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February 11, 1910

LOSES EYE IN CLASS FIGHT.

Flapjack Thrown by William Jewell
Junior Injures a Senior.

LIBERTY, MO., Feb. 10. -- This afternoon the annual class fight between the juniors and the seniors of William Jewel college culminated in the loss of an eye by Lewis Carr, a senior, the result of a flapjack thrown by a junior. The scrap started last night when the seniors placed their colors on top of the high school building. This morning a fight was waged between the two classes on top of the high school building. In the afternoon the freshmen joined the juniors and the sophomores allield themselves with the seniors. The juniors succeeded in placing their colors on the court house, but the seniors took them down and placed theirs around the statue of Liberty. Then it was that Lewis Carr met with his accident. The juniors would not let him down until the chief of police drove them off. The condition of the young man is serious.

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January 26, 1910

GENTLY SLAPPED WITH A KNIFE.

Then Fork Is Used in Restaurant
Quarrel Over "Profits and Loss."

Angus Harding and Frank Barber are owners of a restaurant at 2600 Independence avenue. Monday they quarreled over "profits and loss," and Barber is alleged to have used a fork. A complaint was filed yesterday by Norman Woodson, an assistant prosecuting attorney, charging Barber with felonious assault.

"When the argument came to the boiling point," said Harding yesterday, "Barber grabbed a butcher knife. I thought I was cooked, sure, but instead of stabbing me, he gently slapped me on one cheek and then on the other with the flat side. I made a dive for him. Then he grabbed up a fork and jabbed me in the forehead." Harding exhibited a long gash cut the breadth of his forehead.

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January 12, 1910

IRON BAR IN MIDDLE OF SONG.

Warrant Is Issued for Arrest of
Painter Who Used It.

Music hath charms, but not for Henry Ray. Ray is a house painter employed at 1212 East Forty-forth street. Complaint was issued by the prosecuting attorney yesterday, charging him with felonious assault. Jesse Helm was the prosecuting witness.

Helm was musically inclined. He broke the monotony occasionally with a few verses of popular song.

"I was singing this morning," he told Edward J. Curtin, an assistant prosecutor, "when Ray came down from the scaffolding and struck me in the back with an iron bar."

"What were you singing?"

"Oh, simply 'I Love My Wife, But Oh, You Painter,' " said Helm. "He told me I sang as though I had a busted reed in my organ. I can't imagine why it made him sore when I refused to stop."

"I can guess," said Mr. Curtin, and he issued the complaint.

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January 12, 1910

FINED FOR ASSAULT ON BOYS.

Milkman Brody Had Trouble With
Two Sons of Judge Ross.

On a charge of having assaulted the two small sons of Justice Michael D. Ross, Philip Brody, a milkman, was fined $15 in the municipal court yesterday morning.

Justice Ross lives at 626 Troost avenue and Brody lives in a house to the rear of the premises. The two Ross boys, it is alleged, threw stones at the Brody home and the milkman climbed over a fence and went into the Ross kitchen to chastise them. He was in the act of administering a spanking, it is claimed, when William Ross, the judge's eldest son, appeared on the scene, and after throwing Brody out, called a policeman.

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January 9, 1910

DYING FROM KNIFE WOUNDS.

Roommate of Isaac Dimich Held as
a Material Witness.

Isaac Dimich, a butcher living at 28 North James street, in Kansas City, Kas., is dying at St. Margaret's hospital as a result of two knife wounds. dimich and his fellow workman and roommate, Mike Wookas, attended a celebration of the Greek Christmas Friday night. Early yesterday morning, it is alleged, they quarreled and later the police officers found Dimich injured on the floor of his room. Dr. Mortimer Marder, a police surgeon, was summoned, and after he had given him emergency treatment he ordered the man taken to the hospital, where it was said last night that he could not recover.

Wookas was arrested at the packing plant of Morris & Co. yesterday morning and taken to No. 2 police station, where he is held as a material witness.

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December 26, 1909

FREE LIQUOR, MANY SCRAPES.

Broken Heads and Knife Wounds
Result of Saloon Celebrations.

The North End saloons last night gave free liquor to their customers. The result is that there were several broken heads, some cutting scrapes, not to speak of the parched throats to come. A few of the Christmas celebrators were given free rides to the emergency hospital.

Edward Evans, 1077 Grand avenue, a dishwasher at Eighth and Main streets, was cut in the chest with a knife. His cheek also was slit, the knife blade entering his neck and barely missing the jugular vein. After being treated at the emergency hospital he was taken to the general hospital.

Only one saloon in Kansas City was known to be closed yesterday. "Wish you all a Merry Christmas. This place will be closed until Monday morning on account of Christmas day."

This is the inscription which greeted the would-be Christmas patrons of Jack Sheehan's saloon, 2340 Grand avenue. So far as is known, this is the only saloon which observed Christmas by closing.

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December 18, 1909

DIDN'T DANCE FAST ENOUGH.

So Man With Revolver Shot Robert
Kimme Through Ankle.

According to a statement made by Robert Kimme, of 912 Bellefontaine avenue, as he lay on the operating table of the emergency hospital last night with his right foot shattered from a revolver bullet, there is an armed maniac roaming the down town district of Kansas City.

Kimme was found lying in an alley near Eighth and McGee streets by Patrolman J. Keenan. He declared that he was taking a short cut downtown from his home when a man armed with a revolver walked up to him and commanded him to dance. Kimme attempted to do so, but his efforts failed to please his captor, who shot him through the right ankle.

After receiving emergency treatment Kimme was taken to the general hospital.

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December 11, 1909

DENIED ENTRANCE, HE SHOOTS.

Man Claiming to Be Policeman
Wanted to Search House, Escapes.

When William Peterson, 9 East Seventh street, answered a knock at his door last night he was confronted by a man announcing himself a policeman and demanding the privilege of searching the house. Peterson asked for credentials and when they were not forthcoming he denied the man entrance.

At that juncture the alleged policeman drew a revolver and fired, two bullets piercing Peterson's right thigh and another shattering the thumb on the right hand. The assailant then fled. While making an effort to run on a slippery pavement he was seen by William Jones, proprietor of a rooming house across the street, to fall down and roll in the slush. He has not been arrested. Peterson was taken to the emergency hospital and treated.

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December 10, 1909

KNIFE THRUST ENDS SPEECH.

Soldier, Fatally Wounded, Unable to
Make a Statement.

As the result of a fight between privates of Troop F, Fifteenth United States cavalry, which occurred at Twelfth and Central last night, Frank McFadden is at the general hospital with a knife wound below his heart which may prove fatal, and John Chrobel is suffering from a badly gashed back. George Pease, who is supposed to have done the stabbing, was arrested by Patrolman J. J. Lovell and is held at police headquarters.

McFadden was hurried to the emergency hospital. Dr. H. A. Pond, seeing that the man was probably fatally injured, sent for Assistant Prosecutor Norman Woodson. Further examination of the man showed that the vagus nerve had been injured, affecting the vocal chords and rendering him in capable of speech, and the prosecutor could take no statement.

The troops at Fort Leavenworth, where the Fifteenth cavalry is stationed, were paid off yesterday and McFaddden, Chrobel and Pease came to Kansas City together. They spent all day in the North end of town and were on the way to a theater when the quarrel occurred.

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November 7, 1909

HELD IN CHAIR AND SHAVED.

Customer Does Not Want Other Side
Finished, Barber Objects, Has His
Way, Then Stabs Defending Self.

As a result of a fight which took place in the barber shop at 902 East Fifth street, James Morley was stabbed five times in the back with a pair of scissors, and slashed once in the left arm with a razor and was then locked up in the police station, charged with disturbing the peace, while Mike Raffles, the barber who inflicted the wounds, escaped.

Morley, who is 20 years of age, but who wouldn't tell his residence, had been drinking when h e entered the barber shop at which Raffles is employed, wanting a shave. When Raffles had shaved one side of his face, Morley decided that he would let the other side go. Raffles remonstrated with him, and finally thourgh force managed to complete the job. As soon as Morley was released from the chair he attempted to start trouble. In self defense, Raffles grabbed a pair of scissors and in the melee which followed, stabbed Morley five times in the back. Morley still showed fight, and raffles slashed him with a razor.

