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January 22, 1910

GETS WHAT HE ASKED
FOR WIFE'S AFFECTIONS.

Jury in Five Minutes Gives A. L.
Sherman $50,000 Verdict
Against J. C. Silverstone.

After less than five minutes' deliberation yesterday morning a jury in Judge Thomas J. Seehorn's division of the circuit court gave A. L. Sherman, a Kansas City lawyer, a verdict of $50,000 as a balm for a wound his feelings sustained when his wife lost her love for him in favor of another man three years ago. The suit, for $25,000 exemplary and $25,000 actual damages, was instituted by Attorneys L. C. Boyle and C. M. Howell.

The defendant was J. C. Silverstone, who for several years owned a drug store at Ninth and Wyandotte streets, but is now in Seattle, Was. Silverstone was not present at the opening of the case yesterday, but his lawyers were, and there was some interesting testimony. Mrs. Sherman obtained a divorce a year ago and is not in the city.

According to the testimony of Sherman he and Mrs. Sherman were married in September, 1898. Their life was happy until about January, 1907, when, he testified, Silverstone rose over the domestic horizon and began to shed compliments and other attentions on Mrs. Sherman.

One time Sherman said he asked his wife how it was she could buy millinery and fine dresses without approaching him for a loan. He had noticed for several months past that she was making purchases with out either consulting him or having the bills charged. She told conflicting stories of how she could perform the miracle, Sherman testified. He was not convinced and went to Silverstone's store to see him about it.

Sherman said he seized Silverstone by the throat and forced him back on a barrel in the rear of the drug store. Under threats of killing him, he said he obtained a partial confession and made the druggist beg for his life.

"After that my wife and I had frequent quarrels, and finally she left me, taking our child. The last I heard of her she was in Seattle."

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January 17, 1910

BOTH DIE OF PNEUMONIA.

George Fox's Death Occurs Just
Week After Wife's Demise.

One week from the day his wife died of the same disease, George A. Fox, a foreman for the Faultless Starch Company, died yesterday morning at his home, 1417 Belleview avenue, of pneumonia. He was 59 years old.

A week ago Sunday Mrs. Eugenia Fox died after a short illness and her husband displayed symptoms of the same disease at the time. She was buried, and at once Mr. Fox's illness became serious. Six children survive. They are George A. Rhode, Hill, Henry H. and Eugenia Fox, and Mrs. J. W. Lane.

Mr. Fox lived in Kansas City twenty-five years in the employ of the Faultless Starch Company. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

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January 13, 1910

WEE BABE PROVES MAGNET.

Tot Reunites Parents, Who Thought
They Couldn't Agree.

"It was 'Jimmy' who reunited us," said Mrs. Mary A. Judkins, of 2131 Madison street, who with her divorced husband went to the recorder's office yesterday to procure a marriage license.

It was about a year ago that the couple, newly married, decided they could not live together happily. Shortly before this a boy had been born to Mrs. Judkins. She named him "Jimmy." When the divorce was granted, Mrs. Judkins was given the custody of the babe. The father, however, was permitted to visit his child once a week. These weekly visits resulted in a reconciliation between Mr. and Mrs. Judkins and yesterday they decided to be remarried.

"We're going to try it over again," said Mrs. Judkins, and the husband smiled his approval.

No happier couple, if appearance counted, was ever granted a license to marry by the county recorder, declare the deputies in the marriage license department. Mr. and Mrs. Judkins hurried out of the court house to find a minister.

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January 8, 1910

MAKING WIFE OBEY
IS "BUTTING IN."

Parole Board Rules She Is
"Lord and Master" in
Kitchen Affairs.

In an effort to make his wife obey, as she had promised to do when he married her nine months ago, J. M. Hall, stock clerk for the Great Western Manufacturing Company, 1221 Union avenue, landed him self into the workhouse on a $300 fine three days after Christmas -- during the most joyous week of last year. The "you must obey your master" stunt took place at the Hall home at St. Clair station, near Mount Washington.

A. B. Coulton, manager of the Great Western Manufacturing Company, appeared before the board of pardons and paroles at the workhouse yesterday and asked for Hall's parole. William Volker, president of the board, then looked over the testimony which was given in the municipal court when Hall was convicted and given the highest fine in the power of the court. It ran something like this:

WOULD NOT OBEY.

Charged with disturbing the peace. Wife appeared to prosecute him. She said that ever since their marriage last March he has been dictatorial and domineering and insisted that she obey him as she promised. The day of his arrest he went into the kitchen and, seeing the stove door open, told her to close it. She did not want the door closed and told him so. Then he demanded that she stoop and close the door and she flatly refused.

"Then I'll teach you to obey as you promised," he said. With that Mrs. Hall testified, he grabbed her by the wrist and forced her to her knees demanding that she obey him. Still she refused. Then she was thrown back so as to strike a couch with her back. She did not shut the stove door. Couple have been married since March, 1909. She said she started to leave him several times, but was induced to return.

STICKS TO HIS RIGHTS.

Hall still thought he "had a right" in his own house to make his wife obey. He was obdurate until he found out that his parole hinged upon his apparent change of heart. Then he asked the board for terms. As Mrs. Hall soon will have to go to a s hospital the board provided that Hall pay over to L. H. Halbert, secretary to the board, $7.50 every Saturday night. That will be given to Mrs. Hall.

"Besides paying the $7.50 weekly," said Mr. Volker, "you absolutely must keep away from your wife. You also must report to the secretary once each week."

Hall, still defiant on the question of "obey," agreed meekly to the terms of parole. His employer, Mr. Coulton, said that a separate check would be made out to Secretary Halbert each week and Hall would be sent to deliver it. Hall will be released today.

"Before we parole anyone," explained President Volker to Hall, "we generally find out if he has any regrets for his actions; if he is sorry for doing the thing that caused his arrest. Are you?"

"I think I did as any husband should," said Hall calmly. "She refused to obey and I tried to make her. That's all."

"I see you have no regrets," said Mr. Volker, much in earnest. "I want you to know that I do not think there is provocation great enough for any man to strike a woman."

DEMANDED APOLOGY.

"But I did not strike her," insisted Hall. "I just tried to make her apologize and obey as any good wife should. What are you going to do when a woman absolutely refuses to obey?"

"If she refused to shut the stove door and I wanted it shut," said the board president, who is a single man, "I think I would quietly shut it. But if she wanted it left open I would leave it open. A woman knows more about a kitchen in a minute than a man does in a year. That is her domain; she reigns there as an absolute monarchy and a man has got no business going into the kitchen and telling the wife what to do. It's bound to cause trouble. Let her run the whole house. That's her place. You may run the rest of the earth if you choose, but think how puny, how little, how mean it is to force your wife to her knees by twisting her wrist simply because she would not 'obey her lord and master' and shut the stove door in a place where she, and she alone, has full command. I am not a believer in slang but I am forced to say that what you did might well be called 'butting in.' "

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December 31, 1909

PUGILISM OR NAIL EATING?

Pardon Board Doubtful Which Tends
More to Good Citizenship.

Terence O'Grady, the human ostrich, is free from the workhouse by action of the pardon and parole board yesterday afternoon. He was arrested several weeks ago at the insistence of his wife, who said that his dual role of prize fighter and crockery eater unfitted him for the more domestic one of providing for her and their children. He was fined $500.

Investigation by the board disclosed that O'Grady, if not always a hard working man, possessed a heart as good as his punch and as elastic as his stomach. He said and proved by receipts that he is supporting his widowed mother in Ireland whom he has not seen for more than twenty years. The last money sent to her by Terence was mailed from Kansas City November 4 in the shape of a check for $100. It was one of many such remittances.

"I'll either go back to the prize ring or the kerosene circuit as the human ostrich," said O'Grady to a member of the board who asked him what he would do if paroled. He then added, "It's immaterial to me which I follow. I leave the matter with the board entirely."

Mrs. Kate Pearson stated during the session yesterday that she was afraid O'Grady might swallow a shovel if he were put on the street force. William Volker and Jacob Billikopf could not even guess which of the two occupations named were the best from the standpoint of good citizenship, so the original proposition was remanded back to O'Grady for a decision.

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December 22, 1909

WENT WITHOUT HIS MEALS.

That's a Traffic Policeman's Allega-
tion in Suit for Divorce.

