Find Kansas City Antiques and Collectibles at the Vintage Kansas City Marketplace ~ Own a Piece of Old KC

Vintage Kansas City.com

 

THE JOURNAL COMPANY, Publisher
EIGHTH, M'GEE AND OAK STREETS.

Old News
Headlines and Articles from The Kansas City Journal

BELL & HOME TELEPHONES
Business Office...4000 Main
City Editor.....4001 Main
Society Editor....4002 Main

Two cents. Subscription Rates:  By carrier, per week, 10 cents; per month, 45 cents.  By mail, daily and Sunday, one month, 40 cents; three months, $1.00; six months, $2.00; one year, $4.00.  Sunday only, six months, 75 cents; one year, $1.50.  Weekly Journal, 25 cents one year.

As We See 'Em ~ Caricatures of Prominent Kansas Cityans

The Isis Theatre ~ Kansas City, Missouri

The History of Fairmount Park

Claims of Cancer Cured by Dr. Bye in Vintage KC Missouri

Special Cut Prices ~ Always the Same

Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

January 31, 1910

POPULAR FIREMAN DIES.

"Bob" Hamilton of Kansas City,
Kas., Was "Children's Friend."
'The
LIEUTENANT "BOB" HAMILTON.

" 'Bob' Hamilton is dead." This report yesterday in Kansas City, Kas., brought grief to young and old alike in hundreds of homes in that city, for big, good natured "Bob" Hamilton was the most popular member of the Kansas City, Kas., fire department. His death was due to typhoid fever. Officially he was known as Lieutenant Robert Hamilton of No. 1 hose company, but to the "boys" and to his hundreds of friends he was "Bob." Tributes to his personal bravery and efficiency as a fireman were paid yesterday by his superior officers and the men who worked with him.

Robert Hamilton was 31 years old and had been connected with the city fire department since June, 1906. His record as a fireman is unsurpassed, and his engaging manners and Irish wit won for him hundreds of friends. Little children or women calling at the fire station to inspect the apparatus invariably asked to be conducted about by "Bob" Hamilton. He will long be remembered as the children's friend.

Mr. Hamilton died yesterday at Bethany hospital in Kansas City, Kas. His father, John Hamilton, his mother and immediate relatives were present.

Funeral arrangements have not yet been completed, although it is probable that the burial will take place in Kansas City, Kas.

Labels: , , , , ,

January 14, 1910

FUND ONE-FIFTH COMPLETED.

Mercy Hospital for Children Still
Needs $4,000 for Extension.

One-fifth of the $5,000 needed by the Mercy hospital to furnish the second floor of their hospital for children, has been received and several other donations promised. "We have to have the money to furnish this floor," said Dr. Alice Graham, superintendent of the hospital, last night. "A short time ago we had all the patients that we could care for. I consider that $5,000 will furnish this floor and leave enough funds to pay the help for the year. We have no private income. We received a check the other day from a woman in Detroit, Mich. One large room is to be fixed up for the permanently afflicted children."

Labels: , , , ,

January 9, 1910

DYING FROM KNIFE WOUNDS.

Roommate of Isaac Dimich Held as
a Material Witness.

Isaac Dimich, a butcher living at 28 North James street, in Kansas City, Kas., is dying at St. Margaret's hospital as a result of two knife wounds. dimich and his fellow workman and roommate, Mike Wookas, attended a celebration of the Greek Christmas Friday night. Early yesterday morning, it is alleged, they quarreled and later the police officers found Dimich injured on the floor of his room. Dr. Mortimer Marder, a police surgeon, was summoned, and after he had given him emergency treatment he ordered the man taken to the hospital, where it was said last night that he could not recover.

Wookas was arrested at the packing plant of Morris & Co. yesterday morning and taken to No. 2 police station, where he is held as a material witness.

Labels: , , ,

December 23, 1909

FOR 27 YEARS A HOTEL MAID.

Death Ends Margaret Sullivan's
Long Service at Coates House.

Margaret Sullivan, 65 years old, maid in charge of the parlor floor of the Coates house for twenty-seven years, died at St. Joseph's hospital yesterday morning of pneumonia.

Among her effects in the room at the Coates house which she occupied almost continuously while employed there, were found some papers indicating that she left a considerable estate. It is known about the hotel that she lost a large sum of money in a bank failure ten or twelve years ago. At that time sh e told the housekeeper that she would not deposit another cent in a bank, but this resolve was forgotten, for it developed yesterday that she had a certificate of deposit in the National Bank of Commerce for several hundred dollars. Just what her estate amounts to will not be known until the arrival of her two sisters, Mrs. C. R. Helbing of Grand Crossing, near Chicago, and Miss M. Sullivan of Ogdensburg, N. Y. Mrs. Helbing wired the hotel people yesterday afternoon that she would arrive this morning.

Quiet and unassuming, Miss Sullivan worked steadily day after day, never allowing herself a vacation and making herself a veritable fixture in the first big hotel of Kansas City. She would not allow an y of the other maids to assist her and was on duty regularly.

"It is supposed that Miss Sullivan had some money when she came here," said Manager Firey of the Coates house yesterday afternoon. "She received $25 a month and her board, room and laundry. She was of simple tastes and I suppose saved much fore than her salary, for the parlor floor is supposed to be worth something in the shape of gratuities to the maids, as well as to the bellboys. Her death is regretted by everyone attached to the hotel who knew her."

Labels: , , , ,

December 21, 1909

DENTIST'S BLOWPIPE
EXPLODES; BURNS TWO.