Morley was taken to the emergency hospital in an ambulance, but fought with the doctor all the way to the hospital. When in the hospital he tried to fight everyone with whom he came in contact. Patrolman Miller was sent to quiet the belligerent patient, and Morley again wanted to fight, but one good healthy slap ended the trouble, and Morley was locked up on a charge of disturbing the peace.

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September 28, 1909

SHOT A NEIGHBOR, THEN
ACTED GOOD SAMARITAN.

German Woman Gardner Attempted
to Frighten Victor Marten With
Gun That Wasn't Loaded.
Mrs. Mary Wilsdorf, Who Shot Gardener.
MRS. MARY WILSDORF.

After emptying the contents of a shotgun into the left thigh of Victor Marten, a gardener, Mrs. Mary Wilsdorf, 46 years old, wife of a gardener at Seventy-seventh street and Walrond avenue, yesterday afternoon got on a Marlborough street car and came to the city and gave herself up to Chief of Police Frank F. Snow.

Before leaving her home she gave the wounded man a glass of water and left him lying on the ground near her house in charge of her husband, Carl Wilsdorf, who was later arrested by Mounted Patrolman E. B. Chiles.

Mrs. Wildorf and Marten are neighbors, each owning a ten acre tract of land.

From the facts elicited from the woman through Dr. George Ringle, surgeon at the Emergency hospital, who acted as interpreter for the police, the shooting followed a quarrel, about Marten's horses getting into the truck garden of the Wilsdorf's.

She said the horses frequently trampled the vegetables. One of them wandered over from the Marten field yesterday to the Wildorf land and was locked up in the barn.

When Marten went to the Wilsdorf house to get his horse he was asked to pay a small amount of money for alleged damages. A dispute arose and Mrs. Wilsdorf said that Marten held aloft a potato digger and threatened to kill her.

She said she then ran into the house and got her husband's shotgun, and returned to the yard. When within five feet of Marten the gun was discharged and the contents of one barrel entered the left thigh of Marten. He fell to the ground and asked for a drink of water which was given to him by Mrs. Wilsdorf.

Her husband told her she had better go to town and give herself up to the police, which advice she took. when she first entered police headquarters she was a little excited, and, not being able to speak good English, was misunderstood. The patrolman she met believed her to say a man shot her in the leg, so he directed her to the Emergency hospital. At the hospital Dr. Ringle took her in charge, and, learning that she was the person who did the shooting, took her back to the police station. She was turned over to Chief Snow.

Mrs. Wilsdorf informed the police that the man was still lying in the yard at her home and needed medical attention. Dr. George Todd, 4638 Troost avenue, attended to the man's injuries. Dr. Todd called an ambulance from Freeman & Marshall's and had the man taken to the University hospital.

The woman told Captain Whitsett that she had never before handled a shotgun and did not know exactly how to use it. The one she got in the house was broken at the breech and as she was running with it toward Marten she was trying to replace it. Suddenly the gun snapped into place and was discharged. She said she really did not think it was loaded, but was only trying to scare Marten. She was locked up in the matron's room.

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September 20, 1909

THUGS BEAT AND KICK BOY.

Four Attack Harry Jenkins After
Spitting on Sister's Dress.

Harry Jenkins, 17 years old, living at Sixteenth and College streets, was walking west on Fifteenth street near Prospect avenue last night with his two sisters, Minnie and Mamie, both younger than himself, when they passed a group of three or four ruffians, one of whom spat on the Sunday dress worn by one of the sisters.

"Do you take my sister for a spittoon?" asked the brother resentfully.

At this the toughs attacked young Jenkins, knocked him down and all of them kicked him viciously before the screams of his sisters attracted Officer Jesse Kemp, instructor in pistol practice on the police force, in front of whose house the attack was made.

The ruffians took to their heels when the policeman ran out. None of them was caught.

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September 19, 1909

ANONYMOUS LETTER CAUSES
CHAUFFEUR'S FATAL INJURY.

L. L. Moore, Found Unconscious on
Pavement Friday Night, Dies
at General Hospital.

An anonymous letter was the cause of the fight which resulted in the death of L. L. Moore yesterday afternoon at the General hospital where he had been taken unconscious on the day previous. Moore was a chauffeur and had fought with Benjamin Lamon, another chauffeur at Fifteenth street and Troost avenue. It developed that his injuries were due to his fall on the pavement.

Lamon is employed by Charles S. Keith of the Central Coal and Coke company. He became angry when Mr. Kieth showed him a letter written by an unknown person which accused Lamon of "joy riding" in Keith's motor car. Suspicion pointed to Moore who was desirous of obtaining a position with Mr. Keith and had written an application for position as chauffeur. The handwriting in both cases were similar.

When Lamon accused Moore as the author of the letter at the Missouri Valley Automobile Company, 1112-14 East Fifteenth street, Friday night, Moore refused to make any explanation or denial. A fight followed, and when Moore fell to the sidewalk he struck his head on the curbing, resulting in concussion of the brain, according to surgeons at the General hospital.

Lamon was arrested early morning, and yesterday afternoon was arraigned in Justice Miller's court for second degree murder. He pleaded not guilty. He was released on a $2,000 bond furnished by Mr. Keith. Lamon lives at 1525 Oak street and is married. Moore formerly lived at Maryville, Mo., and had only been in the city a few weeks. He worked for Mrs. Amy Cruise of 1209 Commerce building.

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September 16, 1909

WIFE SAVES HER HUSBAND.

Mrs. Joe Percival Comes to His Aid
With Ax Handle and Routs Bullies.

Owing to the pluckiness and nerve of his wife last night Joe Percival, 7 Park place, is alive today, although beaten and battered by a gang of ruffians and bullies. He needed treatment at the emergency hospital because of the cuts received at the hands of the gang before his wife came to his aid.

Percival is the night man at the Gross & McNeal livery stable, 701 Brooklyn avenue. For some weeks he has had trouble with a gang of men and on several occasions has been compelled to run them away from the stable at night. threats were made to get him. Last night his wife, who is young and pretty, went to the stable to spend the night.

About 1 o'clock this morning Percival went into the stable to put up a horse and was attacked by five or six men who had concealed themselves in the dark stalls. He was down on the floor being pummelled by the bullies when Mrs. Percival came to the rescue. A pickax handle proved to be the weapon which she wielded with effectiveness. The men scattered when she commenced to rain blows upon their heads.

When she attempted to telephone for the police the gang tried to stop her by making threats of getting her, but she waved the pick handle aloft and dared them to start something. When the police arrived from headquarters only Percival and his brave wife were on deck. They were transferred to the emergency hospital where Percival had his injuries attended by Dr. D. C. Twyman. The thugs escaped arrest.

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September 13, 1909

ARM SCALDED; BLAMES COOK.

Boy Helper in Restaurant Causes
Arrest of Kitchen Boss.

Because Marion Bell, 18 years old, upset some water in the kitchen of a lower Walnut street restaurant where he is employed, yesterday, he claims Fred Geddes, the cook, shoved him so violently he fell, his right arm being immersed in a pail of scalding water. He says he was then kicked from the building.

Dr. Fred B. Kyger, surgeon at the Emergency hospital, found that the boy was dangerously burned, and advised him to report the matter to the police. After hearing his story, Sergeant Robert Smith ordered the cook's arrest. He was released on $101 bond for trial in the municipal court tomorrow.

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August 31, 1909

BEATEN CHINAMAN MAY DIE.

Lee Wey Brutally Assaulted in Fifth
Street Laundry and
Robbed of $20.

While resisting two robbers who seized him in his laundry at 620 East Fifth street about 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon, Lee Wey, a Chinaman, was beaten into insensibility before his assailants secured $20 and escaped. With barely a chance to live Wey was taken to the general hospital.

When a customer arrived two hours later Lee was found on the floor unable to move. The police were notified. A hasty examination by Dr. H. L. Morton at the emergency hospital showed that the top of Lee's scalp was cut to shreds.