William F. Heckenberg, a traffic policeman, has filed suit for divorce against Grace E. Heckenberg, alleging violent fits of temper and occasional absence from home when the officer went without meals.

The Heckenbergs have been married twenty years and have three children, a boy of 19, a girl of 8 and a boy of 5 years. The officer asks for the custody of the younger ones. He alleges that the older boy is kept at home assisting with the housework while his wife insists on working down town, against his will, thereby keeping her away from home much of the time. The case is set for the January term of the court.

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December 15, 1909

ONE WIFE AT HOME,
ANOTHER AT HOTEL?

WED NO. 1 27 YEARS AGO; NO. 2
DEC. 7, 1909, THE CHARGE.

Prosecutor and Police Say Benjamin
Franklin Hughes, Held for In-
vestigation, Admits It --
Wife No. 2's Story.
Benjamin F. Hughes, Alleged Bigamist.
BENJAMIN F. HUGHES.
(From a sketch at police headquarters last night.)

That he married one woman, with whom he makes his home, twenty-seven years ago, and another, who, until Sunday lived as his wife at the Hotel Kupper, on December 7, 1909, is said by Captain Walter Whitsett of the police department and Norman Woodson, an assistant prosecuting attorney, to have been admitted by Benjamin Franklin Hughes, 124 North Hardesty avenue, in a statement secured from him in the matron's room at police headquarters last night.

Hughes was arrested yesterday on complaint of Valerie W. Wiler, who lives with her mother, Mrs. Cora Westover, and her sister, Clarice Wiler, at 1622 Madison street. To Lieutenant Robert Smith at police headquarters Miss Wiler represented that she had been married to Hughes, who has a wife and family at the Hardesty avenue address, by Probate Judge Van B. Prather in Kansas City, Kas. The ceremony, she said, was performed Tuesday, December 7.

Miss Wiler was under the impression that Hughes had left the city when she notified the police. It was later determined that he was home with Mrs. Hughes. Officer Oliver A. Linsay made the arrest. The man was held in the matron's room last night and will remain there until an investigation is made of the charges against him at 9 o'clock this morning.

HAS THREE CHILDREN.

Benjamin Hughes is 52 years old, and has lived in Kansas City two years, coming here, Mrs. Hughes said last night, from Glasgow, Mo. He is said to come of an excellent family and has dabbled in politics.

The details of Hughes's statement were not given out last night. It was announced by the prosecutor and Captain Whitsett, however, that he broke down and admitted marrying the Wiler woman in Kansas City, Kas., Tuesday a week ago, giving as his reason that pressure had been brought to bear upon him to unite with the girl.

According to the statement he was married to Mrs. Hughes in Osborn, Mo., April 16, 1882. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. James E. Hughes, pastor of the Baptist church there. Three children, two boys and a girl, were born to them. The oldest son, aged 20, is a clerk in the First National bank. The other son is 16 years old, the girl 11. Few clouds, he declared, darkened his married life until he met the Wiler woman last April. Mrs. Hughes had been congenial, a good, Christian woman whom all respected.

STORY OF NO. 2.

Valerie Wiler last night said she had first met Hughes when she was in the inmate of a home ofr girls at Chillicothe, Mo., under the care of Mrs. E. Carter. She believed the man was a state officer inspecting such public institutions. he seemed to like her at first sight, and came to see her often. Finally he induced her to become his wife.

Leaving Chillicothe, she stated, they went directly to Kansas City, Kas., where she gave her age as 17 years, while Hughes gave his as 45. She produced a certificate on which both names were signed together with that of Judge Van Prather who officiated at the wedding.

After the marriage, she said, the went to the Hotel Kupper where her supposed husband registered ans Frank Hughes and wife. They stayed at the Kupper several days.

"I discovered my mistake last Sunday morning when I was visiting my mother," said Miss Wiler. "She was aware of the attentions paid me by Mr. Hughes and told me that he had a wife and family on Hardesty avenue. I decided to find out if he had deceived me at once.

"Mother, my sister Clarice and I went to the Hughes home about 6 o'clock Sunday evening. We were allowed to enter unannounced, and found the man whom I had supposed to be my husband there surrounded by his family. He was very much frightened, got up quickly, and asked if he could see me alone for a few minutes. I would not listen. It did not take me very long to tell him that what I had to say was to be to his wife as well as to him.

BEGS NO. 1's FORGIVENESS.

"I said to Mrs. Hughes: 'Madame, I have married this man and have the certificate to prove it. We were married last Tuesday.' Then I threw myself at her feet and begged her forgiveness, telling her it was not my fault, that i knew nothing of any former marriage when I allowed him to lead me into matrimony. She forgave me then and told her husband that he was worse than I was. Later she seemed to take it all back, and when I went again to the ho use with my mother and sister tonight she treated me coldly. She even ordered me out of the house. I guess she is a perfect Christian woman. Anyway I loved her at first sight, and feel deeply sorry for her.

When Hughes was courting me he offered me many inducements to become his wife. He said he had been a member of the legislature and owned property in town and a farm near Cameron, Mo., worth in all about$75,000. He admitted that he had been married once, but added that his wife died eight years ago. 'I never loved her as I love you and we will be a very happy couple if you will have me,' he said once.

MRS. HUGHES DISCONSOLATE.

"Sunday night when we confronted him before his wife in his own home, he asked to speak with me aside. I refused, and he seemed very much annoyed. Finally he managed to get close enough to my ear to whisper, 'If you will make up with me, honey, we will get out of this town and go to Mexico.' I do not remember replying. The way he treated his wife did not suit me, although he was kindness itself to me from the first."

At the Hughes home last night Mrs. Hughes would not be interviewed about her husband. She was nearly distracted over his arrest, she said. Occasionally as she spoke she hesitated, wrung her ands and repeated passages from the Bible.

"This woman he married is a very wicked woman," she cried out once. "She drew my husband way to her through her evil ways. Lord have mercy on them both and me. My poor children."

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December 6, 1909

MURDER AND SUICIDE
IN HOME OF POVERTY.

BOY 2 YEARS OLD AND DOG
KEEP VIGIL OVER BODIES.

Kansas City, Kas., Baker Kills Wife
and Himself as a Result, It's
Thought, of Jealousy Caused
by Use of Morphine.
Mrs. Myra Campbell, Victim of a Drug Crazed Murder.
MRS. MYRA CAMPBELL.

Neighbors entering the home of Joseph Campbell, 2952 North Seventeenth street, Kansas City, Kas., at 9 o'clock yesterday morning found the dead bodies of Mr. Campbell and his wife on the floor of the stuffy little room which served the double purpose of sleeping and living room. Clasped in the right hand of the man was a revolver. He evidently had murdered his wife, then committed suicide. Crouching down against the bed in one corner or the room, benumbed with cold and fear, was the little white robed figure of a boy, 2 years old, whose crying through the night and early morning attracted the attention of the neighbors and led to the investigation which resulted in the finding of the bodies.

GUN IN MAN'S HAND.

Charles Phillips, 18 years old, who lives next door to the Campbells, and C. R. Lumsdon, another neighbor, were the first persons to make the discovery. The sobs of the baby induced the two men to knock at the door. Receiving no response after repeated knocking they broke the lock and opened the door enough to obtain a view of the interior of the room. The body of the woman was almost against the door. She had remained in a kneeling posture, the head to one side. A bullet had entered below the left breast, passing entirely through the body and lodged under the skin on the right side. The man lay in almost the same position against the south walls of the room and behind the woman. His arms were folded across his breast and the revolver was held tightly against his body. The bullet had passed through the heart. Campbell was a baker. He was 32 years old.
WIFE SOUTH MISSOURI WOMAN.

He was married about three years ago in southern Missouri, where he became acquainted with the girl, Miss Myra Matthews, who became his wife. She was 20 years old. Although worn and haggard she bore the traces of having been beautiful. Insane jealousy on the part of the husband is the reason attributed for the murder. The bodies were viewed by the coroner and taken to the undertaking rooms of Fairweather & Barker.
Joseph Campbell, Who Killed His Wife and Then Himself.
JOSEPH CAMPBELL.

The killing of the innocent wife and the subsequent suicide of the murderer was but the logical climax of the events which mark the life of Joseph Campbell. Although for weeks Campbell has spoken of domestic troubles, even going so far as to consult Chief of Police W. W. Cook, and on numerous occasions threatening to buy a revolver and "end it all," it is believed by those who knew him best that these troubles and the consequences had their inception in a drug filled brain.

