promised to marry her there, but that the ceremony was delayed for two months. The defense will endeavor to show that Rose Peterson, after her marriage, earned a living not only for herself, but supported her husband, and that he mistreated her; that he drew a knife and threatened to cut her on one occasion and continually threatened to inform her mother how they had lived in St. Joseph.


"If you do tell, you will never tell anything else," Attorney Lowe said the defendant would testify she replied.

Mrs. Sophia Peterson, mother of Fred Peterson, was the first witness for the state. Grief overcame her at the beginning of her examination.

GRIEF OVERCOMES MOTHER.

"I can't stay here," she sobbed, attempting to leave the witness stand.

Judge Latshaw allowed her to retire until she could control her feelings. When she again took the stand she testified that Fred was 20 years old when he was killed, and 18 when he was married. She said she followed the couple to St. Joseph and that Rose, her daughter-in-law, begged her to assist them in being married and that she did so. Mrs. Peterson also told the jury of the young wife coming to her home the night she shot her husband.

"I've shot Fred and if you want to see him alive you will have to hurry," Mrs. Peterson said Rose told her.

The state introduced a letter written by Rose Peterson to her husband about a month before the shooting occurred. It read, in part:

"It is a good thing you ran today. I would have got you, anyhow, if so many people had not been standing around. You stay away from me. Don't you go any place I am. I won't call for you or go to your home or shop anymore. If you want me to go on in that case I will. Fred, go away from Kansas City and don't you come back. I am not afraid of you any more. I will get you if it is ten years. I am willing for my freedom as you are."

SAID HE SLAPPED HER.

Frank Page, a motorman on a Jackson avenue car, testified that as his car passed the scene of the shooting he saw the body of Peterson. He stopped his car and with the conductor, R. E. Moore, went back. At first he testified he saw no one near, but later noticed the defendant climbing up to the sidewalk from the ditch at the side. She was not excited or crying, according to the witness. Asked what she said, he answered:

"She said, 'I shot him because he slapped me. There is the pistol.' She said his folks should be notified and told us where they lived."

"Oh Fred, don't die," the witness said Rose Peterson begged.

On cross-examination the witness admitted that in the preliminary hearing he testified that he had not heard her say her husband had slapped her. Other witnesses were Arthur Detalent, a tailor, who identified the clothes worn by Fred Peterson; Patrolman Patrick Coon, who arrested the defendant, and F. Frick, who was assistant prosecuting attorney at the time, and took the defendant's statement.

A witness for the state who failed to appear was Hal Jensen, a baker. He sent word that he had a batch of dough in process and could not leave it. Judge Latshaw refused to issue for him because he said he used that bread himself and did not want it ruined. The trial will be continued at 9 o'clock this morning.

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