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January 30, 1910

USE OF AEROPLANE IN WAR.

Taft Will Be Asked to Urge Devel-
opment of Craft.

ST. LOUIS, Jan. 29. -- Congress is to be petitioned, according to a resolution passed at a conference of the aero clubs here today to determine the value of aerial craft in warfare.

A committee from the aero clubs is to call on President Taft and ask him to undertake steps to insure the development of aerial craft.

The conference, which was presided over by Cortlandt F. Bishop, president of the Aero Club of America, represented clubs from thirteen cities and states. Mr. Bishop represents by proxy the aero clubs of New England, California and Colorado. Dayton, O., Kansas City, Peoria, Ill., Rochester, N. Y., Indianapolis, Des Moines, Baltimore and Washington had representatives here.

Applications for the international aviation and balloon races were announced from Kansas City, Peoria, Indianapolis and Philadelphia. Baltimore and Washington entered a joint application for College Park, Md.

The place for holding the international aviation and balloon contests will be decided on by the Aero Club of America within thirty days.

Kansas City delegates tonight told of the advantages of their city for the meet, particularly because the winds in the fall blow east and Kansas City is centrally located.

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January 10, 1910

SOCIETY'S AIM TO
UPLIFT PRISONERS.

National Organization to Be
Formed During Present
Convention.

To make good folks out of bad ones is the object of a convention of men and women representing eight states, which began in Kansas City yesterday and will continue until Wednesday.

The meeting is that of the Society of the Friendless, which has for its purpose the uplifting of men, women and children within prison walls and their conversion tion good citizens when they are released. The society was started ten years ago in Kansas and Missouri, but at the present convention a national organization will be perfected.

The opening meeting of the convention was held yesterday in the Institutional church, Admiral boulevard and Holmes street, and the feature was an address by Fred M. Jackson, attorney general of Kansas, who declared that in enforcing prohibition of the liquor traffic Kansas is doing more than probably any other state in the prevention of crime. Other speakers of the afternoon were Henry M. Beardsley of Kansas City and Dr. A. J. Steelman of Seattle, superintendent of the Washington branch of the society.

J. K. Codding, warden of the Kansas state prison at Lansing, was to have spoken, but was unable to attend the meeting yesterday because of injuries received several days ago. He expects to be present at the session today.

Mr. Jackson was assigned the topic of law enforcement as a preventive of crime. He said, in part:

"In Kansas it is figured that one-fifth of the men in prison are there by accident or thorugh the miscarriage of justice, another fifth is a criminal class andd the remaining 60 per cent are men who may either be saved or become criminals.

"We proceed in Kansas the best way to save this 60 per cent, and that is to enforce the law against the organized liquor traffic. The greter per cent of men in prison go there because of the liquor traffic and the state claims the right to oust any business which contributes so largely to the public expense and to public detriment.

"Some people ask why w do not have a local option law or some other measure than prohibition. When you grant licenses in one part of the state, you bot those who do not want liquor as an element of government. When we have prohibition it should be enforced. The state demands it and I do not claim the least bit of credit for my part in enforcing it. An officer who merely does his duty doens't deserve any credit.

"There result where the law ha been enforced is that society and the man have been repaid. Business men realize the poverty which liquor causes and are against it. What is a saloonkeeper? He is a man who wants to share the responsiblilty of government, who helps run the police power, whose consent is necessary to levy taxes and disburse them. By putting him out of the way, more than half hte counties of Kansas have dispensed with their poor houses and in other counties these institutions are but poorly populated.

HAS PAID KANSAS.

"We have decreased crime and criminals. Has it paid Kansas? The results speak for themselves."

Dr. Steelman, who talked on the reformatory side of the prison, told of the wonderful progress made in the treatment of prisoners and of modern methods for making them good citizens after their release. The first step in the movement, he said, was saving the services of the prisoners to the state and this was succeeded by the idea of saving the men themselves. Dr. Steelman was formerly warden of the Joliet (Ill.) penitentiary.

Mr. Beardsley devoted his talk to outlining the purposes of the society. He said the work of the society is both preventive and to help the fallen.

"Criminals," said Mr. Beardsley, "ought to be on the credit instead of the debit side of the state's accounts. A small amount invested in reclaiming these men brings big returns to the state."

Mr. Beardsley said the work of the society has been costing about $12,000 a year, but that this year $15,000 will be required.

Warden Codding of Lansing, in a telegram to the society, expressed regret at his inability to be present and conveyed his good wishes.

The Rev. E. A. Fredenhagen of Kansas City, corresponding secretary of the society, presided at the meeting yesterday.

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December 31, 1909

NEGROES WANT EXPOSITION.

Delegates to Convention Hall In-
dorse Depew Bill.

