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November 25, 1909

OLD RIVER MAN IS DEAD.

Isaac Smith, Also Civil War Veteran,
Dies Alone.

Sitting in a chair, wrapped in a bed quilt, his head hanging over on his chest as if he had but fallen asleep, Isaac Smith, an old soldier and Missouri river navigator 76 years of age, was found dead in a room at 1820 Union avenue about 8 o'clock last night. The old man had been placed in the room about 10 a. m. by his son, William Smith, an employe of the Bemis Bag Company. the coroner said life appeared to have been extinct five or six hours . The body was sent to the Carroll-Davidson undertaking rooms, where an autopsy will be held later.

The son was taken in charge by an officer and taken to No. 2 police station where he made a statement. He said that his father's condition was such about 10 a. m. that he should not be on the street. In taking him to the room, which the old man previously occupied, he fell on the stairway, making a slight abrasion on the nose and causing the nose to bleed freely for a time.

Washing off the blood, the son said, he placed his father in the chair, covered him securely with the bed quilt and left. When he returned at 8 p. m. the old man was in the same position in which he had been left, but life had flown. The dead man had been an inmate of the National Soldiers' Home at Leavenworth, Kas. The coroner does not think an inquest will be necessary.

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November 12, 1909

THOMAS G. BEAHAM
SUCCUMBS AT 68.

FAULTLESS STARCH FOUNDER A
KANSAS CITY BUSINESS MAN
FOR 22 YEARS.

Veteran Army Man Made This City
the Scene of His Many Ac-
tivities -- Became Ill
Last Summer.
Thomas G. Beaham, Faultless Starch Founder & President
THOMAS G. BEAHAM.

Thomas G. Beaham, for twenty-two years a Kansas City business man, died at his home, 2940 Troost avenue, at 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Mr. Beaham had been ill since last summer, while on a hunting and fishing trip on the Nipegon river in Canada.

Mr. Beaham was born in Cambridge, O., the only child of John and Harriett Beaham. His boyhood was spent in Muscatine, Ia., where he enlisted September, 1861, in the Union army as a commissary sergeant of the Second Iowa volunteer cavalry in the Civil war. He was appointed second lieutenant December 1, 1861, and promoted to first lieutenant a month later. Mr. Beaham was detached from his regiment in April, 1862, and assigned to duty as aide-de-camp on the staff of General Gordon Granger, commanding a cavalry division in Mississippi, until August, 1862. On November 19, 1863, he was appointed and commissioned major and aide-de-camp of United States volunteers and assigned to the staff of General Granger. While in the department of the Cumberland, in the military division of the West, he participated in the advance and siege of Corinth; occupation of Corinth and pursuit to Boonville; pursuit of Van Dorn to Duck river and defense of Franklyn against Van Dorn's attack. He was in the battle of Chickamauga, Orchard ridge and Missionary hill, and many other historic battlefields. He resigned September 12, 1864, and was honorably discharged from the service. Mr. Beaham was a lifelong friend of Captain Gordon Taylor of Cincinnati, O., who was on the staff of General Granger.

Shortly after the war he went to Cincinnati, O., where he engaged in the wholesale paint and glass business. In 1878 he moved to Zanesville, where he lived until 1887, when he came to Kansas City and entered into partnership with E. O. Moffatt in the whlesale coffee, tea and spice company. The company was formerly Smith and Moffatt, but Mr. Smith was killed in the cyclone of that year and the firm was started anew under the name of Beaham & Moffatt. At that time Mr. Beaham was living with his family in Independence, Mo.

It was early in the history of the firm of Beaham & Moffatt that the Faultless Starch was originated as a specialty. Shortly afterwards Mr. Moffatt returned to the grain trade and the business was conducted as the Beaham Manufacturing Company. Owing to the growth of the starch department the coffee, tea and spice business was disposed of and for several years the business was conducted as the Faultless Starch Company, unincorporated, Mr. Beaham being the sole owner. In 1900 he moved to Kansas City from Independence and in 1903 the business was incorporated as the Faultless Starch Company with Mr. Beaham as president and Gordon T. Beaham as secretary.

Mr. Beaham is survived by a mother, Mrs. Harriett Beaham, 91 years old. Mrs. Beaham has been living with her son for the past seventeen years. His wife, one son and two daughters also survive him. Gordon T. Beaham, the only son, was named after his lifelong friend, Captain Gordon Taylor of civil war fame. Two daughters, Edna and Helen, reside at home.

Mr. Beaham was a member of the University, Country, Midday and Commercial Clubs; also a member of the Loyal Legion. He was very fond of fishing and hunting and was a member of several shooting clubs. For a number of years he spent his summers in Lake Miltona, Minn.

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September 28, 1909

J. L. NORMAN, SCHOOL
BOARD PIONEER, DEAD.

SERVED WITH PUBLIC EDUCAT-
ION FOR TWENTY YEARS.

Appointed Secretary Year Ago After
Retirement From the Abstract
Business -- Funeral Arrange-
ments Not Made.
Joseph L. Norman, School Board Pioneer.
THE LATE JOSEPH L. NORMAN.

Joseph Lafayette Norman, civil war veteran, compiler of the first set of abstract books in Kansas City, member of the school board for twenty years and its secretary for the last year, died at his home, 816 West Thirty-ninth street at 10:15 o'clock last night after an illness of two months. The funeral arrangements probably will be announced today, by which time a son who is in Mexico, and another who is in California can be heard from.

Joseph Lafayette Norman was born at Hickory Hill, Ill, October 21, 1841. In 1857, the year following the death of his mother, the family moved to Greeley, Kas., and took up a homestead there. A year later Mr. Norman and his father returned to Illinois. In the fall of 1859 Mr. Norman and his father came back West and located at what was Westport, Mo., one mile west of what is now Fortieth street and State Line. The deceased conducted a private school in Westport, and he had to close it at the outbreak of the civil war, August 14, 1862, the day of the battle of Independence, Mo.
ONE SON AN ARMY OFFICER.

Mr. Norman closed his school and with five of his pupils reported at Fort Union on the west side of the city and tendered their services to the government. He served for three years as a member of company A of the Twelfth regiment of Kansas volunteer infantry. At the battle of Westport on his twenty-third birthday, Mr. Norman was aide to General S. R. Curtis and carried across the field of battle an important message under an extremely dangerous fire. His first wife, Miss Martha Jane Puckett, a native of Virginia, died January 1, 1901.

They had five children, the oldest of whom, Captain Trabor Norman, is at present in the infantry, in Southern California. Another son, Joseph L, Jr., is in Mexico. Fred, Frank and Miss Jennie Norman are the other children.

OF A MILITARY FAMILY.

On June 25, 1903 Mr. Norman married Miss Katherine Gent of Kansas City. A son, Howard, was born of this union. Mr. Norman was a member of Farragu-Thomas Post, G. A. R. No. 8, and was also a Mason. H e was the first quartermaster of the Third Regiment N. G. M. In politics he was a Republican.

All of his ancestors were inclined to the military life. His brother, Calvin M., his father, Jones, and his wife's father, William E. Plunkett, all served in the civil war.

His paternal grandfather, Joseph Norman, served in the war of 1812, and his great-grandfather served in the revolutionary war, enlisting from North Carolina.

Mr. Norman commenced the work of getting up a set of abstract books at Independence, Mo. In October, 1865, and in the spring of 18657, with Lafayette Trabor he opened an abstract office. Later the Trabor interests were sold to Richard Robertson. Mr. Norman retired from this business a year ago.

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September 16, 1909

OLDEST KANSAS LANDLORDS?

Distinction Claimed for Emporia
and Downs Bonifaces.

