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February 8, 1910

CORONER'S INQUEST BEGINS
DEATH AND POST-MORTEM OF
COL. THOMAS SWOPE
EXAMINED.

HYDE'S NAME MENTIONED.

Doctors and Nurses Testify
at Independence.

The coroner's inquest into the death of Colonel Thomas C. Swope got underway in Independence yesterday, and it was brought out that Colonel Swope, tried a number of tonics and remedies, and that he worried over his will in the weeks before his death, and wanted the poor of the city to benefit by the income from his residuary estate, valued at $1,000,000.

Harry S. Cook, superintendent of the Forest Hill cemetery, told the story of the removal of the body of Colonel Swope at dead of night from the catacombs where it was at rest. He said that secrecy was observed and that a blanket was hung on the grillwork of the tomb, so that no one could look in, had anyone had an inkling of what was going on.

The casket, he said, had not been touched and the body was frozen and in a good state of preservation.

The autopsy was conducted at Ott's undertaking rooms at Independence. Coroner Zwart, Drs. Hektoen, Twyman, Stewart, Hall, and a younger docter were among those who attended the post-mortem, it was testified. The body was still frozen, and coal oil lamps and stoves were lighted to thaw it. Bottles were filled with hot water and laid on the body, and then all was covered with blankets.

The post mortem began at 2 p. m. After the doctors finished the autopsy, in which they removed all of Colonel Swope's internal organs and his brain, the body was sewed up, dressed and put back in the casket and removed to the third floor of the undertaking establishment, where it was hidden. It was taken back to the vault the following day. This was done in the day time, as the story of the autopsy had leaked out and there was no further reason for secrecy.

Dr. E. L. Stewart, who graduated seven years ago, and specializes in microscopy, took notes for the doctors who conducted the post mortem. Dr. Steward did not remember all of the details of the autopsy. He declaired that he was too busy taking the dictation by Drs. Hall and Hektoen to observe their operations as closely as he would have liked to. He said that so far as he could see, there was nothing about the appearance of any of the organs removed by the doctors which would indicate that they were other than in a normal condition.

Dr. Stewart turned his findings over to Dr. Hektoen, he said. Dr. Hektoen also took charge of Colonel Swope's viscera. Dr. Stewart remarked about the frozen condition of the body, which he said was rather frail. The brain, he said, after removal, was cut into thin slices so that the doctors could ascertain if there had been a hemorrhage. No blood clot was found either in the brain or in the lining.

NO CLOTHING ON BODY.

The clothing had been removed from the body when he first saw it and he noticed an undertaker's mark on the arm. He also noticed a small dark mark on the left wrist and the undertake's mark on the abdomen. He told of pulling off the scalp, sawing the cranium and removing the skull cap and then taking out the brain. This he said was sliced, but he did not remember into how many sections nor their thickness. The brain was then placed in one of the big half gallon fruit jars and was sealed.

Dr. Stewart said that the brain was taken out whole, as he remembered it. There was no hemorrhage, at least none that was visible to the naked eye, he said. Dr. Stewart did not know whether Dr. Hektoen took the kidneys. He said that to the best of his recollection several of the blood vessels near the heart were hardened. He said that neither he, nor any of the doctors who performed the autopsy, could attribute Colonel Swope's death to any unusual condition found in his vital organs.

He said that one kidney seemed to be slightly enlarged, but this fact, he added, might have been natural. The liver, he said, was of the ordinary gray color and was in good condition. Dr. Stewart said that had there been a hemorrhage of the brain that the embalming fluid wich is used would not have reduced it.

Dr. G. T. Twyman, the Swope family physician, was present at the autopsy, which he said was conducted by Drs. Hektoen and Hall. The body was very well preserved, but was frozen hard. the fluids in the body had all turned to ice. Efforts to thaw it were without avail. There was but one abnormal condition of any consequence, he said, and that was a thickening of the walls of the stomach.

KNEW NOTHING OF DEATH.

Dr. Twyman said that Colonel Swope was not anxious to take medicines or tonics. He last saw him professionaly on April 28, 1909. He had seen him at various times since then and there was nothing in his condition to lead him to the belief that he would die suddenly, he said. Dr. Twyman said that he knew nothing about Colonel Swope's last illness or death. He did not know what caused Colonel Swope's death and he declared that there was nothing in the post mortem which could lead him to form an opinion as to the cause of death.

Sylvester W. Spangler, who since 1903 has had charge of Colonel Swope's real estate, told of Colonel Swope's penchant for taking medicines of various sorts which might be recommended to him by friends, including a tonic which contained strychnine, quinine and iron. He also told of the oft-repeated wich of Colonel Swope just prior to his death that he could arrange in some way to so place his residuary estate that the revenue could be used for the benefit of the poor.

"The last time I saw Colonel Swope alive was the Saturday preceding his death," said Mr. Spangler. "I came down on account of the death of the night previous of his cousin and also to attend to any business matters which he might indicate he wanted closed. I was with him for about an hour and he was in bed all of this time. About the close of our converstaion Colonel Swope addressed me: 'So far as pain is concerned,' he said, 'I have none and never felt better in my life, but I realize that I am a weak man and can't live long.' I cheered him up as best I could.

KEPT TONIC IN OFFICE.

"Colonel Swope kept a tonic in his office, which, according to the label, contained strychnine, quinine and iron and was put up in Independence. He took the contents of two of these bottles, to my knowledge. He would take the medicine for a couple of days and then would not take any for several days, or a week. He took a teaspoonful at a dose. The medicine was orange colored. He also took tablets, some of a white sort and some bromo-quinine tablets. He took Pape's Diapepsin for his stomach trouble. In fact, he took a great many medicnes which were recommended to him by friends as good for his particular case. Two years ago he took some acid phosphates.

"He often told me about some new remedy he had purchased and which he said he would give a trial, as it was harmless, and if it did no good it would do no harm. He had a vest pocket memorandum book in which he kept a record of the medicines recommended to him and which he tried. He would invariably return to me and tell me that the medicines were fakes. The elixir, he said, was prescribed by an Independence, Mo., doctor and was to give him strength.

"Colonel Swope rewrote his will while I was in his employ. He did not discuss the bequests with me and I knew nothing of the amounts until after his death and the publication of the instrument.

"The reason he gave me for rewriting the will was that some of his property had greatly increased in value and that some had decreased. He wanted the proportions of his bequests to be as he first intended. After providing for all of his heirs he still had a good deal of property that he wanted to dispose of in a charitable way. This residuary estate was worth, he told me, about $1,000,000. He wanted the revenue from the estate to be applied to the benefit of the poor, regardless of their former conditions in life.

WORRIED OVER WILL.

"He was endeavoring to find a way to dispose of this property so that the revenue would be used for the purpose intended. He could transfer it, he said, so that it would not be necessary for him to make a new will and the old would could not be broken. He was worried over the disposition of the residuary estate. He told me that if he deeded it to the city that the revenue, and possible the principle, might be wasted, while if he deeded it to loyal citizen friends, that he feared they were too busy hustling after the almighty dollar to give the property and the revenue the proper attention.

"About six weeks before he died he went to the vault and got his will. After keeping it in his office for a week he told me one Saturday that he would take it home and spend Saturday and Sunday on it. Monday morning he brought it back and said that he had looked it over carefully and that it was as nearly perfect as he could make it. He said that he could not betteer it if he wrote it 100 times.

"Colonel Swope's effects, such as clothing which he kept in the office, were given to the Salvation army after his death. I never heard of an enemy of Colonel Swope and knew of no one that he ever entertained any malice against.

"Colonel Swope claimed Wooford county, Ky., as his home until he gave Kansas City Swope park in 1903. He lived in Independence except for a few months, about 1904 or 1905, when he roomed at the Orient hotel.

"Colonel Swope voted but once in his life, he told me, and that was when McKinley made the first race for the presidency. Colonel Swope made a special trip to Wooford county, Kentucky, to cast his vote for McKinley."