Lee regained consciousness and told a meager story of the assault. Two men had come into his laundry before sundown and inquired the way to find the water meter. As he started to go down into the cellar, where it was located, Lee was struck over the head with a piece of gas pipe. Half-stunned he grappled with the smaller of the two. The blows rained on his head until he knew no more. His pockets, inside out, told the story of the robbery.

"All my savings for many months," Lee said in broken English.

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August 28, 1909

HALTED A NEGRO PARADE.

Laundry Wagon Driver Was Rough-
ly Handled by Negroes.

During the parade of the negro Knights of Pythias yesterday morning at Twelfth and Central streets a small race riot took place when W. S. Jarboe, a driver for the Fern Laundry Company, accompanied by his wife, tried to drive his wagon in the direction that the procession was marching. His horse was seized by several negroes and others drew the wagon to one side. The excitement subsided of its own accord before the arrival of police from headquarters. Sergeant Robert Smith, in command of the squad, decided that the trouble had been magnified and returned to the station without making any arrests.

After the trouble had subsided and the parade had passed, Jarboe and his wife drove to police headquarters and made a complaint to Daniel V. Howell, assistant city attorney. A warrant was issued for the arrest of George Thompson, a negro lawyer who was leading the parade, and who first seized the horse which Jarboe was driving. The warrant was served last night and the case will be tried in the municipal court this morning.

"I'm not injured -- except my feelings," said Mrs. Jarboe, as she told her trouble to Attorney Howell.

Spectators, both whites and negroes, agree that Jarboe used considerable indiscretion in trying to drive his horse up the line of the parade. Even after the police had arrived and the horse had been rehitched to the wagon, Jarboe had to be restrained from whipping his horse into the mob of persons that were lined along the curbing.

There was very little excitement, considering that it was purely a racial affair, and the parade did not stop. There was no interference on the part of the "armed knights." Mrs. Jarboe was not injured, aside from her feelings, as she admitted to Mr. Howell.

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August 26, 1909

FIGHT ON TOP OF FLYING TRAIN.

Man Thrown Under Car in Struggle,
Dies of Injuries.

While a westbound fast freight was running through the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe railroad yards at Argentine at 2 o'clock yesterday morning, switchmen in the yards saw two men struggling on top of one of the box cars of the train. One of the men was seen to fall between two cars. He caught at a brake beam as he fell, clung to it for a few seconds and then dropped to the track beneath the moving train.

The switchmen carried him to the Y. M. C. A. building, a short distance from the Santa Fe depot in Argentine. He was attended there by Dr. D. C. Clopper, a surgeon for the railroad company. A hole was found on the left side of his head, his left leg was severed below the knee and his left arm was badly mangled. He was taken to St. Margaret's hospital in Kansas City, Kas., where he died at 3:15 o'clock yesterday afternoon.

The injured man was unconscious when picked up, and nothing could be learned of the struggle on the car, or the identity of his companion. He wore a button of the United Mine Workers of America and letters found in his pockets identified him as Albert Winter of Roanoke, Ill. Daniels & Comfort, the undertakers who took charge of the body, telegraphed to the authorities of that city and received orders to hold the body until the arrival of his relatives from Roanoke. Winter was about 35 years old.

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August 13, 1909

JAMES MORAN SHOT
BY JACK O'DONNELL.

POLITICS SAID TO HAVE CAUSED
THE QUARREL.

After Shooting, O'Donnell Disap-
peared, but Later Surrendered
to Police -- Moran Not Dan-
gerously Wounded.

Enmity said to have grown out of a factional fight in the Democratic party in the Second ward last night culminated in a quarrel between Jack O'Donnell, a cigarmaker, who lives at the Century hotel, and James Moran, formerly proprietor of a saloon in the Washington hotel, in which Moran was shot in the neck and painfully injured by O'Donnell. The shooting occurred in the Century hotel about 8:30 o'clock.

Moran with several friends was standing at the bar in the hotel saloon when O'Donnell and Joseph Donnegan, manager of the Century theater, entered the place.

Moran and O'Donnell began quarreling and Harry Friedburg, who was with the Moran party, endeavored to quiet them. He told O'Donnell that there would be trouble if he stayed int he saloon and that it was best that he leave. O'Donnell went into the lobby of the hotel and was followed by Moran, who again started to upbraid O'Donnell. According to witnesses Moran threatened O'Donnell.

BULLET LODGED IN NECK.

"I'll just get you before you have a chance to do anything to me," is the reply credited to O'Donnell, who drew a revolver and fired at Moran, who had turned and was running from the lobby. As Moran dodged into the bargershop from the lobby, O'Donnell, who was following, fired a second and third time. One bullet struck the fleeing man in the back between the shoulders and ranged upwards and to the left, lodgining in the neck. One bullet lodged in the wall and the third went through the door.

Moran ran out of the barger shop and fell on the sidewalk in front. He was carried into the hotel and Dr. J. D. Griffith was summoned. O'Donnell was caught by Friedberg and John Campbell. A police ambulance with Dr. H. T. Morton from the emergency hospital removed the injured man to St. Joseph's hospital. H is wound is not dangerous and he will be out of the hospital in a few days.

COULDN'T LOCATE O'DONNELL.

The police were notified but when they arrived on the scene O'Donnell had disappeared and they were unable to locate him. Inspector of Detectives E. P. Doyle detailed Detectives Kinney and Jennings on the case. After going to the hotel the men went to the hospital to see Moran, who refused to tell anyone who s hot him. The detectives telephoned the inspector that they could not find O'Donnell, but that Joseph Donnegan informed them that O'Donnell would give himself up the first thing int he morning.

Another officer was informed that O'Donnell was in the Century hotel and would give himself up in the morning. His reason for delaying was said to be because Captain Walter Whitsett disliked him and would place him in the holdover without a chance of securing bond. When Captain Whitsett heard that O'Donnell was at the hotel he instructed Lieutenant M. E. Ryan to send Sergeant Robert Greely to arrest him.

FOLLOWED ANOTHER FIGHT.

The quarrel last night followed one in the afternoon during which O'Donnell struck Moran in the mouth and further bruised the ex-saloonkeeper. This fight occurred in Wisman's saloon, Twelfth and Oak streets. Bert Striegel, a deputy constable named Caulfield, Joseph Donnegan and Moran were in the saloon when Jack O'Donnell came in. The men had a drink together and then Moran, it is claimed,, accused O'Donnell of throwing down politically Michael O'Hearn. Other charges were made by Moran and finally, it is said, he called Edward O'Donnell, a policeman and brother of Jack, a name which Jack resented. The men engaged in a fight. Wisman separated them and put the crowd out, as he said he would not allow a fight in his place.

SURRENDERED TO POLICE.

It was midnight before the police could locate O'Donnell and then he voluntarily gave himself up. He rode by himself in a carriage to police headquarters and surrendered to Lieutenant M. E. Ryan. He was not asked about the shooting by the officers in charge and was placed in the matron's room. He did not mention the shooting nor offer any explanation for it.

The trouble between the men, it is alleged, grew out of the fact that O'Donnell and Donnegan were out of the town on the last election day and Moran and his friends accused the two of being faithless to O'Hearn. The breach between the men was widened more by O'Donnell's brother arresting a barber on election day.

The shooting scrape of last night is not the first in which O'Donnell has figured. He was shot in the back by J. D. Cosby, proprietor of the Cosby hotel, following a fight in the hotel. At the same time J. P. Hayes, who was with O'Donnell, was shot twice in the back. The shooting was in February, 1908.

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August 4, 1909

GOOD LUCK BROUGHT HIM BAD.

Boy Who Won Prize Clubbed by
Boy Who Lost.

It was both lucky and unlucky that Carl Adams won an athletic prize at the boys' summer camp yesterday. The prize was a dime, and the contest was to see which boy could stand the longest time with his arms outstretched.

Carl stood the test for eleven minutes. Jim Paulos, a Greek, who sought to re-establish the Athenian championship, could do no better than 10:22. So Jim picked up a stick and hit the winner between the shoulders.

