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January 24, 1910

DEAD MAN'S HOARD
HIS LAST PILLOW.

FIFTEEN THOUSAND DOLLARS
IN SECURITIES IN CASHBOX
UNDER HIS HEAD.

Body of Oscar Schoen, Aged
70, Found Amid His
Savings.

With his head pillowed on a cash box containing $15,000 worth of negotiable securities, mostly government bonds and money orders, Oscar Schoen, a retired shoemaker, 70 years old, was found dead in bed in a squalid room at Missouri avenue and Main streets yesterday morning.

The old man's hand clutched a half emptied phial of morphine tablets while at his side lay a loaded 38-caliber revolver. One of the cartridges had been snapped but had failed to ignite.

Coroner Harry Czarlinsky, who was summoned, stated that death was due to morphine poisoning, whether taken as an overdose or with suicidal intent he was unable to state. He ordered the body taken to Freeman & Marshall's undertaking establishment.

MONEY ALSO IN ROOM.

Although Schoen had occupied the same room in which he was found for over two years, little or nothing was known about him by the owner of the rooming house. He was last seen alive on Thursday morning by Guy Holmes, the janitor of the premises. He told Holmes that he was feeling sick and that if it were not for the expense he would visit a doctor. He used to retire regularly at 6 o'clock every evening and rise at 8 in the morning, when he would go out and buy the daily papers, return and stay in his room. Rarely he made trips up to town.

Police headquarters was notified of the old man's death and Patrolman John P. McCauley, who was sent to investigate, made a further search of the room. Concealed behind an old stove in which Schoen had done his cooking was found $60 in bills and silver, and in an old carpetbag apparently discarded and thrown under the bed, the officer located several abstracts and deeds to Kansas City property in the vicinity of Thirty-first and Troost avenue, which are supposedly of considerable value.

WILL IN POCKETBOOK.

Schoen's last will and testament was also found in an old pocketbook. By its provisions all his property is bequeathed to relatives by the name of Goetz living in Kempsvile, Ill. Charles A. Schoen, a brother at Darlington, Ind., was named as executor. The police have telegraphed to all parties concerned.

One of the witnesses of the will was the manager of a local real estate firm, through whom Schoen had conducted his business. He stated that he know that the old man owned a great deal of property. Schoen at one time conducted a cobbler's shop at 2442 Broadway, but left there about four years ago, giving his reason for selling out and moving the fact that robberies were too common in that part of town.

Naturalization papers dated 1872 and taken out at Darlington, Ind., were found among Schoen's effects, together with several applications to different German provident associations.

Schoen had lived in Kansas City about twenty-two years. He has a sister, Mrs. Bertha H. Goetz, at Kempsville, Ill., and a niece, Mrs. Agnes Yak Shan, residing in Alaska.

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December 12, 1909

BIDS MOTHER GOODBY; DIES.

Samuel Trainor Drank Carbolic
Acid to End His Life.

Samuel Trainor, a packing house employe, living with his aged mother at 1316 Wyoming street, Kansas City, Kas., yesterday afternoon committed suicide by drinking the contents of a three-ounce bottle of carbolic acid. Trainor was 43 years old and had been working steadily.

Mrs. Trainor said yesterday that her son had come into the room where she was sitting about 4:30 o'clock in the afternoon and placed a bottle on the table.

"Well, goodby mother," he said, as he walked from the room. After leaving his mother the man walked into a bed room and lay down on the bed. When found a short time later he was dead.

The body was viewed by the Wyandotte county coroner. Funeral arrangements have not yet been made.

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December 6, 1909

MURDER AND SUICIDE
IN HOME OF POVERTY.

BOY 2 YEARS OLD AND DOG
KEEP VIGIL OVER BODIES.

Kansas City, Kas., Baker Kills Wife
and Himself as a Result, It's
Thought, of Jealousy Caused
by Use of Morphine.
Mrs. Myra Campbell, Victim of a Drug Crazed Murder.
MRS. MYRA CAMPBELL.

Neighbors entering the home of Joseph Campbell, 2952 North Seventeenth street, Kansas City, Kas., at 9 o'clock yesterday morning found the dead bodies of Mr. Campbell and his wife on the floor of the stuffy little room which served the double purpose of sleeping and living room. Clasped in the right hand of the man was a revolver. He evidently had murdered his wife, then committed suicide. Crouching down against the bed in one corner or the room, benumbed with cold and fear, was the little white robed figure of a boy, 2 years old, whose crying through the night and early morning attracted the attention of the neighbors and led to the investigation which resulted in the finding of the bodies.

GUN IN MAN'S HAND.

Charles Phillips, 18 years old, who lives next door to the Campbells, and C. R. Lumsdon, another neighbor, were the first persons to make the discovery. The sobs of the baby induced the two men to knock at the door. Receiving no response after repeated knocking they broke the lock and opened the door enough to obtain a view of the interior of the room. The body of the woman was almost against the door. She had remained in a kneeling posture, the head to one side. A bullet had entered below the left breast, passing entirely through the body and lodged under the skin on the right side. The man lay in almost the same position against the south walls of the room and behind the woman. His arms were folded across his breast and the revolver was held tightly against his body. The bullet had passed through the heart. Campbell was a baker. He was 32 years old.
WIFE SOUTH MISSOURI WOMAN.

He was married about three years ago in southern Missouri, where he became acquainted with the girl, Miss Myra Matthews, who became his wife. She was 20 years old. Although worn and haggard she bore the traces of having been beautiful. Insane jealousy on the part of the husband is the reason attributed for the murder. The bodies were viewed by the coroner and taken to the undertaking rooms of Fairweather & Barker.
Joseph Campbell, Who Killed His Wife and Then Himself.
JOSEPH CAMPBELL.

The killing of the innocent wife and the subsequent suicide of the murderer was but the logical climax of the events which mark the life of Joseph Campbell. Although for weeks Campbell has spoken of domestic troubles, even going so far as to consult Chief of Police W. W. Cook, and on numerous occasions threatening to buy a revolver and "end it all," it is believed by those who knew him best that these troubles and the consequences had their inception in a drug filled brain.

KNOWN AS "MORPHINE JOE."

That the murderer had been addicted to the use of morphine for many years is known, in fact so common was this knowledge that for at least fifteen years he has been known to hundreds of persons in Kansas City, Kas., as "Morphine Joe." A bottle half filled with the drug was found on a chair near the bed.

The police are at a loss to determine at what time the tragedy occurred. The family of William T. Kier, 2950 North Seventeenth street, say that the Campbells were heard pumping water from the cistern as late as 9:30 o'clock last night, but they heard no shots. The family of William Brocket, whose rooms are over those of the Campbells, did not return until about 11 o'clock at night, and no shots were heard by them. Daniel Galvin, a carpenter, living a few doors north, said that he heard a shot around 10:30 o'clock but thought nothing of it.

CHILD AND DOG WITH DEAD.

A scene of utter desolation was witnessed by the men first entering the room. On every side was the evidence of extreme poverty. The ragged covers of the bed, which had not been slept on, were folded neatly back. A few little, cheap pictures adorned the unplastered walls. Despite the cheapness and the poverty there was the touch of a woman's hand, which transformed the scantily furnished room into a home.

The little boy, Earl, crying by the bed where he had stood in the cold during the entire night, and a large dog which stood guard over the dead body of his mistress, were the only living beings in the place of death. The child was hurried to the home of Mrs. C. R. Lumsdon and placed in ht blankets, but the dog growled savagely at the intruders and would not submit to being moved until petted by a neighbor whom he knew.

THE CAMPBELL HOME, KANSAS CITY, KAS.

The news of the murder and suicide spread rapidly over the neighborhood and hundreds of persons gathered about the house. The police were notified and after the bodies had been taken away a guard was set about the house to prevent persons from entering.

The orphan boy will be cared for by his father's mother, Mrs. James B. Grame of 2984 Hutchings street, Kansas City, Kas.

"The news of this awful deed came as a shock to all of us," said Mr. Grame last night. "The fear that something like this would happen has been in our minds for years." The awful condition of Campbell, crazed by drugs, has added twenty years to the age of his mother, who has clung to him through all his troubles.

"It is a matter I cannot discuss, but harsh as it may sound, it is better for the world and better for himself that his life is ended. The thing that hurts me the most is the thought of that poor innocent girl a sacrifice to his drug crazed brain."