KNOWN AS "MORPHINE JOE."

That the murderer had been addicted to the use of morphine for many years is known, in fact so common was this knowledge that for at least fifteen years he has been known to hundreds of persons in Kansas City, Kas., as "Morphine Joe." A bottle half filled with the drug was found on a chair near the bed.

The police are at a loss to determine at what time the tragedy occurred. The family of William T. Kier, 2950 North Seventeenth street, say that the Campbells were heard pumping water from the cistern as late as 9:30 o'clock last night, but they heard no shots. The family of William Brocket, whose rooms are over those of the Campbells, did not return until about 11 o'clock at night, and no shots were heard by them. Daniel Galvin, a carpenter, living a few doors north, said that he heard a shot around 10:30 o'clock but thought nothing of it.

CHILD AND DOG WITH DEAD.

A scene of utter desolation was witnessed by the men first entering the room. On every side was the evidence of extreme poverty. The ragged covers of the bed, which had not been slept on, were folded neatly back. A few little, cheap pictures adorned the unplastered walls. Despite the cheapness and the poverty there was the touch of a woman's hand, which transformed the scantily furnished room into a home.

The little boy, Earl, crying by the bed where he had stood in the cold during the entire night, and a large dog which stood guard over the dead body of his mistress, were the only living beings in the place of death. The child was hurried to the home of Mrs. C. R. Lumsdon and placed in ht blankets, but the dog growled savagely at the intruders and would not submit to being moved until petted by a neighbor whom he knew.

THE CAMPBELL HOME, KANSAS CITY, KAS.

The news of the murder and suicide spread rapidly over the neighborhood and hundreds of persons gathered about the house. The police were notified and after the bodies had been taken away a guard was set about the house to prevent persons from entering.

The orphan boy will be cared for by his father's mother, Mrs. James B. Grame of 2984 Hutchings street, Kansas City, Kas.

"The news of this awful deed came as a shock to all of us," said Mr. Grame last night. "The fear that something like this would happen has been in our minds for years." The awful condition of Campbell, crazed by drugs, has added twenty years to the age of his mother, who has clung to him through all his troubles.

"It is a matter I cannot discuss, but harsh as it may sound, it is better for the world and better for himself that his life is ended. The thing that hurts me the most is the thought of that poor innocent girl a sacrifice to his drug crazed brain."

Persons living in the neighborhood say that Campbell has made numerous threats against his wife. Mrs. M. J. Cleveland, 2984 Hutchings street, said yesterday that Campbell came to her home Saturday morning and told her that he was going to get a gun and kill the whole outfit, meaning his wife. Practically every person living near them were afraid of the man and it was said that he constantly carried with him a gun and a butcher knife. He had recently secured work at the Armour packing plant.

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November 26, 1909

ILLNESS REUNITES COUPLE.

Married Twenty-Seven Years, Di-
vorced Three, Will Again Wed.

A marriage license issued yesterday in Kansas City, Kas., to Henderson James and Ella James is of more than passing interest to ones familiar with the story of their lives. It is a story of twenty-seven years of married life, then an interval of three years as divorcees, an application for a marriage license and the prospective reunion of two persons who began life as husband and wife on Thanksgiving day just thirty years ago in Lawrence, county, Ind.

The illness yesterday of Mrs. James, who is at the home of her son, Guy Henderson James, 305 Shawnee avenue, Kansas City, Kas., prevented the marriage of the couple, but it will be performed just as soon as she is convalescent. Four grown children will be made happy by the reconciliation of their parents.

"We decided it was all a mistake and determined to forget all about it," said Mr. James yesterday.

Mrs. James has been living at 53 Lombard street until recently, when she moved to her present address. She became sick a few days ago and her former husband, who is employed at the stock yards, came to take care of her. After talking the matter over they decided that they could not get along without each other. Mr. James is 51 years old and his prospective bride is 48.

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November 20, 1909

MARRIED HALF A CENTURY.

Golden Wedding Jubilee for Mr.
and Mrs. James H. Prather.

As fortunate a fifty years of married life as has ever been celebrated is that of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Prather of Clay county, who will observe the anniversary Monday afternoon and night, first at their home, three miles north of Harlem, and then at the home of their eldest daughter, Mrs. W. J. Campbell at 2618 Olive street.

During the half century since this pair became man and wife they became parents of six children, grandparents of fourteen children and great-grandparents of two children, and there has not been a divorce, a death or any great trouble in the family.

James Prather, who is now 70 years old, is living in a stately farm house on the site of a log cabin in which he was born. His father, Barrett Prather, acquired the 120 acres comprising the farm, in 1832, when it was valued at $1.25 an acre. Clay county real estate has gone booming since that date and $700 an acre is an average value now.

Mrs. Prather, who was Miss Margaret Emma Bradhurst, comes of a prominent Clay county family and was born but a few miles away from the Prather acres. She is 69 years old. Mr. and Mrs. Prather are possessed of sound bodily health and minds. Neither has experienced much sickness since their marriage. The names of the children are: Edward V. Prather, John B. Prather, Mrs. W. J. Campbell, Mrs. Oscar Westheffer, Mrs. George Barnes and Mrs. Rev. W. J. Parvin. All the children are married and every one of the descendants live within 100 miles of the farm and will be at the anniversary.

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September 23, 1909

SLEPT IN WATER AND
LIVED ON GOAT MEAT.

KANSAS CITYANS MAROONED
NINE DAYS IN MEXICO.

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Miller and
Frank W. Hager Tell of Ad-
ventures in Great Monterrey
Flood and Hurricane.

Huddled with a score of Mexican refugees in a shack fourteen by sixteen feet for over thirty-one hours, while the wind blew with an average velocity of 100 miles an hour and the rain fell i n torrents, and standing during this time knee deep in water was the thrilling experience of Mrs. Robert Miller, a Kansas City bride of a few days on her honeymoon trip in the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico, during the recent hurricane and unprecedented floods there.

Mrs. Miller, who was Miss Anna Belle Schell, her husband, Robert Miller, and Frank W. Hager of Kansas City, who are interested in a big land grant, and John B. Demaras and Demosthenes Lapith of Kansas City, Kas., were the only white persons in that territory for several weeks. During nine days of that time the party, cut off by the floods from roads and communication with the outside world, killed goats and subsisted on goat flesh.

All reached Kansas City early yesterday morning, none the worse for their experience, and Mrs. Miller declares that she is ready to go again.

The party experienced delightful weather until they got well into Mexico. Then it began to rain. They began having trouble at Victoria in getting to Soto La Marina valley, their objective point, which is about eighteen miles from the Gulf of Mexico. they arrived at the village of Soto La Marina on August 27 after riding for some ten miles through water breast deep on the horses. The path was picked up by a native who several times had to swim with his horse.

RACE WITH FLOOD.

On their arrival at Soto La Marina it became apparent that the town would be flooded by the rapidly rising river. It was raining heavily and the only refuge was on the hills west of the town. It would have been impossible to have returned to Victoria, so Mr. Miller and his party joined the native refugees. A quantity of food was hastily gathered and as the water began to fill the streets the inhabitants abandoned the town. The trip to the hills, about fourteen miles, was accomplished with difficulty. Frequently the horses would splash into holes and all of the riders were soaked to the skin.

"When we arrived at the shack near the junction of the Palma and the Sota La Marina river, which is the location of a proposed townsite, the rain was coming down in torrents, and the word torrent means just what the dictionary says it does down there," said Mr. Hager, one of the members of the party. "There were several adobe huts and to these the Mexican refugees hastened for shelter. Some joined us in the shack, which was built of up-ended logs with the chinks plastered with mud and a thatched roof, tied down with the native cord, formed of pieces of stringy bark.

"The way the house was tied together is about the only thing that saved us from the merciless wind and rain that night. It began to blow up about 11 p. m.

WIND GAUGES BROKEN.

"Wind gauges at government stations broke after recording velocities of 124 miles an hour, and I believe that the wind traveled just a little faster where we were.

"There were a score of us in the shack. The water swept through from the hillside until we stood almost knee deep. We had no light nor fire. We had some tortillas which kept us alive. About 7 a. m. the wind died down and for half an hour there was a perfect calm.