SPREADS BURNING GASOLINE
AND FIRES CLOTHING.

Mrs. Wilhelmina Kimberling, Den-
tist Newton's Assistant, in
Critical Condition -- Heavy
Rug Probably Saved Life.

Presence of mind displayed by Mrs. Wilhelmina Kimberling probably saved her life late yesterday afternoon, when a gasoline blow-pipe exploded in the office of Dr. Frank H. Newton, a dentist at 520 Minnesota avenue, Kansas City, Kas., throwing burning gasoline over her clothing and that of Dr. Newton. She ran screaming for aid from the little work room, where the explosion occurred, to the outer office, where she laid down on the heavy floor rug and folded it about her in an effort to check the flames.

Dr. Newton, whose clothing was also afire, raised a window and shouted for help, in the meantime smothering the fire in his clothes. Leslie Channel, a young man who lives in Quindaro, Kas., and his father Samuel Channel, heard the cries and ran upstairs. Mrs. Kimberling's clothing was still burning when they reached her, and Leslie Channel threw his overcoat about her. Dr. Newton, who sleeps in apartments adjoining his offices, carried a heavy comfort from his bed and folded it about her. The folds of the overcoat and comfort smothered the flames, but not until she had been seriously burned.

WOMAN'S CONDITION CRITICAL.

Drs. J. A. Fulton, W. H. McLeod, E. R. Tenney and J. S. Kline reached the scene of the accident soon afterward. The woman was given emergency treatment, and taken to Bethany hospital where it was said last night her condition was critical. She received severe burns on the arms, chest and legs. Her face was also burned, but the attending physicians said the burns there were superficial.

Both of Dr. Newton's hands were burned, and he also suffered a severe burn on the left leg. He was attended by Dr. Kline.

Mrs. Kimberling for several months has worked in the doctor's office. Her mother lives in Illinois. She has one daughter, Hazel, 5 years old, who lives with friends in Kansas City, Mo. Mrs. Kimberling is 23 years old and lived in apartments in the same building in which the accident occurred.

The gasoline blowpipe, which caused the accident, is used by dentists to melt the gold used in fillings and crowns. Dr. Newton said last night he did not know what caused the explosion, but supposed it was due to a defective connection. The dentist's blowpipe is similar to that used by plumbers for melting solder.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

December 14, 1909

BOY COASTER IS KILLED.

Collision on Thorp Hill, Kansas City,
Kas., Fatal to Harry Wollen-
berg, 14 Years Old.

The first coasting accident of the season in Kansas City, Kas., occurred lsat night when Harry Wollenberg, the 14-year-old son of Martin E. Wollenberg of 1137 Locust street in that city, was struck and fatally injured by a loaded bob sled on the long steep Thorp street hill. Harry was coasting down Thorp street, north from Central avenue, and is supposed to have been struck by a sled coming down the same street, south from Grandview. He was picked up by some of the coasters and taken to a house nearby.

Dr. H. P. Clark of 1215 Central avenue was called and found that the boy had received severe internal injuries. Emergency treatment was given and the boy taken to Bethany hospital in a police ambulance, where Dr. Clark and Dr. C. M. Stemen performed an operation. All efforts to save the boy's life proved fruitless, however, and he died at 12:10 o'clock this morning. The body was taken to the undertaking rooms of Joseph Butler.

The accident occurred about 9:30 o'clock, but it was nearly two and one-half hours later when the ambulance reached the hospital. The delay was caused by the icy condition of the streets. Dr. Clark and Patrolman Thomas Shay, who were with the ambulance, were forced to hold the rear wheels to prevent the vehicle from skidding and turning over.

At the hospital the boy said he did not know who ran into him, and inquiry at the scene of the accident did not divulge this information. Harry Wollenberg was in the Seventh A Grade at the Prescott school. His father, Martin Wollenberg, is employed in the tank room at the Swift Packing Company's plant. He has four other children.

The street where the boy was injured was covered with coasters last night. The hill on Thorp street affords one the longest and steepest slides in the city.

Immediately after the accident to the Wollenberg boy, Sergeant P. H. Peterson ordered his men to stop all coasting on hills if the coasters would not content themselves with coasting in one direction. Last winter several young people were badly injured in the northern part of the city in a collision between two bob sleds which were going in opposite directions.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

December 7, 1909

BOILER KILLS FOUR,
RIPS BUILDING OPEN.

DRIVER THROWN FROM PASS-
ING WAGON, DIES.

Explosion Occurs While Steamfitters
Are at Work -- Other Men In-
jured -- Pickets Blown Off
Fence Across Alley.
Results of a Boiler Explosion at 908-10 Broadway.
EXPLOSION WHICH COST FOUR LIVES.

By the explosion of a boiler in the basement of the six-story building at 908-10 Broadway at 11 o'clock yesterday morning, Michael Frawley and James Cox were killed outright, and Andrew Meyer and Essie Williams, a negro porter, so badly burned and otherwise injured that they died before nightfall. Two others were badly hurt, and three stories of the rear portion of the building were wrecked. Considerable damage also was done to adjoining structures.

Within two minutes business men and pedestrians in the neighborhood ventured to enter the front door of the building bent on rescuing those who were hurt. The flooring on the first and second stories had been splintered and a heavy partition in the middle of the building had toppled over. Every window glass on two stories had been blown out. Heavy timbers, torn from their places, hung over overhead, and for a time a general collapse of the rear section of the interior of the structure was feared.