Persons living in the neighborhood say that Campbell has made numerous threats against his wife. Mrs. M. J. Cleveland, 2984 Hutchings street, said yesterday that Campbell came to her home Saturday morning and told her that he was going to get a gun and kill the whole outfit, meaning his wife. Practically every person living near them were afraid of the man and it was said that he constantly carried with him a gun and a butcher knife. He had recently secured work at the Armour packing plant.

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September 29, 1909

KANSAS CITY BUYER A SUICIDE.

Joseph Adler, Wholesale House Em-
ploye, Drinks Poison in New York.

NEW YORK, Sept. 28. -- Joseph Adler, who was a buyer for a wholesale house in Kansas City, Mo., committed suicide in his room in the Hotel Gerard this afternoon by drinking carbolic acid. No reason for the act is known.

According to the police Adler, who is about 40 years old, had been at the Gerard for about a week and occupied a suite of two rooms. This afternoon one of the hotel maids knocked at Mr. Adler's door, wishing to enter the apartment. She received no answer. Later she returned and when again she received no response she tried the door and found it unlocked. She looked into the room and found Adler lying in the same position. The maid hastened to the office and gave the alarm. A clerk went to the room and discovered the suicide.

In the room the coroner's physician found three letters, one of them addressed to "Whom it may concern" in which Adler requests that he be given a simple burial by the nearest undertaker. He also requests that two other letters, which were sealed, one addressed to Hiram Adler of Evansville, Ind., and the other to D. L. & W. P. Haas, 152 State street, Hartford, Conn., be mailed without being opened.

The physicians found nothing in the room that would serve as a clue to Adler's reason for death.

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September 21, 1909

FRIENDSHIP ENDS IN
MURDER AND SUICIDE.

WILLIAM JACOBIA KILLS MRS.
SADIE STOLL AND HIMSELF.

Young Son of Woman Heard Quarrel
and Shooting -- Risks Life Try-
ing to Protect His
Mother.
Mrs. Sadie Brown Stoll, Murdered Woman.
MRS. SADIE BROWN STOLL.
Wife of Samuel F. Stoll of the Stoll-Moore Drug Company.

Murder and suicide ended a close friendship last night when William Jacobia, 600 East Ninth street, shot and killed Mrs. Sadie Brown Stoll, 3617 Tracy avenue, during a quarrel in the front hall of the Stoll home at 9 o'clock and a few minutes later committed suicide on the veranda of his wife's residence, 3217 Forest avenue.

Mrs. Stoll was shot through the heart and died at once. Jacobia shot himself in the head.

The only person in the house at the time Mrs. Stoll was murdered was her 14-year-old son Albert. What passed between the couple before the tragedy is not known definitely, but they were quarreling for nearly a half hour before Jacobia fired the shot. Albert Stoll heard part of the conversation between his mother and Jacobia, but was sent to his room by her just before the shooting.


BOY GETS A SHOTGUN.

That the young son expected serious trouble while Jacobia was there is shown by Jacobia's actions, which Albert Stoll graphically described to the police last night. Immediately after firing the shot which killed Mrs. Stoll, Jacobia started up the stairs, threatening to kill Albert, who had provided himself with a shotgun to protect his own life.

Either the shotgun frightened him or the desire to get away from the scene of his crime, Jacobia gave up the pursuit of the boy, and ran from the house, followed by Albert, who gave the alarm by crying for help.

But few minutes elapsed between the first and second shooting. It is only five blocks from the Stoll home at 3617 Tracy avenue to Mrs. Jacobia's suite in the Alabama apartment house, 3237 Forest avenue, and Jacobia ran all the way.


"I HAVE SHOT MRS. STOLL."

A balcony with no outside steps is front of her apartment, which is on the ground floor. Jacobia made his entrance by way of this balcony and in doing so had to climb over a stone balustrade which encloses it. As he entered with much agitation he said to his wife, who had come to let him in:

"Mamma, I had to come home."

She could see that he was greatly excited, and told him to sit down while she got him a glass of cold water.

"No, no!" he protested, excitedly, "I haven't time. I have just shot Mrs. Stoll. It is awful, it is awful."
William Jacobia; Killed His Friend and Then Himself.
WILLIAM JACOBIA.
Slayer of Mrs. Samuel F. Stoll, who committed suicide when the police traced him to his wife's home at 3217 Forest avenue.

Incoherently he was trying to tell her of the shooting when he heard the sound of steps outside.

"There are the officers coming for me," he said.

"Yes, but you will have to nerve yourself and be calm," she told him.

Mrs. Jacobia went to the door to let in Sergeant M. E. Cassidy and Patrolman Isaac Hull of No. 9 station, and as she did so her husband stepped out on the balcony.

"Where is he?" asked Sergeant Cassidy.


WIFE HEARS DEATH SHOT.

Just then they heard a single shot, and the three went hurriedly to the balcony door.

"There he lies," she answered, pointing to the dead body of her husband, prostrate on the stone floor of the porch. The husband of the murdered woman is S. F. Stoll of the Stoll-Moore Drug Company, formerly at Twelfth street and Grand avenue, and now located at 208 and 210 East Twelfth street. He was notified of the death of his wife by W. R. James, 3615 Tracy avenue. Sam Brown Stoll, 18 years old, the oldest son, was at a theater, and friends were unable to reach him by telephone.

According to the facts as told by Albert last night Jacobia telephoned yesterday afternoon about 3 o'clock and asked for Mrs. Stoll. Albert answered the telephone and upon recognizing Jacobia's voice hung up the receiver. About 8 o'clock last night he again called up and was answered by Mrs. Stoll, and a half hour later appeared at the house.

Mrs. Stoll fell dead in the hallway at the foot of the stairs. Her head was lying against the bottom step, while her feet pointed to the front door. Soon after Mr. Stoll reached home he asked neighbors and friends to inform the relatives of his wife of her death. J. H. Brown, a brother, who lives in Atchison, Kas., was informed of the tragedy.

"Tell all of them to come," said Albert, who was telling his father what should be done.

The account of the shooting as told by young Albert Stoll soon after the murder, while not full in all details, shows daring in a boy so young as far as his part was concerned. He said that he and his brother did not like Jacobia, and that a week ago Sam had purchased a shotgun with the intention of killing the man who was his mother's friend. The shotgun had been kept in their room until a day or so ago, when his mother removed it to the attic.

"Yesterday afternoon when Jacobia called up and asked for mamma, I hung up the receiver," said Albert. "Then about 8 tonight he called mother, and soon afterwards he came to the house. I was in my room at the time. When I heard mamma and Jacobia fussing I decided I would get the shotgun, which I did. I took a shell and after taking out the wad and shot I went down to the first landing and stood there.

HEARD HIS MOTHER SHOT.

"I told Jacobia to leave the house, that he did not have any business here anyway. At that he got mad at me and told me to keep still or he would beat me. Then to bluff him I picked up the shotgun and put a load into it. Mamma made me go to my room, saying she would get Jacobia awa.

"I'll not let that little pup talk to me that way," Jacobia is said to have repeated to Mrs. Stoll.

"Just as I reached the upper hall I heard the shot, and then mamma say, 'Albert, he shot me.' 'Yes, and I'll shoot him, too,' I heard Jacobia say as I was hurrying back downstairs. Jacobia was coming up the stairs, and knowing my shell was not good, I ran to my room and put a loaded shell in the gun and then came downstairs.

RAN AFTER JACOBIA.

"As I reached the head of the stairway Jacobia was going out the front door, and I ran down the steps and followed into the yard. He was then going up the street. I cried 'Help, help,' and someone across the street asked, 'What is the matter, Albert?' When I said mamma is shot nearly all of the people started to the house and I came back and called up papa, but he didn't answer. Then someone told the police.

"I wish I had shot him," Albert admitted.

"Oh, God, why didn't you shoot the scoundrel, boy?" Mr. Stoll asked of his son.

Albert insisted that he did not know what his mother and Jacobia were talking about. Whenever Albert endeavored to tell the police just what occurred, and how, Mr. Stoll, who was walking the floor of the lower rooms, would tell him to keep still. Mr. Stoll refused to answer any questions immediately after the murder.

HUSBAND STILL LOVED HER.

"I loved her with every drop of blood in my body," he said, "and I will not say anything against her. I would not say a word that would reflect upon her. Oh, God, why couldn't he have shot me?"

Not until Samuel Stoll, the elder son, came home after the performance at a theater, did he learn of the tragedy. As he hurried up the steps, he was met by J. A. Guthrie, a friend of the family.

"For God's sake, what's the matter?" he said with a perplexed face.