Dr. E. L. Mathias, probation officer, dressed Carl's injuries at the detention home. The Greek will act as one of the waiters at the camp all week as punishment. The other boy is not much hurt.

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July 30, 1909

ASSAULTED AN EX-MARSHAL.

Lewis Masterson Slashed T. N.
Hughes's Throat With a Knife.

T. N. Hughes, ex-city marshal of Independence, was accosted in that city yesterday morning by Lewis Masterson, who had some words with him about a trial which had taken place in the police court the day previous. Masterson struck Hughes a glancing blow and Hughes knocked him down. Hughes knocked Masterson down a second time and was shoved into a ditch by the push of a woman. Before he could get up Masterson had his knife out, and running over where Hughes was getting up, slashed him across the throat.

It required eleven stitches to sew up the wound. The wound is not necessarily dangerous unless blood poison sets in. Warrants were sworn out for Masterson's arrest, charging him with felonious assault. Mr. Hughes was formerly superintendent of the McCune home.

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July 22, 1909

WAS IN HIDING TWO
YEARS AS MURDERER.

MISSOURIAN BECAME A WAN-
DERER AFTER SHOOTING GIRL.

Betrayed to Police by a Boyhood
Friend, Fines Stark of Neosho
Learns the Girl He Shot
Is Still Alive.

After hiding from justice for two years in the mountains and deserts of the West, following an attempt to kill his sweetheart on the steps of the South Methodist church at Neosho, Mo., on the night of April 3, 1907, Fines Stark, 36 years old, was captured in Salt Lake City, Utah, on July 5. Last night Stark was placed in a cell at police headquarters for safe keeping, while I. H. collier, the sheriff of Newton county, waited for a Kansas city Southern train to take both back to Neosho.

Shortly before train time last night Stark was led from the cell and waited a few minutes while the handcuffs were adjusted to his hands by the sheriff, who evidently wished to take no chances with his prisoner. He looked careworn, and his face was deeply lined. Until the time of his arrest in Salt Lake City, he imagined that his attempt to kill Zea Carnes, his sweetheart, had been successful.

REFUSED TO MARRY HIM.

"I'm mighty glad I didn't kill her," he said. "I've been wandering all over the West, thinking I was a murderer. But I'm going back to face an awful crime, that I wasn't responsible for at the time. I was so crazed with love that I didn't know what I was doing.

"She had refused to marry me and I waited for her on the steps of the South Methodist Episcopal church. As she came down the steps that night with her sister, I fired at her twice with a revolver, and if it had not been for the sister, I would have fired again.

"When the people began running out of the church, I fled into the darkness, for the first time realizing what I had done. I hid in the hills for a couple of days and then beat my way to Arizona. Since that time I've never heard a word from home, until the day of my capture."

If it hadn't been for Samuel Williamson, a boyhood friend, Stark might have still been enjoying his liberty. For the last few months, the fugitive has been a ticket seller for the Sells-Floto circus, though he realized that his constant contact with the crowds might be his undoing. Williamson, who had grown to manhood on an adjoining farm in Newton county, unknown, of course, to Stark, was working in Salt Lake City. On circus day he approached the big tent and at one of the ticket boxes was Stark.

ONCE TALK OF LYNCHING.

"How are you, Stark?" he said.

That was the fugitive's first intimation that he was recognized. He smiled weakly and admitted his identity.

"For God's sake, don't give me up," he pleaded, and to conciliate his friend, refunded the money he had paid for the ticket. At the conclusion of the performance he took Williamson down town and exacted a promise from him that his secret was to be safe. But an hour later a detective placed him under arrest.

Possibly the $300 reward which was offered jointly by the governor of Missouri, the county court and the father of the injured girl, might have been instrumental in Williamson's anxiety to break his word. At any rate, he lost no time in finding the chief of police after he left Stark.

Prior to the shooting of Miss Carnes, Stark had been her devoted lover. They had become acquainted at Pierce City three years previously and when the girl moved with her parents to Neosho, Stark followed her. At last she refused his attentions and the shooting followed.

The community was extremely wrought up over the affair and and at the time there was considerable talk of lynching should the young man be captured. Will Carnes, the father of the young woman, is a contractor in Neosho.

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July 16, 1909

HACKMEN FIGHT AT FUNERAL.

Harry Vaughan Sustains Fracture of
Skull and Recovery Doubtful.

Harry Vaughan, 17 years old, a hack driver living at 818 East Fourteenth street, Kansas City, Mo., and employed by the Wood Bryant and E. Landis Livery Company, Fifteenth and Campbell streets, was probably fatally injured yesterday during a quarrel with Tom Harper, a driver employed by the J. W. Snoddy Livery Company. Vaughan was struck on the head with a rock and his skull fractured at the base of the brain. He was removed to the South Side hospital where the attending physicians said his recovery was doubtful. Harper escaped after striking Vaughan and at a late hour last night had not been captured.

The two men with their carriages had been engaged to attend the funeral of Mrs. W. I. Davis in Rosedale. While services were being held at Kansas City and Rosedale avenues and the carriages were in line ready to take up the funeral procession, the two men had an altercation. Harper, it is alleged, threw a brick, striking Vaughan in the head and while the latter was still staggering Harper lifted a large rock with both hands and struck his victim again. He then ran and the last seen of him he was making his way toward Argentine. The injured boy was given emergency treatment by Dr. O. M. Longnecker and Dr. B. T. Sharp.

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July 13, 1909

FOUGHT OVER 10-CENT MEAL.

Railroad Man and Restaurant Pro-
prietor Land in the Holdover.

A free-for-all fight occurred yesterday afternoon in Main street in front of the city hall, when Harry Fox, a railway laborer, was thrown out of Peter Scando's restaurant, 420 Main street.

The police took all the participants in the fight to headquarters.

Fox, who had been out of employment for several days, as standing in Henry Miller's saloon at 402 Main street when he saw John B. Davis, a clerk for the Burlington camp near St. Joseph. He had worked for Davis two years ago.

"I haven't had anything to eat for two days," declared Fox as he shook hands with Davis. "My pal hasn't had anything either."

Davis consented to buy the two men "the best 10-cent meal in the city," and stopped at 420 Main street. He paid the cashier, and Fox and his friend proceeded to eat.

Both started to leave when they had finished. Alex Feandos, the cashier, halted them at the door.

"Pay me," he said. "Not a step until I get 20 cents."

Fox started to remonstrate when the proprietor jerked off his hat and refused to return it.

"You've eaten about 50 cents worth of food anyway," he said.

Fox picked up a chair and was starting for the cashier when a bottle of ketchup struck the wall near his head. Then Scandos chased him into the street with a double barrel shotgun when the cashier threw him to the sidewalk. He had cocked both barrels of the gun, when Charles Chadwick, a fireman from the station across the street, interfered and took the gun away.

Fox had received a severe beating and was locked up with the proprietor of the restaurant.

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June 30, 1909

SHE SLAPS LAWYER IN COURT.

Then Mrs. Williford Challenges O.
T. Knox to Finish Fight.

When Mrs. Hattie Williford left the witness stand in Judge James H. Slover's division of the circuit court yesterday, she walked straight to where O. T. Knox, an attorney, was sitting and slapped his face. She lives at 1093 Cherry street and had taken umbrage at a question asked her by Knox, who represented Mark Dewey in his divorce suit against Alice Dewey. The latter is a sister of Mrs. Williford.

Mrs. Williford also expressed her determination and willingness to make the fight one to a finish, in or out of the court room. Knox, who has a James J. Jeffries physique, brushed her away before the court attendants arrived.

Judge Slover smiled. No one was fined. The case was not finished yesterday.

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June 28, 1909

MISS OWEN MUST COME HERE.

Prosecuting Attorney's Office Will
Not Take Initiative in Affair.

It was stated last night by Virgil Conkling, prosecuting attorney, that the Annie Lee Owen slugging affair was at an end, so far as the initiative in his office is concerned.

"Until Miss Owens swears to a complaint or statement in this state and before an authorized officer of the state, as is customary in such cases, showing good faith on the part of the complainant, it is my theory that it is not a matter of public policy which would require my office to go outside of this state to take the complaint," said Mr. Conkling.

