Find Kansas City Antiques and Collectibles at the Vintage Kansas City Marketplace ~ Own a Piece of Old KC

Vintage Kansas City.com

 

THE JOURNAL COMPANY, Publisher
EIGHTH, M'GEE AND OAK STREETS.

Old News
Headlines and Articles from The Kansas City Journal

BELL & HOME TELEPHONES
Business Office...4000 Main
City Editor.....4001 Main
Society Editor....4002 Main

Two cents. Subscription Rates:  By carrier, per week, 10 cents; per month, 45 cents.  By mail, daily and Sunday, one month, 40 cents; three months, $1.00; six months, $2.00; one year, $4.00.  Sunday only, six months, 75 cents; one year, $1.50.  Weekly Journal, 25 cents one year.

As We See 'Em ~ Caricatures of Prominent Kansas Cityans

The Isis Theatre ~ Kansas City, Missouri

The History of Fairmount Park

Claims of Cancer Cured by Dr. Bye in Vintage KC Missouri

Special Cut Prices ~ Always the Same

Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

January 30, 1910

GIVES HIS HALF TO
MAHONEY CHILDREN.

JUDGE MICHAEL ROSS, SILENT
PARTNER, DISCLAMES SHARE
WORTH $50,000.

"John Was My Friend and
He Would Have Done That
for Me," He Says.

Judge Michael Ross, John Mahoney's silent partner, yesterday startled the court of Van B. Prather, probate judge of Wyandotte county, by announcing he wished to disclaim a $50,000 share in the Mahoney estate so that it would go to his friend's orphans.

John Manoney was the Kansas City, Kas. contractor who, with his wife and foreman, Thomas F. McGuire, met death in an automobile accident on the Cliff drive Monday afternoon Judge Ross has been justice of the peace in the North End for many years.

One feature about Judge Ross's gift is that he wanted no one except the firm's lawyer to know about it. At the opening of the hearing Judge Prather said he understood that a silent partnership existed in the contracting business between Mr. Mahoney and some one else, and that if such was the case it would be necessary to take different action in the appointment of the administrators than if such a partnership did not exist.

"HE WAS MY FRIEND."

At this announcement Judge Ross arose. He said he had been a full partner of Mr. Mahoney in the contracting business, but that he desired to "wipe the slate clean" and give the children his half of the estate. Judge Prather asked Judge Ross to explain more fully.

"John Mahoney was a good friend of mine," the judge began. "He loved his four children dearly, and I am comfortably situated, and I want those little children to have my interest in the estate. And further, if any of the contracts which Mr. Mahoney left unfinished show a loss when they are fulfilled by the administrators I will give my personal check to make up for it. John was my friend and I know he would have done the same for my family."

When Judge Ross had finished speaking there were tears in the eyes of many in the court room. Judge Prather said nothing for a moment then rising, he reached over and grasped Judge Ross's hand.

"I am 60 years old," Judge Prather said. "I have read of such men, and heard of them, but you are the first of this type whose hand I ever have had the privilege to grasp."

1,000 ATTENDED FUNERAL.

The funeral of Mr. and Mrs. Mahoney was held on Friday in Kansas City, Kas. The services were held at the home, 616 North Seventh street and conducted by the Rev. Father James Keegan of St. Mary's Catholic church. It was estimated that more than 1,000 persons gathered about the house during the services. The children at Central school, where the younger Mahoney children attended, stood with bowed heads while the funeral cortege passed.

Nellie Mahoney and her sister, Lillian, age 6, were still in St. Mary's hospital and were unable to attend the services. They were, however, told for the first time of the deaths of their parents. The girls were taken from the hospital to their home in a closed carriage last night. Lillian is now able to walk about, and the attending surgeons say she is recovering rapidly. The girls are being attended at their home by a trained nurse. Mr. Mahoney's sister is in charge of the house.

Judge Prather said yesterday that he would visit the Mahoney home tomorrow morning in order that Nellie might sign a bond and qualify as an administrator.

Mr. Mahoney did not leave a will, at least none has been found.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

December 9, 1909

FUNERAL OF CHRISMAN SWOPE.

Services Yesterday at Presbyterian
Church in Independence.

The funeral of Chrisman Swope, eldest son of Mrs. Logan O. Swope, took place yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the First Presbyterian church, Independence. Rev. C. C. McGinley, pastor of the church, conducted the service. Mis McGilveray of Kansas City rendered a solo, "Ye Shall Know." Burial was in Mount Washington cemetery.

Miss Lucy Lee Swope, who was in Paris, started home upon receipt of the news of the death of her brother and of the illness of other members of the family.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

December 2, 1909

BOY GETS FATHER'S PLACE.

Judge Pollock Appoints Henry Dil-
lard, 19, Court Messenger.

Judge John C. Pollock of the federal court in Kansas City, Kas., yesterday announced the appointment of Henry Dillard, a negro 19 years old of Topeka, to be the messenger of the federal court. Dillard takes the place of his father, Henry Dillard, who shot himself accidentally while hunting last Saturday. Judge Pollock went to Topeka Monday to attend the funeral of the boy's father. At the funeral Judge Pollock noticed the boy and was so impressed by his manly actions that he decided to appoint him as his father's successor.

"The boy is young, but I believe he will be able to hold the position," Judge Pollock said yesterday. "I am going to give him a trial at least."

Henry Dillard, who was part Cherokee Indian and part negro, was messenger of the federal court in Kansas thirty-three years and won the friendship of many attorneys and federal officers.

Labels: , , , , ,

November 29, 1909

FIRST MOOSE FUNERAL.

250 Members of Kansas City Lodge
Honor Departed Brother.

The Kansas City lodge of the Loyal Order of the Moose had its first funeral yesterday afternoon, when it buried in Mount St. Mary's cemetery, Charles Burns, a contracting carpenter of 1316 Walnut street, who died in St. Mary's hospital last Tuesday. Mr. Burns was a charter member of the local order and the first of nearly 1,000 Kansas City Moose to die. Local lodge officials tried for several days to locate relatives of Burns in the East but without success.

Yesterday's funeral procession included 250 members of the order. It was headed by a brass band and started from the Moose club rooms, at Twelfth and Central streets. From there the cortege moved to the Cathedral, where the Catholic ceremonies were held, Father Lyons preaching the sermon.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

November 22, 1909

FUNERAL IN CEMETERY HOME.

Services for L. B. Root, Who Died on
Wedding Anniversary, Wednes-
day, Two Years After Daughter
Was Buried.

Louis B. Root, superintendent of Mt. Washington cemetery, died yesterday morning at St. Mary's hospital folowing an operation performed last Wednesday for intestinal trouble. The funeral will be Wednesday from the home of Mr. Root in the cemetery.

Mr. Root was the first superintendent of parks in Kansas City. He had lived here twenty-two years. He was graduated from Cornell college in 1875. He taught school for several years and was for four years county surveyor of Elkhart county, Indiana.