"Suddenly with a shriek the wind turned from north to south and blew as strong or stronger from that direction. Of course there was no such thing as sleep. The natives prayed constantly and the women bemoaned their fate. We knew of course that we were in no immediate danger, but we were in constant fear of our little shelter being blown from off our heads. All that day and the next night the storm continued. About 6 a. m. the sun came out the greater part of our stay there.

DINED ON GOAT STEAK.

"When the storm abated we began to look for food. Someone espied some goats on a hillside. We gave chase and an hour later had a nice goat roasting on a spit. That meal was the best I had eaten for some time.

"We were on a slight knoll, and after the meal we started to look around. We were practically surrounded by water, except for one outlet around an almost impassible mountainside dense with tropical verdure. We could do nothing but wait for these waters to subside. We slept on the ground. Saddles were our pillows. For nine days we lived the lives of savages, subsisting almost entirely on goat meat. I thought at one time I liked goat meat, but I got enough to do me the rest of my life.

SLEPT IN THE WATER.
"We finally made the start South. Natives went ahead and with knives and axes cut a path along the mountainside. A forty-mile ride under those circumstances was not the most enjoyable pastime in the world. When we arrived at Paddua there was but one hotel there, and it had one room which had been left with a roof.

"This room, of course, went to the bride and the bridegroom. The rest of us made ourselves comfortable on cots with the blue sky overhead.

"About midnight I was awakened by the patter of rain drops on my face. I was sleepy and pulled the blanket over my head and slept until I found myself resting in several inches of water. The rain ceased an hour or so later and after dumping the water out of the cots we all went back to sleep. It was much easier from there on home, as we found good accommodations at Tampico.

THRIVED AND GREW FAT.

"One of the most remarkable things to us is the fact that although the five of us were wet to the skin for two weeks and slept out on the ground during the greater part of that time, not one of us felt any ill effects. We were chilly at times, it is true, but that wore off and not one of us caught the slightest cold or felt any inconvenience. I gained four pounds. Mr. Demaras gained eight pounds and the others in the party all put on some flesh.

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September 16, 1909

WIFE SAVES HER HUSBAND.

Mrs. Joe Percival Comes to His Aid
With Ax Handle and Routs Bullies.

Owing to the pluckiness and nerve of his wife last night Joe Percival, 7 Park place, is alive today, although beaten and battered by a gang of ruffians and bullies. He needed treatment at the emergency hospital because of the cuts received at the hands of the gang before his wife came to his aid.

Percival is the night man at the Gross & McNeal livery stable, 701 Brooklyn avenue. For some weeks he has had trouble with a gang of men and on several occasions has been compelled to run them away from the stable at night. threats were made to get him. Last night his wife, who is young and pretty, went to the stable to spend the night.

About 1 o'clock this morning Percival went into the stable to put up a horse and was attacked by five or six men who had concealed themselves in the dark stalls. He was down on the floor being pummelled by the bullies when Mrs. Percival came to the rescue. A pickax handle proved to be the weapon which she wielded with effectiveness. The men scattered when she commenced to rain blows upon their heads.

When she attempted to telephone for the police the gang tried to stop her by making threats of getting her, but she waved the pick handle aloft and dared them to start something. When the police arrived from headquarters only Percival and his brave wife were on deck. They were transferred to the emergency hospital where Percival had his injuries attended by Dr. D. C. Twyman. The thugs escaped arrest.

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September 14, 1909

CURTAIN RUNG DOWN
ON MEXICAN ROMANCE.

MISSING HUSBAND APPEARS;
SENORA HOBBS IS HAPPY.

American Street Preacher, Who
Wedded Heiress, Was Driven
From City, But Returns to
Claim Wife and Child.

A wife's faith in her husband was vindicated yesterday when John Hobbs, a Seventh Day Baptist street preacher and incidentally a watchmaker, came to Kansas City from Dorchester, Neb., to claim his wife and child, whom he supposed to be in La Crosse, Kas., but who have been at the Helping Hand institute since August 29. Mrs. Hobbs, a pretty Mexican woman, came here in search of her husband practically in a destitute condition. Her 6-months-old babe was ill and the grief-crazed wife refused to eat or sleep during the first few days, believing her missing husband either was ill or dead.

The husband believed his wife and child were in La Crosse, where he left them, when he came to Kansas City in search of work. He traced them from the Kansas town here. Mrs. Hobbs is one of eight heirs to an estate in Mexico, said to be worth $1,000,000. During her search she refused to communicate with her relatives, or ask for financial aid.

WAS A MEXICAN ROMANCE.

"Didn't I tell you that he would find me," excitedly exclaimed the little Spanish senora over and over again to Mrs. Lila Scott, the matron, and Mrs. E. T. Brigham the assistant superintendent at the Helping Hand, when her husband with a package of letters and telegrams he had sent her, appeared at the institute.

About a year and a half ago pretty Amelia Lastra of Magdalena, Sonora, Mexico, met and fell in love with John Hobbs, an American missionary of the Seventh Day Baptist church in Mexico. Their religions differed and her family objected to the marriage but that counted for little. After the ceremony the young couple moved to another part of Mexico. While there Mrs. Hobbs learned that her father, Felippe Lastra, who owned two silver mines, was dead. Under the Mexican law the estate can not be divided until all of the heirs have given consent. Mrs. Hobbs is one of eight heirs.

Hobbs and his bride finally went to La Crosse, Kas., where the husband worked for a few weeks and then came to Kansas City where he expected to make a home for his wife and child. From that time until yesterday all trace of him was lost.

FORGOT FORWARDING ADDRESS.

When Hobbs found his wife he carried a bundle of letters. They had been sent to La Crosse, Kas., where he had gone to find out why his wife did not reply to his letters or to the telegrams he had sent her. He said he had been preaching on the streets in Kansas City and was one of the street preachers arrested the latter part of August. He said he was given hours to leave the city and as he had no money had to walk. He made his way to Dorchester, Neb., where he got work and then sent for his wife.

It developed after he had explained his absence that Mrs. Hobbs had failed to notify the postoffice in La Cross her forwarding address. The couple left for Nebraska last night.

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August 23, 1909

"COPPER" MADE GOOD NURSE.

Patrick Coon Took Care of Sick
Mother and Babe.

In the manual of questions asked probationary police officers by Thomas R. Marks, police commissioner, there is none which relates to the art of nursing babies. But if there are credentials needed on that score, women in the block on Wyandotte street, between Twelfth and Thirteenth streets, wouldn't mind indorsing Patrick Coon, one of the oldest policemen on the force. In fact, they'd be glad to do so.

To the rowdies and thugs along Twelfth street, which forms part of his beat, Coon is called a "double knuckled copper." The phrase carries with it majesty of person as well as majesty of law. Coon's heart is as big as his body. That's what the women say. And this is why:

Three weeks ago a baby was born to Mrs. Elizabeth Rockey of 1222 Wyandotte street. Mrs. Rockey was sick and alone. Her husband had left her, it is said. The women in the neighborhood told Coon of the circumstances.

The patrolman investigated the case. He found that Mrs. Rockey was worthy of help. So he took up a collection on his beat and with the money bought delicacies such as a mother might relish and saw that the baby was cared for. Word was received yesterday from the missing husband, who has been located, that he wishes to be with his wife. Today a letter is expected telling when he will be at home.

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August 9, 1909

WIFE FLIRTS, HUSBAND SAYS.

Demanded Special Police to Follow
Woman to Park.

Hardly a night goes by without some person telephoning or calling in person at police headquarters and making requests that are not listed in the police manuals as among a copper's duties. If a refusal is met with it is not unusual for the officer's job to be threatened by the person making the request.

Last night was possibly a bit quiet but Lieutenant M. E. Ryan, in charge at headquarters, received two demands to detail officers to perform work that is commonly turned over to the private detective agencies. The first request was made by a woman who demanded that a policeman be sent out on Admiral boulevard and take her husband home. She had found him calling upon another woman, and the wife wanted him escorted home after he declared he would return later in the evening.

Demand No. 2 was made a few hours later. A man hurried into the station and walking up to the desk inquired for the Chief of Police. As the chief was not there he asked for the captain and was informed that a lieutenant was about his size. He then asked to have a plain clothes man follow his wife out to one of the parks during the evening and keep an eye on her actions.