Three hundred and fifty negro delegates to the convention of the Interstate Literary Association of the West, now in session at Convention hall, last night unanimously indorsed Senator DePew's bill, asking congress to appropriate $250,000 for a semi-centennial American Emancipation exposition to be held in some Southern city in 1913 to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the freedom of negroes. The proposed exposition also is for the purpose of showing the progress of the race. Professor R. R. Wright, former paymaster of the army, is one behind the movement.

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November 27, 1909

PAROLE SYSTEM IN HANNIBAL?

Jacob Billikopf's Address at Muni-
cipal League Meeting Responsible.

At the convention of the Missouri Municipal League here a few days ago Jacob Billikopf delivered an address on the work of the board of pardons and paroles and explained the system under which it operates. The mayor, city attorney and some members of the city council of Hannibal, Mo., who were delegates, became interested and sought Mr. Billikopf after the meeting.

"I explained the whole system to them in detail," said Mr. Billikopf yesterday, "and showed them our records. The took home blanks and cards which we use in our work here. Benjamin Henwood, the city attorney, said that a special ordinance would be drawn on his arrival home and a pardons and paroles system put into operation there. All of them approved of our system, and no doubt will adopt a similar one in Hannibal."

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November 18, 1909

HOTEL MEN IN ARMS
AGAINST 'DEAD BEATS.'

MAY PUT CONTRACT ON EACH
PAGE OF REGISTER.

Meeting of Association Concludes
Today With Lunch at Sexton
and Banquet Tonight at
Excelsior Springs.

If the plans of the Kansas-Missouri Hotel Men's association are carried out, it's not going to be so easy to walk up to the hotel register, sign your name, and then walk out the next morning without paying, giving the simple excuse that you are "broke." The legislators of Kansas and Missouri will be asked at the next session to allow the following brief contract to be printed at the head of each page:

"Any one signing their signature below hereby agrees to pay the bill as charged by this hotel. Failure to do so shall be a violation of this contract and party violating same will be punishable by law. The proprietor of the hotel hereby agrees to fulfill his part of the contract."

Sam B. Campbell of the Sexton Hotel.
SAM B. CAMPBELL,
Clerk at the Sexton. Oldest Clerk in Point of Service in Kansas City.

Though stringent laws have been passed in both states, they are usually evaded. The present law reads that any one securing a room "by fraud or pretext" shall be punishable. In the future, a man will be starting at a contract at the head of each page, and the hotel men think that it will be a more serious matter.

In fact, the whole session, which began yesterday afternoon in the Italian room at the Hotel Baltimore, was one of self-protection. Every speaker dwelt on the fact that the average inn keeper was the most oppressed individual in the community. Means of getting around the wily "bad check man," dead beat," "loafer," and how to get better legislation was discussed, and committees appointed to see that action is taken.

F. P. Ewins of the Savoy Hotel.
F. P. EWINS,
Hotel Savoy.

Yesterday's session was opened with an address of welcome by Mayor Crittenden. He complimented the men on their general appearance. T. L. Barnes, president of the association, made a short reply.

There was a general feeling that the meeting would like to face a hotel inspector, and Thomas L. Johnson, state hotel inspector, was asked to be present and, in fact, had agreed to come and discuss the laws regulating hotels. At the last moment Johnson failed to appear.

C. L. Wood of the Sexton.
C. L. WOOD,
Secretary of the Association and Manager of the Sexton.

Last night's gathering was purely social. A Dutch lunch was served in the grill room of the Sexton hotel, which is managed by C. L. Wood, secretary of the association. A ride over the boulevards will be taken this morning, and after the report of committees this afternoon the entire association will take the train to Excelsior Springs, where a banquet will be held tonight at the New Elms.

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November 17, 1909

HOTEL MEN'S YELL
HAS NO RAH! RAH!

"SOMETHING DIFFERENT" TO
BE HEARD IN RIDE TODAY.

Kansas-Missouri Association Mem-
bers Here for Annual Meeting.
Local Officers Elected.
Banquet Tonight.

"Kansas -Missouri hotel me are we,
Enjoying ourselves in old K. C.
Kansas Citee, in the state of old Mizzoo,
With plenty to eat, and other things, too.
How do you do, and how are you?"


To show that the collegians who come to Kansas City on Thanksgiving are not the only ones who can boast of yells, a few of the advance guard of hotel men who are assembling for the annual meeting of the Kansas-Missouri association, composed of the above yell last night at the Hotel Sexton.

"You notice that we cut out the 'Rah, Rah, Rah,'" said C. L. Wood, the secretary of the association. "We want something to distinguish it from the college yell. You will get a chance to hear its carrying power when we take our trip over the boulevards Thursday morning."

That the meeting, which commenced today at the Hotel Baltimore and ends tomorrow night with a banquet at the Elms in Excelsior Springs, is going to be the biggest in the history of the association, is the belief of the officers. More than half of the delegates were in the city last night visiting friends. When Mayor Crittenden delivers his address of welcome today, it is expected that more than 100 members will be present.