Colonel H. C. Whitley, 75 years old, of Emporia, Kas., and Colonel J. H. Lipton, 82 years old, of Downs, both veterans of the civil war and two of the three honorary members of the Kansas-Missouri Hotel Men's Association, were the guests of C. L. Wild of the Sexton hotel yesterday. Colonel Lipton claims the distinction of having operated a hostelry in Kansas for a longer period than any other man in the state. He has been in the business for half a century. Colonel Whitley claims to be the next oldest in the business.

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September 24, 1909

CAPT. A. P. ASHBROOK DEAD.

Served in Volunteer Regiment
Throughout Civil War.

Captain Aaron P. Ashbrook, senior member of the Ashbrook Investment Company, with offices in the Sheidley building, died as the result of a paralytic stroke yesterday morning at his home, 1400 College avenue. He had been ill nearly a month.

Captain Ashbrook was born 76 years ago on a farm in Fairfield county, O. When the civil war began he raised a company of light infantry for the Seventeenth Ohio volunteers, and served until the close as captain. Following the military example of his father one son, Lieutenant Roy M. Ashbrook, is in the army, and is now stationed at Fort McPherson, Ga.

After a short period spent in the dry goods business in Fairfield, Captain Ashbrook married Miss Margaret Faine and moved with her to Kansas City, where he engaged in the real estate business. That was twenty-five years ago. Fifteen years ago, feeling his health failing, he retired from active business, and since then he has traveled in search of health. His wife has been dead many years.

Funeral arrangements have not been made, but it is thought the funeral will be in Harrisonville, Mo.

The following children survive:

Lieut. R. M. Ashbrook, U. S. A., Fort McPherson, Ga.; T. P. Ashbrook, Kent, Ill.' Mrs. Caroline Oldham, Kansas City; Mrs. Addie Sexton, Mrs. Blanche Hutchens, Mrs. Minette Galt and Miss Faye Ashbrook, all of Alhambra, Cal.

The will of Captain Ashbrook was filed yesterday for probate, and Mrs. Oldham was appointed administratix by the court. The will leaves $500 to Margaret Faye Ashbrook and the balance in equal shares to his other children and two grandchildren. No value is placed on the estate.

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August 27, 1909

HORSE TAMES A HORSE TAMER.

Former Policeman Duke Lee Injured
in Wild West Show.

DUKE LEE

Duke Lee, former soldier, Kansas City policeman and rough rider, is in Kansas City again, recuperating from injuries which he received in Grand Rapids, Mich., two weeks ago while attempting to tame a broncho in a Wild West show, with which he has been traveling. Lee was thrown and trampled upon by the vicious animal. He suffered two broken ribs and a dislocated collar bone.

"I can't explain how it happened," Lee said yesterday. "The show keeps wild horses instead of trained ones and it is a real fight in the arena that the crowd is watching."

Lee resigned from the police department in the spring. He served in the regular army and was in the Boxer insurrection in China before his appointment to the force.

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August 21, 1909

FEW QUANTRELL'S MEN THERE.

Former Guerrillas Are More Inter-
ested in the Crop Prospects.

Only twenty-five men responded yesterday morning at the roll call of the Quantrell guerrillas, now in reunion in Independence. Cole Younger was not present, being on a lecture tour, the subject of his lecture being "Keep Straight." Frank James, another noted guerrilla, is down in Oklahoma in the Big Pasture, farming, and did not have time to attend. James has not attended any of the reunions since his noted speech made in the Independence court house yard, in which he declared that his friends were in the North and that he was never turned down except by those of the Southland.

The headquarters of the reunion were in the Brown building, North Main street. Here the scattered membership met and registered and it was here that it was noted that among the absent ones were John C. Hope, ex-sheriff of Jackson county, and Cyrus Flannery Wolf of Bates county, both having died within the past year. Captain Benjamin Morrow was present, Lieutenant Levi Potts of Grain Valley and Warren Welch were busy among the veteran guerrillas. Captain Gregg, who has been in about as many tight places as the next guerrilla who followed Quantrell, was present with his family. Also Dr. L. C. Miller of Knobnoster.

There was no formality about the reunion. "They just met and that was all there was to it," was the way one of them expressed himself. Some of those from Kansas City and nearby points brought well-filled dinner baskets, but the greater portion of those present had to go to restaurants. It was a day of reminiscent stories for the guerrillas and the oft repeated stories of the civil war were gone over and over again. Gabe Parr, who as a boy shot his way to freedom, yet lives, and others with equally hair raising stories were present and passed the day, telling of the yesterdays of their early manhood. The thing that interested these men most was the state of the crops.

The veterans will hold another session today and adjourn, in all probability to meet in Independence next year.

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August 13, 1909

NEW POLICE BOARD
SECRETARY NAMED.

BRYON E. LINE SUCCEEDS "JIM-
MIE" VINCIL SEPTEMBER 1.

Soldiered With Commissioner Marks
During Spanish-American War.
Retiring Secretary Held
Office Twelve Years.

Byron E. Line, formerly chief clerk and assistant purchasing agent of the Quincy, Omaha & Kansas City railroad, has been appointed to succeed James E. Vincil, for twelve years secretary to the board of police commissioners, who presented his resignation to the board yesterday afternoon, effective September 1. Mr. Vincil went into the office under Commissioners Gregory and Scarritt in 1897.

The new secretary is 30 years old. He has lived in Kansas City eight years. His salary will be $2,100 a year. His address is 1001 Penn street, Aberdeen Flats.

During the Spanish-American war Mr. Line was sergeant-major of the Fifth Illinois infantry, and for a time his regiment was brigaded with the 160th Indiana infantry, in which Commissioner Thomas R. Marks was captain. It was there that Line and Marks became acquainted.

Probably today the board will name a clerk to assist the secretary. He will bear the title of "excise clerk," and will have the saloons to look after. He will be expected to prepare a history of each saloon in Kansas City since the law limiting them went into effect.

"He will be expected to look after the sanitary conditions of each saloon," said Mr. Marks, "and also the moral tone, as it were. He must keep a record of all saloon proprietors, bartenders, porters and other employes, with their residences, and a complete history of each man. The day when well-dressed vagrants, 'con' men, highwaymen and burglars may tend bar in Kansas City will become a thing of the past very soon."

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August 8, 1909

MARRIAGE LICENSE TOO HIGH.

John McGinnis Complains That $2
Fee Is Excessive.

John W. McGinnis, 1617 Oak street, told the marriage license clerk yesterday that the charge of $2 for a license was excessive. He said he believed that in view of this fact the minister who married him to Mrs. Susan J. Stratton of 2009 East Eighteenth street, should charge only 50 cents.

McGinnis is an old soldier and says he has been married three times before this venture. He is 69 years of age and his bride 71.

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July 21, 1909

AGED BRIDEGROOM DIES.

Veteran of 65 Married Woman of
27 Last May.

Broken alike in health and spirit without his bride of just two months, Henry C. Porter, the lame Civil war veteran, who at the age of 65 married Miss Carrie Clements, 27 years old, in the Moore hotel here May 10, returned to the scene of his nuptials July 10 last and found surcease from sorrow in death at the St. Mary's hospital Friday. On his advent in Kansas City, Porter pawned his watch for $9 in order to pay his room rent at the apartment house of Mrs. Mary A. Millichif at 1231 Walnut street.

"I am a broken down old man and the worst kind of a fool," Porter told Mrs. Millichif as he paid her the money. "I don't want pity; all I want is a little rest and time to think."

The body was taken to Wagner undertaking rooms. Attempts made by the proprietors of the establishment to locate Mrs. Porter have failed. Two brothers of the dead man, R. M. Porter of Williamston, Mich., and F. C. Porter of Englewood, Col., were notified by telegraph and they have replied to the effect that Porter had plenty of money and a pension of $45 a month. Had he lived until August 4 $138 would have been coming to him in accumulated pensions.