"Guess you will have to do your own trailing," Lieutenant Ryan remarked.

"Gertie always flirts when I am not with her," the man said in further pleading for a policeman to spy for him.

"Then watch her," the lieutenant answered as he told the shortstop to put the man out of the station.

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July 26, 1909

SORRY SHE TOOK A
SHOT AT HUSBAND.

MRS. FRANK O'NEILL'S BULLET
JUST GRAZED HIS NECK.

Wife Says She Was Nervous and
Excited, and That Shooting in
Muehleback Brewery Was
Only to Frighten Him.

A daintily dressed woman talking through the grate of the cashier's window in the general office of the Muehlebach Brewing Company to her husband, a bookkeeper, at 7:30 o'clock last night, attracted little attention from the beer wagon drivers who happened to be about. Sharp words between members of the opposite sexes in the vicinity of Eighteenth and Main streets even at such an early hour in the evening are not unusual.

Suddenly the woman, Mrs. Mary O'Neill of 431 Ann avenue, Kansas City, Kas., opened her chatelaine bag and inserted her hand.

"Mary, what are you going to do?" asked her husband, Frank P. O'Neill, of 3719 Woodland avenue. Mr. and Mrs. O'Neill have been separated since January 1.

The woman drew a small revolver from the bag and fired at close range, the bullet grazing Mr. O'Neill's neck beneath his right ear and lodging inside the neck band of his shirt. Mrs. O'Neill then dropped the weapon and gave herself up to John Glenn, night watchman of the brewery.

JUST SHOOT TO SCARE HIM.

At No. 4 police station Mrs. O'Neill occupied a cell but a few feet from the operating table where Dr. J. M. McKamey was dressing her husband's wound. She was highly excited, nervous and penitent.

"I did not mean to kill him at all," she said, "but he has mistreated me every time I have approached him for money for my support, and I could not help but be on my guard all the time. When he told me to get out of the office tonight I got excited and fired when I only wanted to frighten him.

"My husband and I were married in a Catholic church two years ago," Mrs. O'Neill went on. "He married me without letting me know that he had been married twice before, and that both of these former wives are still living. During the last days of December last year I was sick and somewhat of a burden to him. On the evening of the New Year he left me sick in bed and never came back.

"I have since kept house for my brother, John Semen, at my home on Ann avenue, Kansas City, Kas. The two trips I have taken to see my husband and ask for money from him to buy clothes for myself have not been successful.

NOT SURE HE'LL PROSECUTE.

Frank O'Neill was not sure last night that he would prosecute his wife. His father, Sergeant F. P. O'Neill of No. 6 police station, however, said he would prosecute.

"I have never mistreated my wife," said the son. "It is true that I have been married before. Mary's shooting at me without warning from her, although my mother called me over the telephone half an hour before, and said Mary was on the way to the brewery to kill me."

Dr. McKamey said that O'Neill's would would easily heal.

Mrs. O'Neill is 28 years old.

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July 25, 1909

CHINESE DON JUAN
ARRESTED IN CHICAGO.

CLAIMED GAW WING ELOPED
WITH MRS. ETHEL GORDON.

Celestial of Many Love Affairs
and Woman, Who Is Said
to Be From Kansas
City, Fine.

White women have a strange fascination for Gaw Wing, a Kansas City Chinese. Gaw has been arrested in Chicago in company with a woman who gave her name as Mrs. Ethel Gordon, also of Kansas City. The two eloped recently, it is claimed, and Chicago was the destination.

Gaw at one time, so it is said, went to Topeka where he fell love with a white school teacher. He flashed his bundle of bills and the school teacher became Mrs. Wing. She was at the police station in Kansas City yesterday looking for her recreant husband.

About a week ago, having forgotten his school teacher wife long since, it is claimed, he and Mrs. Gordon, both known to the police in the person of inspector Edward P. Boyle, left Kansas City. It was common gossip among the Chinese of West Sixth street that Gaw left a wife in Kansas City. This wife to who they refer says she was Mrs. Charles Wilson before she married the flighty Wing. She and the Mongolian also eloped to Chicago and were arrested January 26 of this year and were fined in the municipal court of that city. Mrs. Wilson has a child 2 years old.

Gaw's friends in Chicago paid his fine and he and Mrs. Wilson were released.

They came back to Kansas City and their domestic bark suddenly ran upon breakers. Mrs. Wilson Wing dropped out of sight.

Wing and Charlie Chu, a restaurant keeper at 125 West Sixth street, were fast friends and Gaw spent much of his time at the restaurant. White women came and went and from the lot Wing, it is alleged, selected Mrs. Gordon, who the police say lived at the Madison house, Independence avenue and Walnut street. Gaw, it is said, took up his abode at the Madison house and a rapid courtship followed. Gaw and his new spouse left for Chicago about two weeks ago and from that city last night came the news of their arrest.

Gaw was passing under the name of Charles Foy and Mrs. Gordon was registered as his wife. Inspector Boyle says that he is certain the eloping Chinaman is Gaw Wing. Mrs. Gordon told the Chicago police that she had been living in Chicago for over a year with her brother at 516 North Ashland avenue.

The Chinese and the woman were arrested by Chicago detectives after having been seen to enter a questionable hotel together and register as Charles Foy and wife. They were fined $200 and court costs there yesterday morning.

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July 25, 1909

TRAVELS 5,270 MILES
SEEKING HUSBAND.

MRS. E. C. STERLING FINDS HIM
IN KANSAS CITY.

Too Much Mother-in Law Given as
the Trouble -- Left Here on Chi-
cago Street Car Last
February.

After a trip of 5,270 miles in search of her husband, who she says left her on account of "too much mother-in-law," Mrs. Edward C. Sterling of Chicago located her wandering spouse in a cottage at 2912 Fairmount avenue at 12:10 o'clock yesterday morning.

"Yes, I am going to stay right here with my husband," she said, "and we are going to have no more mother-in-laws to bother us. I have the utmost confidence in my husband, and I know that he would not have deserted me of his own accord."

Mr. Sterling refused to make any statement, and regarded his wife with a pleased expression as she told about his numerous excellent qualities.

On the 16th of last February, according to Mrs. Sterling, her husband told her, as they were returning home on a street car after a visit to one of the best theaters in Chicago that the air of the theaters had affected his brain and had made him rather ill. He went back on the rear platform of a car and that was the last she saw of him until he responded to the gentle raps of Sergeant Jerry Caskey on the front door of his house yesterday morning.

Mrs. Sterling in her search visited most of the Western cities. At Los Angeles she was told by her husband's mother that the missing man probably could be located in Kansas City. Accordingly she came here.

Some how Mrs. Sterling imagined that her husband might be a victim of the "affinity" habit, and she was more than overjoyed to find that her fears were groundless.

"I'm going to stay with him," she declared.

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July 21, 1909

AGED BRIDEGROOM DIES.

Veteran of 65 Married Woman of
27 Last May.

Broken alike in health and spirit without his bride of just two months, Henry C. Porter, the lame Civil war veteran, who at the age of 65 married Miss Carrie Clements, 27 years old, in the Moore hotel here May 10, returned to the scene of his nuptials July 10 last and found surcease from sorrow in death at the St. Mary's hospital Friday. On his advent in Kansas City, Porter pawned his watch for $9 in order to pay his room rent at the apartment house of Mrs. Mary A. Millichif at 1231 Walnut street.

"I am a broken down old man and the worst kind of a fool," Porter told Mrs. Millichif as he paid her the money. "I don't want pity; all I want is a little rest and time to think."

The body was taken to Wagner undertaking rooms. Attempts made by the proprietors of the establishment to locate Mrs. Porter have failed. Two brothers of the dead man, R. M. Porter of Williamston, Mich., and F. C. Porter of Englewood, Col., were notified by telegraph and they have replied to the effect that Porter had plenty of money and a pension of $45 a month. Had he lived until August 4 $138 would have been coming to him in accumulated pensions.

The old soldier first appeared here in the early part of last May when he broke into print with the announcement that although 65 years old, with his right leg missing and his right arm paralyzed, he was to marry Miss Clements, lately of Colorado Springs, who was fully a generation his junior.

The ceremony took place in the Moore hotel, Ninth and Central streets. The couple then departed on a tour of the East and were to sail around the Horn of San Francisco later.