WAR ON BAD CHECK MEN.

At the two days' session especial attention will be paid to some form of mutual protection against bad check men.

C. D. Tisdale of the Western Hotel Men's Protective Association, will discuss a proposed detective agency to be established in each city and do nothing but look out for hotel "dead beats." It is estimated that there are 1,500 hotels in Missouri and Kansas, and each loses about $250 a year in bad bills. The total loss, $100,000, would maintain a fair detective agency, the hotel men say.

A meeting of the local hotel proprietors was held yesterday afternoon at the Sexton and plans for the coming interstate association were discussed. A permanent organization also was planned.

Though Kansas City has been prominent in the large gatherings, very little attention has been paid to a local association. F. P. Ewins of the Savoy was elected president and James Ketner of the Densmore was elected secretary of the local society.

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October 28, 1909

GRAY EAGLE BEACHED;
KANSAS CITIANS ABOARD.

Governors Donaghey of Arkansas
and Shallenberger of Nebraska,
Guests -- Fire Grate Bars Fell.

HELENA, ARK., Oct. 27. -- Because of a breakdown in the engine room and the attending danger of the steamer catching fire, the Gray Eagle, one of the fleet of boats accompanying President Taft to New Orleans, having aboard the Kansas City delegation with Governor Donaghey of Arkansas, Governor Shallenberger of Nebraska, Governor Prouty of Vermont, Senator Gore of Oklahoma and Senator Warner of Missouri as guests, was run aground ten miles north of Helena tonight to disembark its distinguished passengers in safety.

The breakdown followed the dropping of the grates in the fire room. The Gray Eagle had been chartered by the Kansas City delegation to the deep waterways convention and was boarded at Alton, Ill., Monday morning. The Gray Eagle is one of the best known boats in the St. Louis harbor. It is the property of the Eagle Packet Company, noted for its speedy boats.

At the time of the accident the boat was running at a speed of fifteen miles an hour. This is faster than the packers ordinarily run.

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October 24, 1909

FOR TAFT BOAT TRIP
DOWN MISSISSIPPI.

KANSAS CITY DELEGATION
WILL LEAVE TONIGHT.

Will Travel to Alton on Four Spe-
cial Cars -- Decorations for the
"Gray Eagle" Sent
Ahead.

Imbued with the "Kansas City Spirit" and a determination to impress upon the big waterways convention at New Orleans the need of improving the Missouri river, the Kansas City delegation will leave for Alton, Ill., at 9 o'clock tonight on four special Pullman cars by way of the Chicago & Alton railway. Decorators were sent to Alton Friday night and by the time the Kansas City delegation arrives tomorrow morning the Gray Eagle, the boat on which the Kansas City delegation will ride, will be one of the gayest in the fleet. At least that was the declaration last night of E. M. Clendening, secretary of the Commercial Club, who has made all of the arrangements for the trip.

Yesterday it seemed very unlikely that President Taft would be able to accept the invitation of the Kansas City delegation to ride at least part of the way down the river on the Gray Eagle. More than a dozen telegrams were exchanged with the management of President Taft's itinerary, but late last night Secretary Clendening was informed that it would be practically impossible. He still hopes that the president will find time to visit the Kansas City boat and take breakfast on the steamer Tuesday morning.

LEAVE ST. LOUIS MONDAY.

The "Gray Eagle" will reach St. Louis at 9 o'clock Monday morning. President Taft will speak in the Coliseum at 11 o'clock. The party will embark at 4 o'clock in the afternoon for the great trip down the river. The fleet arrives at Cape Girardeau at 6 o'clock Tuesday morning, Cairo, Ill., at noon, and Hickman, Ky., at 4 o'clock. Memphis, Tenn., and Helena, Ark., will be the principal stops on Wednesday. Vicksburg will be the only stop of importance on Thursday with Natchez and Baton Rouge on Friday.

The fleet will arrive in New Orleans early Saturday morning and until the following Tuesday night there will be a continuous round of convention work and receptions in the southern city. Grand opera, addresses by the governors of the different states, inspection of the city, and attendance at the convention will take up about all of the time of the Kansas City delegation. The party will leave New Orleans at 6:20 o'clock Tuesday night.

Besides Secretary Clendening, members of the delegation of seventy include Jerome Twitchell, J. H. Neff, Hon. Edgar C. Ellis, C. S. Jobes, H. F. Lang, W. B. C. Brown, C. D. Carlisle, W. G. Mellier and Hon. W. P. Borland.

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October 15, 1909

NEGRO BAPTISTS MEET
IN ANNUAL CONVENTION.

MAYOR JONES OF INDEPEND-
ENCE GIVES WELCOME.

Rev. Caston of Jefferson City Says
Black Boys and Girls Be Edu-
cated and Refers to Macon,
Missouri College.