In 1893, he began contracting work, planned by George E. Kessler, landscape architect for the park board. In 1898 he made a survey of Swope park and a year later was made superintendent of the park. He has been superintendent of Mt. Washington cemetery since 1901 and his work did much to make it the finest burial place in the West.

Mr. Root died on his thirty-fourth wedding anniversary, and will be buried two years to the day from the time his only daughter, Mrs. D. C. Wray, was buried. The widow and one son, Louis P. Root, survive him. The son is engaged in mining in Salvador, Central America.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

November 19, 1909

HER FRIENDS LOYAL IN DEATH.

Mrs. Healy to Be Interred in a Man-
ner Befitting Her Worth.

"I always had friends," Mrs. Margaret Healy used to say, "Sure, haven't I always been friendly?"

Death as a charity patient in St. Joseph's hospital did not rob Mrs. Healy of friends. Yesterday a funeral was arranged for her that would have satisfied her most exacting wish. The "lay sister" of the West bottoms, whose personal services and sacrifices among her poor neighbors made her of note, is to be laid to rest today by the side of little George Traynor, an orphan whom she took into her care when his parents died, in St. Mary's cemetery.

Father Dalton is to celebrate high mass at the Church of the Annunciation, Linwood and Benton boulevards, at 9 o'clock. Many persons who lived near Mrs. Healy and who since have seen better fortune than she, will attend the services as a mark of respect for her useful life.

Men who knew her and her endless charities will act as pallbearers. Mrs. Ellen Hughes, who cared for Mrs. Healy the last six years of her life, and several men who were adopted as boys by her, will be the mourners. The pallbearers will be: John Kelly, Robert E. Donnely, John Doherty, Bryan Cunningham, John Coffey, Patrick O'Rourke.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

November 5, 1909

SAMUEL LIEBERMAN AT REST.

Funeral Held From the Family
Home on Tracy Avenue.

With the casket in which his body reposed hidden by flowers the funeral of Samuel Lieberman, 15 year old son of Rabbi and Mrs. Max Lieberman, was held at the family home, 1423 Tracy avenue yesterday. The services were conducted by Rabbi Isadore Koplowitz. Scores of friends of the family and of the boy called at the home during the day and the house could not hold the throng that was present during the services. Burial was in the Tefares Israel cemetery at Sheffield.

Rabbi Lieberman has asked The Journal to express his family's thanks to their friends for many kindnesses during the illness and death of their son.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

November 3, 1909

FUNERAL OF VIRGINIA OWENS.

Girl Burned at Loretto Academy
Declared Worthy of Canonization.

Solemn requiem high mass was celebrated for Miss Virginia Owens yesterday morning at the Catholic church at Independence, and the church was full of those who mourned for the young girl who gave her life that she might save others.

Rev. James T. Walsh of the Church of Our Lady of the Good Counsel, in Westport, delivered the funeral address. "She showed herself worthy of being canonized," was one of the tributes he paid. Rev. Father Walsh was present at the tragedy, which caused the death of three girls at Loretto academy.

Labels: , , , , ,

October 9, 1909

SWOPE LAID TO REST
WHILE CITY MOURNS.

THOUSANDS BRAVE RAIN TO
VIEW FUNERAL CORTEGE.

Procession Longest Ever Seen in
Kansas City -- Casket Temporari-
ly Placed in Vault at
Forest Hill.

Thomas Hunton Swope, for fifty-two years a resident of Kansas City, and its greatest benefactor, was laid to rest late yesterday afternoon in a vault in Forest Hill cemetery.

Following his request only the Episcopal service for the dead was said. It is the same service which has been said in that church for 500 years, and is used for the burial of both great and lowly, rich and poor.

There was no oratory, no eulogy. The service reminded many of the life of the man for whom it was said -- simple, quiet, impressive.

At Grace Episcopal church, Thirteenth and Washington streets, Bishop E. R. Atwill officiated, assisted by Rev. J. A. Schaad, the rector, and his assistant, Rev. E. B. Woodruff.

As the funeral cortege entered the edifice it was headed by the bishop, who repeated a portion of the service as he walked down the aisle. Chaplin Woodruff bore the staff. Following came the immediate family.

Stuart Fleming, a nephew from colonel Swope's old home in Kentucky, was with Mrs. Logan Swope, a sister-in-law of the dead philanthropist. Then came Dr. B. C. Hyde and wife, a niece of Colonel Swope's and all of the relatives from Independence.

The entire center of the church was reserved for the pallbearers, honorary pallbearers and civic bodies and commercial and fraternal organizations.


SERVICE IS SIMPLE.

Bishop Atwill read the service at the church, and the Rev. Mr. Schaad read the lesson. Mr. Frank B. Fisk presided at the organ and rendered a dirge as the body was carried into the church. Mrs. Darnell, contralto, sang "One Sweetly Solemn Thought." Then a hymn, "O Paradise, O Paradise," was sung by the choir, the audience assisting. At the close of the church service the choir rendered the anthem, "I'm a Pilgrim and a Stranger."

During the service at the church the creed was said, and the Lord's Prayer repeated.

It was 3:30 before the cortage reached the church and after 4 o'clock before it got under way, leaving. When it reached the vault in Forest Hill cemetery it was almost dark and raining hard. Here the services were just as simple as at the church. Bishop Atwill read the committal service and Rev. Mr. Schaad the lesson.

The casket was placed in a large vault, made especially for its reception, and sealed. There it will remain until some future date when it will be removed to its final resting place in Swope park, beneath a monument erected by the people of Kansas city.


AN HOUR IN PASSING.

The funeral cortege was the largest ever seen in Kansas City. Besides the military, civic, commercial and fraternal organizations in line, there were seventy-five carriages, not counting the private vehicles. It took over an hour to pass a given point.

It was nearly 2 o'clock before the mounted police, followed by the Third Regiment band at the head of the regiment, started south on Walnut street from the city hall. Then, in order, came police and firemen on foot, Battery B and band, Uniform Rank, K. of P., Modern Woodmen, Turner society, Elks lodge, park board employes, lodge of Eagles, United Confederate Veterans, labor organizations, Board of Trade and Commercial Club and city officials in carriages. The active and honorary pallbearers preceded the immediate family and citizens in carriages.

As the procession left the public library where Colonel Swope's body has been in state since Thursday morning it passed through a double line of school children, each a "part owner" in the beautiful park which he gave the city. They stood uncovered, their hats and caps over their hears, all the long time the cortege was passing. Children lined both sides of the street all the way down Ninth street to Grand avenue and to Tenth street on Grand.

After the procession had crossed Main street it passed through another double line of children formed on Eleventh street from Baltimore avenue to Broadway, and down Broadway to Thirteenth street. Here again every boy stood uncovered, at attention, while the cortege was passing.