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July 12, 1909

WILL SPEND SUMMER HERE.

Lady Somerset, Formerly of Kansas
City, and Mother, Arrive.

Lady Henry Somerset arrived home yesterday from Paris, France. Lady Somerset, when she left Kansas City for abroad, was Mrs. Adelaide De Mare, the widow of the Pepper building fire victim. while abroad she met Lord Henry Somerset, and they were married a few weeks ago.


Lady Somerset and her mother, Mrs. Craig Hunter, left Paris over a week ago for their home. They reached Chicago without mishap or delay, but from Chicago trouble beset them on account of high water. They should have reached Kansas City Saturday afternoon at 5 o'clock. High waters held their train for twenty-six hours, and when they finally reached their home, 1202 East Thirty-fourth street, Lady Somerset and her mother were decidedly fatigued.


Lady Henry Somerset stated last night that her husband's urgent business kept him in Paris. Lady Henry will spend the summer months with her parents in Kansas City.

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June 24, 1909

PREACHER'S WIFE NOW
IS A FAMOUS SINGER.

MRS. J. V. VON HERRLICH WINS
HONORS IN ITALY.

Good Fairies in Forms of Kindly
Bishop and Celebrated Singing
Master Help Woman to
Rightful Place.

MRS. MATILDA VON HERRLICH.

Hard fought battles, which resulted in many strainings of the heart-strings, have won at last fame and fortune for a former Kansas City girl. Mr. J. F. Von Herrlich, who made a splendid success of her debut in grand opera at Milan, Italy, a few weeks ago, and who, at her very first song as Violetta in "La Traviata," took her Italian audience by storm. But in order to make this wonderful success Mrs. Von Herrlich was forced to leave her home, her children, her husband and native land. The leaving was not made as easy for her as it might have been, and it was not without many misgivings that the young woman, now only 26 years of age, left her family and home ties four years ago to begin her vocal studies in Paris. The story of her studies and her final triumph reads like a fairy tale, with a bishop and the famous Puccini as the good fairies, who entered into the life of the ambitious young woman.

CHOIR SINGER AT 10.

Born in St. Louis, Mo., Matilda Hossfeld was taken to Wichita, Kas., at the age of 10 years. There she entered the schools and her life was just that which usually befalls the school girl. She had a voice, a rich voice, but no one dreamed of the vast possibilities that were in store for her. She used her rich voice at the early age of 10 years, being wonderfully matured at that time, and within a few years she became the director of the choir at St. John's church in Wichita. Meanwhile she was attending high school in the town.

About this time Cupid crept into the game and caused the Rev. J. F. Von Herrlich, rector of the church, to be present at one of the choir rehearsals. He fell in love with Miss Hossfeld. The two were married when the girl was 17 years old. The husband saw only a few of the possibilities which might be developed by her voice; saw her and to him as a rector, in her beautiful singing of the hymnals from the old English masters, and soon he secured a charge in Kansas City, as Wichita offered few opportunities for vocal culture.

ATTRACTED CROWDS TO CHURCH.

Shortly after their wedding, the couple came to Kansas City and lived at 726 Washington street. Mr. Von Herrlich was the pastor of St. Paul's Episcopal church in Kansas City, Kas. His wife was taught the use of her voice by Professor Farley. Still, she used it only for the rendition of the cloistral hymns and great crowds were attracted to St. Paul's church. Charity recitals were given and the gifted young woman sang at many of them, always for the good of the church. Finally the rector was called to New York. In that metropolis larger opportunities presented themselves, and the future prima donna took advantage of a few of them.

Fate willed it that someone who really knew music and who really understood what the world of art would miss if Mrs. Von Herrlich remained only in church choirs, suggested that she train her voice for grand opera. The idea was fascinating and foolish all at once. She, the wife of a minister, to go upon the stage? She would not tolerate it.

Yet the good was done. The word had been spoken and the seed was sown. She told her husband of the conversation she had with the music lover, and he almost rebuked her for entertaining the idea.

"No, you would do far better by remaining in the choir and singing at charity recitals. The magnificent anthems of the great old masters are enough for you and it is work for God. You must either work for God or for the world. If you go upon the stage it must be for the world."

GOOD ADVICE FROM BISHOP.

The rector's wife, the tiny spark of ambition bursting into a sudden flame, argued with him that it was art, not fame or glory on this earth, that she cared for, but the husband was obdurate.

The fairy tale nearly came unto an end, but another and others heard her beautiful voice and urged her on to grand opera and art. Giving way to the importunities of those friends whom she met in her work, the rector's wife went to the bishop of her diocese and put the case to him.

"My dear, if you feel that you should go upon the stage with your voice, by all means go," responded the bishop. "You will be working for God by your singing. You will be working for Him when you fill people's hearts with the poetry and the good things of life. It is not wrong for you to go, it is a great right."

The rector's wife hurried home to her husband. She had a bishop's decision now and what was a curate beside a bishop? And so the husband consented. Within a few months she had sent her two children, Harold, 4, and Hilda, 6 years old, to her sister Hilda in Kansas City, and had set sail for Europe.

For a year she studied under Madame Marchesi and her advancement under such tutelage was exceedingly rapid. But it was not fast enough for the homesick woman, who longed to see her children and her husband.

BECOMES PUCCINI'S PUPIL.

It so happened that the Baroness Prepossiki heard her singing, and became enraptured. The baroness called upon the young woman and urged her to leave Paris and travel with her.

It was during these travels with the baroness that the second good fairy entered and made it possible for all Italy to listen to the voice of the little Western girl from America. This second good fairy was the famous singing master, Puccini.

Matilda Hossfeld Von Herrlich sang for Puccini and Puccini forthwith made her his protege. For three years Mrs. Von Herrlich lived in the home of Puccini as one of the family and the great master gave her his best efforts and made her what the Italian critics call the greatest of the prima donnas.

The name of Puccini and his training caused a large audience to greet the foreign prima donna upon the evening of her debut in Milan, and she was accorded the greatest ovation ever received by a singer upon the stage at Milan. For days the Italian papers were filled with praise for her and her singing. She was cartooned, her pictures appeared in all of the papers of the country, and she was named the "Most Beautiful Madonna."

PRETTIEST GIRL IN WICHITA.

All this was for the girl who was born to William Hossfeld and his wife, Augusta Weinreich Hossfeld, in St. Louis, twenty-six years ago. The mother is dead, having died the year of her daughter's marriage, but her father is living and is at his home, 2614 East Fifth street. He and his daughter, Hilda, younger than Matilda, are taking care of the children.

While living in Wichita and when she was yet unmarried, Miss Hossfeld was voted the prettiest girl in the city. Rival artists and photographers went to her in order to urge her to pose for pictures which might be exhibited at certain exhibitions. Besides that one little happening, and the romance of her marriage, Matilda Hossfeld Von Herrlich's life had been uneventful until the day she held the conference with the good bishop of New York.

Her marriage to the rector of St. John's church in Wichita was surprise to all of her friends, as the rector was many years her senior. Her parents alone knew that the marriage was to take place and the two were married by Archbishop Watkins. Mrs. Von Herrlich is now in Milan.

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June 17, 1909

QUIT BRIDE BEFORE
END OF HONEYMOON.

FORMER MATRON HAS HER HUS-
BAND ARRESTED.

Married Just a Month Ago, Mrs.
Frances Rodgers Burgess Charges
Desertion, and Has Earl
Locked Up.

Just one month ago today, Mrs. Frances Rodgers, 32 years old, matron of the George H. Nettleton home, married Earl Burgess, a distinguished looking stranger from St. Paul, whom she had known a month. Last night, Burgess slept in the holdover at police headquarters and will face Judge Kyle in the municipal court this morning on a charge of vagrancy. Mrs. Burgess, who claims that he deserted her a week ago in St. Joseph, after taking her savings, came to Kansas City, and in person saw that he was safely locked up.

"I'm going to prosecute him," she declared as she stamped her foot last night at the police station. "He has taken every cent of my money, and now I'm penniless."

GIRLS' PICTURES IN POCKET.

Burgess, who is 46 years old, and who was wearing a light gray summer suit of clothes, looked extremely downcast when the jailer inspected his pockets. He colored slightly when several miniature photographs of young women were discovered.