The cause for the explosion is not known. Steamfitters employed by Val Wagner & Co., 3918 Main street, were adjusting a steamcock on the boiler, and were preparing to clean out the pipes. They had started to work last Saturday and yesterday morning they put fire under the boiler in order to do the cleaning. There was no forewarning of anything being wrong with the apparatus, and when the explosion occurred Michael Frawley, one of the steamfitters, was on top of the boiler. The boiler had not been in use for some time, and it is supposed that this is accountable for the very bad condition it was in when the workmen began the repairing.

ONE DRIVER IS KILLED.

James Cox, a driver for the Stewart Peck Sand Company, happened to be driving through the alley and had just reached the building when the explosion occurred. He was thrown bodily from the wagon and dashed to death against the brick pavement. C. R. Misner, another driver in the employ of the same firm, sat beside Cox. He too was hurled from the seat, but escaped with a fractured shoulder. Essie Williams, a negro porter, was in the boiler room at the time of the accident, and he was scalded from head to foot by the escaping steam. H e was hurried to the General hospital and died at 3:45 o'clock yesterday afternoon.

Andrew Meyer and W. H. Straubmeyer, plumbers, were at work on the boiler. Both seemed at first to have received minor injuries but Meyer was suffering from shock so he was sent to St. Mary's hospital. He did not rally, and it later developed that he was internally injured. He died at the hospital at 5:40 o'clock.

WHO THE DEAD MEN ARE.

Michael Frawley, 2040 Madison avenue, was unmarried, an orphan, and 28 years old. He has lived in this city all his life. Two brothers, John and Emmett and two sisters, Mary and Kate Frawley, survive. His body was taken to the Wagner undertaking rooms.

Meyer, Forty-third and Hudson streets in Rosedale, was well known in Atchison, Kas., where he had worked as a steamfitter off and on for many years. He came to Kansas City recently and went to live with a brother at the Hudson street address in Rosedale. He was 45 years old and unmarried. His body was also taken to the Wagner undertaking rooms.

If James Cox, 1416 Central street, has relatives living they were not found last night, and it is almost certain they do not live in this city. He was about 35 years old. It is said he was single, but there is another rumor that he has a wife and child somewhere.

Edward Booker, business manager of the local steamfitters' union, said last night that none of the men killed or injured bore union cards. Frawley, he said, was merely a steamfitter's helper. He had once applied for a card in the union, but did not keep up with the requirements, and his membership was finally cancelled.

Essie Williams, 505 East Sixth street, the negro porter, was also a fireman. The whereabouts of his survivors have not yet been ascertained. His body was taken to the Countee undertaking rooms.

The wrecked building is the property of the Homestead Realty Company and is in the charge of David Bachrach, who as the agent, had the renting of the rooms. The block had been unoccupied recently, but the H. K. Mulford Company of Philadelphia was preparing to move its stock in on the third floor.

"It was a terrific shock which seemed to shake the foundation of our building from under us," said C. M. Lyon, president of the Lyon Millinery Company, which occupies the building adjoining on the south. "Several plate glasses crashed and I ran to the front door and out on the street fearing that possibly a second explosion might occur. the damage we suffered was comparatively small, but the fright we were given was large."

The picket fence surrounding the home of Mrs. Thomas E. Moran, 916 Bank street, just across the alley from the wrecked building, was partly demolished by the concussion and many pickets were torn from the fence and blown several feet away.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

November 29, 1909

FIRST MOOSE FUNERAL.

250 Members of Kansas City Lodge
Honor Departed Brother.

The Kansas City lodge of the Loyal Order of the Moose had its first funeral yesterday afternoon, when it buried in Mount St. Mary's cemetery, Charles Burns, a contracting carpenter of 1316 Walnut street, who died in St. Mary's hospital last Tuesday. Mr. Burns was a charter member of the local order and the first of nearly 1,000 Kansas City Moose to die. Local lodge officials tried for several days to locate relatives of Burns in the East but without success.

Yesterday's funeral procession included 250 members of the order. It was headed by a brass band and started from the Moose club rooms, at Twelfth and Central streets. From there the cortege moved to the Cathedral, where the Catholic ceremonies were held, Father Lyons preaching the sermon.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

November 18, 1909

MOTHERLY HEART STILLED
WHEN "PEGGY" HEALY DIED.

AGED WEST BOTTOMS SQUATTER SPENT
MUCH OF HER LIFE IN WORK FOR
OTHERS.

A motherly old heart was stilled last night when Margaret Healy died in St. Joseph's hospital. She was a charity patient and left no money with which to bury herself. But in life that thought never troubled her.

"I always have friends," she used to say. "Sure, haven't I always been friendly?"

And she had been. Her friendship for all that was human was shown in her adoption of a parentless family of boys and raising the two youngest from her scanty earnings as charwoman and washwoman. It was shown, too, in her working half the night doing washing and household work for neighbors, when the mothers of families were ill, in the many acts of kindness when the stork visited neighbors or when death crossed their thresholds.

A simple, artless old woman she was, who passed her last days in the companionship of a woman who befriended her and gave her shelter. No one who knew her ever heard her moan at fate. She was as full of laughter at 75 years of age as many women in their teens, with the same keen enjoyment of life and interest in the small things of the town and her neighborhood.

Mrs. Healy was about 78 years old. She came to Kansas City several years after the war. She was twice married. Her second husband, John Healy died a year after their marriage. Never in her life had the income of her family been more than $10 a week, but she saw only rosy prisms. Her first husband was a laborer. So was the second. But there always was a bit of meat and bread for the hungry to be found in the family larder and a bit of heart left for the weak and sometimes the undeserving.