THOUSANDS VIEW PROCESSION.

It has been estimated that between 10,000 and 15,000 school children were out. Besides the children, the streets were packed with people along thee entire line of march as far out as Twentieth street and Grand avenue. The windows in every building also were filled with people all the way through the main portion of the city and spectators filled the verandas and windows of every home passed by the cortege entirely to the cemetery. Possibly no fewer than 100,000 people saw the procession.

When Twentieth and Grand was reached all of those in the parade on foot dropped out, the distance to the cemetery being too far for them to walk. At this point the Third regiment, the Uniformed Rank, K. of P., the Modern Woodmen of America, police and firemen were formed in company front along the west side of Grand avenue. It made a solid line of uniformed men for two blocks.

It was intended from this point for the procession to make better time, but the rain had rendered Gillham road very slippery and the procession to make better time, but the rain had rendered Gillham road very slippery and the procession got beyond Thirty-first street on Gillham road before it left a walk.


FLORAL GIFTS BEAUTIFUL.

Between Thirtieth and Thirty-first streets one of the lead horses in the fourth section of Battery B, commanded by Sergeant Cloyse Jones, fell and was injured. The team was taken out and this portion of the battery proceeded with only one team. This caused but a slight delay. Just this side of the cemetery the battery dropped out and returned to the city. The mounted police, however, commanded by Chief Frank F. Snow, acted as convoy throughout the entire procession to the cemetery.

Following the hearse was the most beautiful floral piece ever seen here. It was a remembrance from the city, and represented a white column ten feet high. It was composed of 3,000 white carnations. At the top of the column was a white dove with spread wings. A wreath of American beauty roses and lilies of the valley wounded about the column of the base, which was embedded in autumn leaves. The leaves were gathered in Swope park. "Kansas City Mourns" was the inscription on the column.

Covering the foot of the casket was the Swope family piece, composed of roses and lilies of the valley. A basket of lilies of the valley was sent by the Yale alumni of Kansas City, of which Colonel Swope was a member. Flowers sent by local organizations and friends of the family completely covered the massive state casket.

The sky began to cloud just before the head of the line left city hall, and it passed through a slight shower before reaching the library. After that the sun came out and it appeared as if the rain had passed over. After the services at Grace church, however, the clouds again formed and while the procession was passing the uniformed bodies, standing in line on Grand avenue and Twentieth street, there came the first hard shower. this lasted but a few minutes, and there was a lull until the cemetery was reached, when a downpour started. This continued until the services at the vault were concluded.

PALLBEARERS.

Active pallbearers -- Mayor Crittenden, R. L. Gregory, president upper house; F. J. Shinnick, speaker lower house, A. J. Dean, president of the park board; W. P. Motley, president of the hospital and health board; Frank S. Groves, president fire and water board; William Volker, president pardon and parole board; John T. Harding, city counselor; John C. Paxton, S. W. Spangler.

Honorary pallbearers -- C. O. Tichenor, J.V. C. Karnes, William Warner, R. T. Van Horn, Adriance Van Brunt, Honorable Herbert S. Hadley, D. J. Haff, William Barton, J. C. James, Leon Smith, E. L. Scarritt, R. W. Hocker, R. E. O'Malley, J. C. Wirthman, James Pendergast, M. Cunningham, M. J. O'Hearn, E. E. Morris, R. A. Long, George M. Myers, F. C. Crowell, Wallace Love, W. S. Dickey, J. F. Downing, E. F. Swinney, H. C. Flower, Llewellyn Jones, George W. Fuller, Charles Campbell, W. S. Woods, Ralph Swofford, J. H. Slover, O. H. Dean, James A. Reed, Jay H. Neff, H. M. Beardsley, W. S. Cowherd, George M. Shelley, Lee J. Talbott, J. J. Davenport, R. J. Ingraham, J. W. Wagner, James Gibson,E. R. Crutcher, Cusil Lechtman, Bernard Corrigan, C. F. Morse, L. M. Jones, George H. Edwards, J. H. Hawthorne, J. C. Ford, Rev. Father W. J. Dalton, Homer Reed and John C. Gage.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

October 1, 1909

SCHOOL FLAGS AT HALF MAST.

Funeral Services of J. L. Norman,
Westport Presbyterian Church.

Funeral services for Joseph L. Norman, late secretary of the board of education, who died last Monday, were conducted at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon by the Rev. George P. Baity at the Westport Presbyterian church. A large audience heard the sermon and followed the body to its burial in Forest Hill cemetery.

All the flags on the public schools were at half mast as was the one on the public library, which was closed all day.

Labels: , , , , ,

August 25, 1909

DEATH FROM BOILING STARCH.

One-Year-Old Boy Fell Into a Pan
of It Two Weeks Ago.

The one-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Trestrail of 2919 Indiana avenue, who fell into a dishpan of boiling starch two weeks ago, and was severly burned, died yesterday morning. The funeral was held from the reisdence yesterday afternoon. Burial was in Elmwood cemetery.

Labels: , , , , ,

August 23, 1909

TWO MORE TYPHOID VICTIMS.

Father and Son Succumb to Fever in
Stricken Neighborhood.

Two more victims of typhoid fever have been reported from the neighborhood of Eighth street and Brighton avenue, where there has been a small epidemic of that disease for the past two weeks, the last two cases being father and son, John Sheffner, 5016 East Eighth street, a carpenter 64 years old, died yesterday morning. His son, G. Blaine Sheffner, died last Thursday.

Funeral services will be in the Armour memorial chapel and burial will be in Elmwood cemetery.

Labels: , , , , , ,

July 16, 1909

HACKMEN FIGHT AT FUNERAL.

Harry Vaughan Sustains Fracture of
Skull and Recovery Doubtful.

Harry Vaughan, 17 years old, a hack driver living at 818 East Fourteenth street, Kansas City, Mo., and employed by the Wood Bryant and E. Landis Livery Company, Fifteenth and Campbell streets, was probably fatally injured yesterday during a quarrel with Tom Harper, a driver employed by the J. W. Snoddy Livery Company. Vaughan was struck on the head with a rock and his skull fractured at the base of the brain. He was removed to the South Side hospital where the attending physicians said his recovery was doubtful. Harper escaped after striking Vaughan and at a late hour last night had not been captured.

The two men with their carriages had been engaged to attend the funeral of Mrs. W. I. Davis in Rosedale. While services were being held at Kansas City and Rosedale avenues and the carriages were in line ready to take up the funeral procession, the two men had an altercation. Harper, it is alleged, threw a brick, striking Vaughan in the head and while the latter was still staggering Harper lifted a large rock with both hands and struck his victim again. He then ran and the last seen of him he was making his way toward Argentine. The injured boy was given emergency treatment by Dr. O. M. Longnecker and Dr. B. T. Sharp.

