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February 9, 1910

NEW PLAN TO OUTWIT THIEVES.

Traveler Tears Ticket to Bits and
Scatters Them Over His Person.

Joe Lamford, who claims Seattle, Wash., as his residence, spent several hours yesterday trying to pass through the Union depot gates on a tattered ticket. He explained that on his arrival here last Friday he had torn his ticket for Oklahoma City into small pieces and placed them in different pockets to prevent "lifting." Then according to his story he took in Union avenue. After a few days in the workhouse, he tried to get his ticket together. When he presented the various portions in an envelope yesterday, he was given the option of buying another ticket or counting the ties to Oklahoma City.

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January 29, 1910

FRED'S RELIGION DIDN'T STICK.

He Was "Converted" by Hart, but the
Workhouse Caught Him.

Why did Fred Marshall become a backslider so soon? The board of pardons and paroles yesterday tried to solve the problem. Marshall has been in the workhouse twice before, but last Sunday night he "went forward" at the revival being conducted by Evangelist Hart in Kansas City, Kas. He came to this city Thursday and took aboard too much liquor. The result was a workhouse sentence when he could not produce $15 to pay his fine.

Yesterday Marshall's sister appeared with him before the pardons and paroles board at the workhouse. She pleaded for him, and promised to see that he got less religion and more work in the future. He will be released on parole today.

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January 9, 1910

WORK AND WAGES FOR
DESERVING UNEMPLOYED.

Mayor Formulates Plan to Provide
Living During Present Cold
Weather for All Worthy Needy.

"Kansas City intends to be kind to the needy and unfortunate temporarily out of work," observed Gus Pearson, city comptroller, yesterday, "but we first are going to find out who is worthy of our time and kindness.

"This wail about the starving and homeless unemployed has been magnified. Investigation shows that on many of the coldest nights of the winter there were a whole lot of vacant beds in the Helping Hand institute, and I have it from the management that they had twenty-four more calls for work for men than could be filled.

"The trouble is that a great many well meaning people are imposed upon and their sympathies wrought up by classes of individuals who are continually preying on the purse strings of the charitable, but will not work unless the work meets with their particular tastes."

Mr. Pearson had a conference yesterday with William Volker, chairman of the pardons and parole board. They discussed the plan proposed by Mayor Crittenden of making an additional appropriation of funds to temporarily tide over the unemployed by giving them work at the municipal stone quarries in Penn Valley park and the municipal farm at Leeds. This will be done as quickly as possible after Messrs. Pearson and Volker have conferred with the heads of charitable institutions and the police in reference to the character of men considered really deserving.

"Bums and loafers who stray into Kansas City just to spend the winter and live off the charitable must move on or go to the workhouse," said Mr. Pearson. "We feel that we have a citizenship of our own who should receive our little acts of kindness in times of distress, and so far as the present city administration is concerned, there will be no deserving man or boy without a place of shelter or a meal."

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January 8, 1910

MAKING WIFE OBEY
IS "BUTTING IN."

Parole Board Rules She Is
"Lord and Master" in
Kitchen Affairs.

In an effort to make his wife obey, as she had promised to do when he married her nine months ago, J. M. Hall, stock clerk for the Great Western Manufacturing Company, 1221 Union avenue, landed him self into the workhouse on a $300 fine three days after Christmas -- during the most joyous week of last year. The "you must obey your master" stunt took place at the Hall home at St. Clair station, near Mount Washington.

A. B. Coulton, manager of the Great Western Manufacturing Company, appeared before the board of pardons and paroles at the workhouse yesterday and asked for Hall's parole. William Volker, president of the board, then looked over the testimony which was given in the municipal court when Hall was convicted and given the highest fine in the power of the court. It ran something like this:

WOULD NOT OBEY.

Charged with disturbing the peace. Wife appeared to prosecute him. She said that ever since their marriage last March he has been dictatorial and domineering and insisted that she obey him as she promised. The day of his arrest he went into the kitchen and, seeing the stove door open, told her to close it. She did not want the door closed and told him so. Then he demanded that she stoop and close the door and she flatly refused.

"Then I'll teach you to obey as you promised," he said. With that Mrs. Hall testified, he grabbed her by the wrist and forced her to her knees demanding that she obey him. Still she refused. Then she was thrown back so as to strike a couch with her back. She did not shut the stove door. Couple have been married since March, 1909. She said she started to leave him several times, but was induced to return.

STICKS TO HIS RIGHTS.

Hall still thought he "had a right" in his own house to make his wife obey. He was obdurate until he found out that his parole hinged upon his apparent change of heart. Then he asked the board for terms. As Mrs. Hall soon will have to go to a s hospital the board provided that Hall pay over to L. H. Halbert, secretary to the board, $7.50 every Saturday night. That will be given to Mrs. Hall.

"Besides paying the $7.50 weekly," said Mr. Volker, "you absolutely must keep away from your wife. You also must report to the secretary once each week."

Hall, still defiant on the question of "obey," agreed meekly to the terms of parole. His employer, Mr. Coulton, said that a separate check would be made out to Secretary Halbert each week and Hall would be sent to deliver it. Hall will be released today.

"Before we parole anyone," explained President Volker to Hall, "we generally find out if he has any regrets for his actions; if he is sorry for doing the thing that caused his arrest. Are you?"

"I think I did as any husband should," said Hall calmly. "She refused to obey and I tried to make her. That's all."

"I see you have no regrets," said Mr. Volker, much in earnest. "I want you to know that I do not think there is provocation great enough for any man to strike a woman."

DEMANDED APOLOGY.

"But I did not strike her," insisted Hall. "I just tried to make her apologize and obey as any good wife should. What are you going to do when a woman absolutely refuses to obey?"

"If she refused to shut the stove door and I wanted it shut," said the board president, who is a single man, "I think I would quietly shut it. But if she wanted it left open I would leave it open. A woman knows more about a kitchen in a minute than a man does in a year. That is her domain; she reigns there as an absolute monarchy and a man has got no business going into the kitchen and telling the wife what to do. It's bound to cause trouble. Let her run the whole house. That's her place. You may run the rest of the earth if you choose, but think how puny, how little, how mean it is to force your wife to her knees by twisting her wrist simply because she would not 'obey her lord and master' and shut the stove door in a place where she, and she alone, has full command. I am not a believer in slang but I am forced to say that what you did might well be called 'butting in.' "

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December 31, 1909

PUGILISM OR NAIL EATING?

Pardon Board Doubtful Which Tends
More to Good Citizenship.

Terence O'Grady, the human ostrich, is free from the workhouse by action of the pardon and parole board yesterday afternoon. He was arrested several weeks ago at the insistence of his wife, who said that his dual role of prize fighter and crockery eater unfitted him for the more domestic one of providing for her and their children. He was fined $500.

Investigation by the board disclosed that O'Grady, if not always a hard working man, possessed a heart as good as his punch and as elastic as his stomach. He said and proved by receipts that he is supporting his widowed mother in Ireland whom he has not seen for more than twenty years. The last money sent to her by Terence was mailed from Kansas City November 4 in the shape of a check for $100. It was one of many such remittances.

"I'll either go back to the prize ring or the kerosene circuit as the human ostrich," said O'Grady to a member of the board who asked him what he would do if paroled. He then added, "It's immaterial to me which I follow. I leave the matter with the board entirely."