Until the flood of 1903, Mrs. Healy was a "squatter" in a shell of a home near the Loose-Wiles factory at Eighth and Santa Fe streets.

She and Mr. Healy were married in the Church of the Annunciation by Father Dalton. They lived in several places in the West Bottoms. Years after his death, Mrs. Healy became one of the great colony of "squatters," whose huts were scattered on unused ground from the Armour packing plant to the West bluffs. Mrs. Healy was known from one end of the bottoms to the other.

Mrs. Healy's home in the West bottoms was destroyed in the flood of 1903. She was forced to leave and found a home with Mrs. Ellen Hughes, a widow, at 630 Bank street, a mere lane down upon which the rear of huge factory buildings on Broadway frown. She lived with Mrs. Hughes until seven weeks ago, when Mrs. Hughes found her in her room unconscious and ill. She was taken to St. Joseph's hospital.

"Mrs. Healy was very happy here," Mrs. Hughes said last night. "We two lone women became great chums. She was great company. We used to go to 5 o'clock mass Sundays and sometimes we would walk up the hill again to the chapel at St. Joseph for high mass. I went to call her one Sunday and she didn't answer. Her door was locked, but she had left the window open. I crawled in and found her. She had fallen in a wood box.

"All the Irish knew Mrs. Healy; the McGowans, the Burnetts, the Moores, the Walshes, the Pendergasts, all of them. She'll never lack decent burying. From the time she came into my house dripping to the arms with flood water, she never lacked friends and I know she won't lack them now."

In younger days, Mrs. Healy was called "Peggy," a nickname usually given only to Irish girls of vivacious temperament. She looked on her deathbed little like that stout, buxom "Peggy" Healy that the West Bottoms knew at St. Joseph's, but the still, warn face wears the calm of good deeds done. She will rest in Mount St. Mary's cemetery at the side of her adopted son, George Traynor. The funeral arrangements are still to be made.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

October 16, 1909

TO OPEN SANITARIUM TODAY.

Wm. Volker's Gift Means Much to
Kansas City People.

The opening reception of the tubercular pavilion, Twenty-second and Cherry streets, the gift of Mr. William Volker to the Jackson County Society for the Relief and Prevention of Tuberculosis, is to be held at 3 o'clock this afternoon.

As this is a great event in the history of Kansas City, everyone is cordially invited to be present at the dedication of the sanitarium, which is to be presented by Frank P. Walsh, president of the society, to the city, through its mayor, Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr.

Addresses will be delivered by Professor Charles Zubelin of New York, Mayor Crittenden, Frank P. Walsh and E. W. Schauffler, medical director of the sanitarium.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

October 10, 1909

TYPHOID WRECKS A FAMILY.

Two of Frank Young's Children
Dead, Four Others Ill.

Two children dead within three days of typhoid-pneumonia, and four others seriously ill with the same disease, that is the plight of Frank Young of Linden, Mo., whose second child died yesterday at Wesley hospital.

Edith Young, 12 years of age, died Thursday at Linden. Clelland Young, 11 years old, died here yesterday at Wesley hospital.

Edith was buried in Linden, mo., Friday, and Clelland will be buried today by his sister's side.

One of the other children, a boy, is said to be critically ill.

Labels: , , , ,

October 4, 1909

HE DIDN'T FLATTER HIMSELF.

Colonel Swope Told Kelly Brent He
Was Not the Smart Man Many
Thought Him.

"Many persons think me a smart man but the truth of it is I'm an old fool," Colonel Thomas H. Swope said one day to Kelly Brent.

The two had a real estate deal on, and the colonel concluded at the end of long negotiations not to make the investment.

"Some years ago I concluded to sell off a great deal of my real estate holdings," said Colonel Swope, "and hang me if I didn't sell for a song the best of it. What I sold is worth millions today and a great deal I have left is not worth paying taxes on."

When the park board a few years ago suggested placing of a brass medallion of Colonel Swope at the entrance to Swope park he protested earnestly. He wrote to the board saying that while he lived he wanted no monument to be erected. It was explained that the medallion was not intended as a mark of the memory of the donor of the beautiful park, but as a slight token of appreciation and esteem from the city. After a long parley Mr. Swope reluctantly gave his consent to the installation of the medallion.

No man was more averse to publicity in the making of public bequests than was Colonel Swope. Just a hint being dropped that he contemplated a gift would anger the philanthropist and he would abandon his purpose. Some years ago Colonel Swope visited Roosevelt hospital in New York and asked to be shown through the institution. He incidentally remarked to the attendant that he was from Kansas City and that it was his purpose some day to build a hospital here and present it to the city.

A reporter for The Journal heard of the colonel's intentions and printed the story. The colonel became exasperated over the premature announcement and asked the reporter to visit him at his offices. The reporter to this day remembers the wrath displayed by the colonel and his ears still tingle with the tongue lashing administered.

"By your interference, sir," the colonel loudly declaimed, "you have deprived Kansas City of one of the best hospitals in the country. When people get to knowing my business it is time for me to quit."

It is unnecessary to state that Colonel Swope did not build the hospital, but he did give the ground on which it stands.

"I have known Mr. Swope a great many years, and knew him to be a kind, generous man," said J. J. Swofford last night. "Several times in the past five years I have approached him for donations for the Y. M. C. A. building fund and other funds for the promotion of the association's enterprise. He usually contributed from $100 to $400 a year.

"I know very little of Mr. Swope's business tactics, but I remember a peculiar thing about the manner in which he made these donations. He kept absolutely no account of his charities and when he signed a check to give me for the fund he used a check without a number and stub. He seemed very modest and sensitive about what he gave away.