Labels: , , , , , ,

June 22, 1909

MAJOR J. M. HADLEY IS DEAD.

Father of Missouri Governor Long
a Prominent Citizen of John-
son County, Kas.

DE SOTO, KAS., June 21. -- Major John M. Hadley, father of Governor H. S. Hadley of Missouri, died here at 2:35 o'clock this afternoon from the effects of a stroke of apoplexy which he suffered June 9. For several days he had lain in an unconscious condition, and the end came quietly. His son and daughter, Mrs. J. W. Lyman, came yesterday and were with their father to last night.

The funeral services, conducted by Rev. W. J. Mitchell, pastor of the M. E. church at this place, an old soldier and personal friend, will be held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Snyder at 1:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, after which the body will be taken to Olathe and interment made in the family lot.

The active pallbearers here will be Dr. W. M. Marcks, B. S. Taylor, C. S. Becroft, Zimri Gardner, C. K. Dow and B. F. Snyder. At Olathe they will be chosen from the Masonic lodge.

The G. A. R. and the Masonic orders, both of which Major Hadley was an active member, will have charge of the services at Olathe. The honorary pallbearers at Olathe will be Colonel Conover of Kansas City, Major I. O. Pickering, Colonel J. T. Burris, J. T. Little of Olathe, Frank R. Obb and William Pellet of Olathe, all of whom have been personal friends.

The governor reached Kansas City from the capital on a special train Sunday, after receiving word of the critical condition of his father. He was met at the station by a motor car, and made the remainder of the trip to De Soto overland, arriving at the bedside of his father at 1:30 Sunday afternoon.

The elder Hadley was one of the most prominent citizens of De Soto, president of the De Soto State Bank., and connected with many of the institutions of Johnson county, of which he was a pioneer resident.

Major Hadley located at Shawnee Mission in 1855. In October, 1861, he enlisted in the Eighth Kansas Infantry, being rapidly promoted to the rank of second lieutenant, in which capacity he served for fifteen months.

He was later made lieutenant and then captain of the Ninth Kansas Cavalry, and in May, 1865, was promoted to the rank of major, which title clung to him until death. At the close of the war Major Hadley was elected sheriff of Johnson county and served until 1870, when he was made clerk of the district court. He was also head of the extensive flouring mills at De Soto. In 1877 Major Hadley represented his district in the state assembly as senator, being re-elected in 1879.

He was one of the largest land owners in Johnson county. Mrs. Hadley died in 1875.

EXECUTIVE OFFICES CLOSED.

JEFFERSON CITY, MO., June 21. -- Acting Governor Humphreys said tonight that as a mark of respect to the governor whose father, Major John M. Hadley, died at De Soto, Kas., this afternoon, the governor's office and those departments in the state house grounds which come under the appointment of the governor would be closed tomorrow. This, he said, was as far as he would go, and that he was governed by the governor's wish in the matter, having talked with him by telephone.

No formal proclamation will be issued, however, as Major Hadley was not a resident of the state.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

June 4, 1909

JOHN W. SPEAS, LONG
ILL, KILLS HIMSELF.

With Pistol and Poison Makes Sure
of Death After Writing a
Farewell Note.
John W. Speas, Victim of Suicide.
JOHN W. SPEAS.

After writing a brief farewell note to his family, John W. Speas committed suicide yesterday morning at 6:30 o'clock in a bedroom at his home, 1028 Summit street, by drinking carbolic acid and shooting himself.

Mrs. Speas, who was in the dining room downstairs, hurried to the bedroom when she heard the report of the revolver, and found Mr. Speas prostrate upon the floor. She summoned the family physican, Dr. R. T. Sloan, who said death had been instantaneous. Before firing the fatal shot, it is believed that Mr. Speas swallowed the carbolic acid. According to the deputy coroner either method would have resulted in death.

Mr. Speas has been an active member of the Commercial Club for a longer period probably than any other man in it, and once refused the presidency. He was active in the building of the first Convention hall, and also was conspicuous in the work of reconstructing it after the fire. As a member of the Commercial Club he was looked upon as the most popular active worker. He was president several years of the Priests of Pallas, and a member of the board of directors.

Mr. Speas was a native of Missouri. He came to Kansas City at the age of 10 years, and for several years sold papers, and later carried a paper route. He studied bookkeeping at Spalding's Business college, and then allied himself with the Kansas City Distilling Company. Much of his business career was interwoven with that of E. L. Martin, president of the distilling company. Later Mr. Speas became interested in the Monarch Vinegar company, and eventually became the sole owner.

An enthusiastic baseball fan, he identified himself with National League in the '90s, and for three or four years owned or controlled the franchise in Kansas City. He was a member of the Masons, Elks and Mystic Shrine.

Mr. Speas was born on a farm near Kansas city, October 18, 1862. In 1884 he married Miss Evelyn Southworth. Besides his widow he leaves one son, Victor Speas. Continued ill health of three years' duration is believed to explain his suicide.

The pallbearers for the Speas funeral, which will be held Saturday morning, are F. A. Faxon, L. W. Shouse, E. M. Clendening, William Barton, J. C. Schmelzer, D. P. Thompson, F. S. Doggett and W. H. Holmes.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

June 1, 1909

SIMPLICITY MARKS
CRITTENDEN FUNERAL.

FORMER GOVERNOR OF MIS-
SOURI LAID TO REST.

Rev. Thomas P. Haley Pronounces
Fitting Eulogy in Presence of
Relatives and Friends
of Many Years.

While respecting in every way the wish of the late Thomas T. Crittenden that his funeral be conducted with as little ostentation as possible, hundreds of former governor's friends, men and women, stood under the trees on the lawn at the residence, 3320 Flora avenue, yesterday afternoon within the sound of the voice of the Rev. Dr. Thomas P. Haley, who with the assistance of Rev. Burris A. Jenkins and the Rev. Dr. S. M. Neel, conducted the simple service for the dead.

Governor Crittenden had left a letter addressed to Dr. Haley asking that he officiate at his funeral. The letter was sealed in 1906.

"I count it one of the choicest blessings of my life to have known and loved Thomas T. Crittenden," said Dr. Haley. "He was a man of great heart, noble mind and character, whom none could know but to love and admire.

"Everyone who knew him was his friend. He had close friends far away as well as near, but among those who most revered him, which is an indication of the kind of man he was, are his neighbors, those with whom he came in contact in his everyday life. Every child in the neighborhood knew him and loved him.

WAS KIND TO ALL.

"He was ever willing to recognize his fellows as men, no matter what their station in life might have been. He was as careful to be considerate to the hod-carrier as he was to the banker.

"He would treat the washerwoman with as much consideration as the finest lady."

In finishing his characterization of his dead friend, Dr. Haley touched on Governor Crittenden's rare virtues as a husband and father, saying he was always careful to perform his public duties in the daytime, reserving the evenings for the society of his family.