Then he saw the white shrouded figure in the parlor with the undertaker and his assistants standing near. Mr. Stoll, who saw him, threw his arms about the boy's neck and shouted:

"Your friend killed her, that's what he did. And you knew he was coming to see her all the time."

WHEN THE TWO FIRST MET.

Then both were hurried up the stairs by friends.

"I'll kill him myself," said the youth.

"He has done that to save you the trouble," said Mr. Guthrie. "He committed suicide just after he killed your mother."

Then the father upbraided the son for several minutes, but the youth declared he knew nothing about it. Then both began weeping hysterically, and were finally reconciled. But the father could not remain seated. He walked the floor in anguish.

"I knew the first day he saw my wife," he said. "One day when he was building those flats up on Forest avenue, he came in to use the telephone, and my wife met him at the door. He introduced himself, which was the beginning of their acquaintance. I began to get suspicious when I saw him at the house several times.

WAS TOLD TO WATCH WIFE.

"Somehow I had a suspicion that all was not right, and at times I felt sick. On one occasion I asked her about it, but she became angry and upbraided me so much that I felt almost humiliated. She went on occasional visits to Atchison, and I was suspicious every time that she left home.

"On one of the visits to Atchison, I found his picture in the close, and I was so angry when she came home that I could wait no longer. She flew into a rage, and I could do nothing but submit, not wishing to make the affair public.

"My feelings were again wrought to a high pitch when I received an anonymous letter, telling me I ought to watch my wife. I then determined to hire a detective agency to watch her, but after hiring two men I thought differently and canceled my contract with the firm.

"It has been that way for months until tonight when I was called to the telephone and was told that my wife had been shot. I won't harbor any ill will against her for my boys' sake. She was their mother.

Mrs. Stoll was a large woman with a rich mass of dark brown hair. Her face was full and her eyes were dark brown, which matched her olive complexion. She was considered one of the handsomest women in the neighborhood, and always attracted attention on the street by her dignified bearing. A dimple in her cheek was heightened by an engaging smile. She always dressed in clothes of the latest fashion, which while not always expensive, always were tasteful. She was 38 years old.

Mrs. Stoll was the daughter of J. P. Brown, a wealthy man who lived at Atchison, Kas., Her father died about three weeks ago. He was well known in and around Atchison being one of the most prominent men in that community. While the Stolls lived in Atchison Mr. Stoll conducted a drug store there.

JACOBIA 46 YEARS OLD.

William Jacobia, the dead man, was 46 years old and rather stout. Those who had known him in life said last night that he was apparently of a happy disposition, with rare conversational powers. He took uniformly with women and men, the former long remembering his bright wit and ready flow of small talk.

When Mr. and Mrs. Jacobia were married October 8, 1890, he was an engineer on a Kansas branch of the Missouri Pacific railway. Later he left the railroad in favor of the banking business and founded the Farmer's state bank, the stock of which was owned mostly by farmers at Corning, Kas., which was his birthplace. Seven years ago he sold out his interest in the Farmers' bank and came to Kansas City to enter the real estate business.

POLICE "DIDN'T KNOW."

The police notified Dr. B. H. Zwart, coroner, of the double crime and he in turn notified Deputy Coroner Dr. Harry Czarlinsky. The bodies of the murdered woman and suicide were sent to the Carroll - Davidson undertaking rooms by the deputy coroner.

The police who were stationed at the home of Mrs. Stoll and Mrs. Jacobia refused to give any information regarding the tragedy last night. Whenever any of them were asked who shot the woman or why he shot her or an y other question relative to the case the invariable answer was "I don't know."

One policeman was asked if the body lying in the front hall of the Stoll home was a man or woman, and he said, "I don't know."

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September 18, 1909

KILLS SELF ON "HOBO HILL."

Jesse Skarling, Despondent Because
of His Wife's Illness.

Under a tree on "Hobo Hill," an elevation overlooking the Missouri river near the foot of Main street, Jesse M. Skarling, a painter, killed himself yesterday afternoon by swallowing about four ounces of carbolic acid. Depression on account of his wife's illness is thought to be the cause. Beside him was a note which furnished the only identification.

"My name is Jesse Skarling," the note read. "My dear wife's name is Ida Skarling. My mother lives at Muskogee, Ok. Goodby, friends."

The man evidently had thought about committing suicide for several hours. Beside his body were dozens of cigarette stubs and the grass indicated that he had moved several tim es as the sun shifted. There was no label on the bottle and no indication where the acid was purchased.

After viewing the body, Deputy Coroner Czarlinsky ordered it sent to O'Donnell's undertaking rooms.

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September 14, 1909

KANSAN SUICIDE IN
KANSAS CITY HOTEL.

ALBERT SARBACH OF HOLTON
FOUND DEAD IN ROOM.

Killed Himself With Chloroform,
But Had Acid in Reserve -- Pros-
perous Merchant and Mason --
Motive Unknown.

With an uncorked chloroform bottle fastened to the bed in such a manner that every drop fell on a towel laid over his face, Albert Sarbach, a prosperous merchant of Holton, Kas., was found dead in his room in the Baltimore hotel at 8 o'clock yesterday morning.

Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky said Sarbach probably had been dead two days.

No motive for the suicide could be found yesterday. The only thing that could be found of a significant nature was a bottle of carbolic acid, possibly to have been used had the chloroform failed.

That Sarbach contemplated suicide, though no motive was given, is the opinion of officers who investigated the matter. In one of his pockets was a will which was made out on April 20. The writing was identified as that of Sarbach.

MAID THOUGHT HIM ASLEEP.

Mr. Sarbach is supposed to have gone to his room some time around midnight Saturday. He took the key out of the door, evidently knowing that the maid would use the master key to open the door, and find his body.

The maid opened the door Sunday morning and saw Mr. Sarbach's body lying across the bed. She th ought that he was asleep, probably suffering from the effects of a bad night, and as he was dressed and the bed was made she hurriedly closed the door and went about her work. She returned to the room in the afternoon and when she saw the body was unmoved she concluded that he had not awakened.

Yesterday morning when the housemaid found his body in the same position as the day before she summoned the housekeeper and it was discovered that he was dead.

HIGH IN HIS FRATERNITY.

Sarbach was a member of a prominent family of Holton, and was unmarried. He was a thirty-second degree Mason, and had held various offices in the order. At the time of his death he was grand treasurer for the order in Kansas. At one time he was mayor of Holton, and until his death was a member of the board of regents of Campbell university, located there.

He was elected to the Kansas legislature in 1900 on the Republican ticket. He is survived by a brother, Max Sarbach, and two sisters, Carrie Sarbach and Mrs. Sarah Lehman.

The body was taken to Stewart's undertaking rooms. Dr. Czarlinsky said no autopsy would be held.

Mr. Sarbach's uncle, W. W. Nailer, called at Leo J. Stewart's undertaking rooms and identified the body, which will be sent to Holton for burial.

Samuel B. Strother, public administrator, was yesterday afternoon appointed by the probate court to take charge of Albert Sarbach's estate. This move was made so that the coroner may turn over to Mr. Strother any personal property Mr. Sarbach may have had in this state at the time of his death.

When told of the suicide of his brother Albert at Kansas City, Max Sarbach collapsed. The Sarbach store was closed. No probable cause for the act is known to members of the family.

Sarbach is reputed to have been wealthy. He operated grain elevators in Holton and at Della, Winchester, Boyle, Half Monn, Larkin and Circleville, Kas., in addition to his mercantile establishment. No financial losses sufficient to cause suicide are known.

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September 12, 1909

DESPONDENT, HANGS HIMSELF.

Wm. Mann, 80, Grieved for Wife
Who Died in 1905.

Brooding over the loss of his aged wife who died February 24, 1905, William Mann, 80 years old, a pioneer farmer of Johnson county, Kas., became despondent early yesterday morning and hanged himself with a halter rope in the barn of his son, James Mann, who lives in the suburbs of Bonner Springs. The body was discovered at 10 o'clock by Harley Mann, the ten-year-old grandson. An examination made by the Wyandotte county Coroner J. A. Davis proved that life had been extinct several hours.

Mr. Mann was at one time widely known as a successful farmer of Johnson county, where he lived more than 35 years. In 1903 he moved to Bonner Springs in Wyandotte county accompanied by his only son James. There the two went into the potato raising business. Recently James Mann has been locally known as the potato king from the fact that he yearly cultivated 300 acres of the tubers, considerably more than any other farmer in the vicinity.