The old soldier first appeared here in the early part of last May when he broke into print with the announcement that although 65 years old, with his right leg missing and his right arm paralyzed, he was to marry Miss Clements, lately of Colorado Springs, who was fully a generation his junior.

The ceremony took place in the Moore hotel, Ninth and Central streets. The couple then departed on a tour of the East and were to sail around the Horn of San Francisco later.

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July 20, 1909

DON'T TRY TO RUB OFF BLACK.

"Stick to Race Type," Major Wright
Tells Negroes.

"Let us stick to our race type; don't try to rub off the black," was the injunction of Major R. R. Wright of Savannah, Ga., to a congregation at the African Second Baptist church, Tenth and Charlotte streets, last night. Major Wright was one of the two negro army officers of his rank in the Spanish-American war. He is president of the Georgia State Industrial college for negroes, and a member of hte Amerian Historical Association.

"The negro as a race is as great as any that ever peopled the earth," continued Major Wright. "If you are ashamed of your color read history.

"At the time of the Gallic invasion hundreds of thousands of Romans went to Africa and there tried to found a new nation. Africa through its mighty chiefs repelled the invaders, and drove them back to Italy.

"When Columbus discovered America there were fifteen large negro kingdoms in Africa. One of them on the west coast was three times larger than Mexico. The king of this great monarchy was one of a dynasty 1,100 years old. Think of this line of kings and then of that which is represented by King Edward of England and then of America little more than a tenth as old. Such powerful kingdoms are not founded on sand."

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July 17, 1909

HAD GOOD CIVIL WAR RECORD.

Aged Applicant for Parole Says Son
Was Knighted for Bravery.

Anderson J. Barker, 69 years old, was fined $500 Wednesday for running an alleged "fake" employment agency, wore only a pair of overalls and a short-sleeved shirt when he appeared before the board of pardons and paroles yesterday for hearing on his application for parole, but despite the costume his appearance was that of a stately gentleman of the "old school."

After telling of his service to his country during the civil war, during which he was twice breveted for meritorious conduct on the field, tears streamed down his cheeks as he told of how he had reared his two sons, both of whom, he said, were heads of Y. M. C. A. organizations, one in a suburb of Chicago and the other in Calcutta, India.

"For saving the life of Lord Frazier in Calcutta on November 9 last," said the aged man, his eyes suffused with tears, "my boy Ben was made a knight by King Edward VII of England on February 9 of this year. The king also decorated him with a gold medal for bravery. My other son, Edwin, is a thirty-second degree Mason.

"I have been engaged in one business in this city for seven years. The police judge heard only the testimony of a policeman and the complainant, and said: 'Five hundred dollars.' I never committed a crime in my life."

While discussing the matter of parole, Barker said he would withdraw his application, and appeal. He did not wish to bear the stigma of having to report to the secretary every week. The board told him there was no stigma attached to a parole and promised to look into his references today, when he may be granted freedom.

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July 6, 1909

LIVE OLD DAYS OVER AGAIN.

Fremont-Lincoln Association's Re-
Union in Kansas City, Kas.

About fifty white-haired men, led by a fife and drum corps, marched down Seventh street in Kansas City, Kas., yesterday afternoon to the Washington Avenue M. E. church, where the annual meeting of the Fremont and Lincoln Voters' Association was held. All of them had cast a vote for Abraham Lincoln in the presidential election of 1860, and a majority of them had voted for John C. Fremont in 1856.

At the church an address of welcome was delivered by Mayor U. S. Guyer, which was responded to by Major James P. Dew of Kansas City, Mo., the president of the association. Col. L. H. Waters of Kansas City, Mo., gave some personal reminiscences of Abraham Lincoln, of whom he was a personal friend. A number of five-minute talks were made by others who had voted for the "martyred president."

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July 6, 1909

REVIEWED BATTLE
OF OLD WESTPORT.

REUNION AND PICNIC ON WOR-
NALL ROAD.

Pioneers Hear of Kansas City's Pre-
carious Situation During Price
Raid -- Purchase of Shaw-
nee Mission Proposed.

The battle of Westport was lived over again by a hundred of the city's oldest inhabitants comprising what is now known as the Historical Society at the old Wornall homestead at Sixty-first street and the Wornall road yesterday.

The occasion was a basket picnic of the society and the object was no more than to celebrate the nation's birthday but so many could recall the time when the Wornall mansion was a hospital and and the cottonwoods around the premises were split and riven in battle that the names of Price, Mulligan and Curtis came easy, and many a gray headed veteran leaned eagerly forward in his seat while the speakers marshaled before them the contending armies.

"It was this way," said Judge John C. Gage, who was a participant in the battle. "General Price driven from behind by the Federal forces left Independence, Mo., and crossed the Blue. It was a serious moment for Kansas City for General Curtis left the town unprotected and crossed over to Wyandotte to his headquarters. For a whole night the city was practically at the mercy of the Confederates.

"It was a good thing the Confederates did not know of this movement of Curtis. By the next day he had returned and when the battle occurred Curtis was on hand and fought like a tiger."

Several of the old residents who were present had never heard of the incident referred to by Judge Gage. Others who were participants on one side or the other remembered it distinctly.

MISPLACED STRATEGY.

"Very little has been said of Curtis's desertion of Kansas City at this time," said the judge after his speech to some of those who had never heard. "It was an incident quickly closed by the prompt return of the federal forces from across the Kaw. You see General Curtis at first believed it might be more important to protect Fort Leavenworth than the city. When he discovered how small a force General Price had and that he was practically running away from federal pressure behind he changed his mind. He was no coward and his retrograde movement was merely misplaced strategy."

Other speakers were Judge John B. Stone, ex-Confederate soldier; Mrs. Laura Coates Reed, Hon. D. C. Allen of Liberty, Mo., Miss Elizabeth B. Gentry, Mrs. Henry N. Ess, William Z. Hickman and Dr. W. L. Campbell. Frank C. Wornall read the Declaration of Independence and Mrs. Dr. Allan Porter read a selection entitled "Two Volunteers." The meeting of the society was presided over by Dr. Campbell, who also introduced the speakers.

A proposition was made by Mrs. Laura Coates Reed to the effect that the society purchase the old Shawnee mission in Johnson county, Kas., for a historical museum to be used jointly by the D. A. R. society and the Historical Society. Mrs. Reed's remarks along this line were seconded by those of Mrs. Henry Ess.

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June 28, 1909

SOLDIER, SAILOR AND
THIEF, IN THE TOILS.

"BOBBY" WRIGHT, 75, SPENDS
NIGHT IN HOLDOVER.

Built Missouri Telegraph Lines in
1862, Then Was Steamboatman
and Later Noted "Hotel
Worker."

"Bobby" Wright, 75 years old, formerly soldier, sailor and now the oldest sneak thief in point of experience int he world, stayed in the city holdover last night to avoid worse trouble. Wright has been in the city several weeks, but was not picked up by the police until yesterday.

Wright confided to a visitor through the bars last night that he was born in New England, but was brought up in the South. When the civil war broke out, however, he was loyal to the Union and joined the army, becoming a private in the miners and sappers' division of the army. He was assigned to General Lyon's army in Missouri and afterwards under General Fremont.

"I put telegraph wires clear across Missouri in the year 1862," he said.

After the war he became a sailor on a merchant ship and was for ten years a steamboatman on the Mississippi river. Then his criminal tendencies became assertive and he became a professional thief, if the records kept by the police departments of many cities are to be believed.

His advent into this city was in 1882 and he has been a frequent visitor since. On almost every visit he was entertained in the city holdover, and he has frequently been convicted in the municipal court.