From all parts of the state are negro Baptists in Independence attending the twentieth annual session of the Baptist state convention which opened yesterday morning and will continue in session through Sunday night. The convention was organized or the moral, intellectual and spiritual uplift of the negro race and is presided over by Rev. J. T. Caston, M. D., of Jefferson city, Mo., a prominent negro preacher in the state.

In calling the convention to order, Dr. Caston said:

"We must lift up our own race. The negro boys and girls must be educated, and it is up to us to do it. There is no man or woman on earth who can inspire the negro like the negro. Our boys and girls are looking up to us and we must not go around with a long face. Let us be men and women.

"Twenty years ago the negro Baptists started out to establish a college in Macon, Mo. It was then that we have put down our money and we have been doing so ever since. You must know what we do. The Western college at Macon stands for itself. We are building up little by little. You need not expect the work to be done in a day or in a night. You must look to the future, look to your own strong black arms, if you would make the race anything or if you would be respected by others."

The convention opened with song and praise service, conducted by Rev. O. P. Goodwin of Shelbina. Deacon W. L. Bennett of Jefferson City was appointed marshal. After services the president appointed a committee on enrollment, consisting of Revs. J. H. Downey, I. H. Robinson, E. S. Redd, Mrs. Bell Wood and Mrs. C. E. Alexander.

The feature of the morning session was the annual sermon preached by the Rev. O. T. Redd, D. D., of Chillicothe, Mo. The work of a gospel minister was laid down in the sermon.

In the afternoon session the Rev. Dr. E. A. Howard, pastor of the First Baptist church, white, was introduced and delivered a strong address. He told the ministers that it was a good thing to live a life of Christ, to be consistent with the teaching of the Bible, to do all in their power to make the race better. He reminded them of what they had before them, what they had to do for themselves. He was glad to see they were striving to make their race better. The address was full of good advice.

ANNUAL ADDRESS.

Following this Dr. Caston delivered his annual address to the convention, taking up the work of the past year, reviewing the condition of the churches in the state and asking the ministers to unite as never before for the religious and educational training of the whole negro race. He thought that his people should first do for themselves and then appeal for outside help.

The corresponding secretary spoke. The reports of the treasurer and other officials were made. The women showed that they had collected during the session of their convention, which closed Wednesday night, $1,126. Mrs. C. R. McDowell was complimented for her work.

At the night session Rev. John Goins, superintendent of missions, delivered an address. He took up the missionary work of the negro Baptists.

Mayor L. Jones delivered an address of welcome, which was responded to by Dr. S. W. Bacote of Kansas City.

Revs. J. R. Bennett, J. T. Thornley and B. J. Guthrie delivered short addresses and a large collection was lifted for education.

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August 28, 1909

DOWN THE RIVER WITH TAFT.

Steamboat Chester Will Carry Kan-
sas Cityans to New Orleans.

At a meeting held yesterday afternoon the directors of the Commercial Club enthusiastically accepted the invitation from St. Louis to send a steamboat representing Kansas City with the flotilla which will escort President Taft down the Mississippi river from St. Louis to the big waterways convention at New Orleans in October. Secretary E. M. Clendening was instructed to send notification of Kansas City's acceptance and to ask that the Kansas City boat be assigned a good place in the formation of the down-river fleet.

The steamboat Chester will carry the Kansas Cityans to New Orleans. It is the intention to begin the trip at the home dock, make stops at the towns down the Missouri river as far as Jefferson City and join the flotilla at St. Louis. This scheme, it is thought, is preferable to making the start at St. Louis and besides it will afford the Kansas Cityans an excellent opportunity to campaign for river improvement at Lexington, Glasgow, Boonville, Jefferson City and the other towns down the Missouri between here and the state capital.

The Chester has capacity for sixty passengers, and from the way applications for berths are coming in it is probable that they will be engaged long before the trip is to be taken. A band will be on board the boat, which will be gaily decorated. H. G. Wilson, transportation commissioner of the Commercial Club, will be in charge of the arrangements.

The boat will probably leave Kansas City on the afternoon of October 21, will reach St. Louis October 25 and will arrive at New Orleans October 31. It will be used as a floating hotel for the Kansas Cityans while at St. Louis and New Orleans.

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August 26, 1909

MAYOR CRITTENDEN, SPEAKER.

Addresses the League of American
Municipalities at Montreal.

MONTREAL, August 25. -- With 700 delegates from all parts of the United States and Canada in attendance, the convention of the league of American Municipalities opened here today. Mayor Silas Cook of East St. Louis, Ill., in his opening address, advocated greater publicity of municipal work in order to do away with abuses. John McVickar, the secretary and treasurer, scored Ambassador Bryce for the stand which he took in his book, "The American Commonwealth," saying that because of the bad name given office holders in that book every citizen entering the service of a municipality took his reputation in his hands.

Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., mayor of Kansas City, and Dr. W. H. Atherton of Montreal, delivered addresses on municipal subjects.