Mrs. Kate Pearson stated during the session yesterday that she was afraid O'Grady might swallow a shovel if he were put on the street force. William Volker and Jacob Billikopf could not even guess which of the two occupations named were the best from the standpoint of good citizenship, so the original proposition was remanded back to O'Grady for a decision.

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December 20, 1909

WORKHOUSE INMATES
TAUGHT CLEANLINESS.

METHODS FOLLOWED AT INSTI-
TUTION SETS EXAMPLE.

Improvements Make All Cells Sani-
tary -- Shower Baths Provided
and Fumigator to De-
stroy Germs.

The interior of the workhouse has taken on quite a different aspect in the last few days, important improvements having been completed. The ceilings and walls are painted white, the latter having a heavy coat of red about six feet up from the floor. All of the cells have a new coat of shiny black enamel.

Until the recent improvements, each cell was unsanitary, being equipped with nothing but an old bucket. Now every cell is provided with a sanitary plumbing outfit. It took one month to dig a sewer inside the cell block and make the necessary connections. Outside the work could have been done in a week or ten days, but there the dirt had to be carried out in small boxes. The sewer is from five to seven feet deep and before dirt was reached it was necessary to dig through four inches of solid concrete, chisel through a steel plate one-eighth of an inch thick and then pick the way through eighteen inches more of solid concrete. This is laid beneath the floor to prevent any escapes by tunneling. As it took fully three weeks to reach terra firma it is not likely that anyone would succeed in completing a tunnel before being captured.

There also is a new system regarding mattresses and bedding. When a new prisoner arrives he gets a fresh, clean mattress, stuffed with clean straw. When the prisoner leaves the straw is burned and the bed tick washed. The cleaning method continues with regard to blankets. When a prisoner leaves his blanket goes direct to the laundry. If he is a long term man his blanket is washed and he gets a clean one two or three times a month. He also gets a fresh bed tick with new straw frequently.

SHOWER BATHS FOR ALL.

At the east end of the cell block is a new washroom with a dozen bowls. Across the corridor are shower baths. Both have hot and cold water and plenty of soap. A prisoner is required to bathe on entering the workhouse, all of his discarded clothing going to the fumigator. He also is examined by the workhouse physician, Dr. F. H. Berry. His physical condition also is looked after. For the first time since it was built the workhouse now is absolutely free of any kind of vermin, and Superintendent Cornelius Murphy says he intends to keep it that way.

When a prisoner's clothes go to the fumigator they are not afterwards packed away in a bag and given to him all full of wrinkles when he leaves the place. In the workhouse now is a tailor who understands cleaning, pressing and mending. After leaving the fumigator the underclothing and linen go to the laundry where they are washed and ironed. The outer clothing goes to the tailor who repairs, cleans and presses it. When a prisoner leaves the institution now he often finds his "makeup" in far better condition than when he entered.

"The scheme of putting a prisoner's clothing in good condition," said C. A. Beatty, assistant superintendent, "has proven a good one and the men greatly appreciate it. It does not send a poor man away looking like a trap, but he has a good 'front' and is fit to apply to any man for work. The prison clothes worn by the men are washed frequently and the men are required to take baths often. It is new to many but they are getting used to it."

SOME LEARN TRADES.

In the sewing room, established at the personal expense of William Volker, president of the board of pardons and paroles, all of the bed ticks as well as the clothing worn by both men and women prisoners, are made by women prisoners. One young woman who had been a frequent inmate of the institution now is earning $2.25 a day at a local mattress factory. Others are earning an honest living at overall factories. They learned to sew under the instruction of Mrs. Burnett, who has charge of the sewing room. Some never had done any stitching.

Another adjunct to the workhouse, which has proved a success, is the shoemaking department. A practical shoemaker, hired at the expense of Mr. Volker, is instructing the long term men how to be shoe cobblers and some are learning how to make shoes throughout. The shoes of all prisoners are overhauled and mended in this department. The shoeshop and sewing rooms are located over the barn and are heated by steam.

There are thirty-five men now out at the industrial farm at Leeds. They are now engaged at present in making a new roadway, but in the summer they are going to learn practical farming and gardening. This, too, has proven a success.

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November 26, 1909

WORKHOUSE INMATES
NOT SERVED TURKEY.

ROAST PORK THERE, WITH SIDE
DISHES PLENTY.

Various Institutions Served Thanks-
giving Dinners -- Children Had
Their Fill of Chicken -- Pris-
oners Not Forgotten.

The unfortunate who are in institutions and the unlucky who happened to be in jail yesterday were not overlooked Thanksgiving day. While a regular turkey and cranberry sauce dinner was not served at all places, on account of the high price of the bird, a good, wholesome, fattening meal was served, where turkey was absent.

In the holdover at police headquarters there were forty prisoners, all but five men. when noontime arrived the following was served to a surprised and hungry bunch: Turkey and cranberry sauce, real biscuits and hot cakes, baked potatoes, hot mince pie and coffee with real cream.

Out at the city workhouse there were 107 men and eighteen women prisoners to be served, too many for turkey at prevailing prices. They were all given their fill, however, of the following menu: Roast pork with dressing, baked Irish potatoes, bakes sweet potatoes, vegetable soup, cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie, coffee.

A real turkey dinner with cranberry, baked potatoes, celery, vegetables, pie, and coffee with genuine cream was served to the 109 prisoners in the county jail. After appetites had been appeased the men and women put in the rest of the day singing old-time hymns. It has been truthfully said that no old-time hymn can be started in the county jail but that enough voiced immediately join in to make it a success. And they always know the words and the chorus.

CHILDREN MADE HAPPY.

There were but seven children in the Detention home yesterday, but they were not overlooked. The matron saw that they were served with turkey, vegetables, mince pie, coffee, etc.

At the Salvation Army Industrial home, 1709 Walnut street, fifty-five men, and employes of the institution, sat down to Thanksgiving dinner.

"We had turkey, cranberries, potatoes, celery and other vegetables, bread and butter, mince pie, cake, coffee, candy, nuts and apples," said one of the men. "And we got all we wanted, too."

The Salvation Army proper served no Thanksgiving dinner to the poor yesterday, as it makes a specialty of its big Christmas dinner. Baskets are also given out at that time. Wednesday and yesterday baskets were sent out to a few homes where it was known food was needed.

Probably the happiest lot of diners in the entire city were the twenty little children at the Institutional church, Admiral boulevard and Holmes street. While they laughed and played, they partook of these good things: Chicken with dressing, cranberry sauce, sweet and Irish potatoes, celery, olives, salad, oysters, tea, apple pie a la mode, mints, stuffed dates and salted almonds.

DINING ROOM DECORATED.

The dining room was prettily decorated with flowers, and Miss Louise Mayers, a nurse, and Miss Mae Shelton, a deaconess, saw to the wants of the little ones. After the feast all of them took an afternoon nap, which is customary. When they awoke a special musical programme was rendered, and the children were allowed to romp and play games. Those who had space left -- and it is reported all had, as they are healthy children -- were given all the nuts candy and popcorn they could eat.

"I wist Tanksgivin' comed ever day for all th' time there is," said one rosy-cheeked but sleepy little boy when being prepared for bed last night.

Over 200 hungry men at the Helping Hand Institute yesterday were served with soup and tomatoes, escalloped oysters, roast beef, celery, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, cream turnips,cabbage stew, bread, butter, pumpkin pie and coffee.

Out at the General hospital, the convalescent patients were allowed to eat a genuine turkey dinner but those on diet had to stick to poached eggs, toast, milk and the like. A regular Thanksgiving dinner was served to the convalescent at all the hospitals yesterday.