"About three months ago, I think it was, he made and arrangement with my son Ralph Swofford of Thirty-first and Summit streets, who is president of the executive board of the Franklin Institute, to endow the institution with $50,000 providing as much more could be raised. A campaign has already been started and I believe is pretty well under way to raise the required $50,000.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

September 26, 1909

FOR FREE TREATMENT
OF TUBERCULOSIS.

ROOMS PREPARED IN ASSOCIAT-
ED CHARITIES BUILDING.

City Will Furnish a Nurse and
Bacteriological Examination
of Patients Is to Be
Made Daily.

Three rooms have been fitted up in the building of the Associated Charities, 1115 Charlotte street, as a free dispensary for scientific tuberculosis research and the treatment of persons afflicted with the disease. Daily consultations will be conducted at 2 o'clock in the afternoon, beginning with tomorrow by Dr. Charles B. Irwin, assisted by Dr. Logan Clendening. Mrs. Kate Pierson, George Damon and William Volker volunteer their services in the management of the department which will receive its support from the Provident Association.

Dr. Irwin said last night that all of the rules set out by the National Tuberculosis Society would be observed.

Bacteriological examinations will be made of the expectoration of patients, who will be instructed how to treat themselves and how to prevent or minimize the extent of infection to others.

CITY TO EMPLOY NURSE.

Medicines will be dispensed and a trained nurse will visit the homes of patients to ascertain the sanitary conditions of their respective abodes.

This nurse will be employed and paid by the city, and Dr. W. S. Wheeler, sanitary superintendent, will furnish instruments and necessary appliances.

Those exhibiting early symptoms of the disease will be sent to the sanitarium at Mount Vernon, Mo., supported by the state, or to the one built on the old general hospital grounds by the Tuberculosis Society. There are accommodations at the latter place for twelve patients, and it is contemplated that later its management may be taken over by the city. Patients with whom the disease has reached an advanced stage will be sent to hospitals or probably treated at their own homes if the surroundings and conditions permit.

CARD OF WARNING.

Cards bearing this warning will be distributed among afflicted suspects:

"If you are in a run down condition, languid and suffering from night sweats, you are in danger of contracting consumption readily. It will be greatly to your interest to consult the physicians at the dispensary. Everything is to be gained by early treatment."

The dispensary has issued a printed list of suggestions to consumptives indicating the kind of exercise they should take, the kind of clothing they are to wear and what they are to eat. Eggs and milk are recommended in cases of fickle appetite and these will be supplied by the Tuberculosis Society if the afflicted one is too poor to provide them.

Labels: , , , , ,

September 26, 1909

FATHER O'DONNELL'S
SILVER SACERDOTAL.

LONG SERVICE IN THE PRIEST-
HOOD IN KANSAS CITY.

Friends to Commemorate the Event
on November 1 -- Came From
Tipperary to the West on
Advice of a Friend.
Roman Catholic Priest Father Patrick J. O'Donnell.
FATHER PATRICK J. O'DONNELL,
FOR 25 YEARS A PRIEST HERE.

In 1885 St. Joseph's hospital was an unpretentious structure, a building which now forms a small wing to the greater buildings constructed adjoining it. In one corner of the hospital grounds there stood a little frame building which was used by the druggist attached to the hospital.

In addition to the hospital buildings the grounds now contain a finely appointed church. The priest is the Rev. Father Patrick J. O'Donnell. He has been there twenty-four years. The church building has succeeded a modest chapel in which Father O'Donnell first celebrated mass when he was given charge of the chapel. It was his second charge in the priesthood.

On November 1, Father O'Donnell will celebrate his silver sacerdotal. At least, his friends have advised him that they will celebrate it for him. They have arranged a reception with Father O'Donnell as honor guest in the chapel hall at Eighth and Penn streets for the night of the day which will mark his twenty-fifth anniversary as a priest of the Roman Catholic church.

Father O'Donnell was born in Tipperary in May, 1862. He left Ireland when 14 years old and lived for four years with an aunt in New York. In 1880, he returned to Ireland and attended St. John's Theological seminary at Wexford. He completed the course of religious instruction there in 1884 and came direct to Kansas City.

The reason for his choosing Kansas City as a field for religious work was that a classmate in the Irish school had been ordered to the St. Joseph diocese and had written Father O'Donnell of what a fine country the Western part of the United States is. Kansas City at that time was a part of the St. Joseph diocese. The Right Reverend John J. Hogan, now bishop of Kansas City, was bishop of the St. Joseph diocese. Afterward, when the Kansas City diocese was created, Bishop Hogan became spiritual head of the Kansas City diocese and administrator for St. Joseph.

Father O'Donnell's first religious work in Kansas City was as an instructor in the parochial school of the Cathedral near Eleventh street and Broadway. He taught in the school for several months. In November, 1884, he was ordained as a priest in the Cathedral.

The first charge given Father O'Donnell was in Norborne, Mo. At the time of his ordination, Father O'Donnell was too young to be admitted to the priesthood, but a papal dispensation was granted. He remained in Norborne, Mo., until 1885, when he was appointed chaplain to St. Joseph's hospital and celebrated mass each alternate Sunday at Lee's Summit. He retained the Lee's Summit charge for two years.

Father O'Donnell was asked to build a church in Sheffield. He worked for several years to bring it about. After the church was built he celebrated mass in it. Two years ago it was made a separate charge. In the meantime, the new church at the hospital building was erected. It now serves many parishioners in addition to the convalescents at the hospital.