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August 24, 1909

WITH 5,000 NEGRO DELEGATES.

SUPREME LODGE WILL OPEN
THIS MORNING.

Every State in Union Wil Be Rep-
resented on Roll Call -- Recep-
tion at Second Bap-
tist Church.

With a delegation of 5,000 negro men and women from every state in the Union, the supreme lodge of negro Knights of Pythias opens this morning in Ivanhoe hall, Nineteenth street and Tracy avenue, and continues until Friday night. It is the largest gathering of its kind ever held in Kansas City. Among the delegates are doctors, lawyers, bankers, merchants, clerks, porters, barbers, teachers, editors, farmers and every other profession, trade and business followed by negroes.

A reception was held last night at the Second Baptist church, Tenth and Charlotte streets. Grand Chancellor A. W. Lloyd of St. Louis presided and music was furnished by the choir of the Second Baptist church.

Nelson C. Crews, chairman of the local committee, made an address of welcome.

A solo by Miss Ennis Collins followed.

Welcome to the state was extended by Professor W. W. Yates, who represented Governor Hadley. His address was short and cordial. A selection by the Calanthian choir then followed.

S. W. Green of New Orleans, supreme chancellor, responded to this address.

S. C. Woodson represented Mayor Crittenden in an address of welcome.

There was a solo by Wiliam J. Tompkins and a selection by the choir, "The Heavens Are Telling." Other addresses were made by Prof. J. R. Jefferson of West Virginia; Dr. J. E. Perry, E. D. Green, of Chicago; Dr. W. P. Curtiss, St. Louis; Dr. J. A. Ward, Indianapolis; Mrs. Janie C. Combs and A. J. Hazelwood.

The Supreme Court of Calanthe will be presided over by John W. Strauther of Greenville, Miss. The session will be held at the Hodcarrier's hall. In this meeting every phase of the negro's home life will be discussed. Strauther is one of the most noted men of his race in the country.

At 2 o'clock this afternoon a band concert will be given at Cap Carrouthers by the Bixton, Ia., band, and dress parade at 5:30 p. m. by the entire uniform ranks.

Rev. B. Hillman of Terra Haute, Ind., made the opening prayer last night.

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August 23, 1909

"DEAD LINE" AT THE DEPOT.

Heavy Travel Necessitates a Safety
Zone at the Old Shack.

A dead line, extending four feet from the building line on the Union depot platform, was established last evening for the first time in the recollection of depot employes. The line was painted with chalk and every person who was not going to or from a train was kept behind the dead line.

Several times this summer the depot employes have had more than their share of work to take care of the people who found their way onto the platform and interfered with those who were endeavoring to catch trains.

Yesterday the usual Sunday crush was greatly augmented by the influx of delegates to the negro Pythian convention, which will be held here this week. The crowd fairly swarmed over the depot platforms and several narrow escapes from injury resulted in the crush. About 6 p. m. Depot Master Wallenstrom decided to make a "dead line" behind which he could keep everyone who was waiting for a train or for friends. The dead line was drawn back of the entrances and exits and parallel with the building. Two "Red Caps" kept the crowd within these boundaries.

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June 30, 1909

1,000 TEACHERS TO DENVER.

Missouri Delegates to National Edu-
cational Association to Boost KC.

Badge to Be Worn by Kansas City and St. Louis Teachers.

Decorated with badges bearing a map of the state and the word "Missouri" in big letters across it, 1,000 teachers from Kansas City and St. Louis will go to Denver, Col., to attend the forty-seventh annual convention of the National Educational Association which opens in that city July 3 and continues until July 9. Prof. J. M. Stephenson, principal of the Scarritt school and state manager of the association, said yesterday that every effort possible would be made to advertise Missouri and her schools.

Postcards showing a beautiful view of the Westport High school building in colors will be used to aid in the publicity campaign. Enough of the badges will be carried by the state delegation to decorate all who will "boost" for Missouri. Special trains have been chartered to carry the Kansas City and St. Louis contingents to Denver.

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March 6, 1909

OPPOSED TO LIABILITY LAWS.

Ice Men Are United in Protest
Against Such Legislation.

Members of the Western Ice Manufacturers' Association are strongly opposed to any employer's liability laws. They said so yesterday in convention at the Coates house when the measure now before the Iowa legislature was denounced by H. H. Teachout of Des Moines. "These employer liability bills are dangerous," said Mr. Teachout, "and we ice men should fight them."

"That's right," answered a chorus of voices throughout the hall, but there was no action taken toward making official protest against such legislation.

The ice men, who are holding their eleventh annual convention at the Coates house, listened to trade talks yesterday. State Senator Emerson Carey of Hutchison, Kas., who was to have told the ice men what part they should take in politics, was unable to be present. Last night the annual banquet of the association was held at the Coates house, and today the convention will close with a business session and the annual election of officers.