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September 5, 1909

THREW HIMSELF UNDER TRAIN.

Wife Saw Husband Run to
His Death.

With his mind probably deranged by ill health and financial worries, Charles W. Marsh, formerly a labor leader in Kansas City, Kas., committed suicide by jumping in front of a freight train in that city yesterday morning about 10 o'clock. He died in a police ambulance on the way to Bethany hospital. Marsh was 54 years old and lived near Eighth street and Walker avenue in Kansas City, Kas. He was a painter and paperhanger by trade.

Mrs. Marsh witnessed her husband's suicide from their home, which is only a short distance from the tracks of the Kansas City-Northwestern railroad. He had been despondent for some time and had made threats. While his wife was attempting to dissuade him, he broke away from her and ran to the railroad tracks on which a freight train was approaching and threw himself in front of the engine. His body was almost completely cut in two by the wheels of the cars.

Funeral services will be held this afternoon at 3 o'clock at Butler's undertaking rooms. Burial will be in Oak Grove cemetery. He is survived by a widow and a son, Dr. J. L. Marsh.

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August 8, 1909

KILLS SISTER-IN-LAW
AND COMMITS SUICIDE.

GRANT SIERS SHOOTS MRS.
MARY SIERS AND HIMSELF.

Jealousy and Continual Quarreling
Alleged Cause -- Negro Witness of
Tragedy Says Woman Also
Used Revolver.

Jealousy and continual quarelling is the alleged cause of the death of Mrs. Mary Siers, 1025 Jefferson street, who was shot and instantly killed yesterday afternoon about 4:45 o'clock by her brother-in-law, Grant Siers, who then turned the pistol upon himself and sent a bullet into his head, dying before anyone reached his side. The only witness to the murder and suicide was Susie Richardson, a negro woman, who lives in a house in the rear of the Siers residence.

Siers had lived at the home of Mrs. Siers for the last two years, after being separated from his wife, who lives in Humeston, Ia. Mrs. Siers' husband is divorced and is an inmate of the Soldiers' home at Leavenworth, Kas. From boarders in the house and Chester Siers, a son of the slayer and suicide, it was learned that the couple quarreled most of the time. Jealousy on the part of both is said to have caused nearly all of the domestic trouble.

ORDERED TO LEAVE HOUSE.

About 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon Mrs. Siers was busy showing two real estate men over the house when Grant Siers returned home and began to quarrel with his sister-in-law. She told him to leave the ho use and he entered the hall to get his suit case. The woman threw the suit case at his feet with the admonition not to return. Siers requested time to get his clothing from his room, but she again told him to leave. His son, Chester, finally induced him to leave the house, and the two men went to a saloon at Eleventh and Jefferson streets. Later in the afternoon the father left his son at Eleventh and Main streets.

The next heard of Siers he was entering the yard at the Jefferson street residence. Instead of going in the back way, as was his custom, Siers entered from the front and went around the house to the rear door. A latticed porch is just off the kitchen door, and as Siers walked upon the porch Mrs. Siers appeared in the doorway. She ordered him off and according to the theory of the police he drew a revolver and shot three times. Two bullets entered her body, one on each side of the chest. The third bullet lodged in the wall back of her. Then Siers placed the muzzle of the pistol behind the right ear and killed himself.

SAYS WOMAN USED PISTOL.

The version of the double killing as given by the Richardson woman differs greatly from that of the police theory. She said she was standing in the yard and saw Mrs. Siers point a revolver at Siers and fire twice. Siers, she said, turned and fell, and while on the floor of the porch took a pistol from his pocket and fired at Mrs. Siers, afterwards shooting himself. However, when the deputy coroner, Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, examined the bodies only one revolver was found and that was under Siers. the body of Mrs. Siers was slaying in the kitchen and Siers's body was on the porch.

Mrs. Richardson said that Siers was asking for his clothes and that Mrs. Siers finally ordered him away and said:

"I'll see you dead before I will give you your clothes."

"My God, please don't kill me," Siers exclaimed, she said.

Immediately after this conversation Mrs. Siers began to shoot, according to the negro woman. She was positive two revolvers were displayed. As the police could only find one pistol, and that underneath Siers's body, the discredit the negro's story.

Dr. Czarlinsky also found five shells, which were for the pistol, in the coat pocket of Siers.

SON TELLS OF QUARRELS.

Chester Siers, who is a restaurant cook, said yesterday evening that his father did not own a pistol so far as he knew, but that his aunt had one. He said his father and aunt were in love with each other, but that he had never heard them discuss the subject of marriage.

W. L. Haynes and Charles Callahan, boarders,were in the parlor during the shooting and counted four reports of shots fired. Mrs. Moyer, housekeeper, was in another part of the house. The son of Siers said that in the past when his father had left home after a quarrel with his aunt she always sent him money to come back. About a month ago she had him arrested on a charge of disturbing the peace. He was sent to the workhouse, but after serving a short sentence, Mrs. Siers paid his fine, it is said.

Siers, who was 54 years old, was a barber and had a shop at the corner of Nicholson and Monroe streets. He leaves a widow and six children. The widow and three children reside in Humeston, Ia.

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July 5, 1909

ESCORTS RAN FROM
HOWARD'S REVOLVER.

BOTH LEFT THEIR COATS AT
THE AMBERSON HOME.

Alone, Clara Amberson and Her
Sister Fought a Losing Fight
With Murderer -- Girl Dies
After Four Hours.
Alfred Howard, Who Shot Miss Clara Amberson and Took His Own Life.
ALFRED HOWARD.

Miss Clara Amberson, who was shot in the right temple by Alfred Howard, a rejected suitor, in the dining room of her home, 735 Kensington avenue, just before midnight Saturday, died at 4:20 a. m. yesterday. She did not regain consciousness.

In an unlighted room, and deserted by the young men who escorted them home, and who fled when Howard appeared with his revolver, Miss Amberson, assisted by her sister, Mrs. Mamie Barringer, battled in vain with Howard for possession of the weapon. Finally throwing Miss Amberson to the floor, Howard jumped on her, and then, as Mrs. Barringer seized him about the neck, he pulled the trigger.

The bullet struck Miss Amberson just back of the right temple and she collapsed. Believing that he had killed her, Howard turned the weapon on himself and sent the second shot through his own brain, and fell lifeless beside her. Surrounded by her mother, sister and friends, sthe wounded girl passed away four hours later.

In the light of subsequent events, it is believed that Howard contemplated the murder and suicide Saturday afternoon. It is known that he saw the young women at Forest park in the evening in company with young men, when he had been denied the privilege of escorting them or even calling at their home, and it is believed that the sight of the girl who was all the world to him, encircled in the arms of another man on the dancing floor, maddened him.

Four years ago Alfred Howard, then 22 years old, came to Kansas City from Iola, Kas. He secured a position in a railroad freight office, and roomed and boarded with Mrs. Anna Amberson, mother of the girl he killed. Miss Amberson was then a child of 13.

WANTED TO MARRY HER.

They were together a great deal. Howard assisted her with her studies, and when she was graduated from high school last year he declared his love for her, and asked her to be his wife. This was objected to by her sister and her mother because of her youth.

Six months ago Howard left their house, and shortly afterward went to Hot Springs, Ark. In the meantime Miss Amberson entered a wholesale millinery establishment and was rapidly perfecting herself in that line when he returned three weeks ago.

Howard had been in poor health since his return, but this did not deter him from declaring his ardent love for the girl whom, he told his friends, no other could replace. Miss Amberson found many excuses for not making engagements. Thursday he called her on the telephone and to his several requests for an evening she replied that she had previous engagements.

Saturday evening he called at the Amberson home and asked Miss Amberson to accompany him to a park or that she spend the evening with him as she chose. Miss Amerson smilingly told him that she had an engagement for the evening and that she was sorry. During the conversation he showed the sisters the revolver which he later used. No thought of violence crossed the minds of either girl.

SHADOWED TO FOREST PARK.

Miss Amberson and Mrs. Barringer were unaccompanied when they walked to Forest park, a short distance from their home. There they met several friends, among them Orville Remmick of 5212 Independence avenue, and Ed Doerefull of 4621 East Seventh street.

It is believed that Howard shadowed the sisters to the park. H e arrived at the Ambrose home shortly before 10 o'clock in the evening. The noise he made when he withdrew a screen from a window in the kitchen of the Amberson home and clambered in was heard by Mr. and Mrs. Joe Wharton, roomers on the second floor, but they ascribed it to a parrot. For almost two hours Howard lay in wait. He chose as his hiding place the bedroom of the sisters, which opens from the dining room to the north.