Miss Pearl Virginia Kellar, 36 years old, a trained nurse of five years' experinece, was the witness of the day. Miss Kellar attended Colonel Swope during his last illness and was employed by Dr. B. Clark Hyde, three weeks prior to that event. For several weeks Miss Kellar has been virtually one of the members of the Swope household in Independence. She said that she had only a passing acquaintance with Dr. Hyde, prior to the time that he employed her to go to the Swope home.

MENTIONS HYDE'S NAME.

"Dr. Hyde called me over the telephone Sunday night, September 12. He asked me to meet him Monday at 7:30 a. m. and go to Independence. On the way he told me that Colonel Swope was not really ill; that he had fallen and slightly injured his left shoulder, but to make him feel that I was doing something for him and to massage the injured shoulder. Mrs. Swope and the four daughters met us at the threshold and after donning my uniform I was escorted to Colonel Swope's room where we shook hands and he said he was glad to seee me. The injury I found to be very slight. I was with him three weeks, except one day when I went to the dentist.

" 'Here are some "Pinkle's Pink Pills and some tonic,' said Dr. Hyde to me. 'Let him have the pills and also the tonic as he has been in the habit of taking them.' I found the tonic to contain strychnine, iron and quinine and peptomangan. It was put up by Pendleton & Gentry of Independence. Colonel Swope told me that Obe Gentry had given Mr. Hunton the prescription and that it was very good.

" I kept a nurse's record of Colonel Swope for two weeks, or a week longer than he thought I kept it. He objected to the keeping of the record and when I told Dr. Hyde that I had kept it a week longer than Colonel Swope was aware, and that there was no good reason for keeping it longer, Dr. Hyde suggested that I discontinue it. Colonel Swope objected to me taking his temperature. I made up his bed and straghtened him around, then gave him a bath, an alcohol rub and massage and later another alcohol rub and massage."

NURSE'S NOTES READ.

Miss Kellar here produced her notes and read off her daily notations as to the treatment the patient received and his condition. She said that he ate very full dinners, including cabbage at one meal which she said Dr. Hyde told her he could have as he had been accustomed to it. She gave him occasional drinks containing wine or brandy. She said that Colonel Swope and Dr. Hyde were on perfectly friendly terms.

Her records showed that he took several doses of the pink pills, varying the number from time to time. Monday, September 20, she said that he sat up for an hour in an adjoining room where he looked over the grounds. Wednesday she said that he began taking the tonic, which heretofore he had not touched. She said that Mr. Hunton suggested taht now as he was better that he could take the tonic and get well sooner. Miss Keller also testified to the frequency that Colonel Swope vomited and said that these attacks were without the slightest warning and usually at meal times.
"On Wednesday, September 29 Colonel Swope and I went out riding. We drove out the Lexinton road past the Swope farm which he had not seen in nine years. We were out for two hours and he stood the trip splendidly. Thrusday we drove almost to Kansas City. Friday we started to Blue Springs, but failed to take the right road and had a rough ride.

"After putting Mr. Swope to bed, I came down stairs and Mr. Hunton called me. He was eating dinner and suggested that I eat with him. We had almost finished when Mrs. Swope and Miss Margaret came in. Mr. Hunton looked at me and said that he felt queer. Mildred and a girl friend entered the room at this time and Mr. Hunton tried to pick up a glass of water. He half raised it and then it fell from his hands. I ran to his side and discovered that his left leg was helpless. A negro boy helped me carry him to the library and we summoned doctors.

HUNTON BECAME SICK.

"By the time Dr. Twyman came Mr. Hunton had lapsed into unconsciousness. He had vomited profusely. The boys got an ironing board and we laid Mr. Hunton on this and carried him upstairs. Colonel Swope meanwhile had called, and one of the servants failing to pacify him, I told him that Mr. Hunton was seriously ill. After Dr. Hyde came they decided to bleed Mr. Hunton.

"I did not tell Colonel Swope about the death of Mr. Hunton until Saturday morning. When I told him that Mr. Hunton ws dead, he grasped the bed clothes, and hiding his head, cried, 'Poor Moss.' For a moment he sort of sobbed, and then he asked me to tell him all about it. He th en told me he wanted to be very quiet. He wanted to see no one but Mr. Spangler. He first said taht he did not want to see Dr. Hyde for fear that the doctor might think that he needed him professionally. Colonel Swope did not go across the hall to see Mr. Hunton, and I read to him. The news of Mr. Fleming's wife's death came at noon. Mr. Spangler ws the only visitor. He came about noon."

As Miss Kellar reached this part of her narrative, Deputy Coroner Trogdon conferred with Coroner Zwart and Attorney Reed and announcement was made of adjournment until 10 o'clock this morning.

MRS. SWOPE SHIELDED.

Miss Kellar, the trained nurse who was with Colonel Swope the last three weeks of his life, arrive at the court house shortly before 4 p. m. with Mrs. L. O. Swope and a woman companion. They were driven to the court house in an automobile and were escorted by Attorney John Mastin. They were taken in the witness room, which was kept locked. Miss Kellar, her companion and Mr. Atwood shielded Mrs. Swope from the gaze of the curious. Mrs. Swope was attired was attired in black and wore a heavy veil.

The array of legal talent in the case yesterday was probably the largest in the history of the court house. The Swope heirs and Mr. Paxton, the executor of the estate, were represented by Messrs. Reed, Atwood and Mastin. Virgil Conkling, the prosecuting attorney, represented the state, while Dr. Hyde was represented by Attorneys Walsh, Cleary and Johnson. Coroner Zwart wsa represented by Deputy Coroner Trugdon.

"Can we come in and listen to the case?" inquired Mesdames William Young and Cliff Morrow, neighbors of the Swopes, of J. A. Brown, superintendent of the court house building. "Certainly," he replied and secured them a seat immedately behind the attorneys. There were a score of women at the inquest in the afternoon.

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February 1, 1910

CAN DISTURB INDIAN GRAVES.

Lyda B. Conley, Kansas City, Kas.,
Woman, Loses Lawsuit.

WASHINGTON, Jan. 31. -- The fight of Lyda B. Conley, the Indian woman lawyer, to prevent the sale of the burial ground in Kansas City, Kas., where lie the bodies of her ancestors, came to an end adversely to her in the supreme court of the United States today.

The court affirmed the judgment of the lower courts that her bill to enjoin those who proposed to disturb the burial ground be dismissed.

The court ameliorated the decree by directing that the suit be dismissed without cost to Miss Conley. Miss Conley, who is one-sixteenth Wyandotte and a lawyer, claimed the burial ground of Huron cemetery in Kansas City, Kas., was reserved in perpetuity as a burial ground by a treaty in 1855 between the United States and the Indians.

Congress recently authorized the sale of the land and the removal of the bodies. Miss Conley objected to the removal of the bodies of her ancestors to the burial ground of a Methodist church. She asked for an injunction in the case, but the circuit court dismissed her petition for want of jurisdiction. She argued her own case before the supreme court.

"No court decision or legal technicality will avail in any manner to change my firm determination to prevent the desecration of the graves of my ancestors. I will resist even to the death, any attempt to remove the bodies from the old Indian burial ground and if by force of arms they succeed in killing me, my sisters will see to it that my dead body lies with my father and mother in the Huron cemetery."

This was the statement made last night to a representative of the Journal, by Miss Lyda Conley at her home, 1712 North Third street, Kansas City, Kas.

"The public burying place of the Wyandotte Indians, used by them for that purpose as early as 1814, was by the treaty between the United States and the Indians, in 1855, set aside to the Indians and their descendants as a perpetual burying ground. now by what right does the government claim ownership of this ground or the right to dispose of it? I am not a ward of the government but a citizen of the United States. I am not in rebellion as an Indian ward of the government, but am standing up for my rights as a citizen and as a descendant of the Wyandotte Indians."

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January 14, 1910

COL. "TOM" SWOPE
VICTIM OF PLOT
OF POISONERS?