"If Miss Owen desires to complain against any person or act there is no reason why she should not do so, and she needs but to come one foot into the state of Missouri to make the complaint. This office will not bother the lady, nor persecute her by trying to force her to make a statement which she shows no desire to make at the present time.

"When the grand jury of this county convenes in September it may take up the matter of the slugging, if it deems the affair of sufficient importance."

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June 18, 1909

MORE THAN $2,000
ON SLUGGER'S HEAD.

EXTRAORDINARY EFFORTS TO
GET MISS OWEN'S ASSAILANT.

City Council in Special Session
Offers $1,000 -- Mayor and Other
City Officials Pledge $100
Each for Him.

Rewards aggregating more than $2,000 have been offered for the arrest and conviction of the thug or thugs who slugged Miss Anna Lee Owen, official stenographer for the police board investigation, in her office in the Dwight building Wednesday night, and stole shorthand notes of the important testimony relative to saloons, gambling and the police force, which she was transcribing.

Both houses of the council, in extraordinary session at noon yesterday, by resolution authorized a reward of $1,000, and ten officials personally, following the example of Mayor Crittenden, offered $100 each. Governor Hadley, for the state, announces a reward of $300. The owners of the Dwight building and John T. Wayland, an attorney, offered $100 each.

While Miss Owen was much improved yesterday, she was still carefully guarded at the University hospital., and visitors were not admitted to the sick room. She was unable to throw any more light upon the affair than she had the evening of the brutal attack. That the man who slugged her with a "black jack" wore dark clothes was the nearest to a description that she could supply.

Every detective and policeman in the department was at work on the case yesterday, having been detailed especially to search for clues which would lead to the apprehension of the guilty person. Such a cowardly attack was made upon Miss Owen by the unknown thug aroused every police officer and they were working willingly overtime. The large reward which has been offered through various sources also caused the detectives and uniform men to do their best to secure sufficient evidence to warrant an arrest.

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June 17, 1909

ATTEMPTS MURDER TO
CONCEAL RECORD OF
POLICE PROBE.

THUG STRIKES DOWN MISS A. LEE
OWEN IN HER OFFICE IN
DWIGHT BUILDING.

WON'T STOP
INVESTIGATION.

MAYOR OFFERS A REWARD.

Young Woman Was Alone in Her
Office When Murderous Assailant
Tried to Crush Her Skull With a
Black Jack -- Commissioner Marks
Orders Men Who May Be Attacked
to Shoot to Kill -- Governor Had-
ley May Offer Reward Today.
Girl Struck Down by Unknown Assailants.
UNKNOWN THUG STRIKES DOWN POLICE BOARD'S GIRL STENOGRAPHER; STEALS RECORD OF INVESTIGATION.

Struck on the left temple with a "black jack" by an unknown thug, Miss Anna Lee Owen, a public stenographer who has been taking the evidence in the investigation held by the police commissioners, was knocked unconscious while at work in her office, 605 Dwight building, last night and a part of her stenographic notes stolen. She was taken to the University hospital immediately after being found by Hugh E. Martin. She is said to be in critical condition. Her skull probably is fractured.

Mayor Crittenden personally offers a reward of $100 for the arrest of her assailant.

The attack upon Miss Owen was made some time between 6:30 and 7:15 o'clock, while she was alone in her office. She regained consciousness before being removed to the hospital, but was not able to furnish a description of her assailant.


STRUCK FROM BEHIND.

Miss Owen's office is separated from the hall by a reception room. When Mr. Martin left the office at 6:30, she was at work on the notes. The hall door was closed and also the door leading from the reception room into her office. Mr. Martin returned to his office at 7:15. Opening the door into Miss Owen's office, he found her huddled on the floor. Believing she had fainted from overwork, he lifted her head and was startled by her groaning as if injured.

Liquor which was kept in another office in the suite was secured by Martin and he rubbed the young woman's head with it. She partially revived and exclaimed, "Mother, they have taken my notes." Dr. Eugene Carbaugh was summoned to attend Miss Owen, and Commissioner Thomas R. Marks was notified. He informed the police and then took personal charge of the case.

Cowardly Assault by a Brutal Thug With a Black Jack.
A BLACK JACK, SUCH AS WAS PROBABLY USED IN THE COWARDLY ASSAULT ON MISS OWEN.

Inspector of Detectives Edward P. Boyle carried Miss Owen down stairs in the elevator and placing her in an automobile assisted Dr. Carbaugh in supporting her during the drive to the hospital.

From what little Miss Owen could tell last night she was working over her typewriter when she heard a step behind her chair. Knowing that the men who had offices in the suite had gone home, she looked up to see who it was. She had not heard the outer doors opened. Just as she secured a glance of the figure of a man, she was struck down.

IMPORTANT EVIDENCE GONE.

The stenographic notes and transcripts which she had made during the trials and investigations before the police commissioners were always carefully guarded by Miss Owen, who was afraid an attempt would be made to steal them. The notes were securely locked up in the office vault each night. When an investigation was made after she regained consciousness it was found that a large part of her notes were missing.

Just what notes were secured is not known. It was said that the evidence given late yesterday afternoon in the trial of the case against the conduct of the saloon conducted by James Redmond, 1205 Walnut street, were not secured. But it is believed that a large part of the testimony in the other investigations was lost.

ENTIRE FORCE AT WORK.

Through the inability of Miss Owen to assist the police by furnishing a description of her assailant, and also the failure of the police to elicit any information from the elevator operators was impossible to secure a clue to work on. No one could be found last night who had seen or noticed any stranger loitering in the halls or around the office in the Dwight building.

When Commissioner Marks arrived he ordered that the police make every possible effort to capture the thug, and until midnight he was actively engaged in directing the police in their work. The police were not notified of the assault until 8 o'clock, and inspector Boyle dispatched e very officer in the headquarters at the time to the scene. He and Captain Whitsett followed and were closeted with the commissioner for some time. Every detective in the city was called in and placed at work upon the case. The the substations were notified, and in all over 150 police officers were engaged in searching the city.

GIRL AND MARKS SHADOWED.

After the assault last night Commissioner Marks informed the police that he had been followed and shadowed by two men since he began his activity in the police shakeup. Not only has Mr. Marks been trailed, but Miss Owen has been dogged by two men to and from her work in the city. She was not positive of this surveillance, according to Mr. Marks, until Tuesday evening after the adjournment of the police board.

Intuitively feeling that she was being followed, Miss Owen boarded a Twelfth street car and transferred to a Northeast car. Arriving at Budd park she left the car and entered the park. All of this time the suspected man was in close proximity. At the park he disappeared for a time but was on hand when she again got on a car to ride into the city. She went to the Dwight building after leaving the car and while on the sixth floor saw the man in the hall. She then went to the office of Mr. Marks and informed him of what she had done.

GIRL FREQUENTLY ANNOYED.

Telling her to hold a handkerchief to her mouth if she saw the man on the street, Mr. Marks went down and walked around. He found a man on the street who appeared to fit the description of the man who had bothered Miss Owen, but she denied he was the one. The police were not notified at any time previous to the assault that either Miss Owen or the commissioner were being shadowed.

On another occasion it is said Miss Owen was frightened by men who followed her about the streets and went to the Coates house for the night, instead of returning to her home. While there, it was said, she received a telephone message from some man who refused to give his name. The purport of the telephone message was that there was a man in an adjoining room who intended her harm.

The mother of Miss Owen, who visited her daughter at the University hospital last night in answer to questions, said that her daughter had never mentioned to anyone at home that she was annoyed by anyone or that she had ever been followed.

On orders received from Mr. Marks, the hospital authorities refused to allow anyone to see Miss Owen. Strict orders were issued to not allow anyone but the nurse, her physicians and mother to visit the young woman. A special nurse was secured for her and the police commissioner's orders included a special diet for Miss Owen.

Several hours after the assault Dr. A. H. Cordler was called in consultation and the patient was pronounced to be in a very critical condition.

BY AN IMPORTED THUG.