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January 22, 1909

SEEKING GIFTS FOR MERCY.

Hospital League Wants Food to Feed
the Hungry "Hoo-Hoos."

The Mercy Hospital League, a band of women who have organized for the purpose of aiding that institution, has hit upon a scheme by which it hopes to make a few more dollars for the hospital. During the "Hoo-Hoo," or lumbermen's convention next week, the league intends to supply the hungry "wood merchants" with dinner on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. The spreads will be made in Convention hall.

The league is asking donations of home-made cake and all kinds of home-canned fruits. It is asking the housewives of Kansas City to open their hearts and larders and assist. Mrs. L. Moreland, 1117 Troost avenue, has been made a committee of one to secure donations.

"It is an easy task," Mrs. Moreland said yesterday, "if the good housewives will just come forward with their donations. If convenient for donors to deliver their gifts, I will receive them at my home. My telephone number is 3806Y Grand on the Bell, and if any who wish to aid us will call me up, or drop me a note, we will see that the cake and fruits are collected."

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December 4, 1908

DEMANDS PAY FOR
WORKHOUSE HOBOES.

COMRADE SOUNDS KEYNOTE IN
TRAMPS' CONVENTION.

Cash for Services Rendered Should
Be Given Then Every Saturday
Night -- A Banquet of
Bread and Water.

"Come to order," Chairman James Eads Howe of the Society of the Unemployed said as he took the ruler's seat on the platform. He was addressing about 100 hoboes, tramps and four women, who had gathered in the hall of the labor headquarters building yesterday afternoon. The constitution of the society was then read, and changes were made in the several articles.

Suggestions were made by the unemployed as to the stand they should take regarding the change in vagrancy laws. Howe, the tramp by choice, said he would abolish the vagrancy laws entirely, but that at present he wanted protection from the hold-up of vagrants. His position was attacked by one of the hoboes, who said the vagrancy law was only a big stick in the hands of the millionaires to beat them down.

The same hobo spoke in favor of the municipalities paying every prisoner in the workhouse in actual cash. A municipal lodging house was discussed. One tramp wanted to know if the one here would be like the Chicago shelter, where all hoboes were arrested and sent to the Bridewell when they applied for lodging.

"Awr, chee, that place is fierce; they fumigate yer clothes and hand you supposed coffee and stale bread," J. LeRoy Sands, a Chicago visitor put in.

Mrs. Charles Ferguson requested that sands be added to the municipal shelter committee, because of his experience. Comrade Sands also suggested that the organization favor that every boy tramp that had left a good home be given transportation back.

The popular expression among the tramp fraternity present was that society owed the hoboes a living, and if society did not provide it, the tramps should force it through the ballot boxes.

The good-natured Howe ran the meeting, even against the wishes of the hoboes, and seemed to enjoy his business. Many of the unemployed muttered objections against the women voting on the matters before the convention, and were only pacified by the invitation to attend a banquet at the Poor Man's mission in honor of Mr. Howe. The menu consisted of cold water and pure bread. Mrs. Ferguson, however, captured the King Tramp and gave him a spread at a vegetarian restaurant.

Occasional flashes of wit and humor were given during the meeting by several of the hoboes, and a tramp glass blower did the following for the price of a "pony":

Hunger and want and grim despair
Faces haggard and worn with care,
Crowding and jostling, full of dread,
Pushing each other in search of bread.

CHORUS.
The bread line -- the dead line --
The line of deepest want --
The bread line -- the dead line --
Hungry and ragged and gaunt.

Miserable beings in filth and rags,
Children and women and wrinkled hags,
Young men, old men and beauty fair,
Shoving and standing like beasts in their lair,
Driven together by hunger and care

Chorus --

Thieves and crooks from the cookeries --
Beggars and vags from the slums--
The honest poor man from the tenements,
Workers and boys and bums.
All are mingled together,
Shivering in nameless dread
Trembling and faltering and stumbling,
In search of a piece of bread.

Chorus --

--Comerade Thos. Spade of Cincinnati

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October 25, 1908

HEAL BY PSYCHOTHERAPY.

This Advice Given to Universalists'
Convention Delegates.

The delegates and visitors to the Thirty-seventh annual convention of Universalists in session at the First Universalist church, Park avenue and Tenth street, were addressed yesterday on "Psychotherapy" by Dr. J. W. Caldwell of Galesburg, Ill. He holds the chairs of psychology and sociology at Lombard university.

Dr. Caldwell declared that 80 per cent of all ills are traceable directly to the nervous system, and that the use of drugs in many instances is unnecessary. He earnestly urged upon his hearers the plan of spreading the Emmanuel movement throughout the length and breadth of the land. The Emanuel movement, which was originated in Boston with the Rev. Dr. Wooster, rector of the Emanuel Episcopal church, has to do with psychic healing conducted by a regular board of physicians. Unlike the Christian Scientists, the Universalists believe that medicine should be administered when necessary.