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September 18, 1909

LID ON CIGARETTES
FOR CITY PRISONERS.

"MAKINGS" BARRED FROM THE
WORKHOUSE BY PAROLE BOARD.

No Longer May Favored Ones Have
Delicacies at Table, But Must
Masticate Prison Fare --
Guard Discharged.

The board of pardons and paroles took occasion yesterday to issue its first orders governing the future conduct of affairs at the workhouse. the new orders, or rules, were submitted by Secretary L. A. Halbert and approved by the board. They are taken from rules governing houses of correction in Chicago, Ill., Cleveland, O., Elmira, N. Y., and Boston, Mass.

"General order No. 1, section 1," reads" "At no time will cigarettes, cigarette tobacco or papers be permitted in the workhouse, and the smoking of these harmful things by both men and women prisoners must absolutely be prohibited."

Section 2 permits the men prisoners to have chewing and smoking tobacco, but pipes must be used.

Section 3 puts a ban on food, fruit and delicacies being sent in to prisoners by persons on the outside. that custom has been in vogue here ever since there was a workhouse, and the board is informed that this is the only city that permits it. Hardly a day passes that baskets or packages of food or fruit are not received for prisoners. Joseph Mackey is one prisoner who, it is said, does not know what workhouse "grub" tastes like. All his meals come from the outside.

PRISON FARE FOR ALL.

"Prisoners are not allowed to have food in their cells," explained President William Volker, "consequently it was placed on the dining table for them. It is not fair to have a few eating choice viands while the majority of prisoners have to look on. Prison fare is as good for one as another, and should be part of the punishment."

Secretary Halbert was for abolishing tobacco in any form. He never uses tobacco. Neither of the male members of the board are tobacco users but they, with Mrs. Kate Pierson, compromised on abolishing cigarettes. Prisoners will also be permitted to send out for candy, chewing gum and a small amount of fruit which they may have in their cells.

Hereafter prisoners will not be permitted to carry any money or jewelry into their cells with them. Deposits will be made with the clerk. If a prisoner sends out for any of the permitted "luxuries" he will have to give an order on the clerk for the amount and that will be charged against his account.

The board also is working on rules governing the conduct of guards and other employes at the workhouse. they have not been completed. A resolution discharging Joseph Etzel, a guard, was adopted. A prisoner complained that Etzel had abused him. This is the second time the board has dropped Etzel. The first order appeared to have no effect as he kept on working.

During the recent work house investigation Etzel was accused of attempting to intimidate a witness for the board. he was peremptorily ordered dropped. Why he retained his place no one on the board was able to explain. The ordinance giving the board charge of the workhouse gives it the right to hire and discharge guards. It was said yesterday that Etzel is "out for good" this time or the board will know the reason why. When Superintendent Cornelius Murphy informed Etzel that he had been discharged the guard went before the board.

SAYS "INFLUENCE" IS GOOD.

"I haven't done nothing to nobody or violated no rules here and I demand to know why I'm fired," he demanded.

"We don't think you have the proper influence in a place like this," Mr. Voelker informed him.

"My influence is as good as any of 'em," stated Etzel, proudly. "I have as good backing as the best."

"I am not speaking of political influence," replied the president. "We do not consider you a fit man for the place. I do not care to discuss this matter with you further."

Another guard, who was reported to have been involved in a romance with one of the girl prisoners, a sewing machine girl, was called in to explain. He denied being in love and insisted he had made no arrangements to pay the woman's fine. He was told to return to duty.

Five male prisoners and one woman were ordered paroled yesterday. Several applications were deferred until further investigation could be made.

The board made a rule that a prisoner could not receive visitors until they had been there fifteen days. After that the relatives may visit on Sundays only.

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September 14, 1909

'CAP' PHELAN, SOLDIER
OF FORTUNE, IS DEAD.

NAME GRAVEN IN WAR HIS-
TORY AS BLOCKADE RUNNER.

Staunch Irish-American Patriot
Mixed in Many Attempts to Free
Ireland -- Stabbed for Expos-
ing Clan ne Gael Plot.
Captain Thomas Phelan, Soldiler of Fortune.
CAPTAIN THOMAS PHELAN.

The death of Captain Thomas Phelan, Irish-American patriot and soldier of fortune, which occurred at 2:30 o'clock last Saturday afternoon, in Bremerton, Wash., ended a life full of romance and a checkered career in war and politics. Early in life he was bitten with the wanderlust, and during the early 60s and 70s helped to make history, not only in America, but in Canada and Ireland. Captain Phelan was 76 years old and leaves a widow and four children.

Being a native of Ireland, Captain Phelan throughout his life and did all in his power to bring freedom to Erin. He was born near the town of Tipperary and came to America about 1857, locating at Independence, Mo. He married Miss Alice Cox of that city.

During the early part of Captain Phelan's life he was embroiled in many attempts to free his native country from the yoke of England. Shortly after his marriage in Independence he enlisted as a volunteer in the Seventh Missouri regiment of the Union army and fought with that regiment throughout the war. He rose from the ranks to a captain. He was in many of the important battles.

NAME IN WAR HISTORY.

One of his daring acts committed during the progress of the war was at the siege of Vicksburg. It was necessary to take a steamboat loaded with cotton and other products, and munitions of war, down the river and Captain Phelan was delegated to run the blockade.

Transferring bales of hay for cotton around the edge of the boat he succeeded in getting safely through the lines. His name appears in Civil war history as that of the man responsible for breaking the blockade.

In the late 60's he gained fame and notoriety by engaging in the Fenian raid from the United States into Canada in a futile attempt to occupy Canada and make it a base of supplies from which to carry on warfare with England for the freedom of Ireland.

The Irish in America congregated about Ridgeway, Canada, for the purpose of an uprising and gaining a stronghold in the Canadian country. Some 1,400 Irish left the United States for this purpose, but boats on the waterways cut off a portion, and they failed to land in Canada. A battle in which many persons were killed on both sides was fought by the Irishmen against the Queen's Own regiment.

While making a visit to his home country, Captain Phelan learned that the Clan na Gael was planning to blow up an English ship named the Queen. Although against England, Captain Phelan did not believe in destroying innocent passengers, and therefore notified the English ship people. In some manner his part became public, and O'Donovan Rossa, editor of the Irishman of New York, attacked his loyalty in the paper.

STABBED THIRTEEN TIMES.

The incident occurred during the term as mayor here of Lee Talbot. Captain Phelan was called to New York to be given an opportunity to explain matters relative to his informing the British of the intended blowing up of the Queen.

Close friendship had before existed between Rossa and Phelan, and the latter did not realize that he was to be the victim of a trap. He went to New York and entered Rossa's office. While there an endeavor to assassinate him was made by an Irishman living in the East. Captain Phelan was stabbed thirteen times and received a broken arm in the attack. He was confined in a hospital in New York for many months on account of his injuries. The news that he gave the information to the English leaked out through a story of the plot printed in Kansas City and written by Frank P. Clarke, a former newspaper man, now living here.

Between the years of 1882 and 1888 Captain Phelan was superintendent of the Kansas City workhouse. He was greatly interested in politics and was a staunch Republican all of his life. When the criminal court was instituted in Jackson county he was appointed clerk of the court and was the first to fill this position. Under Mayor John Moore he served as superintendent of public works. While Colonel R. T. Van Horn was a member of Congress Captain Phelan received the appointment of captain of police of Washington, D. C.