Scheme to Gain Control of
Millions by Wholesale
Murder of the Relatives of
the Great Public Benefac-
tor Believed to Have Been
Unearthed.

BODY OF CAPITALIST
TAKEN FROM CEMETERY.

Stomach Will Be Sent to Chi-
cago for Analysis -- Chris-
man Swope, Who Also
Died Suddenly, May Have
Been a Poison Victim --
Suspect Under Close
Surveillance.
The Late Colonel Thomas H. Swope.
COL. THOMAS H. SWOPE.

Was the late Colonel Thomas H. Swope, whose benefactions to Kansas City, including Swope park, amounted to more than a million and a half dollars, the victim of a scientific plot which had for its aim the elimination of the entire Swope family, by inoculation with the typhoid fever germs, looking to ultimate control of the $3,000,000 estate?

Acting on the theory that a poisoning conspiracy rivaling in fiendish ingenuity the most diabolical deeds of the Borgias was responsible for the death of Colonel Swope, October 3, last, and later of his nephew, Chrisman Swope, the body of Colonel Swope was removed Wednesday from the vault where it rested in Forest Hill cemetery and taken to Independence, where an autopsy was held.

The stomach was removed and will be taken to Chicago for analysis by chemists and toxicologists of national repute, in the hope of finding traces of poison, which members of the Swope family, their counsel and friends believe to have caused death.


RESULT OF AUTOPSY.

The autopsy of Colonel Swope's body Wednesday, attorneys for the Swopes say, resulted in the finding that death was not due to apoplexy, as was given out at the time. All the organs, including the brain, were found to be in normal condition. This could not have been the case had he died of apoplexy. The same was found in the Chrisman Swope autopsy. His brain was found to be normal, as were the other organs of his body. A slight trace of typhoid bacilli was found, but not enough, it is claimed, to have caused his death.e

But with this the plot does not end. After Colonel Swope and his nephews were out of the way, a plot was hatched, it is alleged, to kill off the entire family.


NEPHEW'S BODY EXHUMED.

Suspicion of foul play was aroused at the sudden death of Chrisman Swope last month. An autopsy was held, the stomach was removed and a thorough examination made. The stomach is now in Chicago, where it is being analyzed by a commission of eminent chemists and toxicologists.

"It will be several days before an arrest is made," said John H. Atwood of the law firm of Reed, Atwood, Yates, Mastin & Harvey. "We have the evidence well in hand. There is not a particle of doubt in my mind but that both Thomas Swope and Chrisman Swope were poisoned, and that they did not die of the diseases which they were said to have in the newspaper accounts."


TO KILL THE HEIRS.

This plot, said to have been planned with more deliberation, and even more heinous intent than the now famous Gunness affair, had for its supposed end the extermination of all the Swope heirs. Shortly before Chrisman Swope's death, it is charged, a man visited the office of a well known bacteriologist of Kansas City and secured some typhoid germs. With these deadly bacilli, those pushing the matter believe he hoped to innoculate the members of the Swope family.

Colonel Thomas H. Swope and Chrisman Swope are said to have both died after the same manner. The former died October 3. He arose the fateful morning, and was given a bath. An hour afterwards he died in convulsions.

Chrisman Swope was a man of about 30, young and vigorous. Shortly before this it was given out that he was suffering from typhoid fever. He was taken down December 2 and died four days after. He is said to have been administered a capsule an hour before his death. the nurses say that he died in convulsions.


EIGHT OTHERS STRICKEN.

The man suspected secured his typhoid bacteria November 10. His first visit to the Swope home in Independence was made Thanksgiving day. It was only a week after this that Chrisman Swope was taken down with the contagion. The plot is thought to have been to kill off the heirs by typhoid fever.

The sudden death of Chrisman Swope, following so close after the fatal illness of Colonel Swope, immediately aroused the suspicions of the family. An autopsy was held with the result that it was claimed that the last member of the family had not died of typhoid, as was said. The stomach was soon after sent to Chicago.

During this time, it is claimed, there was more evidence of a plot to kill off the entire family. Mrs. Logan Swope was taken down with typhoid fever early in December.

In rapid succession other members of the family were taken down with typhoid fever. They follow in chronological order:
Dec. 2 -- Margaret Swope.
Dec. 4 -- Miss Dixon, the governess. A negro servant by the name of Coppidge, Miss Compton, seamstress.
Dec. 5 -- Stuart Flelming.
Dec. 9. -- Sarah Swope, 14 years of age.
Dec. 11 -- Stella Swope.
Dec. 22 -- Lucy Lee.

None of the victims were in a critical condition.


NURSES FIRST SUSPICIOUS.

Lucy Lee was on her return trip from Europe. It is thought that she was inoculated with the typhoid germs in route to Kansas City. It is known that it takes from six to seven days after inoculation, for the first symptoms of the disease to show. In the case of Miss Lee, she was taken down four days after her arrival in Kansas City.

The investigation which resulted in these startling disclosures was largely at the insistence of the nurses employed in the Swope home during the illness of Chrisman Swope. At their suggestion Dr. G. T. Twyman of Independence was called in to make an investigation. He found the house to be in a sanitary condition and no place from whence the disease germs could possibly originate. Dr. Frank Hall also made an investigation with the same results.

FIVE DETECTIVES ON GUARD.

Mrs. Logan Swope and other members of the family told their suspicions to John G. Paxton, attorney for the Swope estate. At first Mr. Paxton would not believe that there could be anything in these charges. But after an investigation he, too, became convinced that there was truth in them. Mr. Paxton yesterday employed the law firm of Reed, Atwood, Yates, Mastin & Harvey, to push the investigation.

One man suspected is now under the espionage day and night of five private detectives employed by the Swopes.

Dr. Hekpeen of Rush Medical College, Chicago, is in Kansas City making investigations. He will take the stomach of Colonel Swope back with him for a thorough examination. Dr. Haynes of Chicago, a chemist of national reputation, will assist in the chemical tests to be made in the effort to find a trace of poison.

"The Swope millions will be used to run this mystery to the ground," said Mr. Atwood.

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January 9, 1910

LIVED HERE FIFTY YEARS.

Mrs. Elizabeth Tobener, Widow of
Henry Tobener, Is Dead.

Mrs. Elizabeth Tobener, 73 years old, the widow of Henry Tobener, who operated a plug tobacco factory at Fifteenth street and Grand avenue for thirty three years, died late Friday night at her home, 2826 Woodland avenue, of acute pneumonia. She was born in Germany and had lived in Kansas City fifty years.

Mrs. Tobener is survived by four sons, Robert H., Frank W., William C. and Edward F. Tobener, and two daughters, Mrs. Dr. B. W. Lindberg and Mrs. Edward Oberholz. Burial will be in the family vault at Elmwood cemetery. The details of the funeral had not been made last night.

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December 28, 1909

SPADE STRIKES A SKELETON.

Woman's Bones Will Be Buried at
Independence City Cemetery.

While digging a trench at the northeast corner of the Waggoner-Gates Mill company property in Independence yesterday, the workmen struck the skeleton of a woman. The bones indicated that burial took place years ago. Some of the old citizens know the location as the Drury Herold place back in the '49s and the custom back in those days was to bury on the premises.

While it was not certain that it was a grave, yet everything indicated that the body was interred after the old fashion and no dread mystery was connected with the find. The bones will be buried at the city cemetery.

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December 11, 1909

FATHER AND BROTHER DEAD.

Now Patrolman Ganzer's Mother Is
Dying at Lee's Summit.

In the last ten days Charles Ganzer, a police patrolman, has lost his father and brother, and his aged mother now lies at the point of death at Lee's Summit, Mo. The father, George Ganzer, died ten days ago. Yesterday morning William Ganzer, a brother, 24 years old, died on his farm near Hickman Mills. At last reports the officer's mother was reported very low. The funeral of the brother will take place at the Lee's Summit cemetery this afternoon. He will be buried in the family lot.

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November 29, 1909

FIRST MOOSE FUNERAL.