On their way home, Deorfull, who escorted Miss Amberson, and Remmick, who escorted Mrs. Barringer, suggested that they eat some ice cream. They stopped at the Forest Park pharmacy and chatted for a few moments with O. Chaney, the druggist.

RAN FROM REVOLVER.

It was warm and the young men carried their coats over their arms. When they arrived at the Amberson home, they conversed for a few moments on the porch just outside the dining room, when the suggestion that they get a drink of water was made. the quartet entered the dining room. Miss Amberson and Doerfull going to one window seat while Mr. Remmick took a chair. Mrs. Barringer went into the kitchen for the water, when suddenly Howard sprang out of the bedroom.

Holding a revolver which he pointed at Miss Amberson, he cried:

"Throw up your hands and don't scream!"

"It's Alf! Help!" cried Miss Amberson.

Doerfull was first to see the revolver and the first to get out of the room. He was closely followed by Remmick. Both left their coats and hats. The cry for help brought Mrs. Barringer back to the room. By this time Miss Amberson had grappled with Howard and had clutched the revolver. Then began the battle for possession of the weapon and the shooting.

HAD PLANNED THE CRIME.

Screaming for help, Mrs. Barringer, after the shooting, fled to the sidewalk. Neighbors hastened to the scene. Doctors declared Miss Amberson fatally wounded, and said that Howard's self-inflicted wound had caused instant death.

The police who searched his clothing found the note which he had evidently written some time during the evening in which he declared that "Mamie" (Mrs. Barringer) was the cause of the anticipated double tragedy, and asked that Miss Clara and he be buried side by side.

ESCORTS DIDN'T WAIT.

Ed Doerfull, the escort of Miss Amberson, told a reporter for The Journal last evening that he had never been frightened as badly in his life as he was when he looked at that shiny steel barrel and heard the command to throw up his hands.

"I didn't wait to learn any more about who the fellow with the revolver was," said Mr. Doerfull. "Mr. Remmick and I had escorted the girls home and stepped inside the house to get a drink of water. I was close to the door and when I heard the command to throw up my hands and I saw that shiny steel barrel of the revolver, I concluded that I had better play checkers and move.

"I did not stop to grab my coat or hat, but ran. I don't know how I got home, for I was badly frightened. I lay awake all night and got up around 6 o'clock and went over to Remmick's house to see if he got home all right.

"I did not know until then that anyone had been shot, as I was too far away from the house when the shots were fired to hear the noise of the reports.

"I don't know why I ran away and did not notify the police about the man with the gun, but I guess most anybody would act the same as I did if they looked into the business end of a revolver and were ordered to throw up their hands.

GOT THEIR COATS SUNDAY.

"I got my coat and hat this morning at the same time Mr. Remmick got his. We saw Miss Amberson's body then and we will probably go to the funeral together.

"I did not know the young lady very well, having only met her a few times at the park. I did not go back to the house today, as I had an engagement to go to a picnic at Swope park, and it was too late when I got back this evening."

Orville Remmick, who was with Doerfull when Howard entered the room with the revolver in hand, told his parents that he was taken by surprise, and that when he heard the command to throw up his hands and he saw the revolver, his first thought was for his personal safety. He said that he ran for the door and ran home.

REMMICK HEARD REPORTS.

Half a block away he heard the muffled reports, and when he got home he telephoned to the Amberson home and learned of the double tragedy. He feared for a while, he said, that his companion, Doerfull, had been shot. Remmick left his coat and hat at the Amberson home and called for them yesterday morning. He spent yesterday afternoon at Forest park and yesterday evening at Electrick park.

Miss Amberson was 17 years old. She was the youngest of three children. Besides her sister, Mrs. Barringer, and her mother, she leaves a brother, Will, who is in the navy. An effort was being made yesterday to notify him by wire and hold the funeral until his arrival, if possible. The Ambersons came to Kansas City from Salida, Col., six years ago.

Howard had been rooming for the last two weeks at the home of Mrs. Ellen Harper, at No. 801 Cypress avenue, just a block from the Amberson home. That he planned the murder and suicide is believed by Mrs. Harper, as his trunk was locked and contained all of the small articles which he kept about his room.

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July 4, 1909

SHOOTS SWEETHEART
IN A JEALOUS RAGE.

ALFRED HOWARD LAY IN WAIT
FOR HIS VICTIM.

After Killing Clara Amberson, He
Turned Revolver on Himself.
Left Note Blaming Others
for His Deed.

As Clara Amberson and her sister, Mrs. Mamie Barringer, accompanied by two young men, stepped into the doorway of the Barringer home at 735 Kensington avenue, shortly after midnight this morning, a shot was fired which fatally wounded Miss Amberson.

The shot was fired by Alfred Howard, sweetheart of Miss Amberson, an a jealous rage. Mrs. Barringer grappled with Howard, but he shook her off and placing the pistol at his right temple, shot himself. Death was instantaneous.

A note, written by Howard, was found in the dining room of the Kensington avenue home. It reads:

"Mamie was the cause. She caused Clara to turn against me and Clara wanted to be dead when I was gone. Bury us side by side. HOWARD."

The note would indicate that Howard had deliberately planned murder and suicide.

The police at first said it might be evidence of a suicide pact, but the theory was given slight credence.

Howard lived at 801 Cypress avenue. He was 27 years old. He formerly lived at the Amberson home on Kensington avenue.

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July 3, 1909

AGED "CABBY" A SUICIDE.

Dan Marvin Kills Himself to Join
Wife Who Divorced Him.

Love for his wife from whom he had been divorced for four years, and who died a week ago, caused Dan Marvin, 68 years of age, to commit suicide at his home, 405 1/2 East Fifteenth street, early this morning. Marvin used a revolver and shot himself through the heart, death resulting instantly For the past week Marvin has been disconsolate and bemoaned the death of his wife to many of his friends.

"She was the best pal I ever had," he was wont to say, "and I am ashamed of the way she has been treated. She is dead now, dead."

Dating form the death of his wife, who had remarried and was deserted by her second husband, Marvin had not been in a cheery frame of mind. He made continual threats to join her and to repair the wrong which he had done her.

After his body had been removed to an undertaker's the following note was found:

"Friend Will: Please pay Egan $50 to put me away decent and oblige, D. A. Marvin."

The Will referred to is Will Mayberry, at whose liver stable Marvin stabled his horses. Marvin has been a cab driver for many years and for the past eight years he has stood out in front of McClintock's restaurant, on Walnut street.

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June 28, 1909

GRIEF DRIVES AGED
WOMAN TO SUICIDE.

HUSBAND OF HALF A CENTURY
PROCURED DIVORCE.

Heartbroken Over This Treatment,
Mrs. Mary Robinson, 70 Years
Old, a Paralytic, Swallows
Carbolic Acid.

Heart-broken over alleged treatment by her husband to whom she had been married forty-six years, and to whom she had borne 8 children, Mrs. Mary M. Robinson, 70 years old, swallowed carbolic acid yesterday morning at 9:30 o'clock and, successfully struggling against the efforts of a physician to administer an antidote, died an hour and a half later

She lived with her son, Ernest E. Robinson, 37 years old, and father of four children, at 312 South Topping avenue.

For about three years O. G. Robinson, three years his wife's junior, worked in Tennessee. He made frequent trips to Kansas City, however.

Four weeks ago Ernest Robinson says he received a letter from his father, declaring that "he guessed he was of age," and could act as he saw fit. The letter said he had procured a divorce in the South and had married a woman from Mississippi, 32 years old, who is now with him in Kansas City.

AGED WOMAN PARALYTIC.

Already a hopeless paralytic, having used crutches for several years, the aged wife could not bear the added burden. She knew of a bottle of carbolic acid which her daughter-in-law used for household purposes, and secured it.

Although for years she could hardly raise her hand to her head, in her despair she managed to reach the bottle that lay on a shelf higher than the top of the kitchen door.

Ernest Robinson, the son, had been summoned to a neighbor's by a telephone call. Hardly had he taken down the receiver, when his little daughter who had run after him, cried out:

"Papa, grandma wants you to come quick as you can."

"ALL OVER," SHE TOLD SON.

When he reached his mother's side, she told him there was no use in sending for a doctor, "for it was all over with her." By 11 o'clock she was dead.

Her former husband was notified and went with his son to make arrangements with the undertaker.