CHALLENGED COUNT ESTERHAZY.

After the civil war he organized Company D of the Third Regiment and was a captain in the regiment for many years. Later he organized Battery B. For the last seven years he had been in charge of a navy yard at Bremerton, Wash., where ships of the United States are repaired. He was holding this position when he died. Captain Phelan belonged to the G. A. R., but was not a member of any other organization.

Captain Phelen also figured very prominently in a duel which was never pulled off. The participants were to have been a Captain McCafferty and Captain Phelan. Rifles were the weapons chosen, and seconds and grounds had been picked when friends interfered.

At one time a number of Irish left America to aid Ireland, whose sons were to rise against England upon a certain day. Chester, England, was the place of the rendezvous for the Irish-Americans. Arms had been secured for their use.

The English troops, however, got wind of the threatened uprising and were sent out in such large forces that the Irish were overawed. The difficulty between Captains McCafferty and Phelan arose out of the means to be used at this time in trying to free Ireland.

Captain Phelan's family resides at 3205 Washington street. Dr. Y. J. Acton of Bremerton notified the family of the death. The body was buried yesterday afternoon in the Soldiers and Sailors' cemetery at Bremerton, Wash., by Captain Phelan's special request.

For many years Captain Phelan traveled over the country giving exhibitions of shooting and fencing. He was a crack shot with pistols and rifles, and was a famous swordsman.

Captain Phelan, while the Dreyfus affair in France was at its height, challenged Count Esterhazy, accuser of Dreyfus, to a duel with swords, to be fought anywhere in the world.

Besides his widow, Mrs. John Young and Miss Annie Phelan, daughters, and two sons, Robert Phelan, a police detective, and Thomas Phelan, survive.

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September 3, 1909

THEY KICK ON THIS MENU.

Ham, Potatoes, Peas, Biscuits, But-
ter, Milk, Coffee, etc. for Prisoners.

Men who are confined in charity institutions, jails and workhouses are prone to complain of their treatment, and it is proverbial that they always object to the food. Kansas City is no exception in this regard, the latest kick being from men brought back from the municipal farm at Leeds and confined in the workhouse or released. One kicks on the quality, another on the quantity, or rather lack of quantity and various other protests, mild and vociferous, have been registered.

Yesterday Edward Kipple, Daniel Mahoney, Harry Fry, Lee Garrett and Albert Buell, guards at the workhouse, took eighteen prisoners to the Leeds farm. That makes forty-seven men now sojourning there.

Evidently while a the farm the five guards dined. They did not have a special spread but "the staff" ate with the forty-seven prisoners.

"To begin with," said Kipple, "I will give you the bill of fare for supper last night. Fried country ham, good ham, too; fine fried potatoes, cooked peas, hot biscuits, hot corn bread, old fashioned home made bread, the kind 'mother used to make,' apple sauce, as good as any human ever tasted, fresh country butter, made on the ground; coffee and sweet milk, also secured on the farm.

"We were all at one table and I was a little leery that the boss was putting up a spread just for our benefit. I asked a prisoner at another table, 'Hey, fellow, what are you eating over there?' 'Just the same as you are,' he replied. Still not satisfied, I got up and went over to take a look for myself. Sure enough, they had everything we had all the way down the line."

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August 25, 1909

INCINERATING PLANT
THE ONLY SOLUTION.

Safe and Sanitary Way to
Dispose of Garbage.

"The time is at hand for this city to face the garbage problem and to face it in a safe and sanitary sort of way. In my opinion the proper solution lies not only in the collection of all refuse, but also in its final destruction. the city should be provided with an incinerating plant; indeed, it is now so large since the borders have been increased that we should have two such plants."

Dr. W. S. Wheeler, health commissioner, made this suggestion in the first annual report, which he read before the hospital and health board yesterday afternoon.

In discussing this subject Dr. Wheeler tells the board that J. I. Boyer contracted last December to remove garbage three times a day during the months between May and October and twice a day during the other months. The garbage was to be removed away from the city.

"Up to this date," the report states, "Mr. Boyer has not in any particular fulfilled his contract with the city, and, with his present equipment, he will not be able to do so. further, Mr. Boyer has had implicit instructions from your health commissioner that the government officials had warned our department that no more garbage should be dumped into the Missouri river, but Mr. Boyer has, purposely or otherwise, not heeded our protestations in this respect."

"PEST HOUSE FOR DISEASES."

Dr. Wheeler speaks of the workhouse as a "veritable pest house for all kinds of diseases." He blames the construction of the place for the unsanitary condition, and says "unfortunates are packed in cells like rats in holes." He suggests that the place be enlarged so that more cell room may be had, that sewer connections be made with each cell and that two wards be built where the attending physician may see that sick prisoners get humane treatment.

The commissioner next takes up the spit nuisance, tells of the ordinance passed concerning spitting in street cars, and says that education has done much to abate the nuisance.

In a long dissertation on "the house fly," he speaks of the diseases that are carried into homes by this insect. It is his opinion that typhoid fever and many intestinal troubles are spread by the fly.

He recommends the destruction of open vaults and that sewage should not be allowed to empty into adjacent streams, but should be destroyed completely. To keep the city in better condition he recommends more inspectors and a system by which tab may be kept on them to see that they work.

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August 20, 1909

ICE WATER FOR PRISONERS.

Supt. Murphy Has Refrigeration In-
stalled in Workhouse.

"I cannot get along without ice water in the summer, and it is wrong to deprive those who are so unfortunate as to be sent to the workhouse of a cooling and refreshing drink of water," said Cornelius Murphy, the new superintendent at the workhouse yesterday. During the recent hot spell he had plumbers install refrigeration in the supply pipes in the institution leading to the men's department, and yesterday a similar improvement was installed in the women's section.

Mayor Crittenden, who made a personal inspection of the workhouse yesterday, congratulated Mr. Murphy on his thoughtfulness and also complimented him upon the cleanly appearance of everything about the place. The mayor was accompanied by the city comptroller and the city plumbing inspector for the purpose of determining what it will cost to make the cells sanitary and to improve the general sanitation of the building. The inspector was directed to prepare plans immediately for necessary changes so the board of public works can advertise for bids. Comptroller Pearson promised to provide the revenues.

A change in the illumination of the building is also contemplated. Natural gas is used wholly, and the mayor thinks that besides the product being too warm for summer there is danger from fire. He has ordered the city electrician to prepare an estimate of the cost of connecting cables with the new general hospital electric light plant.

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August 14, 1909

IF NUDE IS ART, THEN
ART IS "ON THE BUM"

JUDGE LATSHAW STRICTLY TO
ENFORCE NEW LAW.

In Fining Photographer the $500
Limit, Court Calls Attention to
Most Drastic Enactment
Effective Monday.

If the nude is art, then, in the immortal words of Alderman Miles Bulger, art will be "on the bum" in Kansas City on and after Monday, August 16. Mark the date on the calendar.

Judge Ralph S. Latshaw administered this latest jolt to the "nude" in art yesterday afternoon in the criminal court. Incidentally, he said in no uncertain words that the nude is not art.

Photographers and art schools, who make a practice of reproducing likeness of the human form as it appears without the constraint of clothing will have to get out the fig leaves or something that will be even less translucent than the Adam ready to wear clothes.

The ruling on art in general and nude art in particular came in the case of Leon Vickers, a photographer who had a studio in the Sterling building. He advertised for girls to pose at 50 cents an hour. Then he informed some of the applicants that they would have to pose in the nude altogether and made advances toward two girls.