Over the casket, during the funeral services, was draped the battle flag of the Seventh Missouri cavalry, which Governor Crittenden and Judge John F. Philips organized at the beginning of the civil war. The shot-torn banner was made by the women of Georgetown, Mo., and presented to the regiment. After the war it became the property of Judge Philips, who said it should drape his casket after his death.

NEGRO A MOURNER.

No mourner was more sincere than "Uncle" Dan Edwards, who was Governor Crittenden's "waitin' boy," as he styled himself, during the four years of the war. "Uncle" Dan is now pastor of the Metropolitan Negro Baptist church, at Ninth and Washington streets, Kansas City, Kas. He went to the Crittenden home in the early morning and asked for a last look at the face of his old "marster," and, as he said, "tuck dinner" there. He followed his master's body to Forest Hill, where it was buried.

Among those who came to the funeral was J. B. Waddell of Springfield, whom Governor Crittenden appointed as his adjutant general.

Enough floral offerings were sent to make a great mound at the grave. Members of the family, however, asked that the greater part of the flowers be sent to adorn graves that might go through Memorial day undecorated. Among the pieces sent was one from the children of the neighborhood bearing the card which read:

"Children of the Kentucky Block"

City officials and attaches in their offices also sent many beautiful floral pieces.

The pallbearers were Kelly Brent, John Hanley, W. W. Collins, S. L. Long, Daniel T. Blake, W. S. Cowherd, Porter H. Hovey and Leon T. Brown.

So profuse was the floral offering in memory of Governor Crittenden that Mrs. Crittenden requested that some of them be sent to various hospitals in Kansas City after the burial. The flowers were all left at the cemetery until late yesterday afternoon, when many were collected and sent to the following hospitals:

German hospital, new general hospital, old city hospital, Nettleton home, St. Joseph's hospital, St. Mary's hospital, and Mercy hospital.

RESOLUTION IN COUNCIL.

The council in special session yesterday passed the following tribute to the memory of the ex-governor:

"The death of former Governor Thomas Crittenden is a distinct loss, not only to our city, but to our state and nation. When a boy, following the dictates of his ancestral instincts, he dedicated his life to his country's service and took up his sword to defend its flag. To the closing of his rich and fruitful life, as soldier, congressman, governor, consul general and citizen he gave the best he had, his time, his talent, his eloquence, his energy to the state and nation. He was an illustrious example of American manhood. He was courageous and tender, courtly and constant, patriotic and modest. He honored women, trusted men and worshipped God. He belonged to the rare old school which held honor above wealth and virtue above life. He was every inch a Crittenden, which means that he turned his back to no foe and bended the knee to none but his Maker.

"He has fought the fight, he has finished the work, he has kept the faith and now takes his place full of honor among his distinguished ancestry.

"This city does not mourn alone. Today tears are falling nationwide. We, his neighbors, join with the multitudes in deploring his loss and extend to his sorrowing wife, his distinguished son, our mayor, and all the members of the grief-stricken family our earnest sympathy."

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

May 19, 1909

DYING MAN IS BAPTIZED.

Waldo Fox Submerged in Bath Tub
Just Before Death Came.

Before slipping away into endless sleep, Waldo Fox, a street car motorman, was baptized in a bath tub full of water at the Post Graduate hospital Monday night.

Mr. Fox had bee ill several weeks with typhoid fever, and knew he was to die in a short time. The baptismal ceremony was performed by the Rev. James Small, pastor pro tem of the Independence Boulevard Methodist Episcopal church, in the presence of the elder Mr. Fox, who came here from Granby, Mo, and hospital attendants.

Funeral services ere held at Wagner's undertaking rooms yesterday afternoon. The body was taken to Granby, Mo., for burial last night. Mr. Fox was unmarried and lived at 1311 East Forty-sixth street.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

May 16, 1909

GOV. RIDDLE'S FUNERAL TODAY.

Body Passed Through Kansas City
Escorted by Delegation.

Escorted by the widow and a delegation of five men, representatives of five secret orders of which he was a member, the body of former Lieutenant Governor A. P. Riddle, editor of the Minneapolis Messenger, who was killed in an automobile accident near Salina, Kas., May 13, was taken through Kansas City last night on the way from Minneapolis to Girard, Kas. "Governor" Riddle, as he was known, was 63 years old.

It was while on a pleasure tour with four of his friends going form Minneapolis to Salina, Kas., that the accident which resulted fatally for Governor Riddle occurred. The car was running at high speed when they lost the main road and struck an obstacle, the editor being thrown from the machine to the ground, striking on his head and causing concussion of the brain which resulted in his death an hour later while being carried in the car to the nearest doctor. Those in the car at the time of the accident were John L. King, Samuel Kreager, Charles Thomas and Charles Richmond.

With the body last night were S. J. Agnew, representing the Elks; C. N. Miller, Knights of Pythias; John Hartley, Sons and Daughters of Justice; J. C. McCrum, Odd Fellows, and Dr. J. C. Brewer of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. All are from Minneapolis, Governor Riddle's home. The funeral will take place today at Girard.

Labels: , , ,

April 10, 1909

CHARLES C. YOST DIES
AFTER BRIEF ILLNESS.

FUNERAL SERVICES WILL BE
HELD SUNDAY AFTERNOON.

Was Prominent Politician and Busi-
ness Man and Member of Many
Orders -- Had Lived in Kansas
City Thirty-Seven Years.
Charles C. Yost, Dead at 47.
CHARLES C. YOST.

Charles C. Yost, prominent Republican politician and partner in the Smith-Yost Pie Company, died last night at his home, 3032 Park avenue, after an illness of a week. His trouble was inflammation of the brain.

Mr. Yost was born 47 years ago in Rochester, Ind. Charles was only 10 years old when his parents brought him to Kansas City. He received a common school education and graduated from the Kansas City High school at the age of 16 years. He was only 19 years old when he became a clerk in a grocery store, a position which he held for two years and a half. At the end of that time he had accumulated enough money to go into the grocery business with L. M. Berkeley as a partner. Unfortunately, during the boom years of 1885-6-7 the firm invested heavily in real estate and went down with a large number of other business houses when the boom burst. The partnership made an assignment.

It wasn't long, however, before Mr. Yost was on his feet again. He organized the Yost Grocery Company and operated it for four years, selling out in 1894. After that he became the owner of a novel concern called Yost's Market. A short time later he went into the business of manufacturing pies, and rapidly built up his business. In 1902 he consolidated his interests with those of Howard Smith.

Mr. Yost was an ardent Republican all his life. He was appointed city assessor by Mayor Webster Davis in 1895, and reappointed for two terms by Mayor Jones. He was chairman of the Republican county committee for several years and a member of many republican clubs.