Another son, Arthur B. Robinson, 40 years old, lives next door to his brother at 310 Topping avenue. He has three children. These two sons are the only ones of the eight children surviving.

Mrs. Robinson was born, reared and married at Jay, Mo., but for twenty-three years had lived in Missouri.

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June 26, 1909

WOULD KILL SELF AT DEPOT.

After Quarreling With Husband,
Woman Tries to Swallow Acid.

Despondent and angry because of domestic troubles, and after several hand-to-hand encounters with her husband in the presence of hundreds of persons, a woman attempted to swallow the contents of a bottle of carbolic acid at the Union depot last night, and only the timely interference of Patrolman John Coughlin prevented her from accomplishing her act.

Attracted by the crowd that had gathered about the couple early in the evening, Coughlin forced his way up to them and ordered the disturbance to cease. For a time they were quiet, but several times again broke out in heated and spirited argument, each time drawing a crowd of curious onlookers.

Finally the woman drew the vial of acid from her handbag, opened it and was about to place it to her lips when the patrolman intercepted it. both the man and woman were taken to No. 2 police station. Neither would give their names, and Captain Ennis, after hearing both sides of the story, on the woman's promise of good behavior, allowed them to leave without being booked.

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June 17, 1909

FARE LIFE OF CAR
ENDED BY SUICIDE.

RUNS AWAY AND DASHES IT-
SELF AGAINST POLE.

Deliberately Leaves Barn and Makes
Wild Run Down Ninth Street
Until It Jumps Track at
Wyandotte Street.

Roanoke car No. 604 committed suicide last night at 7:30 o'clock by running down Ninth from Washington street and dashing itself against the trolley pole at the southeast corner of Ninth and Wyandotte streets. So carefully was the act committed that no one was hurt and the tracks were left clear, but the car was smashed to kindling.

No. 604 returned from a hard day's work and was put into the car barn at Ninth and Wyandotte streets by Motorman Floyd Dyer, 809 West Twenty-first street. It was raining and there was a despondency in the air, but the car manifested no signs of the deep design it was nursing within its breast.
INTENT ON SUICIDE
Fifteen minutes later, when none of the street car men was looking, it poked its nose out of the barn and started, gathering speed as it progressed. A girl clerking at a laundry agency across the street from the barn saw it start.

"There was no one on or near the car," she said. "It came out deliberately like a living thing, and ran away before anyone had time to stop it."
Two street car men saw the runaway after it had gone half a block and ran after it. Fortunately there were no cars on the track in front and the rain had driven pedestrians from the streets.
Detective Andy O'Hare, who was waiting for a car at Ninth and Wyandotte streets, saw the car bearing down upon him. The trolley was threshing wildly although it had been on the wire when 604 left the barn.
DASHES ITSELF TO PIECES.
Grinding the speed limit beneath its wheels, the suicide leaped the track at Wyandotte steret, instead of making the turn, and precipitated itself sideways against the granitoid walk at the west side of the Boston Drug Company, on the southeast corner.
It was brought to a stop by an iron trolley pole, and the bed of the car left the trucks and fell sideways on the walk, completely blocking passage. Only two windows in the drug store were damaged. Every window in the car ws broken, the front end was ripped open and a few solid planks were left.
The wreck was entirely clear of the tracks and traffic was not delayed. Dyer, the motorman, is positive that he set the brake before leaving the car.
"Clear case of suicide, probably due to despondency brought on by the whether," was the verdict of the wreckers who cleared the debris away.

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June 4, 1909

JOHN W. SPEAS, LONG
ILL, KILLS HIMSELF.

With Pistol and Poison Makes Sure
of Death After Writing a
Farewell Note.
John W. Speas, Victim of Suicide.
JOHN W. SPEAS.

After writing a brief farewell note to his family, John W. Speas committed suicide yesterday morning at 6:30 o'clock in a bedroom at his home, 1028 Summit street, by drinking carbolic acid and shooting himself.

Mrs. Speas, who was in the dining room downstairs, hurried to the bedroom when she heard the report of the revolver, and found Mr. Speas prostrate upon the floor. She summoned the family physican, Dr. R. T. Sloan, who said death had been instantaneous. Before firing the fatal shot, it is believed that Mr. Speas swallowed the carbolic acid. According to the deputy coroner either method would have resulted in death.

Mr. Speas has been an active member of the Commercial Club for a longer period probably than any other man in it, and once refused the presidency. He was active in the building of the first Convention hall, and also was conspicuous in the work of reconstructing it after the fire. As a member of the Commercial Club he was looked upon as the most popular active worker. He was president several years of the Priests of Pallas, and a member of the board of directors.

Mr. Speas was a native of Missouri. He came to Kansas City at the age of 10 years, and for several years sold papers, and later carried a paper route. He studied bookkeeping at Spalding's Business college, and then allied himself with the Kansas City Distilling Company. Much of his business career was interwoven with that of E. L. Martin, president of the distilling company. Later Mr. Speas became interested in the Monarch Vinegar company, and eventually became the sole owner.

An enthusiastic baseball fan, he identified himself with National League in the '90s, and for three or four years owned or controlled the franchise in Kansas City. He was a member of the Masons, Elks and Mystic Shrine.

Mr. Speas was born on a farm near Kansas city, October 18, 1862. In 1884 he married Miss Evelyn Southworth. Besides his widow he leaves one son, Victor Speas. Continued ill health of three years' duration is believed to explain his suicide.

The pallbearers for the Speas funeral, which will be held Saturday morning, are F. A. Faxon, L. W. Shouse, E. M. Clendening, William Barton, J. C. Schmelzer, D. P. Thompson, F. S. Doggett and W. H. Holmes.

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June 2, 1909

ENDED HER LIFE IN A WELL.

Despondent Seamstress Commits Sui-
cide at 3026 Jackson Avenue.

Despondent and suffering from a protracted illness, Miss Anna Shinogle, a seamstress, ended her life yesterday afternoon by drowning herself in a well at the home of her sister, Mrs. John E. Asher, 3026 Jackson avenue. The suicide occurred about 3:30 o'clock, and the woman gave no intimation that she contemplated taking her own life. Miss Shinogle was 32 years old. Her father resides in California and a brother, Edward Shinogle, lives at 906 Spruce street.

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May 20, 1909

KNOCKS ACID FROM HAND.

Girl Thwarts Young Man's Appar-
ent Attempt at Self-Destruction.

C. S. Brown raised a bottle of carbolic acid to his lips in the Union depot yesterday afternoon, but before he could swallow any of the drug Miss Hilo Pickerell, of St. Joseph, knocked the bottle from his hand. A depot patrolman took Brown to No. 2 police station, but on the intervention of Thomas McLane, a St. Joseph shoe salesman, and George Pickerell, he was not locked up. Miss Pickerell told the police that twice before she had knocked carbolic acid bottles from Brown's hand. Brown in an engraver and until one month ago lived in St. Joseph. Recently he has been staying at the Monarch hotel, Ninth and Central streets. He had gone to the depot to see the Pickerells on a train for St. Joseph.

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May 14, 1909

DEATH BY CARBOLIC ACID.

Unidentified Man Commits Suicide
Near Centropolis.

The body of an unidentified man was found in a lot between Drury and Hardesty avenues on Fifteenth street yesterday morning by Mrs. Della Morris, who lives in the vicinity. Harry Czarlinsky, deputy coroner, said death was due to carbolic acid poising.

The name Henry Patterson was found on a piece of paper in the man's pocket. The underclothing bore the letters J. E. C. and the initials J. C. were upon a signet ring which he wore. H e was about 50 years old, five feet five inches in height, weighed 140 pounds and wore a dark suit, patent leather shoes and a soft hat. His eyes were gray and his hair brown.

ENDED LIFE WITH SHOTGUN.

Morgan Jones, a farmer who lives near Dallas, Mo., killed himself with a shotgun early yesterday morning. He had been ill for a number of years and it is thought by his friends that it caused despondency. He was 30 years old and unmarried. He had been formerly employed as a bookkeeper in Kansas City.

TRIED TO DIE, BUT FAILED.

In a saloon at 1025 East Nineteenth street F. D. Miskelly of Excelsior Springs attempted to kill himself by drinking chloroform. He was taken to the general hospital. He is in precarious condition.

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May 2, 1909

TRACING MRS. YARBROUGH.

Woman Suicide, Implicated in Mur-
der Charge, Stopped Here.