Vickers was tried in the municipal court, where a fine of $100 was imposed. He appealed to the criminal court, where the fine was raised to $500.

"Photographers all over the city make a practice of posing nude subjects," said the attorney for Vickers.

TO STOP "LIFE CLASSES."

"If they do," said Judge Latshaw, "they will soon be on the inside of the jail bars, looking out."

"But they pose nude subjects and make sketches from the nude at the Fine Arts institute," suggested Daniel Howell, assistant city attorney, who conducted the prosecution.

"They will not do so after Monday," remarked the court, decisively. "The legislature has enacted a law, effective Monday, which covers just such cases. I am sorry, Vickers, that I cannot send you to the penitentiary. There ought to be a law under which I could do so."

However, the fine of $500 imposed on Vickers is equivalent to the maximum imprisonment fixed in the new statute. The photographer will have to go to the workhouse for a year. The new law makes the maximum imprisonment one year and the maximum fine $1,000 and provides that both may be imposed.

A further section of the new law forbids the circulation of any obscene pictures or literature. If rigidly enforced, it will have a considerable bearing on the trade in suggestive postcards, which has grown to abnormal proportions in the past few years.

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August 14, 1909

MANUAL TRAINING FOR
WORKHOUSE PRISONERS?

Superintendent Murphy Will Go to
Chicago to Get Ideas for
Changes Here.

Changes in the conditions which now prevail at the workhouse are to be instituted as soon as possible, if the ideas of the members of the pardon and parole board are carried out. At the meeting of the board yesterday afternoon it was decided to send Cornelius Murphy, new superintendent of the workhouse, and L. A. Halbert, secretary of the board, to Chicago, where they are to make an exhaustive study of the conditions which are in force at that institution.

It was deplored by the board that there is no means of teaching a prisoner at the workhouse any trade by which he might make his living if he were released or pardoned. Such institutions as laundires, shoe shops and tailoring shops were mintioned as among the available ones which might readity be had in the Kansas City workhouse.

Mr. Murray and Br. Halbert probably will leave for Chicago some time during the last part of next week. William Volker and Jacob Billikopf, members of the board, both have examined the Chicago workhouse and express much appreciation of its methods.

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July 31, 1909

CORNELIUS MURPHY
SUCCEEDS O'HEARN.

MAYOR CRITTENDEN NAMES
NEW SUPERINTENDENT.

Confirmation at the Hands of the
Upper House of the Council
Is Expected Monday
Night.
Cornelius Murphy, New Workhouse Superintendent.
CORNELIUS MURPHY.
Appointed Superintendent of the Workhouse to Succeed Patrick O'Hearn.

Cornelius Murphy was yesterday appointed superintendent of the workhouse by Mayor Crittenden to succeed Patrick O'Hearn, whose resignation has been demanded and accepted. Mr. Murphy will have to be confirmed by the upper house of the council, and it is thought that this will be done at the meeting Monday night.

Mr. Murphy is a man of good judgment, a fine disciplinarian and thoroughly understands the handling and treatment of prisoners of the stripe that are confined in the workhouse," was the statement given out by the mayor.

For fifty-two years Mr. Murphy has been a resident of Kansas City and during that time has been active in Democratic politics. In the earlier days he was identified with the Marcy K. Brown wing of the party, and later when "the rabbits," under the generalship of J. B. Shannon, put Brown off the political map Murphy cast his lot with the Shannon bunch. He is a brother of Daniel Murphy, a former presiding judge of the county court.

During his political career Mr. Murphy served two terms as county marshal, was superintendent of mails when George M. Shelley was postmaster and for two years was inspector of detectives while Colonel L. E. Irwin was chief of police. In recent years Mr. Murphy has been conducting a livery and sales stable.

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July 27, 1909

O'HEARN MUST QUIT
AT ONCE, SAYS MAYOR.

WORKHOUSE SUPERINTENDENT
TOLD TO RESIGN.

Pardon Board in Charge of Institu-
tion Today -- Crittenden Not
Ready to Announce Suc-
cessor -- Board's Report.

The resignation of Patrick O'Hearn as superintendent of the workhouse, effective this morning, was demanded by Mayor Crittenden in a letter to O'Hearn mailed last night. The letter should be in the hands of O'Hearn when he reports at the institution today. The action of the mayor was based on the official report of the board of pardons and paroles, and the demand that the superintendent be removed without further ceremony.

"I have mailed a letter to Mr. O'Hearn asking for his immediate resignation. He should receive it by the early mails tomorrow," said the mayor.

"But suppose he does not resign?"

"I have no fears in that direction. It will be safe to say that Mr. O'Hearn will not be superintendent of the workhouse after tomorrow morning. The whole thing is a closed incident. Officially I asked the board to investigate workhouse conditions. It has done so, and its verdict is in my hands.

HASN'T NAMED SUCCESSOR.

"The workhouse has been a source of much annoyance and tribulation to every administration. Naturally my administration came in for the share of odium and criticism that springs up regularly year in and year out. I am glad I had the investigation made. It was the means of disclosing conditions at the city's penal institution that should and will be corrected."

"Who is to be O'Hearn's successor?"

"I have several men of integrity and sound judgment who are good disciplinarians under consideration, but I do not know if any of them would accept the position for the salary, which is $150 a month. A man possessed of the requirements to make a satisfactory superintendent of the workhouse is not looking for $150 a month job. He is better employes and better paid."

The mayor said that possibly by tonight or tomorrow he will be able to announce the name of the new superintendent, and that in the meantime the board of pardons and paroles will exercise jurisdiction over the workhouse.

GUARDS TO BE DISCHARGED.

It is thought that most of the guards under the O'Hearn regime will be discharged.

There was talk in political circles last night that Edward Winstanly, city purchasing agent was being considered as O'Hearn's successor, but the report was not taken seriously. It was argued that the man who will be appointed must have had some experience in handling prisoners.

"Everything that belongs to the city will be returned," declared the mayor.

This means an effort will be made to recover the two calves and a black mare, claimed by the city, which testimony at the hearing showed had been sent from the workhouse during O'Hearn's administration.

O'Hearn was appointed superintendent in April, 1908. His wife is matron of the institution, but whether she will be asked to resign has not been determined.

The report of the board of pardons and paroles deals with conditions past and present at the workhouse, and contains many recommendations for improvements.

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July 23, 1909

O'HEARN'S MEMORY
PROVES TREACHEROUS.

SUPERINTENDENT CAN'T RE-
MEMBER SPECIFIC ACT.

Fails to Recall Alleged Whipping of
Negro Girl for Insulting Wife.
Investigating Treatment
of Prisoners.

That men and women prisoners have been kept in the dungeon at the workhouse for periods ranging from eleven to forty-three hours at a stretch is a part of the prison records being investigated by the board of pardons and paroles.

The investigation which Mayor Crittenden requested should be made into affairs at the workhouse was begun yesterday morning in the lower house council chamber. Superintendent Patrick O'Hearn was on the stand both morning and afternoon.

When the afternoon session opened, Frank P. Walsh, attorney for the board, who is conducting the inquiry, asked O'Hearn how many prisoners had been given sentences in the dungeon for stealing food from the dining room table.

"I don't know of any," said O'Hearn, "that was most always used as a threat. When a prisoner was sent to the dungeon it was generally for something else."