Wright is whitehaired, partly bald and has white whiskers. He is stooped and tall. His particular branch of thievery is known as hotel work. He walks into a hostelry, goes upstairs, and when he finds a door unlocked enters the room and makes away with all the valuables he can conceal about his person. This is the police report on Bobby Wright.

"He is one of the cleverest men in the country at his trade," said Inspector of Detectives Edward J. Boyle last night.

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June 22, 1909

MAJOR J. M. HADLEY IS DEAD.

Father of Missouri Governor Long
a Prominent Citizen of John-
son County, Kas.

DE SOTO, KAS., June 21. -- Major John M. Hadley, father of Governor H. S. Hadley of Missouri, died here at 2:35 o'clock this afternoon from the effects of a stroke of apoplexy which he suffered June 9. For several days he had lain in an unconscious condition, and the end came quietly. His son and daughter, Mrs. J. W. Lyman, came yesterday and were with their father to last night.

The funeral services, conducted by Rev. W. J. Mitchell, pastor of the M. E. church at this place, an old soldier and personal friend, will be held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Snyder at 1:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, after which the body will be taken to Olathe and interment made in the family lot.

The active pallbearers here will be Dr. W. M. Marcks, B. S. Taylor, C. S. Becroft, Zimri Gardner, C. K. Dow and B. F. Snyder. At Olathe they will be chosen from the Masonic lodge.

The G. A. R. and the Masonic orders, both of which Major Hadley was an active member, will have charge of the services at Olathe. The honorary pallbearers at Olathe will be Colonel Conover of Kansas City, Major I. O. Pickering, Colonel J. T. Burris, J. T. Little of Olathe, Frank R. Obb and William Pellet of Olathe, all of whom have been personal friends.

The governor reached Kansas City from the capital on a special train Sunday, after receiving word of the critical condition of his father. He was met at the station by a motor car, and made the remainder of the trip to De Soto overland, arriving at the bedside of his father at 1:30 Sunday afternoon.

The elder Hadley was one of the most prominent citizens of De Soto, president of the De Soto State Bank., and connected with many of the institutions of Johnson county, of which he was a pioneer resident.

Major Hadley located at Shawnee Mission in 1855. In October, 1861, he enlisted in the Eighth Kansas Infantry, being rapidly promoted to the rank of second lieutenant, in which capacity he served for fifteen months.

He was later made lieutenant and then captain of the Ninth Kansas Cavalry, and in May, 1865, was promoted to the rank of major, which title clung to him until death. At the close of the war Major Hadley was elected sheriff of Johnson county and served until 1870, when he was made clerk of the district court. He was also head of the extensive flouring mills at De Soto. In 1877 Major Hadley represented his district in the state assembly as senator, being re-elected in 1879.

He was one of the largest land owners in Johnson county. Mrs. Hadley died in 1875.

EXECUTIVE OFFICES CLOSED.

JEFFERSON CITY, MO., June 21. -- Acting Governor Humphreys said tonight that as a mark of respect to the governor whose father, Major John M. Hadley, died at De Soto, Kas., this afternoon, the governor's office and those departments in the state house grounds which come under the appointment of the governor would be closed tomorrow. This, he said, was as far as he would go, and that he was governed by the governor's wish in the matter, having talked with him by telephone.

No formal proclamation will be issued, however, as Major Hadley was not a resident of the state.

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May 31, 1909

MEMORIAL DAY PLEASURE
SEEKER CALLED TRAITOR.

Person Who Attends Ball Game Then
Should Be Branded, Says
Rev. James Schindel.

"Tomorrow will be Memorial day, a holy day, not a holiday. If it were in my power I would gather every man in Kansas city who goes to a baseball game or other amusement on that day, into some public concourse and brand him as a traitor."

With these words the Rev. James C. Schindel, pastor of the First English Lutheran church, last night denounced everything that would tend to desecrate the day when America pays grateful tribute to her soldier dead. At nearly all of the churches yesterday, mention was made of the day.

Various G. A. R. posts of Kansas City will visit the cemeteries today and decorate the graves of the fallen and at Independence the Pythians will remember their departed members.

Mr. Schindel's sermon was to members of the Grand Army of the Republic, Women's Relief Corps, Confederate Veterans Army of the Philippines, Ladies' Auxiliary, Society of the Porto Rican Expedition, United Spanish war veterans, the Third Regiment of the Missouri national guard and the Lincoln circle of the G. A. R. The church was crowded.

When Mr. Schindel made his denunciation of persons who seek amusement on such an occasion as Memorial day, the veterans could not withhold suppressed applause.

Paul's words: "I have fought a good fight," furnished the pastor his text.

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May 31, 1909

PLAYED ROUND WORLD
WITH GENERAL GRANT.

PEDRO MEYRELLES ALSO LED
PATTI'S ORCHESTRA.

End Comes to Noted Musician, Who
for Many Years Was Musical
Director at Leavenworth
Soldiers' Home.

Pedro C. Meyrelles, the bandmaster who accompanied General U. S. Grant around the world, who led Patti's orchestra for ten years, long musical director of the Leavenworth Soldiers' home and once one of the most distinguished musicians and conductors in this country, died yesterday morning at his hime, 2321 Harrison street, after a protracted illness.

Mr. Meyrelles was born of a family of musicians in Oporto, Portugal. He first began the systematic study of music at the age of 11. when a young man he graduated from the best musical school in Lisbon and at 28 came to America.

ROUND WORLD WITH GRANT.

He landed in Boston, where he gave lessons. When a bandmaster was wanted to accompany General U. S. Grant in his triumphal tour around the world. Meyrelles was honored with the position. He was enlisted in the army for three years and was made a first lieutenant in order to accept this post. The king of Portugal himself decorated Meyrelles with a medal and the empress of China had him to sup with her and afterwards gave him a decoration.

When the trip was over Meyrelles found himself a national figure. Upon his return to Boston he was chosen by Patti to lead her orchestra and remained with the great singer for ten years, making two trips abroad with her. It was at this time that Meyrelles met the woman who afterwards became his wife. She was Miss Georgia Follensbee, a member of an old Boston family and a singer in Patti's company.

They were in the company together for several years, but it was not until twenty-one years ago that they were married. The event occurred immediately after Meyrelles left Patti's company to accept a governor appointment as director of music at the Soldiers' home, Leavenworth, Kas. Meyrelles remained in this position until May 20 of last year, when his failing health made it necessary for him to retire.

WELL KNOWN AS COMPOSER.

Meyrelles, besides being a master of every musical instrument played in either band or orchestra, was a composer of many well known pieces. His arrangement of the Stabat Mater is a classic and his "Governor Owen's March" is still widely used. In addition he composed all the music used in the Priests of Pallas festivals for the last five years and all used in the Kansas building at the Louisiana Purchase exposition. For his own use, his favorite instrument was the clarinet.

Meyrelles was a Mason, a member of the B. P. O. E. and the Theatrical Mechanical Association. A Roman Catholic by training and practice for many years, he had fallen away from his faith, but in his last hours he asked for a priest and was given the rites of the church. The cause of his death was principally heart trouble.

The body will be taken to the Old Soldiers' home near Leavenworth and will be given military burial tomorrow.

He leaves a widow.

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May 29, 1909

PIONEER CONDUCTOR DIES.

A. B. Shepherd Ran Out of Topeka
in 1870 on Santa Fe.

A. B. Shepherd, one of the three conductors who were with the Santa Fe railroad when it started out of Topeka in 1870, and one of the oldest passenger conductors working out of the Union depot, died yesterday morning at his home, 1216 Washington street, at the age of 67 years. For several years Mr. Shepherd has had a night run on the Missouri Pacific line from Kansas City to Coffeyville, Kas.