"I met him in April," said the wife, "and he represented himself as a retired traveling man. He said that he had property in St. Paul, Oklahoma City and Omaha. In fact he was just traveling because he hated to be idle.

"I became interested at once, and accepted when he proposed marriage. I was then matron of the Nettleton home at a good salary. We went to St. Joseph, my former home, where my two children by my first marriage are in school. He then left me, but returned five days later.

DEAF TO HIS PLEADINGS.

"I forgave the first desertion, but when he again left me last Thursday I couldn't stand it any longer. He claimed that he had gone to St. Paul, but I traced him to Kansas City. I'm mighty glad to see that he is arrested, but I don't know what I'm going to do without money. I don't think he has a foot of property."

Detectives J. J. Raferty and M. J. Halvey arrested Burgess at a rooming house near Fourteenth and Broadway, where he was with a young woman. Mrs. Burgess waited for the detectives at Twelfth street and Broadway, and accompanied them to the station. Burgess implored her not to have him locked up, but his wife ignored his pleadings.

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June 9, 1909

BRADY SAYS HE SHOT
IN DEFENSE OF HOME.

CLAIMS FLANAGAN TOOK AD-
VANTAGE OF WIFE.

Board of Education Draughtsman
Tells of Circumstances Which Led
to Killing -- Woman in the
Case Testifies.

Leon H. Brady, charged in the criminal court with murder for the second degree killing of Joseph E. Flanagan, went on the stand yesterday as a witness in his own behalf. The case will go to the jury today. Brady testified that he was 31 years old, had come to Kansas City at the age of 5, graduated from the public schools here and had taken a mining course in Columbia university, New York city; that afterwards he had worked for a copper mining company in Butte, Mont., had been engaged as engineer in a geological survey of Northern Montana and later had gone to Mexico to work in the Guggenheim smelters at Acientos and other places. He returned to Kansas City in April of last year and has since been a draughtsman for the board of education.

"When was the first time you heard of Flanagan pressing his attentions upon your wife?" he was asked.

"It was a couple of weeks before Flanagan was shot. My wife told me she could not go out of her room but that Flanagan was dodging around. I said to her:

" 'He hasn't said anything out of the way, has he? If he has, let me know. I can't call him down for standing around in the halls. That's only bad manners.' "

"When was the next time your wife complained?"

WARNED BY TELEPHONE.

"The Sunday preceding the shooting I was called from dinner to the telephone. A voice, which said it was Flanagan's, asked me if I wanted to take a walk that afternoon. I said I was going to my father's. After I had been at his home a time with my baby, a woman called me by telephone and said: 'You'd better come home and see what's doing.' "

Brady said that as soon as he returned to the Angelus boarding house at 1014 East Fifteenth street, where he lived at that time, he found Flanagan had appeared there almost as soon as he had departed. This was three days before the killing, which occurred Wednesday, March 24.

On Monday, said Brady, he asked his wife to explain a statement that Flanagan had threatened her on Sunday, and she began to cry.

"I've been in torments for two months," she told him.

She then told the husband, according to his story, that Flanagan had mistreated her twice, and had threatened her if she did not keep still. She said she had been afraid to tell before that time.

The next evening Brady met Flanagan at Twelfth street and Troost avenue. They walked down town and back to the Paseo before separating at Fifteenth street and Troost avenue. Brady was armed. Mrs. Brady was not mentioned.

"Why didn't you ask Flanagan to explain?" he was asked.

"I wanted to. My idea was to get at the thing somehow. I did not want to shoot him down in the street, but I did not know how to bring up the subject."

Tuesday evening the men went walking together again. They talked about revolvers, but not of Mrs. Brady.

"I thought I might see some way out of it all without a scandal or a tragedy," said the witness.

Telling of the events leading up to the shooting and of the happening itself, Brady said:

"When I came home Wednesday noon for lunch, Flanagan, who had moved away from the Angelus for a month, was back again. We talked. Mrs. Brady was ill and I took her lunch upstairs to her. I told my wife Flanagan was back. Then I went on to my work, two blocks away.

"But I could not work. As I had passed out of the house I had seen Flanagan sitting in the parlor, grinning at me sarcastically, as I believed. I went back to the house and up the rear stairs to our room. I asked Mrs. Brady whether she had been bothered, referring to Flanagan, and she said no. For fifteen minutes I remained, playing with the baby. I had put the revolver I carried on the dresser.

WENT WILD WITH RAGE.

"Presently Mrs. Brady said she was going downstairs. Almost immediately after the door had closed behind her I heard her cough. The thought flashed through my mind that Flanagan must be there. I jumped up and grabbed the revolver as I heard my wife say, 'No! No! No!'

"When I jerked the door open I saw my wife with her back to the door. Flanagan had hold of her shoulders and she had her hands up as if to push him away. I went wild with rage and turned loose on him with the gun at once. I suppose before he could have let go of her.

"At the first shot Flanagan fell. He started to get up, and I fired three times more. Then he ran to his room. He was running, and I thought he might get a gun, so I reloaded the revolver.

"Did you say to Mrs. Brady, 'If I didn't kill him I'm going to?' "

"I don't remember saying that."

Mrs. Belle L. Bowman, owner of the boarding house, had previously testified that she heard Brady use such words.

On cross-examination Brady said his wife did not call for him, but only said, "No, no, no."

Mrs. Mary Rosanna Brady, whose story to her husband caused the killing, preceded her husband on the stand. During the morning session of court she had been excluded from the room on account of being a witness. As soon as she had testified, she went to the prosecutor's office and remained there until the evening adjourment was taken.

TOLD OF BRADY INDIGNITIES.

Only once while she was on the witness stand did Mrs. Brady cry. That was when she told of the killing.

"I was born in Fort Madison, Ia.," said Mrs. Brady, "and in 1903 went to Mexico with my parents. July 4, 1905, I met Mr. Brady, and September 29 of the next year we were married. We have a boy 22 months old.

"I first met Flanagan in October, 1908, when I came to Kansas City. We grew to have a speaking acquaintance in the latter part of December. It was not until the Monday before the tragedy that I told Mr. Brady of the indignities Flanagan had heaped upon me. I have suffered from asthma since I was 3 years old. If it an unusually severe attack, morphine has to be administered. This leaves me in a helpless condition.

"About two weeks before the shooting I told Mr. Brady that Flanagan was spying on me. On the Monday afternoon I mentioned I told him that, on January 11, Flanagan had come to my room and taken advantage of me while I was helpless from drugs. He came into the room and took the baby while the doctor was there. As soon as the doctor had gone he took me into his room. I resisted and he said I would be foolish to tell Mr. Brady, as it would only make trouble. On February 27, he did the same thing."

The witness said that on the Sunday preceding the killing, while Brady was visiting his father, Flanagan had come to her room and had asked if everybody was gone and if she was expecting anybody. She said she had closed the door in his face. He told her, she said, that he "would do her dirt" and that he put his hand to his pocket.

CALLED HER A "BLUFFER."

"On Tuesday he came to the room again and said, 'Did you tell Brady anything?'

"I said 'yes,' and he said: 'You are a great bluffer. I was out walking with Brady last night and your name was not mentioned.' "

Relating the details of the shooting, Mrs. Brady said:

"It happened in front of my door. About 1:20 o'clock that afternoon Mr. Brady returned home. I told him I was going to the bathroom, and went out. I still had hold of the doorknob when I met Flanagan. He bade me the time of day and said: 'Won't you invite me in?'

"I said: 'Of course not. We are no longer friends.'

"He said: 'I want your friendship even if you no longer want mine.'

"I asked him why, and he said, taking hold of me in spite of my efforts to tear away: 'Because I love you. I'm jealous of you. I want you all to myself.'

"Then," said the witness, "Mr. Brady opened the door." She wept violently for a moment.

"As the door was opened," resumed Mrs. Brady, "he let go and I fell back against a trunk that was standing in the hall. Mr. Brady shot as soon as the door was open. I think he shot four times. Then I went downstairs with him and the baby, and telephoned for his sister. Then they took him away."

On cross-examination the attention of Mrs. Brady was called to discrepancies between her testimony on the stand and the statements she made to the prosecuting attorney soon after the shooting. She said was excited when she made the statement. On the witness stand she said that her friendship for Flanagan ceased after he had mistreated her. In her statement she had said they continued on friendly terms. She said also that she was in possession of her faculties at the time of the attack January 11, and that she could scream. Flanagan did not carry her into his room, she said. She remembered being there fifteen minutes and that the door was locked.