Father O'Donnell is of genial disposition. He is known as "a man's priest" because of the strong interest he invariably has held in athletics and his liking for the society of men. He is a member of the Kansas City lodge of the Elks, being the only member of the order among the priests of Missouri.

Father O'Donnell's family lives in Kansas City, they having removed from Ireland several years after he was assigned to the charge at Norborne. His various charges in Jackson county have given him a wide acquaintance here, while he is one of the few priests ordained at the Cathedral who has retained a parish in the city. As a result of his long residence here, the reception planned for him is to be made notable by his friends.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

September 2, 1909

CAUGHT IN MACHINERY.

Austrian Packing House Employe
Dies of Injuries.

Vincent Kozak, 22 years old, of 32 South Park avenue, Kansas City, Kas., while working in the fertilizer room at the Cudahy packing plant yesterday morning was caught in the shafting and sustained injuries from which he died an hour later at Bethany hospital. He has a wife in Austria. Funeral services will be held this morning at Butler's undertaking rooms. Burial will be in St. John's cemetery.

Labels: , , , ,

August 30, 1909

LIEUTENANT RYAN MAY DIE.

In Critical Condition as Result of
an Operation.

Lieutenant M. E. Ryan of the police, is in critical condition at St. Joseph's hospital, following an operation performed yesterday afternoon. The operation was to remove a growth inside his right ear. He was unconscious early this morning. His physicians had little hope of his recovery.

Lieutenant Ryan has been on the police force twenty years, having been appointed a patrolman while Thomas M. Speers was chief of police. He was stationed for years at No. 4 police station at Fifteenth and Walnut streets. A year ago he was removed to police headquarters.. Mr. Ryan lives at 3711 Woodland avenue. He is married and has four children.

Labels: , , , , , ,

August 26, 1909

DIES IN STATE HOSPITAL.

For Years Harry B. Taylor Was a
Well Known Band Man.

Harry B. Taylor, 32 years old, who was for years a drummer in Coleman's Military band in Kansas City, Kas., died yesterday morning in the state hospital for the insane at Osawatomie, Kas. The body will be brought to Fairweather & Baker's undertaking rooms in Kansas City, Kas., this morning. Burial will be in Leavenworth, Kas. He is survived by a sister, Esther, 15 years old.

Labels: , , , , , ,

August 13, 1909

JAMES MORAN SHOT
BY JACK O'DONNELL.

POLITICS SAID TO HAVE CAUSED
THE QUARREL.

After Shooting, O'Donnell Disap-
peared, but Later Surrendered
to Police -- Moran Not Dan-
gerously Wounded.

Enmity said to have grown out of a factional fight in the Democratic party in the Second ward last night culminated in a quarrel between Jack O'Donnell, a cigarmaker, who lives at the Century hotel, and James Moran, formerly proprietor of a saloon in the Washington hotel, in which Moran was shot in the neck and painfully injured by O'Donnell. The shooting occurred in the Century hotel about 8:30 o'clock.

Moran with several friends was standing at the bar in the hotel saloon when O'Donnell and Joseph Donnegan, manager of the Century theater, entered the place.

Moran and O'Donnell began quarreling and Harry Friedburg, who was with the Moran party, endeavored to quiet them. He told O'Donnell that there would be trouble if he stayed int he saloon and that it was best that he leave. O'Donnell went into the lobby of the hotel and was followed by Moran, who again started to upbraid O'Donnell. According to witnesses Moran threatened O'Donnell.

BULLET LODGED IN NECK.

"I'll just get you before you have a chance to do anything to me," is the reply credited to O'Donnell, who drew a revolver and fired at Moran, who had turned and was running from the lobby. As Moran dodged into the bargershop from the lobby, O'Donnell, who was following, fired a second and third time. One bullet struck the fleeing man in the back between the shoulders and ranged upwards and to the left, lodgining in the neck. One bullet lodged in the wall and the third went through the door.

Moran ran out of the barger shop and fell on the sidewalk in front. He was carried into the hotel and Dr. J. D. Griffith was summoned. O'Donnell was caught by Friedberg and John Campbell. A police ambulance with Dr. H. T. Morton from the emergency hospital removed the injured man to St. Joseph's hospital. H is wound is not dangerous and he will be out of the hospital in a few days.

COULDN'T LOCATE O'DONNELL.

The police were notified but when they arrived on the scene O'Donnell had disappeared and they were unable to locate him. Inspector of Detectives E. P. Doyle detailed Detectives Kinney and Jennings on the case. After going to the hotel the men went to the hospital to see Moran, who refused to tell anyone who s hot him. The detectives telephoned the inspector that they could not find O'Donnell, but that Joseph Donnegan informed them that O'Donnell would give himself up the first thing int he morning.

Another officer was informed that O'Donnell was in the Century hotel and would give himself up in the morning. His reason for delaying was said to be because Captain Walter Whitsett disliked him and would place him in the holdover without a chance of securing bond. When Captain Whitsett heard that O'Donnell was at the hotel he instructed Lieutenant M. E. Ryan to send Sergeant Robert Greely to arrest him.

FOLLOWED ANOTHER FIGHT.

The quarrel last night followed one in the afternoon during which O'Donnell struck Moran in the mouth and further bruised the ex-saloonkeeper. This fight occurred in Wisman's saloon, Twelfth and Oak streets. Bert Striegel, a deputy constable named Caulfield, Joseph Donnegan and Moran were in the saloon when Jack O'Donnell came in. The men had a drink together and then Moran, it is claimed,, accused O'Donnell of throwing down politically Michael O'Hearn. Other charges were made by Moran and finally, it is said, he called Edward O'Donnell, a policeman and brother of Jack, a name which Jack resented. The men engaged in a fight. Wisman separated them and put the crowd out, as he said he would not allow a fight in his place.