Born and reared in Wellsville, O., Mr. Shepherd enlisted in the One Hundred and First Ohio volunteers at the outbreak of the civil war. At its close he was discharged with the rank of sergeant. Immediately he became a brakeman on the Cleveland & Pittsburg railway and had been in the railway business since, working out of Kansas City for thirty years.

Mr. Shepherd was a member of the Order of Railway Conductors. A widow and two sons, Charles, who lives in Armourdale, and Wilbur B., who lives at the Washington street address, survive.

Funeral services will be held this afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home. Rev. Dr. George Reynolds, pastor of the Second Presbyterian church, will officiate. Burial will be in Forest Hill cemetery.

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May 11, 1909

OLD SOLDIER OF 65
WINS YOUTHFUL BRIDE.

HIS PROPOSAL FOLLOWED SOON
AFTER FIRST MEETING.

"My Reasons for Marrying Are Not
for Publication," Said Veteran
Porter's Young Wife -- Plan
a Fine Honeymoon.

CARRIE CLEMENTS.
27-Year-Old Bride of 67-Year-Old Civil War Veteran.

December and June were mated last night at the Hotel Moore, Ninth and Central streets, when Henry C. Porter, 65 years old, was married to Miss Carrie Clements, 27 years of age. Porter, who lost his right leg at the battle of Gettysburg, supported himself on his crutches and took the hand of his diminutive bride in his while she promised to "love, honor and obey him until death did them part."

In celebration of the occasion the old soldier wore a "boiled shirt" with a stiff collar and necktie, for the first time in thirty years.

"I've been too busy out in Colorado and New Mexico to wear city clothes," he said. "But when a man marries there are a good many changes that come into his life and it isn't too much to ask him to wear these things then."

"Ours was a short courtship but a stirring one," continued Porter, his blue eyes twinkling. "I had seen her long before I made her acquaintance and was struck by her daintiness and prettiness. I made up my mind to win her. We boarded at the same house in Pueblo and two months ago I proposed and she accepted me. It's just like other love stories except that I was in a hurry and she couldn't resist me."

BRIDE A NEW YORKER.

Miss Clements is a brunette, four feet five inches tall. She was born in Caldwell, Warren county, N. Y., and her parents and only sister live there yet. Three years ago she went to Pueblo, and was employed in a department store when the veteran met her.

"Why should a young woman like you marry an old man like Mr. Porter?" she was asked.

"That is the only question I will not answer," she replied. "I have my reasons, but they are not for publication."

Henry C. Porter enlisted in the Ninety-fifth New York volunteers at the outbreak of the civil war. He was in many battles and was orderly to General Reynolds at the battle of Gettysburg. He was a few feet behind that general when he was killed, and the next day was mowed down himself in the charge on Missionary Ridge. For several months he lay in the hospital with a lame leg, and afterwards joined a Nebraska cavalry regiment.

After the surrender at Appomatox, and the review of the troops at Washington, he found time to have his leg amputated, and then started to earn his living by his trade as a miller. He had learned this business at the age of 14 years, and at the time of his retirement several years ago had worked at it for forty years.

GROOM IS WELL-TO-DO.

Porter moved to Colorado twenty-two years ago, and has worked in Denver, Leadville, Telluride, Cripple Creek, Pueblo and Albequerque, N. M. After his retirement he lived comfortably on his pension and the income from his property. He is fairly well-to-do.

The honeymoon trip which the oddly assorted pair will take is one to be envied. Miss Clements left Pueblo for this city several days ago and took rooms at the Buck hotel. Yesterday Mr. Porter arrived, and they were married last night. Today or tomorrow they will leave for St. Louis, and after resting a few days, proceed to Chicago. Thence they will travel by easy stages to Washington. Their next stopping place will be Baltimore, and they will take ship for San Francisco at New York. Later they will make a trip through Yellowstone Park, and will then go back to Pueblo or Denver, and begin housekeeping.

"I want to be back home in time to attend the national G. A. R. convention which will be held in Salt Lake City September 7," said the soldier, saluting and marching away in a brand new pair of crutches bought for the glad occasion.

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May 2, 1909

PRAISES AMERICAN SOLDIER.

General Morton Tells of Valor at
Army Officers' Banquet.

What is said to have been the largest gathering of army officers, graduates of West Point, away from the academy itself, was held at the Hotel Baltimore last night when nearly 100 officers assembled in the ball room at the first of a series of annual banquets to be given in Kansas City. Brigadier General Charles A. Morton of Omaha, commander of the department of the Missouri, was the presiding officer.

General Morton, in response to the toast, "The Army," said that the valor of the American army on the field of battle had never been questioned and that its efficiency and strength has only been made possible by its superiority. The general spoke of the condition of the army today and declared that its increase had never been in proportion to the increase of the population of the country.

Following General Morton, Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., welcomed the officers and their guests to Kansas City. The mayor extended to them the usual courtesies and promised immunity from arrest while within the corporate limits of the city.

The following toasts were responded to: "The Navy," Lieutenant R. S. Landis, U. S. N., and "Military Education by Captain H. A. White of the military school at Fort Leavenworth. "Our Dead" was a silent toast.

Brigadier General Frederick Funston, who was to have responded to the toast "West Point," was obliged to leave the banquet room early and was not heard. General Funston was the guest of honor. Other guests were: General Rambold, Colonel Loughborough and Colonel Lechtman.

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April 29, 1909

DANCE IN FULL UNIFORM.

Governor's Staff at Mansion Hop in
Honor of Colonel Andrae.

JEFFERSON CITY, April 28. -- Governor Herbert S. Hadley tonight gave a dance in honor of Colonel Henry Andrae, warden of the state penitentiary and a member of the governor's staff,, who is to be married tomorrow to Miss Gussie Neff.

For the event the governor invited all the members of his official staff, and about twenty of them reported in full regimentals. None made a braver showing than Colonel E. S. Jewett of Kansas City, who was in full uniform, and smothered in gold lace.

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April 23, 1909

CROSSED THE PLAINS
TOGETHER IN 1858.

FORMER COMRADES MEET FOR
FIRST TIME SINCE.

George W. Friend and Ferd Smith
Fought on Opposite Sides in War
and Both Were in Battle
of Lexington.

Curiosity on the part of a young man who desired to witness the meeting of two old soldiers of the same war, but who fought under different flags, last night brought together two men who crossed the plains in company in 1858, but who had not heard of each other since. George W. Friend of Anderson, Mo., and Ferd Smith of 3339 Morrill avenue were the principals in the meeting.

It was in 1858 that the men joined the same train of freighters from Kansas City to Fort Union, N. M., and drove teams of oxen and fought Indians on the plains for ninety days. On the return of the freighters to Kansas City they were disbanded and them men went back to their farms. They lost track of each other until last night.

MEET AT HOSPITAL.

An operation being necessary to save the life of his son, George W. Friend came to Kansas City several days ago and took his son to Wesley hospital. About the same time a nephew of Ferd Smith became ill and went to the hospital. The nephew met Mr. Friend and last night when his uncle called to see him the nephew introduced the old men.

"Smith, Smith. You are not the Smith from Lafayette county, are you?" Mr. Friend asked.

"Yes, I joined the Confederate army at Lexington," Smith replied.

"A man named Smith crossed the plains with me in '58," Friend remarked.

"That's me," Ex-Freighter Smith answered.

"What, are you 'Pudd' Smith?" Friend asked, and when he was told that the old soldier was the same man who crossed the plains with him, he led the way to two chairs on the veranda where there was a great talk-fest.

During the conversation the friends discovered that they were both engaged in the battle at Lexington,, one fighting for the Confederacy and the other on the side of the Union.

TRIED TO KILL EACH OTHER.

"I did my best to kill you, Friend," Smith informed his friend.

"Same here, Pete," was the rejoinder made by Friend.