NOT A WOMAN IN COURT ROOM.

Also, she said she and her husband had discussed Flanagan before the shooting on the same afternoon, but later modified her statement.

W. S. Gabriel, assistant prosecuting attorney, who with Ruby D. Garrett, is conducting the prosecution, produced a note signed "Mary," and asked the witness if she had written it to Flanagan. She said the note was not written by her.

Mrs. Brady told her story with her face to the jury. She seemed hardly conscious of the presence of her husband, for she glanced in his direction but seldom. There was not a woman in the courtroom to hear her story and and hardly two rows were filled by spectators. She told her story without emotion. Mrs. Brady wore a white waist, a gray walking skirt and a small black hat trimmed in red. Her heavy veil was lifted when she testified.

Among other witnesses for the defense called during the afternoon was Dr. William T. Singleton, who treated Mrs. Brady January 11 and February 27 for asthma by giving her a hypodermic injection of morphine and atrophine. He said the drugs were sedatives, but would not necessarily effect the use of the vocal organs.

Joseph L. Norman, secretary of the board of education, and J. M. Greenwood, superintendent of schools, both old friends of the Brady family testified to the defendant's good character.

SAYS HE WAS LURED INTO TRAP.

The state rested its case at noon. According to the opening statement by Mr. Gabriel, it had proposed to show that Flanagan had been lured into a trap.

Among the state's witnesses were: Dr. Ralph E. Shiras, surgeon of the emergency hospital staff; Dr. James Moran and Dr. J. Park Neal of the general hospital, and G. E. Marsh and W. T. Latcham, patrolmen. Dr. Moran was present when Mr. Garret took Flanagan's dying statement, in which he declared himself innocent of wrongdoing. Only that part of the statement in which Flanagan said Brady shot him without saying a word was permitted to go to the jury. The wounded man died at the general hospital a few hours after the shooting. Every bullet took effect.

The state's chief witness was Mrs. Bowman, who conducts the boarding house. She said Flanagan and Mrs. Brady were frequently alone on the third floor of the house, where both had rooms, but that Flanagan did not seem to be there more when Brady was gone then at other times.

It was Mrs. Bowman who said that Flanagan tried to descend the stairs after he was shot. The witness said she heard Brady say: "Let him come. If I haven't killed him I will."

SHOT IN DEFENSE OF HOME.

The witness said that Mrs. Brady, when under the influence of opiates, was at times almost unconscious.

Gen. Milton Moore opened the afternoon session by briefly outlining the defense. His main argument was that Brady shot in defense of his home.

Statements by both state and prosecution led to the belief that the arguments summing up the testimony will be brief and will consume less than two hours. This will not be because of limitation by the court, for Judge Ralph S. Latshaw, before whom the case is being tried, seldom limits murder trial arguments.

The jury with which Brady's fate will rest is made up of the following: James A. Wood, 4315 Main street; C. C. Wagoner, 3202 Gillham road; J. J. Ronham, 2852 East Seventh street; William H. Hand, 1229 Cherry street; Michael Bresnahan, 1831 Oak street; E. E. Esslinger, 3902 Belleview avenue; Charles J. Lewis, Mt. Washington; F. O. Hartung, 3006 Garfield avenue; J. B. Ralph, 3513 St. John avenue; Alfred Simpson, Independence avenue; Jesse Robertson, 6216 Peery avenue; D. J. Biser, 1933 Montgall avenue.

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May 31, 1909

POPE'S SPECIAL BLESSING.

Unusual Honor for Kansas City
Couple's Golden Wedding.

An unusual honor in the form of special blessings from the pope on the occasion of their fiftieth wedding anniversary was enjoyed by Mr. and Mrs. Alexis Gosselin, 3240 Chestnut street. The anniversary was observed in Aurora, Kas., a week ago, where most of the Gosselin family resides. The Holy Father cabled his special blessings upon the couple and as a further token of regard he caused an enlarged picture of himself to be sent to them.

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May 26, 1909

WROTE 275 LETTERS TO WIFE.

Urging Her to Come Back, So Di-
vorce Was Denied Sheridan.

Andrew Jackson Sheridan, 65 years old, was yesterday denied a divorce from Louisa M. Sheridan, from whom he has been separated eight years. Mr. Sheridan, who lives in the house boat Mable, moored at the foot of Minnesota avenue, on the Kaw river, brought the suit before Judge E. L. Fischer of the Wyandotte county district court. The reason why he could not procure legal separation from Mrs. Sheridan was because he was found to think too much of her. Disaster came to his plans when lawyers for the defense produced in evidence 275 letters to the defendant, urging her to come back and live with him.

The plaintiff has lived in the house boat on the Kaw over three years and his face is brown from the reflection of the river. Mrs. Sheridan lives with her son in Toledo, O. Depositions from her were read in court. All of the 275 letters which Sheridan has addressed to his wife in the past year are affectionate and urge her to come live in his boat. In different places he alludes to her as being made up of parts of the pig, oyster and chicken. In one letter he promises to give her treatment to make her a "perfect human like myself."

Judge Fischer believed that a man who could give so much free advice to his wife and sign himself her loving husband did not badly want a divorce.

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May 14, 1909

QUARRELED ON HONEYMOON.

Deaf Husband and Tongue-Tied
Bride Booked for Municipal Court.

When Ben Green, who is deaf, married Eliza Reamer, who is tongue-tied, last week at the home of his mother in Lawrence, Kas., everyone thought the match an excellent one, though the couple had known each other only a week.

With light hearts they boarded a train for Kansas City, where they intended to spend their honeymoon. Possibly the world at large wouldn't have known about the union if they had not been arrested at Independence avenue and Holmes street yesterday afternoon. They were quarreling.

Both were taken to police headquarters and charged with disturbing the peace. In default of bond they were kept at the station. Mrs. Green, in the matron's room, attempted to tell about her marriage.

She met Green in Wichita a week ago, she said. It was a case of love at first sight. Green persuaded her to go to Lawrence, where they were united. The husband was unable to find work, she said, and they quarreled. The case will be tried in the municipal court this morning.

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May 6, 1909

WILL GET $80,000
WHEN HE MARRIES.

PAUL GARVIN, 25 YEARS OLD,
LOOKING FOR WIFE.

Millionaire Uncle in Denver Be-
queaths Fortune to Young Chem-
ist Upon Condition Which He
is Anxious to Fulfill.

Paul Garvin, 25 years old and good looking, who lives at the northwest corner of Fourteenth and Oak streets, yesterday received word of an inheritance of $80,000 from a rich uncle in Denver, who has recently died, but to this fortune is attached the string of matrimony. Mr. Garvin, by the conditions of the will, must marry and settle down before the inheritance is handed over to him. No particular girl was named in the will, and now Mr. Garvin is "setting his cap."

INTENDS TO MARRY.

"Sure, I am going to marry," said he last night while discussing the condition imposed. "Not that I am going to marry for the money alone, but I am about to become 'one of our respected and influential citizens.' There's one drawback, however. I don't know any girl who would have me. I am perfectly 'heart whole and fancy free.' Until now I never had enough money on hand to think of getting married, and girls have not attracted me. But I am looking for 'her' now, and I am going to look fast, too."

Mr. Garvin is wholly at sea in regard to his future wife. He has never had an ideal.

"I don't want to advertise for a wife. I guess I will have to wait until the grand passion seizes me and then I will know all about it."

UNCLE WAS PECULIAR.

Mr. Garvin's uncle was a resident of Denver, having large mining interests. His estate is said to be worth $1,000,000. His name also was Paul Garvin. The will made by Mr. Garvin gives all of his property to his son, with the exception of the bequest made to his namesake. Should Mr. Garvin die, unmarried, the money is to go towards the establishment of a free health resort in Colorado Springs.

"Uncle Paul was peculiar," said Mr. Garvin. "Every time I saw him he would urge me to get married and quit roving. I am a chemist, when there is any desire to work on my part, and he wanted me to take charge of his assaying work for him. But I like to travel, and so I have been doing. I guess he was afraid to give me this money outright, thinking that I might blow it all in traveling.

Mr. Garvin will remain in Kansas City indefinitely.

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