"I will read from your own records," said Mr. Walsh. "Do you remember Ed Cox, who was placed in the dungeon on September 2, 1908, for stealing bread from the table and carrying it away in his trousers leg?"

"I remember him," replied O'Hearn. "He fought the guards. I saw that myself."

Walsh -- "Do you recall Paul Tillman, Alice Stark, Sadie Shepherd, Hattie Newton, who served thirteen hours each in there, and Charles Meredith, who served an hour and a half? The records show that each was confined for stealing bread."

O'Hearn -- "I don't recall them in particular; there were so many of them put in there."

Dropping the subject for a moment, Mr. Walsh asked O'Hearn if he had ever sent prisoners out to drive city sprinkling wagons at night, if he had had his own wagons repaired at the expense of the city or if he had shod horses belonging to Mr. Cartright, former guard at Leeds, at the city's expense.

NO CHARGES FILED.

Frank M. Lowe, attorney for O'Hearn, objected. He demanded that he be given a copy of the charges against O'Hearn. He was told that there was none.

"Mr. O'Hearn is not on trial here," explained Mr. Walsh. "Things may crop out which may reflect on Kipple, head guard, some of the other guards or Mr. O'Hearn himself. There have been no specific charges filed. This board is simply making a most searching investigation with a view to bettering conditions at the workhouse. Information has been secured from prisoners, former guards and others. Even rumors are being looked into. What Mr. Lowe asks for we cannot give as we haven't it."

Mr. Lowe was told he would be furnished with copies of the evidence from day to day for his information.

"Do you keep a record of the number of days each prisoner works?" asked Mr. Walsh, resuming the inquiry.

"No," replied O'Hearn, "only the names of the guards were kept. We worked some prisoners one day and another lot the next."

O'HEARN SAYS HE IS BUSY.

Walsh -- Do you make a report to the city comptroller showing the number of days each man works?"

O'Hearn -- "No, I'm not required to. Every day excepting Sundays and holidays is credited as a working day whether the prisoner works or not.

Mr. Walsh tried to get from O'Hearn what his duties were about the institution, but they seemed so varied and even vague that he asked him to describe a typical day's work for himself.

O'Hearn -- Well, I get up early to begin with. On my way to the workhouse I may stop at the quarry for a time. Then I look after the food and general cleaning. I make trips about the yards, the stable, laundry, quarry and spend the rest of the time in my office. I may have to make trips down town after requisitions and see after men working at places on the outside. I always put in a busy day."

Walsh -- Do prisoners gamble in the cell room?

O'Hearn -- I don't think so. That is, I have never seen them.

O'Hearn explained that Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays are visiting days at the workhouse. Fifteen minutes is the time limit set on visitors but they often remain longer when overlooked, he said.

DOESN'T REMEMBER WHIPPING.

During the morning session Mr. Walsh asked of Superintendent O'Hearn: Did you ever whip a negro girl for insulting your wife?"

"I don't remember," replied O'Hearn.

Walsh -- "Did Mr. Burger make a hose for you to do the whipping with?"

O'Hearn -- "I can't remember."

Walsh -- "Well, if you ever did a thing like that you surely ought to recall it. Did you or did you not whip the negro girl as I asked?"

O'Hearn -- "I just can't remember whether I did or not."

SENT WOMAN TO DUNGEON.

Edward L. Kipple, head guard at the workhouse, was questioned about prisoners being sent to the dungeon.

Walsh -- "Ever know of prisoners being sent to the dungeon?"

Kipple -- "Y-e-s, sometimes, when they got unruly they were sent there for ten or twelve hours."

Walsh -- "Ever sent a woman there?"

Kipple -- "Believe I sent one. In all I guess I've sent four or five to the dungeon."

Walsh -- "Who has the authority to send a prisoner there?"

Kipple -- "Only Mr. O'Hearn or myself."

Walsh -- "What do you consider a sufficient length of time in the dungeon?"

Kipple -- "That depends on what they do."

Mr. Walsh then read a list of names from the workhouse record of men and women prisoners who had been kept in the dungeon eleven, thirteen, fifteen, eighteen and twenty-four hours. Three had been kept there for thirty-eight hours, one for forty-one and another for forty-three hours. While in the dungeon, which has only one small opening over the door for ventilation, prisoners are shackled with their hands to the wall, making it necessary for them to stand. The dungeon is said to be in a very unsanitary condition.

Kipple testified that he had never seen nor heard of a prisoner being struck with a club while in the dining room, that blankets were never used twice without washing and that he knew nothing of vermin in the cell rooms. He also swore that he had never known of liquor and drugs being secured by the prisoners or of gambling among prisoners.

Claude Marshaw, known as "Goldie," who served a term for peddling cocaine and was himself then addicted to the habit, said that the drug was often spirited into the workhouse. He said that Mike Green and "Red" Crawford, both now escaped, had gum opium and whisky most of the time.

"Who brought the stuff in?" asked Mr. Walsh.

"I don't know, only that they had it. Green would take up a collection every afternoon to get a bottle and he always got the whisky about 7 p. m."

Walsh -- "How about the food out there?"

Marshaw -- "Bad, very bad. In the morning they always had pan gravy in a rusty pan, coffee in a rusty cup, half a loaf of hard, moldy bread and a small piece of meat.

SAW PRISONERS ATTACKED.

Walsh -- "Ever see a prisoner assaulted in the dining room?"

Marshaw -- "Yes. I saw Dan Mahoney beat a man in the dining room and I saw Mahoney, Foley, Gent and an Italian called Mike beat up another one."

Walsh -- "Was 'Riley, the Rat' there while you were there?"

Marshaw -- "Yes, two or three days, but he never even put on prison clothes. He wore 'cits' all the time, Riley did. He and Green and others gambled, playing 'coon-can' and 'craps.'"

Jesse Cooper, a negress who has had short sojourns at the workhouse, said there was vermin in the negro women's quarter, that blankets were not often washed and that the bread was hard and moldy. She also said she that two negro women had each spent two days and nights in the dungeon while she was there.

John Mulloy, a parole prisoner, told of an assault which he had witnessed on a negro boy in the dining room. It started, he said, because the boy did not step fast enough for Dan Mahoney who jabbed him with a club. The boy grabbed at the stick and was beaten over the head until he bled. Mulloy also condemned the meals.

The hearing will be resumed at 9 o'clock this morning. There are many witnesses to bet examined. By the ordinance, passed Wednesday noon, the board of pardons and paroles now has charge of the workhouse.

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July 20, 1909

MORE POWER TO THE BOARD.

Mayor Would Vest in It Complete
Control of the Workhouse.

Accompanied by a special message, Mayor Crittenden last night had an ordinance sent to the upper house of the council to enlarge the powers of the board of pardons and paroles so as to give it almost complete control of the workhouse, and full control so far as rules of government and their enforcement go. In his message the mayor says "the honesty or efficiency of the superintendent of the workhouse has never been questioned by me, but should an investigation made by the pardon board under their power, as enlarged by this proposed ordinance, prove that he has been faithless, then he, as well as any of his subordinates who are shown to be unworthy, can no longer continue in the city employ."

The ordinance was passed by the upper house unanimously, but referred to the workhouse committee by the lower house, the Republicans voting against the reference. It would permit the pardons board to make all the rules for the management of the workhouse, enforce their observance, try the superintendent or any other workhouse officer for cause. The ordinance would also allow the board to find officials or officers guilty of the evidence should warrant, recommend the dismissal of the offender, which recommendation the mayor is to be bound to act upon.