He was married to Miss Hattie M. Beedle of Johnson county, Kas., in 1883. Six children survive. They are Leroy, Charles, Joseph, Mrs. Pearl Yost Dietrich, Miss Nina and Miss Jeannette. All of them live in this city.

Mr. Yost was a mason, a member of the Knights of Pythias, Woodmen of the World, Order of American Mechanics and several other societies.

Funeral services will b e held from the home Sunday at 3:30 p. m. The Rev. E. C. Smith, pastor of the Linwood Methodist church, will officiate. Burial will be in Mount Washington.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

March 21, 1909

ACCIDENT STOPS FUNERAL.

Street Car Struck Coal Wagon and
the Wagon Jammed a Hearse.

An east-bound Twelfth street car collided with a coal wagon, which was waiting for a funeral procession to pass, forcing it into the hearse and nearly overturning the latter at Twelfth and Holmes streets yesterday morning. Jesse Roylston, a negro driver, was thrown from the coal wagon. His hip was bruised. He was taken to the general hospital.

The accident happened so quickly that no one could account for it afterward, but it is said to have been partly due to the abruptness with which the coal wagon driver halted his team in front of the car.

The funeral was that of Robert Burns of 1305 East Thirteenth street, and the procession, under the direction of the Woodmen of hte World, was on its way to St. Patrick's church. The hearse belonged to the J. C. Duffy Undertaking Company of Fifteenth street and Grand avenue and was driven by John Muser. It was only slightly damaged.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

December 12, 1908

FUNERAL OF OFFICER MULLANE.

Brave Officer Will Be Buried Today,
Wearing His Uniform
and Star.

Dressed in his full uniform of blue, the same uniform he had so gallantly defended only a few brief days ago, and with his badge of authority, star No. 151, shining from his breast, the body of brave Michael P. Mullane lay in a casket at his home, 931 West Twenty-fourth street, all day yesterday. Hundreds called out of respect for the widow's grief, looked upon the face of the gallant man whom they had once called dear friend, and departed.

Michael Mullane is the first officer in Kansas City to be buried in full uniform, his star and all. It had been his request in life that should he die in the discharge of his duty to be laid away "Just as I fought, with my uniform on."

The funeral will be this morning at 8:30 o'clock. There will be a short service at the home at that hour. At 9 a. m. solemn requiem high mass will be said at the Sacred Heart Catholic church, Twenty-sixth street and Madison. Burial will be in Mount St. Mary's cemetery.

Yesterday Chief Ahern received many telegrams from police departments in nearby cities and over the country. All were of condolence, and many spoke with praise for the officer who had made such a gallant fight, only to sacrifice his life because he refused to shoot a woman.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

December 10, 1908

FUNERAL OF OFFICER DALBOW.

Will Take Place This Afternoon.
Police to Attend.

Mrs. Albert O. Dalbow, the widow of Patrolman Dalbow, killed in the city hall riot, yesterday accompanied her brother-in-law, Joseph Dalbow, to his home at Sixty-first street and Troost avenue. She will live there until she makes other arrangements after the funeral of her husband.

The funeral services will be at the home of Joseph Dalbow this afternoon at 2 o'clock. The body will be placed in a vault at Forest Hill cemetery.

A special order was issued yesterday afternoon by Chief of Police Daniel Ahern detailing officers to act as pallbearers and as an escort. The pall bearers will be officers John Tarpey, H. A. Eads, Edward Boyle, John P. Withrow, M. A. Savage and George Hightower.

Chief Ahern telephoned to the police chiefs of Kansas City, Kas, and Leavenworth, inviting them to send a representation of the police departments of their cities to attend the funeral of Patrolman Dalbow. Thirty patrolmen were ordered to act as the special escort and the night men were urged to attend. The police detail will be in charge of Drill Master Lang.

David E. Bowden, chief of police of Kansas City, Kas., last night made out a list of twenty-two patrolmen and officers which detail will represent the Kansas Cit, Kas., police department at the funeral of former Patrolman Dalbow.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

September 24, 1908

M'DONALD LAID TO REST.

Appropriate Respect Paid to Memory
of Dead Marshal.

The funeral of Martin McDonald, marshal of the North division of the city court, Kansas City, Kas., who was shot to death by Ernest Lee, whom he was trying to arrest at the latter's home Monday, was yesterday afternoon from the McDonald home, 425 Haskell avenue. The services were conducted by the G. A. R. and the A. O. U. W., and were largely attended by friends and city and county officials. Interment was in Mount Hope cemetery.

The body of Lee, who killed himself after murdering Marshal McDonald, will be sent to Ames, Ok., where the dead man's mother, Mrs. Ella Rader, lives.

Labels: , , , , ,

September 13, 1908

SQUARED HIMSELF WITH LODGE.

George Runtz Left Money to the Odd
Fellows Club By His Will.

George Runtz, 35 years old, who came to this city a month ago sufferieng form consumption and apparently penniless, will be buried from Eylar's chapel, Fourteenth and Main streets, this afternoon. After his death Runtz was found to have $340 in a bag around his neck. By his will, which was written shortly before his death, most of this money is given to the local lodges of Odd Fellows, who cared for him throughout his illness when he was thought to be indigent.

What disposition he made of his property at his home in Cincinatti, O., is not known. The Odd Fellows will conduct the services. Burial will be in the Odd Fellows' lot in Union cemetery.

Labels: , , , , , ,

August 14, 1908

ANNA MAY WILLIAMS
AT REST.

"Suicide the Result of a Disordered
Brain," Says Rev. Moore.

Standing above the body of pretty Anna May Williams, the Rev. Charles W. Moore, pastor of the Institutional church, yesterday said:

"No one is perfect, and all of us have sinned. Then let us not be judges, upon the sins of others. It is well that this sweet little should passes before God for final judgment. God does not hate the sinner, but loathes the sin. It is only those who have sinned that need the Savior and this little soul soul was one of that class. Who can say that his feet have not occasionally strayed from the narrow path? If there be any, let him judge, but beware of the Pharisee.

"I do not hesitate to say that suicides are the result of a disordered brain. No person is in his right mind when he deliberately takes his own life, cutting off the beauties of life on this earth and causing great grief to those who are left behind. But knowing that God is just and His forgiveness is great we commit this soul to His keeping."

The chapel at Forster-Smith's undertaking rooms, where the funeral was held, was crowded with friends of the dead girl and with men and women who had hoped to get a glimpse of the body prompted by curiosity.

As the broken hearted mother was led down to the waiting carriage by her husband, her grief became uncontrollable and she sobbed aloud. Persons a block away were attracted by the cries of the mother and a large crowd of excitement seekers gathered in front of the undertaker's establishment.

Labels: , , , ,

June 7, 1908

JOSEPH H. RAYBURN IS DEAD.

Assistant Fire Chief Was Injured
While Trying to Spare Another.