The police are positive that Mrs. Helen Yarbrough, who committed suicide in the Manhattan hotel in Wichita Friday night, was in Kansas City several weeks ago. She was wanted at Claremore, Ok., on a charge of complicity in the murder of John Bullette, and rather than face the officers she took strychnine.

Detectives had been looking for Mrs. Yarbrough in Kansas City for several days. With the aid of a photograph she was traced to an East Side boarding house, where she had stopped during the month of March. She left ostensibly for Topeka April 7, but went to Claremore instead. The murder was one of the most brutal on record in Oklahoma. While in Kansas City Mrs. Yarbrough had no callers and made no friends.

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April 19, 1909

SUICIDE IN SWOPE PARK.

Virne Willard, Despondent Through
Ill Health, Makes Good His
Threat to Die.

With a revolver in the right hand and a bullet hole in the head, the badly decomposed body of Eugene Virne Willard, 417 Lawton place, was found yesterday afternoon in a ditch about a mile east of the main entrance to Swope park, by two small boys, who notified park authorities.

Two patrolmen were sent from No 9 district, and Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, deputy coroner, notified. In the man's coat pocket they found a small memorandum book containing a sh ort note, asking anyone who found the body to notify his wife. It was signed, "Eugene Willard, 417 Lawton place."

The park employes did not remember having seen the man, and it could not be determined just when the suicide was committed, but he evidently had been dead several days.

Mrs. Susie Willard, wife of the suicide, when seen in their apartments at 417 Lawton place, last night, said that her husband had been afflicted for some time with tuberculosis and heart disease, and that he complained of his head.

"My husband was about 33 years old. We had been married five years," she said. "He was very nervous, and the fact that of late he was unable to attend to his duties at the stock yards about made him insane.

"Three weeks ago Virne came home and told us all he would kill himself. Later he told my mother, Mrs. Sarah Powell, that he went one time to the Kaw river to jump in, but that he found the water too shallow and too muddy for the plunge and changed his mind. By a statagem we succeeded in getting a hold of his revolver and hiding it under some papers on the cupboard. Last Wednesday we found the weapon missing.

"Thursday morning I asked Virne to go to the store and purchase some ribbon from a sample I gave him. By night he had not returned, so I notified the police. Since then my brother has tramped the outskirts of the city trying to find the body, confident that my husband had killed himself.

When ill health drove the husband to despondency, Mrs. Willard penned the note and placed it in his pocket, giving her address and asking that in case of accident she be notified.

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April 15, 1909

MURDER AND SUICIDE
END SIEGE OF MONTHS.

ENRAGED ROSEDALE HUSBAND
KILLS WIFE AND HIMSELF.

Breaking Into Home in the Early
Morning, Frank Williams Slays
Sleeping Wife -- Shoots Him-
self Under Fire.

Although the members of the family of Frank Williams, a laborer, have been living at 65 Clinton street, Rosedale, Kas., in a state of siege of nearly three months, and have never during that time retired for the night without placing loaded revolvers beneath their pillows, Williams smashed in the door of his home at 4:40 o'clock yesterday morning, killed his wife, Addie Williams, as she lay sleeping, and committed suicide by sending a bullet into his own brains, after being fired upon by his stepson.

Because of brutal treatment of his stepchildren and his wife, Williams had often been arrested, and upon the last occasion his stepson, James Goodell, refused to allow him to return home. Mrs. Williams on February 11 brought suit for divorce, and from that time began to hear of threats by Williams to exterminate his family and commit suicide. He lived in a tent only a few rods from his home, and was often seen skulking around the house.

WIFE KILLED WHILE ASLEEP.

Mrs. Williams lived in a cottage of four rooms with her son, James Goodell, her daughter, Mrs. Emma Clute, her son-in-law, Oscar Clute, and a grandson, Johnnie Aldine, who is four years old. The pistols were kept under the pillows of three of the members of the household for use should the husband and stepfather attempt to carry out his threats.

Shortly before 5 o'clock yesterday morning James Goodell was awakened by the crash as Williams broke down the kitchen door with a battering ram. Realizing that it was his stepfather, bent upon a murderous mission, Goodell seized his revolver and rushed into his mother's room, which adjoined the kitchen. Before he was able to reach the room, Williams had fired twice, both bullets striking his wife in the forehead. Williams then ran into the kitchen and Goodell fired three shots at him, none taking effect.

The murderer then placed the pistol to his forehead and fired, the bullet splitting and making it appear as though he had been struck by two bullets. Clute and his wife, who occupied the front room, did not reach Mrs. Williams's side until after Williams had committed suicide. Mrs. Williams was killed instantly and probably was asleep when she was shot. The suicide lived for an hour after he shot himself but was unconscious until the end. The grandson was sleeping with hie grandmother and saw Williams fire the shots.

GRANDSON WITNESSED MURDER.

According to Goodell, not a word was spoken by any of the parties during the shooting. Afterwards the little grandson said he saw his grandfather shoot his grandmother. Last night Goodell said he had expected a killing for two months, but believed that it would be his stepfather who would be killed.

Mrs. Williams was 40 years old and her husband 51. They had been married nineteen years.

Coroner J. A.Davis of Kansas City, Kas., was notified soon after the shooting, and took charge of the bodies. He ordered them removed to the Gates undertaking establishment, where he will hold an autopsy this morning. In the afternoon an in quest will be held for the purpose of ascertaining all of the facts leading up to the tragedy.

"The fact that Williams's stepson, James Goodell, fired three s hots at him while he was retreating from the house," said Coroner Davis, "leaves some little doubt as to whether Williams fired the shot that ended his life or was killed by one of the three shots fired at him by Goodell. This will be easily determined at the post mortem examination, as one of the revolvers was of 38 and the other of 32-caliber."

After the bodies were removed from the Williams home, Dr. Davis locked the doors and took possession of the keys. It is probable the coroner's jury will visit the premises today. The surviving members of the Williams family spent the night at the home of neighbors. They were indignant over the coroner's action in locking up the house. Dr. Davis stated last night that he took possession of the premises because both heads of the household were dead, and he did not want any trouble to arise over the disposition of whatever property was there.

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April 7, 1909

COME HOME, WROTE PARENTS.

Pathetic Letters Establish Identity
of Girl Suicide.

There is no longer any doubt as to the identity of Miss Effie Sloan, the young woman who committed suicide by jumping from a third-story window of the general hospital April 3. Miss Sloan was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. N. M. Sloan of Jasper, Ark., according to several letters found yesterday in her trunk.

It is apparent from the letters that the parents live on a farm a few miles from town and that the girl had been away from home a year or more.

"Do come home, dear; we are so anxious to see you once more," is a phrase which occurs many times in brief notes from father and mother. "We thought a long time that you had been killed in a railroad accident and we have worried our hearts sore," says one of the letters, signed by the father.

The fact that several women who knew Misss Sloan here professed to believe that she was using an assumed name led to the investigation of her effects by the administrator and the coroner at the Wagner undertaking rooms yesterday.

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April 5, 1909

HOSPITAL PATIENT'S SUICIDE.

Woman Tricks Nurse and Hurls
Herself From Third Story
Window to Death.

Nurses and patients at the general hospital were startled and shocked last night when Effie Sloan, a patient, committed suicide by leaping from a window on the third floor to the ground below. She was dead when assistance reached her side a few seconds after she jumped.

Miss Sloan entered the hospital on March 31. She was assigned to the ward on the third floor in which were other women patients. The woman was very restless on Saturday afternoon and night, but yesterday the physicians noticed that she was very quiet. About 7:00 last night as one of the nurses passed her cot she asked for a glass of milk. the nurse started after the milk, and Miss Sloan arose from her bed.

After getting up the patient walked the length of the ward to a window. She raised it and began climbing up on the sill. Two patients, Misses Cora Smith and Lulu Williams, took in the situation and ran towards her in an effort to prevent her from jumping. As Miss Smith reached the window Miss Sloan threw herself from off the window ledge.

Succeeding in catching only a slight hold of the gown worn by the woman, Miss Smith was not able to hold her long enough to give Miss Williams time to help. Miss Sloan weighed about 160 pounds, and the woman who attempted to hold her against the window sill by her gown weighs 120 pounds.

When Miss Sloan broke from the grasp of Miss Smith, her body shot downward to the turf beneath the window, and the two patients screamed and fainted. The nurse on duty in the ward immediately notified the internes who ran to the woman's aid. It was found that her skull had been fractured and that death was instantaneous.

When Miss Sloan entered the hospital she gave her age as 26 years, and her residence as 1123 Oak street.