SURRENDERED TO POLICE.

It was midnight before the police could locate O'Donnell and then he voluntarily gave himself up. He rode by himself in a carriage to police headquarters and surrendered to Lieutenant M. E. Ryan. He was not asked about the shooting by the officers in charge and was placed in the matron's room. He did not mention the shooting nor offer any explanation for it.

The trouble between the men, it is alleged, grew out of the fact that O'Donnell and Donnegan were out of the town on the last election day and Moran and his friends accused the two of being faithless to O'Hearn. The breach between the men was widened more by O'Donnell's brother arresting a barber on election day.

The shooting scrape of last night is not the first in which O'Donnell has figured. He was shot in the back by J. D. Cosby, proprietor of the Cosby hotel, following a fight in the hotel. At the same time J. P. Hayes, who was with O'Donnell, was shot twice in the back. The shooting was in February, 1908.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

July 21, 1909

AGED BRIDEGROOM DIES.

Veteran of 65 Married Woman of
27 Last May.

Broken alike in health and spirit without his bride of just two months, Henry C. Porter, the lame Civil war veteran, who at the age of 65 married Miss Carrie Clements, 27 years old, in the Moore hotel here May 10, returned to the scene of his nuptials July 10 last and found surcease from sorrow in death at the St. Mary's hospital Friday. On his advent in Kansas City, Porter pawned his watch for $9 in order to pay his room rent at the apartment house of Mrs. Mary A. Millichif at 1231 Walnut street.

"I am a broken down old man and the worst kind of a fool," Porter told Mrs. Millichif as he paid her the money. "I don't want pity; all I want is a little rest and time to think."

The body was taken to Wagner undertaking rooms. Attempts made by the proprietors of the establishment to locate Mrs. Porter have failed. Two brothers of the dead man, R. M. Porter of Williamston, Mich., and F. C. Porter of Englewood, Col., were notified by telegraph and they have replied to the effect that Porter had plenty of money and a pension of $45 a month. Had he lived until August 4 $138 would have been coming to him in accumulated pensions.

The old soldier first appeared here in the early part of last May when he broke into print with the announcement that although 65 years old, with his right leg missing and his right arm paralyzed, he was to marry Miss Clements, lately of Colorado Springs, who was fully a generation his junior.

The ceremony took place in the Moore hotel, Ninth and Central streets. The couple then departed on a tour of the East and were to sail around the Horn of San Francisco later.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

July 17, 1909

TO WED LOVER IN HOSPITAL.

Nellie Lylee Will Marry James Bar-
ton, 'Tho He Can't Recover.

One of the prettiest romances of the year will culminate tonight in the marriage of James T. Barton and Nellie E. Lyle at the Bell Memorial hospital in Rosedale, Kas. The hospital is to be the scene of the wedding because the groom is an inmate of the institution and not able to leave his bed.

While working in a stone quarry at Mankato, Kas., in 1906, a rock fell upon Barton's back and broke it. His life was despaired of, but he recovered sufficiently in March, 1907, to be taken to the Bell Memorial hospital, where he has been ever since. Physicians give no encouragement for his ultimate recovery and so far have only succeeded in keeping him alive.

Soon after the groom was brought to Rosedale there arrived in the Kansas suburb Miss Nellie E. Lyle from Moberly, Mo. She was the stricken man's fiance, and desired to be near her sweetheart. Securing employment she has lived near the injured man, and has done much to make his life in the hospital pleasant.

W. A. Drew, city marshal of Rosedale, yesterday appeared at the court house in Kansas City, Kas., and secured a marriage license for James T. Barton, 32 years old, of Corbett, Wyo., and Nellie E. Lyle, 26 years old, of Moberly, Mo. A nurse at the hospital last night confirmed the rumor of the marriage tonight, but the superintendent said he knew nothing about it.

Labels: , , , ,

July 16, 1909

HACKMEN FIGHT AT FUNERAL.

Harry Vaughan Sustains Fracture of
Skull and Recovery Doubtful.

Harry Vaughan, 17 years old, a hack driver living at 818 East Fourteenth street, Kansas City, Mo., and employed by the Wood Bryant and E. Landis Livery Company, Fifteenth and Campbell streets, was probably fatally injured yesterday during a quarrel with Tom Harper, a driver employed by the J. W. Snoddy Livery Company. Vaughan was struck on the head with a rock and his skull fractured at the base of the brain. He was removed to the South Side hospital where the attending physicians said his recovery was doubtful. Harper escaped after striking Vaughan and at a late hour last night had not been captured.

The two men with their carriages had been engaged to attend the funeral of Mrs. W. I. Davis in Rosedale. While services were being held at Kansas City and Rosedale avenues and the carriages were in line ready to take up the funeral procession, the two men had an altercation. Harper, it is alleged, threw a brick, striking Vaughan in the head and while the latter was still staggering Harper lifted a large rock with both hands and struck his victim again. He then ran and the last seen of him he was making his way toward Argentine. The injured boy was given emergency treatment by Dr. O. M. Longnecker and Dr. B. T. Sharp.

Labels: , , , , , ,

July 4, 1909

WANTS A SANE FOURTH
IF BOYS ARE WILLING.