The morning session was Woman's day. The general theme, "Larger Work of Women," was discussed by Mrs. Wilbur S. Bell. Mrs. Clara Weeks spoke on the interesting subject, "The Work that Has Been Done, and May Be Done for Children."

Miss Gertrude Green, principal of the Irving school, delivered an address last night upon "The Ethical Care of Children." Miss Green said: "Children form good habits more readily than bad ones. The sense of personal responsibility is of utmost importance in the formation of a child's character. I am among those who believe that the world is growing better. Thirteen years of experience with children has taught me the inestimable value of careful training. Make the children realize that they are the future business men and women of the community, impress upon their minds the watchword of 'Good Citizenship,' and the result will be all that you can desire."

E. B. Hoffman, president of the Bankers' Trust Company, spoke upon "The Ethics of Banking."

The convention will close tonight.

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August 1, 1908

THEY'LL EAT IN A GRAVEYARD.

One of the Pleasures Reserved for
Visiting Cemetery Superintendents.

The twenty-second annual convention of the Association of American Cemetery Superintendents will be held in Kansas City August 11, 12 and 13. Members of this association from every state in the Union will be present. Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr. will deliver the address of welcome and other city officials will contribute to the programme. William H. Dunn, superintendent of parks will deliver an address on "Oiled Roads," and George E. Kessler, landscape architect, will talk on "The Cemetery." Among other things scheduled on the program is a luncheon at Mount Washington cemetery at 1 o'clock, August 12.

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May 24, 1908

MINISTERS SOAKED
DURING AUTO RIDE.

Not Enough Cars to Carry
All the Presbyterians.

Three hundred ministers and commissioners to the 120th general assembly of the Presbyterian church got a soaking yesterday afternoon that was unorthodox to say the least. In less than an hour after they has started on a two-hour automobile ride over the boulevards and through the parks of Kansas City, the rain suddenly fell in torrents and it continued falling for nearly an hour.

This feature of the ride was not according to schedule and neither was that contingency looked for when the start was made from Convention hall. The ministers and commissioners started out without umbrellas or raincoats and many of the automobiles were without hoods so they got a genuine soaking. When the rain first began falling, many of the automobiles deserted the line and made straightway for Convention hall or for the hotel of the commissioners. Others stayed in the line and completed the ride.

On the whole, the plans and arrangements for the automobile ride did not work out as well as the committee had expected. While more than 100 automobiles had been promised, not more than fifty showed up at Convention hall at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon. These were speedily filled by the waiting commissioners. Enough tickets had been distributed to fill the number of automobiles expected and consequently there were many disappointed commissioners. Those who were unable to secure seats returned to their hotels.

THESE KEPT DRY.

The "Seeing Kansas City" cars took care of a great number of the commissioners and their wives. Some preferred this ride to the automobiles because of the fact that they were allowed to take the women with them. The cars were sent over the usual route. The automobiles were sent over the most advantageous route in the city. They were headed by guides on motor cycles.

The start was made from Convention hall promptly at 2:30 o'clock. E. M. Clendening was master of ceremonies.

"Are you all ready?" he called down the line.

Shouts assured him they were. The sharp pop-pop of starting motors and the pungent smell of burning gasoline next greeted the ears and nostrils of the ministers and commissioners. Then slowly the line started down Thirteenth street to Grand avenue. The ministers joked each other and the good natured taunts of those left behind were directed at those in automobiles.

"You needn't hold your head so high just because it is your first ride in an automobile," yelled one as a friend disappeared down the street in one of the six cylinder cars.

"Did you never see an automobile before?" asked one commissioner of another who was examining the steering gear of one of the machines.

"I see plenty of them now, if I have never seen them before," returned the friend.

Altogether, it was a good natured and happy bunch of ministers, elders and commissioners that took that ride. They had had two days of strenuous work in the sessions of the assembly, and the afternoon gave opportunity for a general laxity from those arduous duties. William Henry Roberts, the former moderator and now stated clerk; the Rev. B. P. Fullerton and E. M. Clendening occupied the first automobiles.

PICTURE CARDS AND BOOKS.

Post card souvenirs and souvenir books illustrating the parks and boulevards of Kansas City were handed to the commissioners before they stepped into the automobiles. The booklets were given by the park board and besides the illustrations of the parks and boulevards contained some facts and figures concerning the city. These facts and figures were prepared by the Manufacturer's and Merchants' Association. This is the first opportunity that the park board has had of giving these booklets away. The post cards contained this printed message which the recipients were directed to send to their home folks:

Dear Home Folks: Having an enjoyable visit here. Am an honorary member of the Commercial Club's Prosperity Club. The motto is "Look Pleasant, Be Cheerful, Talk Prosperity. Yours --"

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January 26, 1908

WILL BE TREELESS
IN FIFTY YEARS.

Condition Which Foresters
Say Confronts Southwest.