250 Members of Kansas City Lodge
Honor Departed Brother.

The Kansas City lodge of the Loyal Order of the Moose had its first funeral yesterday afternoon, when it buried in Mount St. Mary's cemetery, Charles Burns, a contracting carpenter of 1316 Walnut street, who died in St. Mary's hospital last Tuesday. Mr. Burns was a charter member of the local order and the first of nearly 1,000 Kansas City Moose to die. Local lodge officials tried for several days to locate relatives of Burns in the East but without success.

Yesterday's funeral procession included 250 members of the order. It was headed by a brass band and started from the Moose club rooms, at Twelfth and Central streets. From there the cortege moved to the Cathedral, where the Catholic ceremonies were held, Father Lyons preaching the sermon.

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November 22, 1909

FUNERAL IN CEMETERY HOME.

Services for L. B. Root, Who Died on
Wedding Anniversary, Wednes-
day, Two Years After Daughter
Was Buried.

Louis B. Root, superintendent of Mt. Washington cemetery, died yesterday morning at St. Mary's hospital folowing an operation performed last Wednesday for intestinal trouble. The funeral will be Wednesday from the home of Mr. Root in the cemetery.

Mr. Root was the first superintendent of parks in Kansas City. He had lived here twenty-two years. He was graduated from Cornell college in 1875. He taught school for several years and was for four years county surveyor of Elkhart county, Indiana.

In 1893, he began contracting work, planned by George E. Kessler, landscape architect for the park board. In 1898 he made a survey of Swope park and a year later was made superintendent of the park. He has been superintendent of Mt. Washington cemetery since 1901 and his work did much to make it the finest burial place in the West.

Mr. Root died on his thirty-fourth wedding anniversary, and will be buried two years to the day from the time his only daughter, Mrs. D. C. Wray, was buried. The widow and one son, Louis P. Root, survive him. The son is engaged in mining in Salvador, Central America.

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November 19, 1909

HER FRIENDS LOYAL IN DEATH.

Mrs. Healy to Be Interred in a Man-
ner Befitting Her Worth.

"I always had friends," Mrs. Margaret Healy used to say, "Sure, haven't I always been friendly?"

Death as a charity patient in St. Joseph's hospital did not rob Mrs. Healy of friends. Yesterday a funeral was arranged for her that would have satisfied her most exacting wish. The "lay sister" of the West bottoms, whose personal services and sacrifices among her poor neighbors made her of note, is to be laid to rest today by the side of little George Traynor, an orphan whom she took into her care when his parents died, in St. Mary's cemetery.

Father Dalton is to celebrate high mass at the Church of the Annunciation, Linwood and Benton boulevards, at 9 o'clock. Many persons who lived near Mrs. Healy and who since have seen better fortune than she, will attend the services as a mark of respect for her useful life.

Men who knew her and her endless charities will act as pallbearers. Mrs. Ellen Hughes, who cared for Mrs. Healy the last six years of her life, and several men who were adopted as boys by her, will be the mourners. The pallbearers will be: John Kelly, Robert E. Donnely, John Doherty, Bryan Cunningham, John Coffey, Patrick O'Rourke.

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November 19, 1909

WOMAN BALL PLAYER DEAD.

Former Bloomer Girl Will Be Buried
in Potter's Field.

Miss Daisy Hoover, for ten years a professional baseball player, died destitute in the city hospital November 11 and was be buried in the potter's field yesterday.

Miss Hoover was for several years second baseman on the Boston Bloomer Girls, but for the past two seasons had been playing in the East with the Star Bloomers, making her home during the winter in Kansas City. Last winter she had charge of one of the concessions in the Hippodrome. She returned to Kansas City about a month ago and three days later was taken sick and wsent to the hospital. She is survived by a sister, Mrs. George Johnson, Navarre, Ohio.

Claud East, manager of the cafe at 307 East Twelfth street, formerly manager of the Boston Bloomer Girls, says that Miss Hoover was one of the best women ball players that ever threw a ball.

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November 5, 1909

SAMUEL LIEBERMAN AT REST.

Funeral Held From the Family
Home on Tracy Avenue.

With the casket in which his body reposed hidden by flowers the funeral of Samuel Lieberman, 15 year old son of Rabbi and Mrs. Max Lieberman, was held at the family home, 1423 Tracy avenue yesterday. The services were conducted by Rabbi Isadore Koplowitz. Scores of friends of the family and of the boy called at the home during the day and the house could not hold the throng that was present during the services. Burial was in the Tefares Israel cemetery at Sheffield.

Rabbi Lieberman has asked The Journal to express his family's thanks to their friends for many kindnesses during the illness and death of their son.

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November 2, 1909

PAT M'MAHON TO SANITARIUM.

Tim, Another Brother, of Triple Mur-
derer, Dies at Hospital.

Another chapter to the tragic history of the McMahon family was added yesterday when Patrick McMahon was removed to the Grandview sanitarium in Kansas City, Kas. The strange actions of the younger brother since the confession by James McMahon to the murder of his two sisters and his brother-in-law have convinced the authorities as well as his relatives that Patrick needs rest and medical treatment. A few days ago Pat went to the penitentiary at Lansing and demanded the release of his brother, Jim. He was taken to Kansas City, Kas., by Sheriff Al Becker, where he was detained until it was thought safe to release him. After consultation with his relatives it was decided that he should be placed in the sanitarium, where he will have an opportunity to rest and recover. He will be detained in Kansas City, Kas., until developments show whether he should be removed to a state institution.

Timothy McMahon, the invalid brother, who was removed several days ago to St. Margaret's hospital in Kansas City, Kas., died there yesterday. The funeral services will be held today at the Church of the Blessed Sacrament in St. John's cemetery. The father of the McMahon boys died just thirteen years ago yesterday.

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October 24, 1909

NO REFERENCE TO TRAGEDY.

Murder Victims' Funeral Held in
Church Where Two of Them Met
and Married and One Confirmed.

The funeral of Alonzo R. Van Royan, Mrs. Van Royen and Rose McMahon, victims of the triple murder on the Reidy road, in Wyandotte county, was held yesterday morning. From the undertaking rooms of Daniels & Comfort, where more than 5,000 persons viewed the three bodies during the 24 hours that they lay in state, the cortege moved to the church of the Blessed Sacrament in Chelsea place. This little church was not one-third large to accommodate the crowd that gathered to attend the services. It was the first triple funeral ever held in Kansas City and nearly every woman in Chelsea place congregated at the church and strived to get in.

There were several odd circumstances in connection with the service. In this church Mr. and Mrs. Van Royen were married. Father Bernard S. Kelly, now chancellor of the Kansas City, Kas., diocese, married them, and they were the last couple he married while pastor there.

It was at a fair, given for the benefit of this church, that Van Royen met his wife, and Father Kelly, who married them, preached the funeral sermon.

In the Church of the Blessed Sacrement, also, Rose McMahon, the third victim of the tragedy, made her first holy communion and was confirmed.

Father L. L. Dekat, formerly of Winchester, Kas., read the mass. He is the new pastor of the church and this was his first official act in connection with his pastorate. Father Patrick McInerney, the retiring pastor, assisted.

A requiem high mass was celebrated. In his sermon Father Kelly made no reference to the tragedy, confining his expression to the moral of death.

After the three coffins had been carried in Mrs. McMahon, James and Patrick McMahon and other members of the family led the procession, sitting in pews near the altar rail. The service was brief.

The bodies were buried in Mount Calvary cemetery, Kansas City, Kas.

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October 10, 1909

GEO. P. OLMSTEAD
DIES AT 80 YEARS.

PASSES AWAY WHILE SEATED
AT BREAKFAST TABLE.

Was Connected With Many Promi-
nent Institutions in Kansas City
Where He Lived Nearly
Forty Years.
The Late George P. Olmstead.
GEORGE P. OLMSTEAD.

George P. Olmstead, an octogenarian, half of whose life was lived in Kansas City, died yesterday morning at the breakfast table in his home at 1311 Forest avenue. Until five years ago he was a member of the Cady & Olmstead jewelry firm at 1009-11 Walnut street, which still retains his name. Prior to that he was one of the leading lumbermen of the Missouri valley.