The coroner was notified of the suicide by Dr. J. Park Neal and asked to make an investigation.

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April 4, 1909

LITERARY MAN A SUICIDE.

Body of William Ward Mitchell,
Author, Editor and Poet, Taken
From the River.

Decomposed almost beyond recognition, the body of William Ward Mitchell, author, poet and editor, was found in the Blue river at Blue Mills yesterday afternoon. Mr. Mitchell had frequently talked suicide to his physician, Dr. Ralph W. Holbrook, 415 Argyle building, under whose care he had been for several weeks during the past year, and it is believed he accomplished his own death.

Seven years ago, or thereabouts, Mr. Mitchell was the editor of the Higginsville, Mo., Jeffersonian. During that time Mr. Mitchell wrote several books which attracted more or less attention. Perhaps the most popular of them all was "Jael," a historical novel of local setting.

Two years later the editor became a nervous wreck from overwork and deep study. Last fall he came to Kansas City and consulted Dr. Holbrook, an old friend. Dr. Holbrook advised him to take treatment and he was sent to a local hospital. Natural pride of family and other peculiarities, caused Mr. Mitchell to use the name of M. W. Ward while in Kansas City last fall.

In November he was discharged from the hospital and went to board with A. J. Leonard, 1006 Forest avenue. From time to time he was heard to talk of self-destruction, particularly to his friend and doctor. His act of suicide, which was committed about three months ago, being the time that all trace of him was lost, seems to be the outcome of brooding over imagined or real ills.

"Mitchell was always a dreamer," said Dr. Holbrook last night, "and his act can readily be accounted for. He considered himself down and out because of his health. Yet in the very midst of it all he would write the prettiest and most optimistic poetry that you ever read. For five years he has not been to his home in Higginsville.

His mother is aged an palsied, and has frequently sent word for him to come home.

"Mitchell has relatives by the name of Ward who live in Kansas City, on the Paseo, I think."

Mitchell's body was taken to Independence, and there a corner of an envelope bearing Dr. Holbrook's address was found in his clothes.

Dr. Holbrook was notified immediately and last night he made the trip to Independence by motor car to identify the body. The identification was complete. The clothes which Mr. Mitchell had worn when he committed suicide were the same which he had when he left Kansas City last December. On that occasion he told his landlady that he was going for his mail and then disappeared.

Mr. Mitchell was 38 years old.

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March 15, 1909

ENDS DEBAUCH BY SUICIDE.

Man Believed to Be A. W. Butter-
field Strangled Himself to
Death in the Holdover.

While temporarily insane from the excessive use of alcohol, a man, believe to be A. W. Butterfield, committed suicide in the holdover at police headquarters yesterday afternoon by hanging himself with a handkerchief. He was dead when discovered by Philip Welch, the jailor, at 2:30 o'clock, and Dr. W. L. Gist of the emergency hospital said he had been dead about a half hour.

Patrolman L. A. Tillman arrested a man at Third street and Grand avenue at 9 o'clock yesterday morning and at the station had him locked up for safe keeping. The prisoner was drunk and resisted the jailor and Patrolman Bryan Underwood, who searched him at the desk. He was last seen alive by Jailor Welch, who entered the cell at noon to give him his lunch.

The suicide tied a handkerchief around his neck and to the bars of his cell door. With his face turned from the door, Butterfield then allowed the weight of his body to rest upon the handkerchief and slowly strangled to death.

A small gold watch, $1.70 in silver and a pair of gold eye glasses were taken from him. A small button worn by the suicide tended to show that he was a member of the United Brotherhood of Leather Workers of Horse Goods. He was about 40 years old. Coroner B. H. Zwart ordered the body taken to Stewart's undertaking rooms.

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January 27, 1909

TRIES SLEEP FROM A BOTTLE.

Waitress, After Quarreling With Hus-
band Cook, Attempts Suicide.

Because she had quarreled with her husband and feared that he meant to leave her, Dollie Duchaine, 26 years old, 1321 Cherry street, attempted suicide last night by inhaling the fumes from a handkerchief saturated with chloroform. Dr. J. W. Hayward of No. 4 police station attended to the woman.

Duchaine is a cook at Roarke's restaurant. H is wife is a waitress at the same place. James Love, 1000 Independence avenue, who had seen the woman early in the evening, said she told him her husband had become angry over some orders she had given him.

"Words followed," Love said, "and it seems that Duchaine told his wife he was going to leave her. She was down-hearted and depressed when I left her."

A note written by the woman before she took the chloroform was found by Officer Fraser. It was as follows:

"Well, Johnnie if you do what you said you would tomorrow, I don't care what happens to me, so I will take a little sleep from the bottle under my pillow. Your as ever, 'D.' "

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January 8, 1909

DEATH PACT IN
DOUBLE KILLING?

BODIES OF MAN AND WOMAN
FOUND IN ROOM.

POISON PROBABLY WAS USED.

NO SIGNS OF VIOLENCE, BUT
MARKED FACIAL CONTORTION.

Little Light on Mysterious Deaths of
J. W. Brault and Mrs. Julia
Kenner in Their Troost
Avenue Apartment.

With no external evidence as to how or why they came to their end, J. W. Brault and Mrs. Julia Kenner were found dead in a room at 1517 Troost avenue at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Whether it was a suicide pact between the man and Mrs. Kenner, who may be his wife, or a murder and a suicide, the police are unable to say. The woman was a baking powder demonstrator and about 38 years old. The man at one time was an agent for crayon pictures. He looked to be 45 years old. The couple evidently died yesterday morning.

They had been doing light housekeeping and when Mrs. Mary Kimmons, who conducts the apartment house where the two roomed, failed to detect the usual odor of cooking food at noon yesterday she sent W. F. Gray, who, with his wife, lives in the apartment house, to investigate. Gray found the door locked. He climbed up and looked over the transom. He saw the two bodies lying on the bed. That of the man was on its back; that of the woman was lying across him, the hands clasped as if in agony, the face contorted.

MAN DIED FIRST.

The police and coroner were united. Two detectives and Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky broke in the door. From the position of the bodies, the detectives were led to believe that the man died first. There were no marks of violence on either body. Poison probably caused the death of both, but only a postmortem examination, which will be made this morning, will establish the fact.

When Mr. Gray looked over the transom, he said he smelled chloroform, but no trace of the drug was found. There was a small vial of laudanum on the dresser, but Dr. Czarlinsky said that there was no evidence of laudanum poisoning.

Mrs. Gray, wife of the man who made the discovery, said that about 3 o'clock yesterday morning she heard Mrs. Kenner rush across the floor screaming "Help," and "Lord have mercy!" She paid little attention to the cries then, as she and Mr. Gray had often heard the couple quarreling. However, she told Mrs. Kimmons of it just before noon.

The dead man and woman came to the apartment house a week ago and registered as man and wife.

SAID THEY WERE MARRIED.

Many letters addressed to Mrs. Julia Kenner were found, but there was only one that might have belonged to Brault. This one was to the Egg Baking Powder Company of New York and applied for a position as agent. It set forth that Brault had married Mrs. Kenner, alluded to as "one of the company's best demonstrators." It was evidently a copy of a letter Brault had sent to the company.

In the meagerly furnished room was a bed, a center table on which was a pan of biscuits,, a dressing table crowded with bottles of various descriptions, and a trunk, the property of Mrs. Kenner. On top of some articles of woman's wear in the trunk was a telegram addressed to "Mrs. Kenner, 132 West Court street, Cincinnati, O." It read:

"Letter mailed today. Am well. Lots of love. -- Your Harry."

The searchers could find no other indication that a man whose first name was Harry had ever written the woman. Another letter from the Egg Baking Powder Company of New York was addressed to the woman at 1512 Biddle street, St. Louis.

NO LACK OF MONEY.

The theory the police first entertained was that lack of money had brought on despondency which had occasioned the double tragedy. This was given up when a certificate of deposit for $50 on the Exchange Bank of Kansas City was discovered in the trunk.

Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, the assistant coroner, said last night he was entirely at sea as to the method used in bringing death to the couple. He was sure neither gas nor chloroform was used.

"My opinion is that the woman killed the man and the in her desperation put an end to herself," said he. "From the appearance of the room and of the bodies I do not consider it possible that some one could have entered the room and murdered the couple."

That was also the opinion of Lieutenant W. J. Carroll of No. 6 police station, to whom the tragedy was first reported.

The bodies were ordered taken to the Leo J. Stewart undertaking establishment.

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