The old soldiers have arranged to see each other every day while Friend is in town. The first t rip across the plains made by Friend was for Anderson & Hays of Westport, in 1857, and he freighted to Fort Union. Thereafter he crossed the plains twelve times, most of his trips being to Fort Union, although he made one to Santa Fe and another to Denver.

Mr. Friend is 71 years old and his friend of the plains is 72 years old.

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April 18, 1909

OLD SOLDIER SAVES
LIFE OF A WOMAN.

KNOCKED DOWN MAN WHO
STABBED MRS. ETHEL GRAY.

George Ripley, in Mad Fit, Was
Using Knife on Keeper of Room-
ing House When Charles
Hendrickson Interfered.

The strong right arm of Charles Hendrickson, 68 years old and a member of Fighting Joe Hooker's command during the civil war, saved the life of Mrs. Ethel Gray, 25 years old, last night at 9 o'clock. Hendrickson knocked down George Ripley, an admirer of Mrs. Gray's, after he had stabbed her in the back with a dirk.

Mrs. Gray, whose husband is out of town, bought a building at 215 East Fourteenth street last week and opened it as a rooming house for men only. Hendrickson, who is a carpenter, and W. T. Huddleston, a druggist, were among the roomers.

"I have known George Ripley only a week," she said at the general hospital last night. "He made my acquaintance in a restaurant and walked home with me. He called two or three times but never made love to me until last night. When he came into the room I saw that he had been drinking and it was not long before he began making love to me in the presence of Mr. Hendrickson. I am a married woman and, of course, I paid no attention to him. Then he got angry and struck me."

Hendrickson caught the man's arm after he had landed several blows on Mrs. Gray's face. Huddleston heard the noise and came to the old soldier's assistance. Between them they quieted the man and locked him in a rear room, while Mrs. Gray ran to the drug store of Adolph Lahme at Fourteenth street and Grand avenue and telephoned the Walnut street police station for an officer.

While she was away Ripley escaped from the house by opening a window, but Hendrickson and Huddleston almost immediately discovered his absence and went to the front door to prevent him from waylaying their landlady on her return. Ripley sprang out of the alley between Grand avenue and McGee streets and Huddleston attempted to prevent him from reaching Mrs. Gray.

"This isn't your butt-in," said Ripley. Huddleston gave way and Ripley ran after Mrs. Gray. At her own doorstep he caught her and stabbed her once in the back. Then the old soldier, who was standing on the steps, stepped down and struck the would-be assassin in the face. Ripley was knocked down, but arose and rushed at the woman again. Hendrickson struck again and knocked the knife out of his hand. Then Ripley fled.

The ambulance from the Walnut street police station was called and Dr. H. A. Hamilton dressed the cut, which was in the middle of the back. The knife penetrated to the vertebra. While the physician was at work the woman told the story to officers J. S. Scott and E. M. Wallace and furnished them with a description and a picture of her assailant. Later she was removed to the general hospital, where it was said that she would recover. Ripley has not been arrested. He is about 25 years old and rooms at 1322 Wyandotte street.

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April 4, 1909

OLD SOLDIER A BRIDEGROOM.

Abraham Vanderpool Confesses to 70,
While His Bride is 44.

Abraham Vanderpool, an old soldier of Liberty, Mo., who modestly gave his age as 70, took out a license yesterday to wed Mrs. Martha Ann Fannon of Kansas City. She confessed to 44. The marriage ceremony was performed last night at the home of Mrs. Khoves, daughter of the bride, 225 West Sixteenth street.

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March 25, 1909

CIVIL WAR VETERAN DEAD.

Captain Williams Had Been an In-
valid for Two Years.

Captain W. J. Williams, a veteran of the civil war, for forty years a resident of Kansas City, Kas., died yesterday at St. Margaret's hospital from the effects of an operation. He was 73 years old and had been practically an invalid for the past two years.

Captain Williams was born in North Carolina and at the age of 19 years ran away from home and joined the regular army at Leavenworth for the sole purpose of going with the troops to attack Brigham Young at Salt Lake City. His company was among the forces dispatched to the Mormon capital, but before much of the journey had been accomplished war was declared between the North and South and the westbound troops were recalled to Fort Leavenworth and sent South. Captain Williams was engaged in the battle of Wilson creek.

Of a family of five children, Captain Williams is survived by one son, Frank Williams, a former member of the Kansas City, Kas., police force. His wife died eight months ago. He lived at 193 South Pyle street. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

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March 4, 1909

CUSTER SURVIVOR TO TALK.

Older Boys Will Hear "What Makes
a Soldier."

A meeting of older boys will be held at the Academy of Music Sunday at 3:30 p. m. under the auspices of the Y. M. C. A. An address on "What Makes a Soldier" will be delivered by Colonel T. W. Goldin, mounted messenger for General Custer and a survivor of the battle of the Little Big Horn.

This will be the first of a series of meetings for older boys which will be held at the same place every Sunday afternoon. Moving pictures representing biblical scenes will be shown after the lecture. Special music will be furnished. admission by ticket only.

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March 4, 1909

ADMIRAL EVANS IS THANKFUL.

Telegraphs Appreciation to President
for Interest in Son's Behalf.

In a personal telegram which was forwarded to Washington yesterday, Rear Admiral Robley D. Evans and wife thanked President Roosevelt for his efforts in behalf of their son, Lieutenant Frank Evans, whose court-martial sentence for misconduct in the Philippines last year was reduced from a loss of 150 numbers and a reprimand to a loss of fifty numbers and a reprimand. The aged parents of the young officer heard of the modification of their son's sentence at the Hotel Baltimore yesterday morning and were overjoyed.

Admiral Evans and his wife departed yesterday afternoon for Joplin, where the admiral lectured last night.

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March 2, 1909

AGED COUPLE KILLED
BY ESCAPING GAS.

FOUND IN THEIR HOME 36
HOURS AFTER DEATH.

Bodies of A. H. Tuttle, Civil War
Veteran, and His Wife, Discovered
in Residence -- Grate and
Heater Burning.

Last night, when Captain Jack Burns of fire company No. 18 entered the house of A. H. Tuttle, 2617 East Twenty-fifth street, and found an aged man and his wife both dead, Tuttle lying on his side on the floor and his wife sitting in a chair in the front room of the house. A gas grate and an overhead gas heater in the room were burning.

The first intimation of a tragedy was discovered by A. M. Weed, a solicitor for the Wells-Fargo Express Company. Captain Tuttle, as he was familiarly called, has been an employe of the express company for the past twenty-five years. When he failed to appear at the depot yesterday morning, for the first time in years, it was thought he was ill. Mr. Weed called at the house about 2:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon and failing to get a response to repeated ringing of the door bell, walked around the house. He questioned a little girl playing in the yard as to whether Tuttle lived the4re, and if she had seen either of them that day. The girl replied that she had not seen either of them since Sunday morning. Weed found the milk on the back porch and the morning papers on the front porch.

FILLED WITH GAS FUMES.

Mr. Weed returned to the office and reported to H. B. Jeffereies, assistant agent, that he suspected something wrong. Mr. Jefferies visited the house at 6 o'clock and after investigating saw the blue flame of the gas heater, which is attached to the gas jet, through a side window. He went to the front porch and putting his hand on the large plate glass window found it to be hot. He called W. W. Hunt, who lives at 2619 East Twenty-fifth street, and after a consultation sent a boy to No. 18 fire station for a ladder. Captain Burns and one of his men responded and entered the house through an upstairs window.

"As soon as I opened the window I could smell the gas fumes and the still more horrible odor of decaying human flesh," said Captain Burns. "It was necessary to light matches to see in the ho use as most of the curtains were drawn. The heat was intense. Coming down the stairs the heat was more noticeable and gas fumes made breathing difficult. In the parlor, off the reception hall, we found the old couple; Captain Tuttle lying on the floor and Mrs. Tuttle sitting in her Morris chair in front of the burning grate, her head over on her breast as if in sleep."