Joseph H. Rayburn, assistant fire chief, died last night at 6:30 o'clock from injuries sustained in an accident while going to a fire May 19. Mr. Rayburn was at home for lunch, when an alarm of fire from the home of Dr. B. F. Watson, 2401 Wabash avenue, was turned in. Mr. Rayburn used his buggy in going for his meals, so the alarm was telephoned to his house, and he started to the scene of the fire. Rayburn, in driving on Wabash, collided with the cart of a by delivering papers. In attempting to avert the collision, he swerved sharply, turning his buggy over and throwing him against an iron lamp post.

He was unconscious when picked up and taken to St. Joseph's hospital. The injuries were thought not to be dangerous, but peritonitis developed later.

Mr. Rayburn lived at 3031 Prospect avenue with his wife and two sons. He was 47 years of age.

Mr. Rayburn was one of the best liked men on the fire department. He was appointed to the department and assigned to No. 8 engine company, December 21, 1886. He was promoted to a captain November 4, 1895, and placed in charge of No. 18 engine company. January 7, 1907, he was appointed sixth assistant chief, and placed in command of engine company No. 14, located at Twenty-sixth and Prospect avenue.

The funeral will be held Monday morning at 9:30 o'clock at the residence, 3031 Prospect avenue. Services will be held at the New Annunciation church, corner of Linwood and Benton boulevards, at 10 o'clock. Interment will be in Mount St. Mary's cemetery.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

May 29, 1908

WILL DEDICATE LONG CHAPEL.

Erected by John Long for $40,000.

Tomorrow afternoon the Mrs. John Long Memorial Chapel in Mount Washington cemetery will be dedicated. The late John Long, a retired wholesale grocer, erected the $40,000 chapel as a tribute to the memory of his wife, Mrs. Emma Stuttle Long, who died October 1, 1906. Mr. Long died in February this year and his own funeral was the first to be held in the chapel he built.

The dedication will be at 2:30 in the afternoon. Edward L. Scarritt, president of the cemetery association, will preside. There will be addresses by the Rev. J. A. Schaad, the Rev. S. M. Neel and the Rev. William J. Dalton. Mrs. Gilure and Mrs. McDonald will sing solo selections and a quartette will furnish the balance of the programme.

Mrs. Long was known for her charities among the poor and the chapel her husband built to her memory is for the poor, the rich, the religious and those of all the world who have not professed faith. Al, who are eligible to be buried in the cemetery, are to have the free use of the chapel.

Labels: , , , ,

May 17, 1908

DR. W. S. WOODS'S BROTHER DIES.

Funeral Was to Be Held Yesterday.

Dr. W. S. Woods, who arrived from his California trip Friday night, received telegraphic news enroute that his brother, James M. Woods of Rapid City, S. D., had died. Word was also waiting Dr. Woods here that the funeral was to be held yesterday.

Dr. Woods's brother had often associated in Kansas City enterprises. He was 74 years old.

Labels: , , , ,

May 8, 1908

HARVEY SKINNER IS DEAD.

Was the Man Who Revived While
Wake Was Being Discussed.

Harvey Skinner, a printer, 55 years old, died in Kansas City, Kas., yesterday. Monday afternoon he was given up for dead by his relatives, who then assembled at the home, 166 North Valley street, Kansas City, Kas., for the purpose of preparing for a wake, only to be cut short in their discussions by the sudden reviving of the supposed corpse, who asked for a drink. Skinner is survived by a widow and eight children. Funeral services will be held at St. Benedict's church, Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Burial at St. Mary's cemetery.

Labels: , , , ,

March 16, 1908

FOOD FOR QUONG SUE'S SPIRIT.

It Is Deposited in His Grave, That He
May Feast in Paradise.

In keeping with the funeral rites of his native land, Quong Sue, a Chinese laundryman who died at his home, 309 West Fifth street, March 8, was buried in Union cemetery yesterday afternoon. All of the dead man's belongings, including his Bible, were burned at the head of the grave and the coffin was lowered during the burning of incense.

It is a peculiar belief of the Chinese that the departed spirit must spend an indefinite period trying to find its way through paradise They believe that the spirit must have food and drink, the things necessary for material existence. Consequently choice foods and wines are deposited in the grave with the coffin Quong Sue's spirit will feast upon smothered chicken, roast beef, rice tea, ham , chop suey and two kinds of wine.

Labels: , , , ,

January 25, 1908

DEAF MUTE FUNERAL SERVICE.

Body of James Jarrett Buried in Elm-
wood Cemetery.

A deaf mute funeral service was held at Stine's chapel yesterday afternoon. It was for James Jarrett, a shoemaker, who lived at 3615 Independence avenue with his wife, who is also a mute, and a son almost grown. Rev. Jensen of the German Lutheran church officiated, delivering his sermon audibly at the same time as with the sign language of deaf mutes. About forty of them attended and a number of other friends. A deaf mute congregation worships every other Sunday afternoon at a church at Sixteenth and Cherry streets. The body of Mr. Jarrett was buried in Elmwood cemetery.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

September 3, 1907

SO SHE COULD WED.

DAUGHTER HASTENED FUNERAL
OF HER MOTHER.

DID NOT WAIT FOR PRIEST.
MARRIED SOON AFTER LEAVING
THE CEMETERY.

John Dugan, Recently Divorced, Ar-
rested After His Wedding With
Margaret Delougherty -- It
Is Claimed Woman Is
of Unsound Mind.

The priest who administered the last spiritual advices to Mrs. Catherine Delougherty, of No. 1208 Guinotte street, missed her funeral yesterday morning because Marguerite Delogherty, daughter of the dead woman, was in such a hurry to get married that she had the ceremony advanced a half hour and the sexton had thrown the sod over the coffin before the holy man arrived. Friends of Mrs. Delougherty during her lifetime were astonished when they went to the house at the appointed hour, and later drove hurriedly to St. Mary's cemetery, only to find the grave filled in and the cemetery officials in charge.

"Miss Delougherty drove to the county court house," the sexton told the belated mourners, "at least that is the address her escort gave to the driver."

CARRIAGE FOLLOWS FUNERAL.

The Delougherty funeral was set for 10 o'clock yesterday morning. Mrs. Delougherty, 71 years old, had died Saturday night, but no wake had yet been held. The dead woman owned a large amount of real estate and was reputed to have a large sum of ready money in the bank.

Marguerite Delougherty is 35. For several months John Dugan, a switchman, employed by the Missouri Pacific railway, had boarded at the Delougherty home. Three months ago his wife, who was but 25, secured a divorce.

Yesterday morning, for a reason unknown at the time, Miss Delougherty gave orders for the funeral procession to leave the house at 9:30 o'clock. She rode in a carriage with neighbors. Dugan occupied a carriage alone in the seat of the procession.