The Dwight building was thoroughly searched by the police. Every street car in the city, and especially those leading into the suburbs, was being ridden by a police officer all night long. The outgoing trains were watched, although the police believed that the man would endeavor to leave the city by street car.

Inspector Boyle said last night that it was his opinion that the attack upon Miss Owen, and the theft of the stenographic notes, was done by an imported thug. If it was accomplished by home talent the inspector expressed the opinion that it was done on the spur of the moment to cover, if possible, damaging testimony given during the recent investigation. If the thug was imported for the purpose, St. Louis is probably the city, Inspector Boyle said, and his belief is also that of Captain Whitsett and Chief of Police Frank Snow.

Two men who have already figured in the police investigation and the saloon trials were ordered arrested and locked up of investigation. The theory of the police is that while these two men did not do the work they could give valuable information as to who did. But the men had not been found at 1 o'clock this morning. Captain Whitsett said he believed that the man would be arrested before twenty-four hours had passed. Acting Chief Snow said the man would be in custody by morning and inspector Boyle was positive he could not escape arrest.

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May 28, 1909

UNKNOWN MAN TRIES TO
KILL ROBERT M'CLINTOCK.

Attacks Him With Knife in Front
of Twelfth Street Entrance to
His Restaurant.

While standing in the front of the Twelfth street entrance to McClintock's restaurant, Twelfth and Walnut streets, Robert McClintock, son of the proprietor, was stabbed three times by one of three passersby, who attacked him without provocation or warning. Hundreds of people were on their way home from the theaters at the time.

Mr. McClintock's stiff hat broke the force of the first blow, but the blade cut a long gash in his scalp. The second cut also was in the head, near the first. McClintock, weak from the loss of blood, then grappled with his assailant, who cut him again on the forehead and broke away, pursued by a dozen men, but eventually escaping.

R. S. McClintock, proprietor of the restaurant, was standing in front of the Walnut street entrance when he saw a man run panting past him. He wore no hat and several men were chasing him. A moment later his son was led into the restaurant with the blood streaming down his face.

"I'm sure I would know the man if I saw him again," said Mr. McClintock last night. "Had I known what he had done, I could have knocked him down as he ran past. I don't know of an enemy Robert has. I will give $100 for his assailant's arrest and conviction.

Young McClintock remembered that he had an altercation a year ago over the payment of a check with a man to whom his assailant bore a strong resemblance.

The assailant left his hat. In the sweatband were the initials "D. D." It bore the brand of the "Lid," and evidently had been worn several months.

A cashier in the restaurant declared that three men a half hour before had come in and asked the whereabouts of Robert McClintock. Without thinking anything peculiar in their actions, she told them that he was likely in the office on the Walnut street side. Satisfied that he was inside, the men waited until he appeared.

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May 5, 1909

CHASED WEBER WITH A KNIFE.

"Red" Whitman and Ex-Captain
Give Impromptu Wild West Show.

An attraction that wasn't scheduled to take place at the afternoon performance of Miller Bros.' Wild West show yesterday was pulled off by "Red" Whitman, the proprietor of a lunch stand; Ex-Captain William Weber, now an assistant license inspector, and James E. Roberson, a policeman. The spectacle of Whitman chasing Weber with a butcher knife and the policeman in pursuit of both produced no little excitement. It all ended when Whitman was brought to the ground by the policeman's club.

The melee started when Weber asked Whitman if he had a license. Whitman was busy dispensing steaming sandwiches and did not care to be bothered. He used an expression that displeased the ex-captain, who proceeded to climb over the inclosure.

He changed his mind, however, when Whitman picked up a butcher knife and started to meet him. Not content with repelling the attack, Whitman started to chase Weber from the grounds, but Patrolman Roberson ended the chase with his club. Whitman was taken to No. 6 station, where he was booked for disturbing the peace and selling goods without a license.

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April 18, 1909

OLD SOLDIER SAVES
LIFE OF A WOMAN.

KNOCKED DOWN MAN WHO
STABBED MRS. ETHEL GRAY.

George Ripley, in Mad Fit, Was
Using Knife on Keeper of Room-
ing House When Charles
Hendrickson Interfered.

The strong right arm of Charles Hendrickson, 68 years old and a member of Fighting Joe Hooker's command during the civil war, saved the life of Mrs. Ethel Gray, 25 years old, last night at 9 o'clock. Hendrickson knocked down George Ripley, an admirer of Mrs. Gray's, after he had stabbed her in the back with a dirk.

Mrs. Gray, whose husband is out of town, bought a building at 215 East Fourteenth street last week and opened it as a rooming house for men only. Hendrickson, who is a carpenter, and W. T. Huddleston, a druggist, were among the roomers.

"I have known George Ripley only a week," she said at the general hospital last night. "He made my acquaintance in a restaurant and walked home with me. He called two or three times but never made love to me until last night. When he came into the room I saw that he had been drinking and it was not long before he began making love to me in the presence of Mr. Hendrickson. I am a married woman and, of course, I paid no attention to him. Then he got angry and struck me."

Hendrickson caught the man's arm after he had landed several blows on Mrs. Gray's face. Huddleston heard the noise and came to the old soldier's assistance. Between them they quieted the man and locked him in a rear room, while Mrs. Gray ran to the drug store of Adolph Lahme at Fourteenth street and Grand avenue and telephoned the Walnut street police station for an officer.

While she was away Ripley escaped from the house by opening a window, but Hendrickson and Huddleston almost immediately discovered his absence and went to the front door to prevent him from waylaying their landlady on her return. Ripley sprang out of the alley between Grand avenue and McGee streets and Huddleston attempted to prevent him from reaching Mrs. Gray.

"This isn't your butt-in," said Ripley. Huddleston gave way and Ripley ran after Mrs. Gray. At her own doorstep he caught her and stabbed her once in the back. Then the old soldier, who was standing on the steps, stepped down and struck the would-be assassin in the face. Ripley was knocked down, but arose and rushed at the woman again. Hendrickson struck again and knocked the knife out of his hand. Then Ripley fled.

The ambulance from the Walnut street police station was called and Dr. H. A. Hamilton dressed the cut, which was in the middle of the back. The knife penetrated to the vertebra. While the physician was at work the woman told the story to officers J. S. Scott and E. M. Wallace and furnished them with a description and a picture of her assailant. Later she was removed to the general hospital, where it was said that she would recover. Ripley has not been arrested. He is about 25 years old and rooms at 1322 Wyandotte street.

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March 10, 1909

MAY BE A NEIGHBOR

WORKHOUSE FOR GALLAGHER IF
HE CAN'T PAY FINE.

Again Assessed $100 for Attacking
Reporter and Old Appeal Bond
Doesn't Hold -- Must Put
Up or Go to Jail.

For forcibly entering a room on July 15 last year in which Albert H. King, a reporter for The Journal, lay injured after being slugged by the defendant a week before, "Jack Gallagher, who says his name is John Francis Gallagher, was sentenced yesterday to pay a fine of $100, with court costs. The case was tried before a jury in Judge E. E. Porterfield's division of the criminal court, which was only a few minutes in making up its mind.

The visit made to Mr. King's room, which Gallagher stated on the stand "was just a friendly call," was made at 5 o'clock in the morning. He was arrested at the time, but by an oversight of an officer at the Walnut street station, who did not realize the gravity of the offense, Gallagher was released on bond of $11. He was no sooner out of the station two hours later than he returned immediately to Mr. King's room, and a second time tried to force an entrance. For this offense he is yet to be tried.

Gallagher was tried before a jury in Judge Ralph S. Latshaw's division of the criminal court last month for an assault committed on Mr. King July 8, last. On this occasion he was also fined $100 and costs, and given a stipulated time in which to pay the fine.

The grand jury found an indictment against Gallagher for the assault, and it was, therefore, a state charge. The case tried yesterday, and the one still pending, are appeals from the municipal court where he was fined for disturbing the peace. Gallagher spent nearly one month in the workhouse before bonds for an appeal could be perfected.