Mr. Olmstead had seated himself at breakfast, and was glancing over the morning paper when his daughter, Mrs. Ben F. Qualtrough, was about to serve the coffee. As she came in she noticed his head was bowed, but thought little of it, as he often became drowsy when sitting.

Mr. Olmstead's head fell lower and touched the paper, and Mrs. Qualtrough became alarmed. Unable to awaken him, she called her husband, but they could do nothing and he had lapsed into unconsciousness. Dr. R. T. Sloan was summoned, but when he arrived the aged man was dead.

Besides his wife he leaves a son and a daughter, C. B. Olmstead and Mrs. Ben F. Qualtrough, both of 1311 Forest avenue, Miss Catherine G. Olmstead, a sister, 88 years old, has been at Wesleyan hospital for three years with a fractured limb.

The funeral will be held from the hours Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock with Rev. Burris A. Jenkins, pastor of Linwood Boulevard Christian church, in charge. Temporary burial will be in the vault in Forest Hill cemetery.

Mr. Olmstead was born September 17, 1829, at Little Falls, N. Y., where he grew to manhood and learned the carpenter's trade. Early he made the journey by canal, lake, river and gulf to Corpus Christi, Tex., but did not remain there long.

Later he engaged in the lumber business at Pontiac, Ill, where he was married in 1859 to Miss Cornelia E. Hunt, who survives him. He remained there for several years and again removed to Tuscola, where he lived until they came to Kansas City in 1869. Mr. Olmstead built a home at 800 Jefferson street and lived there until 1887, when he bought the present family home at 1311 Forest avenue. The Jefferson street house was sold at the time of the construction of the cable incline.

On coming to Kansas City Mr. Olmstead became a member of the lumber firm of Leach, Hall & Olmstead, all of the members of which are now dead. Their lumber yard was west of the Union depot and the site is now occupied by a number of large wholesale houses. In 1882 he became a partner of L. S. Cady in the jewelry firm of Cady & Olmstead and in 1887 the lumber firm was dissolved. Four years ago he sold his interest in the business of Cady & Olmstead. For a number of years he was identified with R. M. Snyder, now dead, in Texas and Arizona ranch properties.

Current events drew much of Mr. Olmstead's attention and he took a vivid interest in the happenings of the world at large. His large library attests that he was a wide reader and he was known as a close and intelligent student of the Bible. During the pastorate of Rev. T. P. Haley, he was an active member of the First Christian church at Eleventh and Locust streets. Mathematics and astronomy held an odd fascination for him.

Mr. Olmstead was a close friend of Col. R. T. Van Horn and frequently he would contribute keen and well-written comments on public affairs to the columns of The Journal.

Last fall he was invited to Pontiac to attend the fiftieth anniversary of the Masonic lodge there, which he founded, but he was obliged to decline.

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October 9, 1909

GRANITE MAUSOLEUM WHERE
COL. SWOPE'S BODY RESTS.

Temporary Resting Place of Colonel Thomas H. Swope.
Mausoleum Serving as the Resting Place of Col. Thos. H. Swope.

The body of Colonel Swope is resting in Forest Hill. The mausoleum in which it was placed rises in classical lines of grayish-white granite from the paths which border a lake, the waters of which touch the base of the ground upon which the walks are laid.

Ivy mantles the sides of the mausoleum, contrasting harmoniously with the brownish verdure of fall. Leaves from nearby trees carpet the grass at the sides of the walks.

From across the lake the lines of the mausoleum the ground is raised above and with seats at each corner, are mirrored in the water. At the sides of the mausoleum the ground is raised above the level of the banks of the lake and is studded with trees. Approached by a sweeping drive, the catacomb is imposing. From its front an unbroken view may be had across the land and the tiny island which nestles near the bank into a wooded stretch which now is glorious with the brown and yellow and gold of early autumn.

The body of Kansas City's benefactor will remain in the mausoleum until after arrangements for the permanent burial have been made by Colonel Swope's family and friends. Then it will be taken to the final resting place, which for several generations, at least, should be a shrine for those who love trees and grass and flowers and all the beauties of "God's outdoors."

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October 9, 1909

SWOPE LAID TO REST
WHILE CITY MOURNS.

THOUSANDS BRAVE RAIN TO
VIEW FUNERAL CORTEGE.

Procession Longest Ever Seen in
Kansas City -- Casket Temporari-
ly Placed in Vault at
Forest Hill.

Thomas Hunton Swope, for fifty-two years a resident of Kansas City, and its greatest benefactor, was laid to rest late yesterday afternoon in a vault in Forest Hill cemetery.

Following his request only the Episcopal service for the dead was said. It is the same service which has been said in that church for 500 years, and is used for the burial of both great and lowly, rich and poor.

There was no oratory, no eulogy. The service reminded many of the life of the man for whom it was said -- simple, quiet, impressive.

At Grace Episcopal church, Thirteenth and Washington streets, Bishop E. R. Atwill officiated, assisted by Rev. J. A. Schaad, the rector, and his assistant, Rev. E. B. Woodruff.

As the funeral cortege entered the edifice it was headed by the bishop, who repeated a portion of the service as he walked down the aisle. Chaplin Woodruff bore the staff. Following came the immediate family.

Stuart Fleming, a nephew from colonel Swope's old home in Kentucky, was with Mrs. Logan Swope, a sister-in-law of the dead philanthropist. Then came Dr. B. C. Hyde and wife, a niece of Colonel Swope's and all of the relatives from Independence.

The entire center of the church was reserved for the pallbearers, honorary pallbearers and civic bodies and commercial and fraternal organizations.


SERVICE IS SIMPLE.

Bishop Atwill read the service at the church, and the Rev. Mr. Schaad read the lesson. Mr. Frank B. Fisk presided at the organ and rendered a dirge as the body was carried into the church. Mrs. Darnell, contralto, sang "One Sweetly Solemn Thought." Then a hymn, "O Paradise, O Paradise," was sung by the choir, the audience assisting. At the close of the church service the choir rendered the anthem, "I'm a Pilgrim and a Stranger."

During the service at the church the creed was said, and the Lord's Prayer repeated.

It was 3:30 before the cortage reached the church and after 4 o'clock before it got under way, leaving. When it reached the vault in Forest Hill cemetery it was almost dark and raining hard. Here the services were just as simple as at the church. Bishop Atwill read the committal service and Rev. Mr. Schaad the lesson.

The casket was placed in a large vault, made especially for its reception, and sealed. There it will remain until some future date when it will be removed to its final resting place in Swope park, beneath a monument erected by the people of Kansas city.


AN HOUR IN PASSING.

The funeral cortege was the largest ever seen in Kansas City. Besides the military, civic, commercial and fraternal organizations in line, there were seventy-five carriages, not counting the private vehicles. It took over an hour to pass a given point.

It was nearly 2 o'clock before the mounted police, followed by the Third Regiment band at the head of the regiment, started south on Walnut street from the city hall. Then, in order, came police and firemen on foot, Battery B and band, Uniform Rank, K. of P., Modern Woodmen, Turner society, Elks lodge, park board employes, lodge of Eagles, United Confederate Veterans, labor organizations, Board of Trade and Commercial Club and city officials in carriages. The active and honorary pallbearers preceded the immediate family and citizens in carriages.

As the procession left the public library where Colonel Swope's body has been in state since Thursday morning it passed through a double line of school children, each a "part owner" in the beautiful park which he gave the city. They stood uncovered, their hats and caps over their hears, all the long time the cortege was passing. Children lined both sides of the street all the way down Ninth street to Grand avenue and to Tenth street on Grand.

After the procession had crossed Main street it passed through another double line of children formed on Eleventh street from Baltimore avenue to Broadway, and down Broadway to Thirteenth street. Here again every boy stood uncovered, at attention, while the cortege was passing.


THOUSANDS VIEW PROCESSION.