The ordinance grows out of the recent police developments.

WORKHOUSE HEARING THURSDAY.

President William Volker of the board of pardons and paroles announced yesterday that the investigation which that board is to conduct into affairs at the workhouse will begin at 9 o'clock

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July 14, 1909

WORKHOUSE NOT FIT
PLACE FOR INSANE.

PARDON AND PAROLE BOARD
ORDERS INVESTIGATION.

Mrs. Kate Pierson, a Member, Se-
verely Criticises Humane Officer
Greenman -- One Pardoned and
Ten Paroled Yesterday.

Incarceration at the city workhouse of persons who are mentally deficient came in for severe censure before the pardon and parole board yesterday afternoon. Colonel J. C. Greenman, humane officer at the municipal court, was criticised by Mrs. Kate Pierson.

The matter was brought to the notice of the board by its secretary, L. A. Halbert, who made a report upon certain prisoners, among them three insane persons.

"Colonel Greenman thinks it is his duty to have those insane persons sent to the workhouse," said Mrs. Pierson. "As long as he can keep an insane person away from St. Joseph he is happy. He seems to take a certain pride in keeping down the county's expense."

Frank P. Walsh, another member of the board, said in that connection:

"Whatever may be the cause it is a regrettable situation, and one which needs our attention. We must find some place for those who are insane. The workhouse certainly is not the place for them."

BOARD TO INVESTIGATE.

The board decided to make prompt investigation of the reported insane cases and ordered the secretary to secure competent medical assistance to make the necessary examination. The board itself will see to the court order of commitment.

It was asserted that paroled prisoners were often rearrested within a few hours or days following parole. The secretary said in this connection that he had approached a prisoner and asked if he wished to be paroled.

"No, I don't," the prisoner is said to have answered. "I have only three months to serve, and then I am free. If I get paroled I get pinched again right away and have to serve out my parole as well as my new sentence. I'd rather serve it out."

It was decided by the board that the police commissioners be asked about this and also asked to detail a special officer to the board for use in rearresting those paroled prisoners who break faith with the pardon board.

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June 26, 1909

PRISONERS SWELTER IN
OVERCROWDED
WORKHOUSE.

On Men's Side Capacity is 112, and
Number of Inmates Is 131.

While the sun's rays sizzled down upon the roof of the Kansas City workhouse yesterday afternoon 131 men lay in cells, panting and sweltering. The cells on the men's side have equal space for fifty-six white men and the same number of negroes, the total capacity being 112. If there are more than that number there are no more bunks for them.

Instead of the men being divided equally, yesterday there were eighty-three white men and forty-eight negroes, making it necessary to place one-third of the white men with the negroes. The municipal farm at Leeds relieves the situation some. There are twenty men there, and if these were in the workhouse it would make living intolerable.

At this season of the year the workhouse is generally running "short-handed." The police, however, in the last month have been extraordinarily vigilant. Many commissions have expired, and more soon will expire, and the new board has announced that recommissioning the men will depend entirely on their records.

The women's department at the workhouse has accommodations for sixteen white and thirty-two negro women. This department, however, is not so crowded. Yesterday there were fifteen white and nineteen negro women prisoners.

The board of pardons and paroles relieved the situation some yesterday by paroling eleven men and two women, all but one of whom will be released today. One of the men will not be released until July 1, when certain conditions have been complied with.

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June 23, 1909

"I'LL FIX YOU" COST $500.

Angry Father Threatened His Son
in the Municipal Court.

When Raymond Agill was fined $50 in the municipal court yesterday morning for mistreating his wife, he shook his fist at his 12-year-old son, who was a witness for his mother.

"I'll fix you when I get out," he declared.

When Judge Kyle heard the remark, he increased the fine to $500, and in default of payment the man was sent to the workhouse.

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May 15, 1909

FOUR ITALIANS SENT
TO THE WORKHOUSE.

BELIEVE THEY ARE BLACK
HAND SOCIETY MEMBERS.

Two Were Fined $1,000 and Two
$500 -- Any Attempt to Secure
Their Release Will Be
Fought.
Four Italian Men Suspected of Being Black Hand Society Members.

Four Italians who were arrested by Detectives J. L. Ghent and "Lum" Wilson in a rooming house at 503 East Third street, and who are suspected by the police of belonging to the Black Hand society, were fined yesterday morning in the municipal court for vagrancy, and in default of payment of the fines were sent to the workhouse. Vincenzo Domenico and Frank Bruno were fined $1,000 each on two charges, while Francesco Amelo and Maro Choapa, the other members of the gang, were fined $500 each.

Ever since Italian business men received threatening letters demanding money a few weeks ago the detectives have been investigating the matter. Domenico and Bruno first excited suspicion, and after watching for several days, the detectives decided to bring them to police headquarters. When searched, both were found to be armed with revolvers. The other two Italians were arrested, and when their room, on Third street, was entered, where all had been living, several revolvers and shotguns were found.

In court yesterday morning, none of the prisoners professed knowledge of the English language. The court failed to establish that any of the men had been the authors of the threatening letters.

The police will fight any attempt to get them out of the workhouse as they regard them as dangerous characters and while it was not proved that they were actually members of the dread Italian society it is thought that they know more than they care to tell.

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May 9, 1909

TEACHING WOMEN TO SEW.

Installation of Machines at Work-
house Proves a Success.

William Volker, president of the board of pardons and paroles, is feeling gratified over the success of his scheme of placing sewing machines in the workhouse and giving the female inmates a chance to learn a trade.

The machines were installed a short time ago at Mr. Volker's expense but they have been in actual operation but ten days. the first three days it was hard to get the women interested, but a few finally went to work and the rest soon followed them. A prisoner in the workhouse, who is a cutter, was given patterns and laid out the work. A woman instructor taught the female prisoners how to sew and the result was fifty-six pairs of overalls of various sizes for the men prisoners. Most of the women never handled a machine or a needle before, but they are learning fast.

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May 7, 1909

GOOD WORK AT CITY FARM.

Board of Pardons and Paroles Has
Helped Clean It Up.

"The board of pardons and paroles is doing great work out at the city farm, near Leeds, with prisoners from the workhouse," said Mayor Crittenden last night. During the afternoon, in company with Jacob Billikopf and Frank Walsh of the board of pardons and paroles, C. A. Sumner, of the City Club and W. C. Root of the tenement commission, the mayor made and inspection of the farm.

"A year ago portions of the farm were veritable jungles," said the mayor, "but things are different now. With the board of pardons and paroles acting in a supervising capacity, prisoners from the workhouse have cleaned out all the underbrush, erected buildings for their sh elter and laid out gardens which have been planted with all kinds of produce.

"The site for the proposed tuberculosis hospital has been put in fine shape and just as soon as bonds are voted the erection of the building will be under way."

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April 3, 1909

ALLY OF "RILEY, THE RAT."

So "Simply but Richly Dressed"
Woman Was Fined $500.
Girl Friend of Riley the Rat
WOMAN WHO CALLS HERSELF "MAY CLARK."

The woman who stood "simply but richly dressed" in the municipal court yesterday morning and "showed much refinement," was fined $500 for picking a woman's pocket in a main street store on Thursday, was identified yesterday as the woman companion of "Riley, the Rat," who is now cracking rocks at the city workhouse.

When questioned by the judge, the woman said that her name was "May Clark" and that she had "come from home." She refused to give further information as to her friends or relatives.