DEAD THIRTY-SIX HOURS.

Mr. Jefferies and Mr. Hunt went into the house and opened the doors and windows. Coroner's physician, Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, was called and declared that the death had occurred thirty-six hours earlier. He said that asphyxiation from inhaling carbon monoxide was the cause of death. Carbon monoxide is the fumes from imperfect combustion of natural gas, and is similar to that given off my burning anthracite coal.

Before noon Sunday morning Mrs. Tuttle went to a neighbor, Mrs. Jackson, at 2515 East Twenty-fifth street, and borrowed a cupful of sugar, saying she was going to make a custard pie. This was the last time she was seen alive. Other neighbors had seen the couple earlier in the day.

From the appearance of the house, those acquainted with Captain and Mrs. Tuttle declared that they had evidently just gotten up from the breakfast table. The breakfast dishes had been washed and were on the dining table, covered with a cloth. Captain Tuttle's razor, shaving brush, mug and strop were lying on the kitchen table.

W. L. Cowing, 2506 Montgall, said that Mr. and Mrs. Tuttle were to have gone with him to Shawnee Sunday afternoon to look over some land. "I saw them yesterday morning," said Mr. Cowing last night, "and they both declared they would go. When I came to the house in the afternoon I got no response to my ringing of the doorbell and concluded they had gone ahead of me."

Rev. R. P. Witherspoon, 1601 Belmot avenue, brother of Mrs. Tuttle, was called form the Gypsy Smith meeting and arrived at the house after 9 o'clock. He was shocked at the news. He said that he had never known a happier or more devoted couple.

"My sister and her husband have led an ideal life," he said, "and had it not been for neighbors and friends this thing might have gone unnoticed for days. They loved each other and everyone around them, and were loved by them in turn."

CIVIL WAR VETERAN.

Captain Tuttle served in the Sixteenth Ohio regiment of infantry in the civil war. Shortly after the war he became a director in the Missouri penitentiary at Jefferson City, where he remained several years. He afterwards went to Warrensburg, Mo., and engaged in business. Twenty-five years ago he joined the messenger service of the Wells Fargo Express Company and remained with them until his death.

Promotions came one after another, until he became money deliverer and one of the most trusted employes of the company. His superiors and associates declare that his word was as good as a bond. It is said that the company has offered several times to retire him on a pension, but that he has steadily refused, saying that he must be around and doing something or he couldn't feel right. He drew $36 a month as pension from the government.

Three sons survive the couple. They are Lloyd Tuttle, a salesman for the Ferguson-McKinney Dry Goods Company in St. Louis; Charles P. Tuttle of Coalinga, Cal., and Harry Tuttle of St. Paul, Minn. Mr. Tuttle has a brother living in Creston, O., and Mrs. Tuttle has a sister, Mrs. T. J. Claggett, Marshall, Mo., and two brothers, Charles Witherspoon, Mansfield, Tex., and the Rev. R. P. Witherspoon of this city.

The bodies were taken to Carroll-Davidson's undertaking rooms on Grand avenue. News of the deaths has been telegraphed to the sons and the funeral arrangements will await their arrival in this city.

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February 27, 1909

"FIGHTING BOB" CRIPPLED.

Wheel Chair Ordered for Admiral,
Who Has Rheumatism.

"Rear Admiral Robley D. Evans will arrive on the Burlington from St. Louis Saturday morning at 7:10. Meet him with a wheel chair and see that he is cared for. He has a severe attack of rheumatism."

This was the order received by Union depot officials last night. "Fighting Bob" is coming to Kansas City to lecture next Tuesday evening at Convention hall under the auspices of the local Young Women's Christian Association on "From Hampton Roads to San Francisco," relating interesting incidents in connection with the cruise of the American battleships during the first leg of their globe-encircling journey.

It was not known here that Admiral Evans was ill until the above instructions were received by the depot authorities. Kansas City business men had planned to have a delegation meet the distinguished visitor and entertain him, but it is probable that his condition will prevent him from taking part in any social functions. It is thought, however, that he will be able to fill his engagement.

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December 6, 1908

DID YOU EVER ADDRESS
MR. LINCOLN AS 'ABE'?

IF SO COL. L. H. WATERS WANTS
YOUR NAME.

It Will Also Admit You to a Place
on the Programme at
Next February's
Centenary.

Grand Army men are scouring the woods for people who personally knew Abraham Lincoln, in order that provision may be made for including their names in the programme which is being arranged for the Lincoln centenary next February. There are known to be a dozen people living in Kansas City who casually knew the president, but the Grand Army post officers want men who knew Lincoln well enough to call him "Abe." Colonel L. H. Waters says there are no such people here, "because," he said yesterday, "in my time and Mr. Lincoln's time nobody but the people of his own age and in exalted position dared to call him anything but Mr. Lincoln. I knew him for twenty years. I employed him to help me in cases. I was with him in his great campaigns and he helped me during the war, but I never called him 'Abe,' and I seldom heard anybody else so address him. He was like no other man that I ever met."

"Maybe you will break down the 'Abe Lincoln story' legend, too," was said.

"And I will," replied Colonel Waters. "In all those twenty years of fairly close association I never saw Mr. Lincoln sit down and swap stories. He would tell stories to illustrate his points, but he would not do what I do, and what all the balance of us do once in a while, sit down and deliberately say, 'that reminds me,' and go on and tell stories by the dozen. Do not understand me as saying that Mr. Lincoln never told stories. He did, and they were always excruciatingly funny.

"In Kentucky two families had a feud, and two sons moved over to Illinois and, of all bad luck, took up adjoining farms. One went to the farm of the other and called him a shameful name. The offended one was hoeing potatoes at the time. He felled the invader with the blade and was indicted. I defended him when he was tried for the criminal offense and Mr. Lincoln helped me. He knew I was to get $50 and, when I asked him -- we were at Macomb -- to help me, he said he would have to charge me $25. It was pretty stiff in view of my getting only $50, but I agreed to it. Mr. Lincoln was an older man than I. He let me try the case, sat behind and prompted me, as he always prompted young lawyers, and wrote out the instructions. Then he made me copy them and for a quarter of a century 'my' instructions were held up to public view in that district. I took credit for them, but the credit belonged to Mr. Lincoln.

"I asked him if he thought the judge would give them to the jury.

" 'They are the law,' Mr. Lincoln answered. 'The judge will give them.'

We got our man off and then the bully sued him for $5,000 damages. It was the first damage case ever brought in the county. I was to get another $50 for defending the man. Again I turned to Mr. Lincoln and again he said he would have to charge $25.

"Now for an Abraham Lincoln story, which has the merit of being a true one. There were two lawyers on the other side, one with a voice like the Bull of Bashan. He fairly roared when he spoke. Mr. Lincoln always spoke in a conversational tone. His face was worse than homely in repose and more than beautiful when lit up, as it always was when Mr. Lincoln was engaged in conversation.

" 'There is nothing in this case, as the counsel on the other side would admit if only he knew anything about it,' Mr. Lincoln said in our behalf. 'The fortunate thing for the plaintiff is that our client had a hoe instead of a revolver. It is not the day when a man can invade the castle of another and apply to him epithet sand escape without the weight of a blow.

" 'I have said,' Mr Lincoln went on, 'that counsel on the other side would know there was nothing in this suit if only the counsel knew, but counsel talks too loud. He reminds me of the boat on the Sangamon river. It had a four-foot boiler and a six-foot whistle. Every time it whistled it had to stop running, and when it started running it had to stop whistling. Counsel on the other side has to stop thinking when he talks and has to stop talking when he thinks.' "

Colonel Waters is to be the principal speaker at the Lincoln centenary.