It has been estimated that between 10,000 and 15,000 school children were out. Besides the children, the streets were packed with people along thee entire line of march as far out as Twentieth street and Grand avenue. The windows in every building also were filled with people all the way through the main portion of the city and spectators filled the verandas and windows of every home passed by the cortege entirely to the cemetery. Possibly no fewer than 100,000 people saw the procession.

When Twentieth and Grand was reached all of those in the parade on foot dropped out, the distance to the cemetery being too far for them to walk. At this point the Third regiment, the Uniformed Rank, K. of P., the Modern Woodmen of America, police and firemen were formed in company front along the west side of Grand avenue. It made a solid line of uniformed men for two blocks.

It was intended from this point for the procession to make better time, but the rain had rendered Gillham road very slippery and the procession to make better time, but the rain had rendered Gillham road very slippery and the procession got beyond Thirty-first street on Gillham road before it left a walk.


FLORAL GIFTS BEAUTIFUL.

Between Thirtieth and Thirty-first streets one of the lead horses in the fourth section of Battery B, commanded by Sergeant Cloyse Jones, fell and was injured. The team was taken out and this portion of the battery proceeded with only one team. This caused but a slight delay. Just this side of the cemetery the battery dropped out and returned to the city. The mounted police, however, commanded by Chief Frank F. Snow, acted as convoy throughout the entire procession to the cemetery.

Following the hearse was the most beautiful floral piece ever seen here. It was a remembrance from the city, and represented a white column ten feet high. It was composed of 3,000 white carnations. At the top of the column was a white dove with spread wings. A wreath of American beauty roses and lilies of the valley wounded about the column of the base, which was embedded in autumn leaves. The leaves were gathered in Swope park. "Kansas City Mourns" was the inscription on the column.

Covering the foot of the casket was the Swope family piece, composed of roses and lilies of the valley. A basket of lilies of the valley was sent by the Yale alumni of Kansas City, of which Colonel Swope was a member. Flowers sent by local organizations and friends of the family completely covered the massive state casket.

The sky began to cloud just before the head of the line left city hall, and it passed through a slight shower before reaching the library. After that the sun came out and it appeared as if the rain had passed over. After the services at Grace church, however, the clouds again formed and while the procession was passing the uniformed bodies, standing in line on Grand avenue and Twentieth street, there came the first hard shower. this lasted but a few minutes, and there was a lull until the cemetery was reached, when a downpour started. This continued until the services at the vault were concluded.

PALLBEARERS.

Active pallbearers -- Mayor Crittenden, R. L. Gregory, president upper house; F. J. Shinnick, speaker lower house, A. J. Dean, president of the park board; W. P. Motley, president of the hospital and health board; Frank S. Groves, president fire and water board; William Volker, president pardon and parole board; John T. Harding, city counselor; John C. Paxton, S. W. Spangler.

Honorary pallbearers -- C. O. Tichenor, J.V. C. Karnes, William Warner, R. T. Van Horn, Adriance Van Brunt, Honorable Herbert S. Hadley, D. J. Haff, William Barton, J. C. James, Leon Smith, E. L. Scarritt, R. W. Hocker, R. E. O'Malley, J. C. Wirthman, James Pendergast, M. Cunningham, M. J. O'Hearn, E. E. Morris, R. A. Long, George M. Myers, F. C. Crowell, Wallace Love, W. S. Dickey, J. F. Downing, E. F. Swinney, H. C. Flower, Llewellyn Jones, George W. Fuller, Charles Campbell, W. S. Woods, Ralph Swofford, J. H. Slover, O. H. Dean, James A. Reed, Jay H. Neff, H. M. Beardsley, W. S. Cowherd, George M. Shelley, Lee J. Talbott, J. J. Davenport, R. J. Ingraham, J. W. Wagner, James Gibson,E. R. Crutcher, Cusil Lechtman, Bernard Corrigan, C. F. Morse, L. M. Jones, George H. Edwards, J. H. Hawthorne, J. C. Ford, Rev. Father W. J. Dalton, Homer Reed and John C. Gage.

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October 6, 1909

PEOPLE TO JOIN IN
MOURNING FOR SWOPE.

PUBLIC FUNERAL FROM GRACE
CHURCH FRIDAY.

Body to Rest Temporarily in Vault.
Later Suitable Monument Is
to Be Erected Over
Grave.

The body of the late Thomas H. Swope will be brought from Independence at 5 o'clock tonight and lie in state in the Library building, Ninth and Locust, from 9 a. m. Thursday to noon of Friday.

Funeral at 3:30 o'clock Friday afternoon from Grace Episcopal church. Body will rest temporarily in a vault at Forest Hill cemetery.


The body of Colonel Thomas H. Swope is to rest temporarily in a vault at Forest Hill cemetery to await arrangements to be perfected by Kansas City for a final resting place in Swope park.

A monument appropriate to the man who while in life was the city's greatest benefactor and the poor man's friend is to be erected over the grave, and the design in all probability will be a statue. A mask of Colonel Swope's features will be taken at Independence this morning and kept in reserve.

Colonel Swope is to be given a public funeral at 2:30 Friday afternoon, in which the militia, civic and commercial organizations of the city , the governor of the state of Missouri and other distinguished citizens will take part. The tribute from the city will be as free from ostentation as the occasion will permit. There will be no extravagant floral displays, nor flights of oratory. There are to be but two floral offerings at the bier. One will be a blanket of roses for the casket from the family, and the other a broken shaft of choice exotics from the city. It was the colonel's request that there be no lavish display of flowers.

BISHOP ATWILL CELEBRANT.

The simple and beautiful burial services of the Episcopal church will be read by Bishop E. R. Atwill at Grace Episcopal church, Thirteenth street, between Broadway and Washington, and the choir will render appropriate music. In arranging the official programme yesterday, the committees representing the city did not fully complete the details for having the children of the public and private schools participate in the exercises. John W. Wagner, who, with Alderman Emmett O'Malley, has in charge the completion of added details, said last night that he will endeavor to have several thousand school children lined along the sidewalks on Eleventh street, west of Wyandotte, and south on Broadway to Thirteenth street, as the funeral pageant moves to the church. The children will probably sing "Nearer My God to Thee." The participation in the services of school children was suggested to Mr. Wagner by S. W. Spangler, business manager for Colonel Swope.

"School children used to come to the colonel's office by hundreds to look at the man who had given Swope park to the city," was Mr. Spangler's explanation.

The body of Colonel Swope will be escorted from Independence by Mayor Crittenden, Aldermen O'Malley, Wirthman and Edwards, of the upper house; Aldermen Morris, Gilman and Wofford of the lower house, and a detail of mounted police. From 9 a. m. Thursday to noon of Friday the body will lie in state at the library, guarded by a detachment of police and state militiamen. Entrance to the building will be by Ninth street and egress by Locust street.

FROM PUBLIC LIBRARY.

The funeral cortege will move from the library building at 2 o'clock Friday afternoon in the following order:

Mounted Police.
Third Regiment Band.
Battery B.
Police on Foot.
Fire Department Detail on Foot.
Civic and Commercial Organizations.
City Officials in Carriages.
Honorary Pallbearers.
Active Pallbearers.
Hearse.
Family in Carriages.
Citizens in Carriages.

MEETING OF THE BOARD.

There is to be a special meeting of the board of education this morning to consider the suggestion that the pupils of the public schools participate in the funeral of Colonel Swope, and to plan arrangements for having the body lie in state at the library.

Last night Mayor Crittenden and John W. Wagner conferred with J. Crawford James, chairman of the board, on the propriety of the pupils being stationed at a point along the funeral march. Mr. James took kindly to the suggestion, and will present it to the board.

Contrary to general belief, Thomas H. Swope did not gain the title of "Colonel" in warfare. A newspaper during an exciting campaign of civic improvement used the title, which did not have the entire sanction of Mr. Swope.

"Now I will have to go through life with the unearned title of colonel," he complained one day to Kelly Brent.