When the jury returned its verdict in Judge Porterfield's court yesterday, Gallagher was allowed to go, the court stating that the bond made by Judge William H. Wallace when the case was appealed, would remain in effect until the fine and costs were paid. Cliff Langsdale, city attorney, who h ad prosecuted the case, was not satisfied with this arrangement, however, and found a recent law which states plainly that when a person is fined in the criminal court, after having taken an appeal from the municipal court, he must settle the fine and costs at once, or be committed to the workhouse until such fine and costs are paid.

Judge Porterfield admitted that the recent law took precedence. An effort was made then to get a commitment from the criminal clerk consigning Gallagher to the workhouse until he had settled up with the court. The clerk's office was closed, however, so the commitment will be asked for first thing this morning.

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January 23, 1909

TWO JOHNS IN TROUBLE.

One Finds Way to Hospital and the Other
to Police Station.

"You are jollying, John, John Jones said to John Birmingham last night as the two sat in a store at 250 West Fourth street. For some reason the insinuation was objected to by Birmingham and he swung one of his crutches against John Jones's head. The crutch broke and so did Jones's head. Jones was taken to the emergency hospital and Birmingham to Central station. Both men were later arrested and charged with disturbing the peace.

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January 3, 1909

FIGHTS FOR PRICE OF DRINK.

Man Attacks Frank Irons and Sever-
ly Injures Him.

While walking in an alley from Grand avenue to McGee between Eighteenth and Nineteenth streets last night about 8 o'clock, Frank Irons, who lives at 215 East Tenth street, was accosted by a man who asked for the price of a drink. Irons refused and the man struck him and clinched with him.

In the course of the struggle Irons received several cuts on the back of the head. The assailant ran, and the wounded wan was taken to the general hospital, where his cuts were dressed. He was very weak from loss of blood last night, but has a good chance for recovery.

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December 10, 1908

BRAVE POLICEMEN
WILL BE HONORED.

PROMOTION FOR PATRICK
AND MICHAEL MULLANE.

At Least That's What the Commis-
sioners Were Believed to Convey
When They Spoke of Re-
ward Yesterday.

Sergeant Patrick Clark and Patrolman Michael Mullane, if nature favors them and they recover from their wounds received in the battle with fanatics Tuesday afternoon, are to be rewarded. That is the intention of the present police board.

Only Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., and Andrew E. Gallagher were present yesterday at the meeting. Commissioner Elliot H. Jones was at the funeral of Joseph Chick. The board had hardly convened when Mayor Crittenden announced that he wanted to say a few words regarding the bravery displayed by the police the previous day, some of which he and Commissioner Gallagher witnessed.

"This board wants here and now to command the bravery displayed by its officers in the fight with religious fanatics yesterday," began the mayor. "The action of Sergeant Patrick Clark in going into the fight empty handed and the game fight put up by Patrolman Michael Mullane, both of whom were wounded, is to be especially commended. It is the intention of the board to reward these men in a befitting manner. The board, of course, deeply deplores the accidental shooting of the girl, Lulu Pratt, but under the circumstances it was unavoidable."

The "befitting manner" spoken of can mean nothing but promotion. Patrick Clark went on the department September 12, 1888. On May 6, 1901, he was made acting sergeant and September 18 of the same year he was made a regular sergeant. Since his appointment he has served faithfully, not a black mark being made against him.

During the life of the present board many promotions have been made, some of them men who had served but a few years on the department. Every time any promotions have been made, it was always believed that long service men would get prizes. "Pat" Clark's name was always spoken of in rumor as the one man who would certainly be rewarded. But he got nothing, the promotions going to men who evidently had more influence. The sergeant never turned a hand in his own favor and refused always to let his friends annoy the commissioners.

Now that promotion is in sight for the brave officer who, unarmed, defended his brother officers, his friends all say that nothing short of a captaincy will do for him. His friends will not stand back any more, even at his request.

Patrolman Michael Mullane went on the force November 16, 1905, as a probation officer, and on December 31, a year later, was made a regular patrolman. That might seem a short time upon which to base promotion, but there are men on the force who have not done one-tenth the service that Mullane did who wear sergeant's stripes. "Mullane has proved that he will stand under fire," everybody is saying, "and if he is not made a sergeant it will be nothing short of unjust."

The board also took up the matter of allowing the city's streets to be used promiscuously by itinerant fanatics. An order was issued requiring the chief of police to personally handle this class of fakirs, and use his judgment regarding the issuance of a permit. Hereafter all new comers who attempt to use the streets to expound their peculiar religious teachings will be immediately arrested.

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December 10, 1908

OFFICER MULLANE IS SINKING.

At Midnight He Was Not Expected
to Survive Until Morning.
Clark Is Better.

Captain Walter Whitsett went to St. Joseph's hospital last night to see Sergeant Patrick Clark and Patrolman Michael Mullane, wounded in the riot of Tuesday afternoon. Clark is doing nicely, with chances far in his favor for recovery, but Mullane is low, and was not expected to survive the night. At midnight he began to sink.

To Captain Whitsett, Sergeant Clark was grappling with the big fanatic who had the knife and gun. She ran in behind me, but I paid little attention to her until I felt the sting of the bullet.. In the struggle I was cut across the right eye."

If this is the case Sergeant Clark was shot by Lena Pratt for, according to her own statement made last night, she was the only one of the girls who carried a revolver. The ball entered Sergeant Clark's right shoulder blade, ranged upward and lodged in the shoulder. Two X-ray photographs were taken of the shoulder yesterday in an attempt to locate the exact position of the ball, but they were not very successful. He has recovered sufficiently from the shock to be operated upon today, say his physicians, Drs. Eugene King and W. A. Shelton. His right eye will have to be removed and then follows the great danger, as is the case in all such operations, of affecting the other eye. The greatest of care will have to be taken of him after such an operation.

When Captain Whitsett called to see Patrolman Mullane he was admitted by the latter's brother, Jack Mullane, an insurance agent. He was allowed to remain only a few minutes. The brave officer, who had battled against such overwhelming odds from the fact that he had absolutely refused to shoot the woman and girl who were firing at him, turned painfully on his bed and said, "Hello, captain, what's the matter? What have I done?" Then he was quiet for a moment, and, reviving, said: "I have three little children at home. My God, what of them! For my little girl's sake I'm glad I didn't shoot the woman and girl. I could have killed them, and they have killed me."

Then he sank again into a semi-conscious state. The gallant officer is making a braver fight for his life than he made in the thickest of the riot, and in his occasional conscious moments declares that he will live for the sake of his wife and children.

A. J. Selsor of 2412 Benton boulevard, the bystander who was shot in Tuesday's riot, cannot recover.

The bullet entered his body at the right side, passing through the fleshy part of his arm just above the elbow, ranged slightly downward and broke the spinal cord.

Mr. Selsor has been a resident of Kansas City for about ten years. He is 72 years of age. Previous to coming to Kansas City, he lived at Gallatin, Mo., and was engaged in banking and farming.

When his daughter told him that the papers referred to him as a "retired farmer," he said it was a mistake; he is merely a "tired" farmer. Besides his daughter, Mrs. Godman, he has three other children, who are either here or coming. They are: Mark Selsor, connected with a magazine in New York; Mrs. H. F. Cox, dramatic art teacher with the Harvey Dramatic Company of Chicago; Frank Selsor, owner of a drug store in Muskogee, Ok.

At last midnight Louis Pratt, lieutenant of James Sharp, alias "Adam God," was still alive. He is in the general hospital with a bullet in his brain, and his legs pierced with balls. One leg was amputated Tuesday night. He cannot recover.

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December 9, 1908

BULLETS KILL TWO AND WOUND FIVE IN FIERCE BATTLE BETWEEN POLICE AND BAND OF RELIGIOUS FANATICS

FIGHT BEGAN IN FRONT OF CENTRAL POLICE STATION AND ENDED AT MISSOURI RIVER BANK.

MAN AND GIRL AMONG DEAD

YOUNG GIRL, MEMBER OF THE BAND,
PIERCED BY BULLETS AFTER FLEE-
ING TO THE RIVER.

Three Policemen Wounded.
Houseboat Where Religious Fanatics Sought Refuge
Tent on Missouri River Flat Boat Where the Women and Children Members of the Religious Fanatics Took Refuge.