When taken to the workhouse yesterday afternoon, she was recognized by Bert Pease, the wagon driver, as the woman who came to the workhouse every few days to see "the Rat." On different occasions she would bring him baskets of fruit and other delicacies.

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March 21, 1909

NEW PAROLE PLAN ADOPTED.

Prisoners Violating Their Agree-
ment Must Serve Triple Time.

A new order of things was put in practice by the board of pardons and paroles at its meeting yesterday. Persons paroled do not get off so easily and the board has an opportunity of keeping track of parolees longer than before. The new scheme was learned by the board on its recent visit to Cleveland, O., where it made a thorough investigation of the house of corrections and the parole system there.

When a prisoner is paroled now he agrees that should he violate any of the conditions of his parole he is to go back to the work house and serve out three times the amount of his unexpired term. He also agrees to report to the secretary of the board, if on parole, for that length of time instead of just for the unexpired term of his sentence, as has been the case. Under the new system if a man with 100 days to serve violates his parole he will be taken in custody and returned to the work house, where he will have to serve 300 days.

A matter came to light yesterday which heretofore had been kept under cover. That was the fact that William Volker, president of the board, out of his own pocket, pays the fare of every paroled prisoner who is sent out of the city to his family or friends, often fitting him out with new clothing before doing so. Several such cases arise at each meeting. Mr. Volker has also fitted numbers of men out here in the city so as to enable them to "make a good front" when they went to work. This class of work has always been done by the Provident Association, but Mr. Volker so far has taken the burden upon himself.

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March 10, 1909

MAY BE A NEIGHBOR

WORKHOUSE FOR GALLAGHER IF
HE CAN'T PAY FINE.

Again Assessed $100 for Attacking
Reporter and Old Appeal Bond
Doesn't Hold -- Must Put
Up or Go to Jail.

For forcibly entering a room on July 15 last year in which Albert H. King, a reporter for The Journal, lay injured after being slugged by the defendant a week before, "Jack Gallagher, who says his name is John Francis Gallagher, was sentenced yesterday to pay a fine of $100, with court costs. The case was tried before a jury in Judge E. E. Porterfield's division of the criminal court, which was only a few minutes in making up its mind.

The visit made to Mr. King's room, which Gallagher stated on the stand "was just a friendly call," was made at 5 o'clock in the morning. He was arrested at the time, but by an oversight of an officer at the Walnut street station, who did not realize the gravity of the offense, Gallagher was released on bond of $11. He was no sooner out of the station two hours later than he returned immediately to Mr. King's room, and a second time tried to force an entrance. For this offense he is yet to be tried.

Gallagher was tried before a jury in Judge Ralph S. Latshaw's division of the criminal court last month for an assault committed on Mr. King July 8, last. On this occasion he was also fined $100 and costs, and given a stipulated time in which to pay the fine.

The grand jury found an indictment against Gallagher for the assault, and it was, therefore, a state charge. The case tried yesterday, and the one still pending, are appeals from the municipal court where he was fined for disturbing the peace. Gallagher spent nearly one month in the workhouse before bonds for an appeal could be perfected.

When the jury returned its verdict in Judge Porterfield's court yesterday, Gallagher was allowed to go, the court stating that the bond made by Judge William H. Wallace when the case was appealed, would remain in effect until the fine and costs were paid. Cliff Langsdale, city attorney, who h ad prosecuted the case, was not satisfied with this arrangement, however, and found a recent law which states plainly that when a person is fined in the criminal court, after having taken an appeal from the municipal court, he must settle the fine and costs at once, or be committed to the workhouse until such fine and costs are paid.

Judge Porterfield admitted that the recent law took precedence. An effort was made then to get a commitment from the criminal clerk consigning Gallagher to the workhouse until he had settled up with the court. The clerk's office was closed, however, so the commitment will be asked for first thing this morning.

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February 25, 1909

WHAT! MAKE THE RAT WORK.

"Well, Say! What Sort of a Town
Do You T'ink Dis Is?"

Confined for one week in the workhouse, where he was sent on a $500 fine in the municipal court February 18, John Riley, commonly called Riley the "Rat," a well known pickpocket, is "carefully guarded," but not allowed to do any manual labor.

On Tuesday afternoon "the Rat," dressed in the garb of workhouse prisoners, sat in the lobby of the bastile, conversing with his wife. His hands were as smooth and pink as those of any young lady of society. Although the rules regulating the length of time visitors may see prisoners to fifteen minutes are posted upon the walls,, "the Rat" was allowed to sit on a bench and talk to his wife for at least an hour.

When Patrick O'Hearn, the superintendent, was asked if Riley had been put to work, he said he had not.

"It is too cold, and the mud is too deep," the superintendent remarked.

Only in pleasant weather are the inmates, with pulls, allowed to work out their fine for the day.

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February 24, 1909

ROBBER WAS FULL OF "COKE."

Wanted More "Dope," His Defense
for Stealing.

After a cocaine debauch which he said cost nearly $400, Richard L. Hayes, a carpenter, who broke into the harness shop of Pearl Martin, 1720 Troost avenue, last Saturday night and stole a blanket, a shovel and a halter, confessed his guilt before Justice Shoemaker yesterday and was sentenced to serve twenty days in the workhouse.

"It was not I that stole the stuff, judge," said Hayes, "it was the 'coke.' I had spent all my money and wanted more of the drug. I am a carpenter and until last week was employed at the county farm. I had not touched a drop of liquor nor used cocaine for more than three months until I came to town last week.

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January 13, 1909

WORKHOUSE PRISONERS
GET COKE AND OPIUM?

PARDON AND PAROLE BOARD
WILL INVESTIGATE RUMORS.

Also Would Know Circumstances Sur-
rounding Escape of F. E. Golden.
Severn Are Freed at Yes-
terday's Session.

The mystery surrounding in disappearance of F. E. Golden from the workhouse January 5 is being investigated by the pardon and parole board. Golden and an old man named George Rogers were recently fined $500 each for attempting to "short change" local merchants.

When he went to the workhouse he had $21.50 and a watch. After he had been there several days the money and watch were returned to him one morning. That night he escaped from the engine room where he was working.

"Patrick O'Hearn told me," said Secretary Frank E. McCrary, "that the engineer left the room and , in violation of strict orders, failed to lock the door. When he returned, Golden had decamped."

Mr. Billikopf said the board might want to know why Golden's money and watch happened to be given him the very day he happened to escape?

According to Mr. McCrary, Superintendent O'Hearn said Golden's watch was given him so he could tell the time down in the engine room, so he would know when to fire up. It appears to be the custom to give prisoners their money when it is asked for.

EASY TO GET "DOPE."

Another matter the board may look into is the passing of different kinds of "dope" in to prisoners. At every meeting so far prisoners have voluntarily stated that they sent out every day for gum opium, morphine and cocaine.

"Some of the guards will get it for you," one man stated, "if there is anything in it, but it is most generally brought in by the men of the chain gang. The money is given them when they go out in the morning."

The board yesterday gave freedom on parole to seven workhouse prisoners and sent one back until some of his statements would be investigated.

RAILROADED TO PRISON.

Paroled yesterday was Daniel Shoemaker, 21 years old, a negro dining car waiter, a dragnet victim. He was arrested December 3 "for investigation" and held three days, forty-eight hours longer than the law allows. Then he was fined $50 as a vagrant. Shoemaker told the board yesterday that he had just come in from his run when arrested, but that the police would not allow him to telephone and prove it. Even in court this was denied him.

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