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October 1, 1909

SCHOOL FLAGS AT HALF MAST.

Funeral Services of J. L. Norman,
Westport Presbyterian Church.

Funeral services for Joseph L. Norman, late secretary of the board of education, who died last Monday, were conducted at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon by the Rev. George P. Baity at the Westport Presbyterian church. A large audience heard the sermon and followed the body to its burial in Forest Hill cemetery.

All the flags on the public schools were at half mast as was the one on the public library, which was closed all day.

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September 16, 1909

HEBREWS SUE TO PREVENT
MOVING OF THEIR DEAD.

Charge Such and Act on Part of
Owners of Bikur Cholim Cemetery
Would Be Desecration.

An injunction suit to restrain the present owners from moving any of the bodies buried in the Bikur Cholim cemetery was filed in the circuit court yesterday by Sarah Binkowitz, Morris Newberg and others.

The cemetery has been used by Hebrews as a burial place, but not since 1893. It is at the northeast corner of Eighteenth street and Cleveland avenue and occupies about one-fourth block.

In the suit filed yesterday Henry Oppenheimer, Omar E. Robinson and Bikur Cholim Benevolent Association are named as defendants. The plaintiffs are the descendants and the relatives of Julius Newberg and David Binkowitz, who were buried in the cemetery in 1888.

It is alleged in the petition that the lots were sold with the guarantee on the part of the cemetery association that the land would always be maintained as a cemetery. This, it is alleged, is no longer done. In fact, according to the petition, mortgages against the land were foreclosed in 1903.

Charging that the defendants are now threatening to remove the bodies, and adding taht such action means desecration in the eyes of the Hebrew, an injunction forbidding such action is asked. An order also is sought to compel the cemetery asociation to live up to its agreement to maintain the graves in a suitable manner.

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September 2, 1909

CAUGHT IN MACHINERY.

Austrian Packing House Employe
Dies of Injuries.

Vincent Kozak, 22 years old, of 32 South Park avenue, Kansas City, Kas., while working in the fertilizer room at the Cudahy packing plant yesterday morning was caught in the shafting and sustained injuries from which he died an hour later at Bethany hospital. He has a wife in Austria. Funeral services will be held this morning at Butler's undertaking rooms. Burial will be in St. John's cemetery.

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August 25, 1909

DEATH FROM BOILING STARCH.

One-Year-Old Boy Fell Into a Pan
of It Two Weeks Ago.

The one-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Trestrail of 2919 Indiana avenue, who fell into a dishpan of boiling starch two weeks ago, and was severly burned, died yesterday morning. The funeral was held from the reisdence yesterday afternoon. Burial was in Elmwood cemetery.

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August 23, 1909

TWO MORE TYPHOID VICTIMS.

Father and Son Succumb to Fever in
Stricken Neighborhood.

Two more victims of typhoid fever have been reported from the neighborhood of Eighth street and Brighton avenue, where there has been a small epidemic of that disease for the past two weeks, the last two cases being father and son, John Sheffner, 5016 East Eighth street, a carpenter 64 years old, died yesterday morning. His son, G. Blaine Sheffner, died last Thursday.

Funeral services will be in the Armour memorial chapel and burial will be in Elmwood cemetery.

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July 30, 1909

PIONEER BLACKSMITH DIES
LEAVING $150,000 ESTATE.

Henry Nevins Came to Kansas City
in 1869, and Opened Shop
on Third Street.

Henry Nevins, pioneer horseshoer of Kansas City and in the early days a fair prototype of Longfellow's "Village Blacksmith," died at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon at the family residence, 1032 Olive street. He was 70 years old.

He was born in Tipperary county, Ireland, and came to this country when a young man, spending some years in Canada, where he learned the blacksmith trade and where he married. Later he crossed the line into the United States, settling first in Burlington, Ia., and from there removing to Kansas City in 1869.

He first opened a shop at Third street and Grand avenue and for twenty years Nevins's blacksmith shop was a landmark.

In those early days when railroads were in their infancy and mules and horses were yet the main standby for transportation, the blacksmith was a most important person.

Nevins met the situation with an energy that never seemed to tire, and it is on record that during rush seasons he has been known to stand in the smith forty-eight hours at a stretch, without sleep, eating in the shop meals brought to him by his wife.

Early in his career in Kansas City Mr. Nevins began to put his savings into real estate, and this policy he continued throughout his career. But once in his life did he part with real estate he had purchased, and that was about eight years ago, when he sold to the Armour Packing Company the property at 306 West Eighth street for $10,000, and for which he had paid $900 in early days. For an other property next to the Gillis opera house, which cost him $800 he recently refused an offer of $800 a foot.

Practically all his wealth is in inside Kansas City real estate and a conservative estimate of his estate places the figure at $150,000.

Later he moved his blacksmith shop to 512 Walnut street, and when that property became too valuable for a blacksmith shop he moved once more to 512 Grand avenue, where he continued in business until five years ago, when he retired, owing to advancing age and continued ill health.

He leaves a wife and six children, three sons and three daughters. The children are: John M., James H., William J., Elinore, Catherine Marie and Rose.

The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Aloysius's church, and burial will be at St. Mary's cemetery.

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July 4, 1909

NEGRO CEMETERY CHAPEL.

Cornerstone Will Be Laid at High-
land Today.

The cornerstone of the new chapel in Highland cemetery, a burying ground for negroes at Twentieth street and Blue Ridge boulevard, will be laid this afternoon at 3 o'clock. M. O. Ricketts of St. Joseph, grand master of the negro Masons of Missouri, will be in charge of the services. The building committee is composed of: C. H. Countee, Dr. J. E. Perry, A. T. Moore, L. A. Knox, T. W. H. Williams and T. C. Unthank.

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June 1, 1909

SIMPLICITY MARKS
CRITTENDEN FUNERAL.

FORMER GOVERNOR OF MIS-
SOURI LAID TO REST.

Rev. Thomas P. Haley Pronounces
Fitting Eulogy in Presence of
Relatives and Friends
of Many Years.

While respecting in every way the wish of the late Thomas T. Crittenden that his funeral be conducted with as little ostentation as possible, hundreds of former governor's friends, men and women, stood under the trees on the lawn at the residence, 3320 Flora avenue, yesterday afternoon within the sound of the voice of the Rev. Dr. Thomas P. Haley, who with the assistance of Rev. Burris A. Jenkins and the Rev. Dr. S. M. Neel, conducted the simple service for the dead.

Governor Crittenden had left a letter addressed to Dr. Haley asking that he officiate at his funeral. The letter was sealed in 1906.

"I count it one of the choicest blessings of my life to have known and loved Thomas T. Crittenden," said Dr. Haley. "He was a man of great heart, noble mind and character, whom none could know but to love and admire.

"Everyone who knew him was his friend. He had close friends far away as well as near, but among those who most revered him, which is an indication of the kind of man he was, are his neighbors, those with whom he came in contact in his everyday life. Every child in the neighborhood knew him and loved him.

WAS KIND TO ALL.

"He was ever willing to recognize his fellows as men, no matter what their station in life might have been. He was as careful to be considerate to the hod-carrier as he was to the banker.

"He would treat the washerwoman with as much consideration as the finest lady."

In finishing his characterization of his dead friend, Dr. Haley touched on Governor Crittenden's rare virtues as a husband and father, saying he was always careful to perform his public duties in the daytime, reserving the evenings for the society of his family.

Over the casket, during the funeral services, was draped the battle flag of the Seventh Missouri cavalry, which Governor Crittenden and Judge John F. Philips organized at the beginning of the civil war. The shot-torn banner was made by the women of Georgetown, Mo., and presented to the regiment. After the war it became the property of Judge Philips, who said it should drape his casket after his death.

NEGRO A MOURNER.

No mourner was more sincere than "Uncle" Dan Edwards, who was Governor Crittenden's "waitin' boy," as he styled himself, during the four years of the war. "Uncle" Dan is now pastor of the Metropolitan Negro Baptist church, at Ninth and Washington streets, Kansas City, Kas. He went to the Crittenden home in the early morning and asked for a last look at the face of his old "marster," and, as he said, "tuck dinner" there. He followed his master's body to Forest Hill, where it was buried.