At the grave the few friends who had arrived in time to accompany the body remonstrated with the daughter to await the coming of the priest, but she declared in authoritative manner that his coming did not matter and ordered the sexton to fill up the grave. At this juncture, as the little group of friends looked on bewildered, Dugan advanced and handed Miss Delougherty into his own carriage and told the driver to take them to the court house. The little group of friends sadly departed.

PROCURED A MARRIAGE LICENSE.

A marriage license was at once procured and by the time the priest had arrived at the cemetery, Miss Delougherty was being married to Dugan by the Rev. H. S. Chruch, of No. 328 Park avenue, who had been called to the office of the license clerk while the necessary papers were being filled in and approved.

As the priest turned away from the covered grave the daughter re-entered her carriage at the court house and she and her husband drove toward the Delougherty home. The stopped at several houses and invited their friends to a bridal feast. Before the carriage reached the home a case of beer and a jug of liquor had been taken on.

The presence of negroes mingling with white persons at the marriiage festivities attracted neighborhood attention and soon the information of a carousal at the Delougherty home was telephoned to President E. R. Weeks, of the Humane Society. Here the troubles of the married pair began. For President Weeks had investigated the Delougherty girl before, and had on his desk the opinion of a medical man that she is of unsound mind. On two occasions, President Weeks said, neighbors called his attention to Miss Delougherty's condition, and he later called in Dr. J. F. Sawyer, Fifth street and Lydia avenue, who was the Delougherty family physician. He readily gave his opinion that the girl is not always mentally reasonable.

THE GROOM ARRESTED.

W. H. Gibbens, assistant Humane officer, was dispatched to the Delougherty home, and soon after Patrolman Fitzgerald arrived and placed the bridegroom under arrest. He was locked up for investigation. Today a charge may be placed against, or, at the expiration of twenty-four hours, he must be released.

President Weeks said he may act under the statute which prevents the marriage of one of unsound mind or on the grounds that the probate court should become custodian of the property of the deceased.

J. W. Hogan, an assistant county prosecutor who investigated the arrest, stated that the marriage of an imbecile is not void, but that the marriage may at once be canceled by authorities if the case is proven.

Neighbors of the Deloughertys stated last night that recently the aged woman showed bruised arms and stated to them that she had been beaten. That, they say, was three weeks ago. Immediately, the neighbors state, Mrs. Delougherty was reported ill and that she was never able to leave her bed.

The bride remained last night in her mother's death chamber alone after the arrest of the groom.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

July 5, 1907

COFFIN BURNED AT WAKE.

Thirty-Five Italians Were in House
When a Lamp Upset.

At the wake of Antonio Bruni, 120 East Fourth street, last night the overturning of a coal oil lamp set fire to the coffin and the floor of the room. The sacred candle stick was knocked to the floor and when the firemen arrived, one corner of the coffin was burned through. Thirty-five Italians were crowded in a back room. After the fire was out they filled up the halls and front rooms and teh wake went on. It was at the residence of Sam Bruni, brother of the deceased.

Labels: , ,

May 12, 1907

MISS WITTEBART'S FUNERAL TODAY

The funeral of Miss Aurora Wittebart, who lost her life in the University building fire, will take place tis afternoon at 3 o'clock from St. Patrick's church, Eighth and Cherry streets. There will be no services at the home of Mrs. F. C. Schmidt, where the remains were taken from Stine's. Miss Wittebart's parents, who are at the Densmore, were able to leave the hotel yesterday to assist in the arrangements for the funeral.

May 12, 1907
FUNERAL OF PROFESSOR De MARE

The funeral of Professor Georges De Mare, the high school drawings instructor who was killed in the University building fire, was held yesterday morning at 10 o'clock at St. Vincent's Catholic church, Thirty-first and Flora. Rev. Francis X. Antill conducted the services. Burial was in Mount Washington cemetery.

Labels: , , , , , ,

March 30, 1907

MUSIC KEPT PUPILS AWAY.

Italian Bandmaster Offers to Change
Hours of Practice and Is Released.

A. Kantizarro, manager of a boys' band, was before the juvenile court yesterday afternoon on complaint of teachers of the Karnes and Washington ward schools, who accuse him of enticing boys away from the schools to play in his band. The teachers stated that some ten or fifteen boys had been ruined for school purposes through he influence of Kantizarro and his band, and that many truancy cases were caused by the demands of the Italian for the boys to play at funerals, etc. The bandmaster promised to make his practice hours such as not to interfere with the school work of his boys, and to relieve them from funeral duty on school days, and the case was dismissed.

Labels: , , , ,

March 4, 1907
DID NOT GO TO HIS FUNERAL.

Mrs. Booth Said to Be Unable to
Leave Her Home

Mrs. Ida Booth, 2625 Garfield avenue, whose husband committed suicide last Thursday night because his wife, who was 23 years his junior, was about to institute proceedings for a divorce, did not attend the funeral of her husband at Valley Falls, Kas., yesterday. It was said that the shock of her husband's death had unnerved her for the ordeal of attending his funeral, and made her physically unable to leave her home.

Mrs. Booth's petition was one of the longest ever filed in Jackson county. It makes these allegations:

That shortly after the marriage in Leavenworth, June 29, 1905, after the Booths came to Kansas City, the husband became cold and exacting; that the wife was compelled to pay board for herself and her sister out of her private income; that she had to cook and clean up for the boarders; that her husband demanded all her property and did not take her to places of amusement; that he took charge of her mail, and that his personal habits were such that she could not bear to live with him.

Owing to the suicide of Booth, the case will be dismissed when it is called for trial.

Labels: , , , ,

February 26, 1907

FUNERAL OF A CAR VICTIM.

Margaret Blume, Killed on Eighteenth,
A Neighborhood Favorite.


Margaret Blume, the 5-year-old child killed by a street car Sunday at Walrond avenue on Eighteenth street, will be buried this morning in St. Peter and St. Paul's cemetery, Twenty-fifth and Brooklyn.

MARGARET BLUME.
The funeral service will be at Sacred Heart church at 9 o'clock, Rev. Father R. G. Lyons officiating. Margaret was the oldest of three children and was a neighborhood favorite.

Motorman Jesse F. Cannon, who was running the car, was arraigned on a charge of manslaughter and criminal negligence yesterday before Justice Theodore Remley. His preliminary hearing was set for March 7 and he was released on a bond of $500.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

Google
 
Web vintagekansascity.com
Share on Facebook
Get the Book
Vintage Kansas City Stories ~ Early 20th Century Americana as Immortalized in The Kansas City Journal
Vintage
Kansas City Stories


More Books

SYNDICATE

Get this feed on your RSS reader

The History and Heritage of Vintage Kansas City in Books
Vintage Kansas
City Bookstore

Powered by Blogger

Vintage Kansas City.com

Vintage Antique Classics ~ Vintage Music, Software, and more Time Travel Accessories

In association with
KC Web Links.com ~ The Ultimate Kansas City Internet Directory