THE DEAD.

ALBERT O. DALBOW, policeman
-- Shot through the breast, abdomen and thigh.
LULU Pratt, 14 years old, fanatic
-- Shot through back of neck at base of brain. Bullet came out through left cheek


THE INJURED.

-- Shot through the right chest and cut through right eye and upper lip with dagger. Taken to St. Joseph's hospital; dangerous.
Michael Mullane, patrolman
-- Shot in the right chest, right kidney and left hand. Taken to St. Joseph's hospital; dangerous.
Louis Pratt, fanatic
-- Shot in forehead. Right ankle crushed and shot in calf of same leg. Leg amputated at general hospital later.
J. J. Sulzer, retired farmer living at 2414 Benton boulevard
-- Shot in right hip, also in right chest. Latter bullet glanced and severed the spine. Paralyzed from shoulders down. Taken to University hospital; will die.
Lieutenant Harry E. Stege
-- Shot through left arm. Ball passed along his chest from right to left, grazing the skin, taking piece out of arm. Went back into fight.

In a battle between police and religious fanatics which began at Fourth and Main streets at 3:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon and ended at the Missouri river bank, two persons were killed and five were injured. The trouble came about through the police trying to break up a religious street meeting, at which revolvers and knives were carried by the exhorters.

Just a few minutes before the tragedy occurred George M. Holt, a probation officer, found Mrs. Melissa Sharp, Mrs. Della Pratt and the latter's five children singing near Fifth and Main streets. He asked why the children were not in school, and was answered with an insult.

"Do you belong here?" he asked of one of the women.

"No, we have a house boat on the river," she replied.

The fanatics, after a collection amounting to about $3 or $4 had been made, started north on Main street with Mr. Holt following. They went into what is known as the Poor Man's mission, 309 Main street, conducted by J. C. Creighton and wife. Mr. Holt then approached J. A. Sharp, husband of one of the women, and addressed him and Louis Pratt, the other's husband.


ASSAULTED HOLT.

"I am the father of Jesus Christ," said Sharp. "I have been sent to reorganize the world. You are no more than damned sheep. Get out of here. I am going to preach with my children right in front of that police station. You'll see what they'll do to me. Get out!"

With that Sharp drew a big revolver and struck Mr. Holt over the head. He left the "mission" with the fanatics following, all of them but two having revolvers, Sharp with both revolvers and knives. The fanatics consisted then of Mr. and Mrs. Sharp, Mr. and Mrs. Pratt and the latter's children, Lulu, 14, Lena, 12, Mary, 11, Dewey, 8, and Edna, 4 years old.

While Mr. Holt hurried into police headquarters, his head bleeding, the fanatics ranged along the curb in front of John Blanchon's saloon, 400 Main street, and the men began to flourish revolvers and knives and talk in wild tones about what God had commanded them to do. While all this was going on Patrolman Dalbow, who was sent from the station to see what the trouble was, walked up to James Sharp, who styles himself as "Adam God." Witnesses say that Dalbow spoke kindly to the man and told him he must cease, as a crowd was gathering.


"I'LL SHOOT THE SERGEANT."

"Do you come as a friend, brother?" Sharp asked.

"Yes," replied the officer," the sergeant wants to see you.

"I am going over and shoot the sergeant," said Sharp, his wrath rising again.

Just at that juncture Lieutenant Harry E. Stege, who had followed Dalbow out of the station, arrived on the scene and said to Sharp, "Drop that knife," at the same time drawing a revolver and pointing it at Sharp.

Then the trouble began in real earnest. Louis Pratt, who, up to that time had stood mute by the curb, a little in the rear and to one side of Sharp, raised a revolver which he was carrying in his hand and shot at Lieutenant Stege.

Louis Pratt, Religious Fanatic
LOUIS PRATT.
Religious Fanatic, Whose Leg Was Shot
Off in Fight With Police.

The ball tore through Stege's clothing form the right to the left side along the chest, taking a chunk out of the left arm. Stege retreated, shooting, and a general fusillade was opened on the police. Pratt shot Dalbow through the chest, just as he was drawing his revolver, and one of the women, Mrs. Sharp, witnesses say, shot him in the back as he retreated.

DIES IN EMERGENCY.

Dalbow staggered across the street south to the door of the emergency hospital. As he pushed open the door his revolver fell from his hand. "I am shot bad," he said to Dr. R. N. Coffey. The officer caught him and carried him to a cot in the hospital. He died in a few minutes without regaining consciousness.

The shooting by that time had attracted the attention of all the officers in police headquarters. Sergeant Patrick Clark, in his shirt sleeves and unarmed, went out and into the thickest of the fray. The big leader, Sharp, was tackled by the sergeant and, though the latter was armed with both a knife and a revolver, the sergeant went after him with his fists. Clark was stabbed twice in the face and as he turned, was shot through the shoulder.

Captain Walter Whitsett, Inspector Charles Ryan, Detective Edward Boyle and others went into the street, emptied their revolvers and returned for more ammunition.

The gamest fight against the greatest odds was made by Patrolman Mullane, who ran down Fourth street from Delaware street just in time to meet the enraged fanatics fighting their way toward him. Louis Pratt, Mrs. Sharp and Lulu, the oldest Pratt girl, all attacked him, paying little heed to the shots of others. He at that time was the only policeman in uniform in range. Mullane would shoot at Pratt and when the woman and girl would walk right up to him and shoot at him, the big Irishman, realizing that they were only women, only clubbed his gun and struck at them.

The three-cornered fight lasted until Mullane's gun was empty and they had him cornered behind a small wagon on the north side of Fourth street. While he was attempting to get at Pratt the woman and girl pumped shots into him from the rear. He soon followed Sergeant Clark into the station, where both men fell to the floor. Doctors attended them there. They were later removed to the emergency hospital, their wounds dressed, and sent to St. Joseph's.

SPECTATOR IS SHOT.

While there were no fewer than 500 spectators in the crowd when the shooting began, only one was shot. That was J. J. Sulzer, 2414 Benton boulevard, a retired farmer. He was an onlooker and was hit by two bullets, the fanatics evidently taking him for an enemy. He was shot in the right hip first and almost immediately afterwards in the right chest. That ball ranged in such a manner that the spinal cord was severed. Mr. Sulzer dropped on the car tracks in front of city hall. He was treated at the emergency and sent to the University hospital. The doctors think he cannot live, as he is paralyzed from the shoulders down.

SHARP, RINGLEADER, ESCAPED.

There was not a moment while the fight was on that the police could not have killed all of the women and children, but they refrained from doing so. Seeming to realize the fact, the women and older Pratt girls -- Mary, Lena and Lulu -- constantly gathered around the two men who were doing most of the shooting. The women and girls would circle about the men, thereby blanketing the fire of the police, and would then fire point blank at the officers themselves.

Among the fanatics, Pratt and Mrs. Sharp made the gamest fight. Sharp, the leader of the bunch, disappeared during the fight, as if the earth had swallowed him. Pratt was so badly wounded that he had to be left on the street, but even then one of the women, Mrs. Sharp, ran to him and gave him a loaded revolver. Struggling to position, he fired again until his weapon was emptied.

Chief Ahern turned in a riot call, and all the police in the city that were available appeared there as soon as possible, under commands of captains and lieutenants.

When it was found that Sharp, the ringleader, had escaped, the chief scattered his men in all direction over the city. It is believed that he was wounded. The houseboat was guarded last night.
WOUNDED RESTING EASILY.

At midnight Dr. Eugene King of St. Joseph's hospital said that Sergeant Patrick Clark was in a serious condition, but that he was doing nicely, and stood a good chance to recover. Patrolman Michael Mullane had shown some little improvement during the hour preceding 12 o'clock. Dre. King said that his chances of recovery were very slight.

The condition of J. J. Sulzer at the University hospital was reported by Dr. A. W. McArthur at midnight to be very critical. Dr. McArthur said that one of the bullets was lodged just beneath the skin on the left side of his body, but that he would not attempt to remove it until this morning.. Hope for Mr. Sulzer recovering from his wounds was slight, the surgeon said.

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