Among those who came to the funeral was J. B. Waddell of Springfield, whom Governor Crittenden appointed as his adjutant general.

Enough floral offerings were sent to make a great mound at the grave. Members of the family, however, asked that the greater part of the flowers be sent to adorn graves that might go through Memorial day undecorated. Among the pieces sent was one from the children of the neighborhood bearing the card which read:

"Children of the Kentucky Block"

City officials and attaches in their offices also sent many beautiful floral pieces.

The pallbearers were Kelly Brent, John Hanley, W. W. Collins, S. L. Long, Daniel T. Blake, W. S. Cowherd, Porter H. Hovey and Leon T. Brown.

So profuse was the floral offering in memory of Governor Crittenden that Mrs. Crittenden requested that some of them be sent to various hospitals in Kansas City after the burial. The flowers were all left at the cemetery until late yesterday afternoon, when many were collected and sent to the following hospitals:

German hospital, new general hospital, old city hospital, Nettleton home, St. Joseph's hospital, St. Mary's hospital, and Mercy hospital.

RESOLUTION IN COUNCIL.

The council in special session yesterday passed the following tribute to the memory of the ex-governor:

"The death of former Governor Thomas Crittenden is a distinct loss, not only to our city, but to our state and nation. When a boy, following the dictates of his ancestral instincts, he dedicated his life to his country's service and took up his sword to defend its flag. To the closing of his rich and fruitful life, as soldier, congressman, governor, consul general and citizen he gave the best he had, his time, his talent, his eloquence, his energy to the state and nation. He was an illustrious example of American manhood. He was courageous and tender, courtly and constant, patriotic and modest. He honored women, trusted men and worshipped God. He belonged to the rare old school which held honor above wealth and virtue above life. He was every inch a Crittenden, which means that he turned his back to no foe and bended the knee to none but his Maker.

"He has fought the fight, he has finished the work, he has kept the faith and now takes his place full of honor among his distinguished ancestry.

"This city does not mourn alone. Today tears are falling nationwide. We, his neighbors, join with the multitudes in deploring his loss and extend to his sorrowing wife, his distinguished son, our mayor, and all the members of the grief-stricken family our earnest sympathy."

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May 29, 1909

PIONEER CONDUCTOR DIES.

A. B. Shepherd Ran Out of Topeka
in 1870 on Santa Fe.

A. B. Shepherd, one of the three conductors who were with the Santa Fe railroad when it started out of Topeka in 1870, and one of the oldest passenger conductors working out of the Union depot, died yesterday morning at his home, 1216 Washington street, at the age of 67 years. For several years Mr. Shepherd has had a night run on the Missouri Pacific line from Kansas City to Coffeyville, Kas.

Born and reared in Wellsville, O., Mr. Shepherd enlisted in the One Hundred and First Ohio volunteers at the outbreak of the civil war. At its close he was discharged with the rank of sergeant. Immediately he became a brakeman on the Cleveland & Pittsburg railway and had been in the railway business since, working out of Kansas City for thirty years.

Mr. Shepherd was a member of the Order of Railway Conductors. A widow and two sons, Charles, who lives in Armourdale, and Wilbur B., who lives at the Washington street address, survive.

Funeral services will be held this afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home. Rev. Dr. George Reynolds, pastor of the Second Presbyterian church, will officiate. Burial will be in Forest Hill cemetery.

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May 19, 1909

THIRD PARALYTIC
STROKE WAS FATAL.

FRANCIS M. FURGASON WAS ILL
THREE WEEKS.

Seventy-Six Years Old, Mr. Furgason
Had Long Been Active in
the Charities of
the City.

As the result of a paralytic stroke which came to him over three weeks ago, Francis M. Furgason, president of the Furgason & Tabb Underwriting Company, with offices in the Dwight building, and a pioneer among the progressive men of this city, died quietly at his home, 1006 East Thirty-third street, at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon. He was 76 years old.

Until a few days ago it was hoped that the stricken man might partially recover, although it was conceded by family physicians that a third stroke would cause his death. At times there seemed to be even chances that the third stroke would not come, for the patient and frequent rallies and the advantage of a hardy physique. Monday, however, he began to fail and early yesterday morning it was known that there was no hope for him. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock from Calvary Baptist church. Dr. F. C. McConnell, Rev. J. M. Cromer and Rev. H. T. Ford will officiate in the services. The deacons of the church will act as active pallbearers. Interment will be in Elmwood cemetery.

WAS ONCE Y. M. C. A. PRESIDENT.

Mr. Furgason was born near Indianapolis, Ind., April 1, 1833. His father was a pioneer of sturdy Scotch extraction, who had pushed west to the Hoosier state when it was yet a wilderness and staked out a farm at what is now the very center of Indianapolis. Mr. Furgason spent his first years on the farm, but at 18 his father sent him to Franklin college.

Mr. Furgason was graduated at Franklin when he was 22 years old, at the head of a large class for that time. The following year he was made a teacher at the college, and three years later elected to the presidency, which place hie filled, it is said, with credit to himself and the institution until the year 1867, when he gave up his collegiate work and came to Kansas City, where he became involved in the insurance trade.

In 1861 the Y. M. C. A., which was then only an infant organization, was in bad financial straits and temporarily suspended. The war, which had been the cause of the trouble, was now over and many members had returned and were anxious to revive the association on a more active basis than ever before. The board met and Mr. Furgason was elected president of the Y. M. C. A. D. A. Williams, an electrician, was made secretary. The move proved a fortunate one for the associaton.

Under Mr. Furgason's management headquarters and a reading room were established on the south side of Missouri avenue on Delaware. Rent was obtained free from the late D. L. Shouse, then a banker, and the four years of the Furgason administration saw the Y. M. C. A. on an improved financial basis, with a membership that was twice as large as it had been at any previous period. Mr. Furgason never gave up his interest in the Y. M. C. A. and other organizations for the benefit of the younger element of the city.

Soon after his connection with Y. M. C. A., Mr. Furgson was hired as a teacher in the Franklin school at Fourteenth and Washington streets, and served in this capacity eight years. After this he resumed his former occupation of insurance agent and followed it until his retirement from active business a few years ago.

MEN RESPECTED HIM.

"He was one of the kindest and gentlest old men I have ever had the pleasure of knowing," said the Rev. F. C. McConnell of the Calvary Baptist church recently. "I knew Mr. Furgason for thirty-five years," said George Peake, a veteran accountant, who has offices in the First National bank building. "It seemed as if he had the perpetual desire to extend sunshine in all directions."

Mr. Furgason was married twice, once in the early 50s, the last time to Mrs. Laura Branham in 1858. His widow and one son, Frank, who has taken his place in the firm of Furgason & Tabb, survive him. A son, Arthur, and a daughter, Emma, died within a few months of each other three years ago.

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March 29, 1909

SINGER HERE SINCE WAR.

George Youngclaus, Formerly a Gen-
eral Contractor, Is Dead.

George Youngclaus, Formerly a General Contractor, Is Dead.

George Youngclaus, 67 years old, who was a choir singer in the old Southern Methodist church before it was torn down years ago, and known as a tenor singer in this city since the civil war, died yesterday at his home, 1016 Cherry street. Mr. Youngclaus is survived by a widow, Elma Youngclaus, and three sons, Herbert, Robert and George Youngclaus, all living in Kansas city. He was born in St. Johns, New Brunswick, his parents having come there from the Shetland Islands. He came to this city from Pittsfield, Mass., in 1869, the year the Hannibal bridge was completed, and engaged in general contracting.

Mr. Youngclaus had a fine tenor voice and was often heard in social gatherings and in church events. He was a member of the Epperson megaphone minstrels.

Funeral services will be from the home at 2:30 o'clock tomorrow afternoon. Burial in Union cemetery.

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