Lumber dealers of Kansas City and the states of Missouri, Knasas, Arkansas and Oklahoma generally, are centering all interest upon their twentieth annual convention, which is to begin in the city Tuesday morning. Between 1,500 and 2,000 of them have notified Secretary Harry A. Gorsuch of their intention to attend. Among these, at least 500 will be women, perhaps teh largest percentage of women that ever atended a purely commercial convention in this city.


All the indications point to the most important series of meetings in the history of the association during the three days the convention will last. Matters of such weighty imporance as the government efforts at forest preservation and the institution of the parcels post will occupy a great deal of the time, and the discussions upon these are to be led by some of the most important authorities upon the subjects to be secured in the whole United States. It is expected that these will attract not only the lumbermen of the Southwestern district, but of the entire West.

Overton Price, chief assistant forester of the department of the interior, will be the chief speaker upon the matter of forest preservation. His talk will be particularly interesting in view of the recent statistics compiled about the forests of Arkansas, one of the most important to the Southwestern district. It has been ascertained that there are about 100,000,000,000 feet of standing timber in that state, of which 20,000,000,000 is pine. In the year 1906 the total cut in that state was 2,000,000,000 feet, the largest in history. It is estimated that at this rate, in fifty years this will all be cut, assuming that growth will be offset by the deforestation and waste.

In Mr. Overton's address he will outline the plan whereby the government proposes to eliminate the extravagant wastes with which the forests in that state have been slaughtered. A large delegation from Arkansas will be present to learn the plans proposed and to secure hastiest cooperation with the government.

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February 1, 1907

IT WAS THE LIMIT.

WOMEN SOUVENIR HUNTERS
TOOK COLLINS AT HIS WORD.

LUGGED OFF A HEAVY DOOR.

"YOU DON'T MEAN WE CAN
HAVE IT?" THEY COOED
"Sure, I Do," Said Collins, and His Eyes Nearly Fell Out When
They Carted Off an $8.50 Door That
Weighed Forty-Eight Pounds

R. J. Collins, manager of a sash and door manufacturing company, had an exhibit at the Coates house in the club room durning the Southwestern lumbermen's convention this week. As a souvenir his firm gave away a little door, about eight inches long and five inches wide. After about 3,000 had been given away, the supply ran out yesterday right after the noon hour.

About 2 o'clock two wwomen walked into the room. Mr. Collins greeted them effusively, and gave them each an American Beauty rose. He had a large jar of the flowers for the fair sex visitors.

"Haven't you got some doors that you are giving away as souvenirs?" asked one of the women very sweetly.

"Why -- why --no --yes --yes," said Collin. "We have just those two left," and he pointed to the south wall against which stood two full-sized, regular house doors, with glass panels.

Are you giving them away?" said the other woman, eagerly.

"Yes," said Collins, He thought he was having a little joke, and the women were appreciating it.

"Well," said the first woman, "would you give us one?"

"Certainly," said Collins, The thing looked serious, but he determined to be game.

"And may we take one?" said the other woman.

"Help yourself," he said with a grandiose flourish.

"To his utter amazement and astonishment, the two women grabbed hold of the door, stood it on one side, and then, each taking an end, started out of the room.

"It's heavy," murmured one of the women, "but I guess we can m anage it. Can you carry your end?" The other woman cooed an affirmative.

They pushed out the crowded hall toward teh lobby. The door weighed forty-eight pounds, but was more awkward than heavy. One of the women slipped and almost fell. She exploded mirthfully, took a fresh grip, and they plodded on. They reached the lobby. Several hundred lumbermen stood glued to the marble tiling, speechless. But the women never noticed. They swung out of the north door of the hotel and onto the pavement. There they placed the door against the wall of the building.

They hailed an expressman, had him load the door into his wagon, gave him an address, and away he went. Unruffled, except for a few dislodged locks, they returned to the hotel and quietly went upstairs, pursuing thier quest for souvenirs.

Just as the women were getting throught he outside door w3ith their prizes, E. W. Gardiner spied them. He rang for a porter.

"Go find out at once about that," he said. "Ask the sash and door exhibit in the club house."

The porter ran into Collins.

"It's alright," said the latter. He came out and told it all to Gardiner, and then to L. M. Firey, the manager. Then he bought the cigars.

"It's on me -- it's on me," mumbled Collins weakly. "It's on me. I spotted the womwen as souvenir hunters as soon as they hit the place. I was out of the little doors, so I thought I sould spring a joke and tell them to take a big, real one. And they took it. I'm game, though. The door is theirs. It's worth about $8.50. I'll stand that allright, allright. The way they worked to lug it out of the hotel was worth the money. That's the limit on souvenirs. I've seen all kinds of it -- but that's the best, isn't it?" HE turned to Firey and Gardiner. They nodded their heads.

Give us some more cigars," said Collins. I'll have to steady my nerves."

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