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November 8, 1908

SOLDIER WHO SHOUTED
"REMEMBER CUSTER"
IS DEAD.

Heart Disease Claims As a Victim
David H. Pingree at the
Age of 56.

You remember the story in the history books about the massacre of General Custer in the Bad Lands of South Dakota, do you not? Especially you remember the stirring incident of the time when the troops who had been sent to revenge the death of the gallant leader and capture the redskin chief, Sitting Bull, wavered and were about to retreat before the withering fire poured out upon them from ambush, a soldier rose in his saddle and cried aloud:

"Remember Custer."

Only two words, but they made history. The soldiers rallied, taking those words for their battlecry and charged, inflicting the most decisive defeat upon the Indian warriors ever suffered in the history of the race.

The man who spoke those words is dead. David H. Pingree, 56 years old, formerly member of the Seventh United States cavalry, dropped dead of heart trouble last Friday morning. He had been honorably discharged from the army with the mark of "excellent" in 1891, after a service of six years. He came to Kansas City, where he remained a short time, but soon went to Iola, Kas., where he went into the hotel business, but for the past two years has been living in this city. A wife, who lives in Rich Hill, Mo., survives.

Besides turning the tide of the battle by giving his comrades a slogan to fight for at the psychological moment Pingree contributed largely to the victory in another way. A party of Indians were hidden behind a tent close to the regiment and they were picking off a cavalryman at every opportunity. Pingree and another soldier loosened up a Hotchkiss gun and trained it on the tent. In a few moments there was no tent left and the Indians were forced to seek another cover.

Pingree was an Elk. The lodge will have charge of the funeral services at 2:30 this afternoon from Eylar Bros. chapel, Fourteenth and Main streets. Burial will be in Mount Washington cemetery.

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October 24, 1908

JESSE JAMES USED TO
KEEP NEGRO SCHOOL.

J. M. TURNER, EDUCATOR, RE-
CALLS EARLY DAYS HERE.

Former Minister to Liberia Taught
First Negro School in Mis-
souri -- Addresses Negro
Hadley Meeting.

From slavery into the diplomatic service cost J. Milton Turner a life of effort, but he had time on the side to educate the negroes of Missouri and help 'em out in Kansas. Turner, who was the principal speaker at the negro Hadley meeting last night in the Rev. Dr. Hurst's church at Independence avenue and Charlotte street, came here yesterday for the first time in a great many years.

There wasn't any reception committee at the depot to greet him, so he strolled up to Ninth and Main streets to have a look at the site of the first negro school in Missouri. Turner taught that school. It was supported by Jesse James, and most of the legal advice and diplomatic stunts necessary to keep a Confederate school board from running Turner out of the community came from Colonel R. T. Van Horn.

Turner said last night that he came here in '67 to get the Republican separate school law into effect. There wasn't a negro school in the state when he landed, although the law provided that there should be in every district where there were over twenty pupils. The school board of '60 and '61 had gone off to join the Confederate army, and had returned and arbitrarily taken up their old duties and were then finishing up their terms in office. They got back to duty just in time to confront the separate school law, which Republicans had placed on the books and which the Democrats have been claiming credit for ever since.

JESSE JAMES CONTRIBUTES.

Turner wanted to start a school, but the Confederate school board here wouldn't recognize either him or the law. Turner said yesterday that Colonel R. T. Van Horn secured a carpenter shop for him at Ninth and Main streets and told him to get busy. Turner had a wife, but no furniture, and a generous storekeeper gave him cloth to make a partition and goods boxes to make tables. The board refused to pay his salary and he lived in the carpenter shop and taught school in a corner of it the entire winter without pay.

"Jesse James used to ride in and shoot up the town," said Turner. "He was in sympathy with the school. When he was ready to leave the town he used to ride up and demand to see the n----- school teacher. I would go out trembling and admit that I was the teacher.

"Are they paying you?" Jesse James would ask. When I told him no he would hand me a $10 bill and ride away. He was about the only cash patron I had."

In the spring, after his first term, the carpenter returned and offered to sell Turner his place, 200 feet on Main street and seventy-five feet on Ninth street, for $300, and offered to trust the negro for the money. Turner thought the carpenter was crazy and declined, taking a summer job as a bootblack in a hotel on the Kansas side of the border.

GETS HIS BACK PAY.

Getting into Kansas got Turner into more trouble. Susan B. Anthony and Mary Cady Stanton and Jim Lane and a bunch began to espouse woman's suffrage about that time, and the issue became woman's suffrage against negro suffrage. But Turner extricated himself and got back to Kansas City, where, he said yesterday, a Dutchman who had been elected to the school board settled up with him for all the back salary and rehired him for teacher.

Then Turner went down the river on a steamboat, and Joseph L. Stephens got him to stop off at Boonville and teach the second negro school in the state. Stephens paid the bill. Stephens afterwards got to be father of a governor of Missouri. Thomas Parker, then state superintendent of instruction, heard of the negro educator and sent for him. He appointed Turner second assistant, but said he did not have an y money to meet his salary. Turner worked for nothing until he was also named second assistant by the Freedman's bureau at Washington and assigned to Missouri and Kansas territory. This paid $125 a month. The Missouri Pacific railway gave the transportation and Turner began to travel about establishing negro schools. He put in 140, and then discovered there wasn't a negro in his territory who could read or write, and he was up against it for teachers.

News didn't travel fast in those days, and it was a long time before Turner learned that a negro regiment on the battlefield had voted to appropriate $5,000 to build the Lincoln institute at Jefferson City. Turner got busy and called a convention at the state capital, had 790 negroes there, and invited the general assembly to look on. That night members of the general assembly went down and donated $1,000 toward negro education.

A THAW GETS INTO THE GAME.

The outgrowth of Turner's Jefferson City convention was a bill in the general assembly to appropriate $15,000 to the negro educational movement, just as soon as the negroes themselves could certify to having a like capital in cash and real estate. The negroes sent Turner down East to beg money, and he got $1,000 in cash from a fellow named William Thaw down in Pittsburg, whose son afterward got into print for killing Stanford White on a New York roof garden. Begging did not suit Turner, and he returned to Missouri.

"This brings us to the convention of '70, when we Republicans got the balance of power in Missouri," said Turner with a chuckle, as he rubbed the rheumatism out of his aged joints. "That's where I met Carl Schurz of St. Louis. Mr. Schurz was in the senate. That's when the fifteenth amendment was put in operation.

"I was in that convention, backed up by 200 negro delegates, and I was in joint debate with Carl Schurz for three days. He wanted to enfranchise the Confederate veterans, and so did we negroes, but we kicked when Schurz wanted the bill to read for the benefit of white men only. With my 200 negroes I held the balance of power, and Mr. Schurs bolted the convention and the party."

This convention and the memorable three days' debate with Carl Schurz got Turner into the limelight. Colonel R. T. Van Horn of Kansas City recommended him to President Grant, and the negro was sent as minister to Liberia. He stuck it out there for eight years, and then returned to St. Louis, where he was born into slavery, and became a lawyer. For twenty years he has been an attorney for the negroes of Indian Territory, and secured for them their treaty rights there.

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September 27, 1908

MAJOR JOHN COON DEAD.

Former Kansas City Man Held Of-
fice During Grant's Term.

Major John Coon who, until three years ago, resided in Kansas City, died at Lyons, Mich., Thursday, aged 86 years. He was a civil war veteran, having served as a paymaster during the war and afterwards was first assistant secretary fo the interior under President Grant.

The burial will be in Cleveland, O. The widow will return to Kansas City and reside with her daughter, Mrs. C. H. Abney, 3223 East Tenth street.

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