POLICE HAVE STRINGENT OR-
DERS FROM CHIEF SNOW.

Health Commissioner Wheeler Has
Placed Supply of Tetanus Anti-
Toxin With Hospitals --
Quiet in Most Districts.

This year there is to be an extraordinary effort made to have a same Fourth, and also Fifth of July in Kansas City. Chief of Police Frank F. Snow issued orders yesterday that he wanted as many men on duty during the "busy" parts of both days as possible. If the people do not want to act in a sane manner while celebrating a policeman may be on hand to make them. The chief called for the arrests of all parties caught putting explosives on the street car tracks, and wanted officers to take special care to see that "no fireworks of any kind are exploded near any hospital or near where there are sick people."

Dr. W. S. Wheeler, health commissioner, has taken steps to keep down, as far as possible, mortality resulting from gunshot or firecracker wounds. Tetanus often follows such wounds, especially in the hands, and death is frequently the result. At the general hospital, the emergency hospital and the Walnut street police station, Dr. Wheeler has placed a supply of tetanus anti-toxin with instructions to use it immediately in every case where it is suspected the injury may develop lockjaw.

"It has been shown," said Dr. Wheeler last night, "that where the anti-toxin is used promptly it acts as a preventive. It has also been used with good results in many cases where the disease had already begun to develop."

Dr. Isadore Anderson, in charge of the dispensary at the Post-Graduate hospital on Independence avenue, secured a supply of the anti-toxin from Dr. Wheeler and will use it in all cases where its use may be indicated. This dispensary being a free one, has many injured persons.

Chief of Police Frank F. Snow issued stringent orders recently indicating the class of firecrackers and fireworks which would be permitted. Firearms of any character, whether loaded with blank or bullet cartridges, are prohibited.

Labels: , , , , ,

June 21, 1909

RESTORED TO LIFE
BY MANIPULATION.

STARTLING RESULTS IN SERIES
OF EXPERIMENTS.

Scientific World Profits Through
the Research of a Former Kan-
sas City Physician, Dr.
Thomas Bennet.

An article in the last issue of the Medical Record calling attention to a remarkable series of experiments upon human beings in New York city whereby seventeen persons whose heart action had stopped, were resuscitated by manipulating the heart with the hand to induce artificial contraction of the ventricles, recalls to physicians that the incept of the idea at the bottom of this experiment is due to Dr. Thomas Bennet of New York, who performed the same experiment upon a hog while in this city twelve years ago.

Dr. Bennet, who was at that time professor of anesthetics in the University Medical college, was one of the first men to specialize in this branch of science. He is now ranked as one of the leading anesthetists in the world and is head of that department in the Roosevelt hospital, New York city.

EXPERIMENTED ON ANIMALS.

When he was a practitioner here, Dr. Bennet was on the visiting staff of St. Margaret's hospital, Kansas city, Kas. The problem of prolonging life by applications to the heart interested him and he performed several minor experiments upon small animals, which convinced him that the correct method to induce normal heart action was to massage the upper portion of the thoracic cavity so as to induce contractions at the same rate at which the heart usually works. In order to test this idea he procured a hog after some difficulty, killed it, and then after heart action had ceased for several seconds, made an incision in the left breast, inserted his hand and massaged the heart rythmatically. After a few seconds the animal respired and showed other signs of life. Shortly after this Dr. Bennet announced his intention to specialize in the field of anesthetics and has since followed the fruitful field of inquiry which he opened up.

BROUGHT BACK TO LIFE.

Four years ago an experiment of the same kind was performed by leading Jackson county surgeons upon a dog in the clinic of the University Medical college. In this case it was four minutes after heart action had ceased that the incision was made and artificial action of the ventricles induced. The animal was brought back to life, but as soon as the pumping with the hand ceased the body became lifeless again.

Similar experiments have been performed at Johns Hopkins university in the last decade, but none of them antedate Dr. Bennet's experiment with the hog at St. Margaret's hospital. Although his experiment was not a complete success, his friends claim that he conceived the idea before any others.

The Medical Record declares that nine of the persons who were resuscitated in this manner in the New York hospitals recently are still living, and that seventeen of the forty-five operated upon after heart action had ceased were brought back temporarily, at least. In the New York experiments not only is artificial heart action brought about by inserting the hand into the breast and massaging the upper half of the organ, but artificial respiration is induced and the other parts of the body are moved by the surgeons at the same time.

To what extent these experiments may be carried, local physicians are unwilling to venture an opinion.

Labels: , , , ,

June 1, 1909

SIMPLICITY MARKS
CRITTENDEN FUNERAL.

FORMER GOVERNOR OF MIS-
SOURI LAID TO REST.

Rev. Thomas P. Haley Pronounces
Fitting Eulogy in Presence of
Relatives and Friends
of Many Years.

While respecting in every way the wish of the late Thomas T. Crittenden that his funeral be conducted with as little ostentation as possible, hundreds of former governor's friends, men and women, stood under the trees on the lawn at the residence, 3320 Flora avenue, yesterday afternoon within the sound of the voice of the Rev. Dr. Thomas P. Haley, who with the assistance of Rev. Burris A. Jenkins and the Rev. Dr. S. M. Neel, conducted the simple service for the dead.

Governor Crittenden had left a letter addressed to Dr. Haley asking that he officiate at his funeral. The letter was sealed in 1906.

"I count it one of the choicest blessings of my life to have known and loved Thomas T. Crittenden," said Dr. Haley. "He was a man of great heart, noble mind and character, whom none could know but to love and admire.

"Everyone who knew him was his friend. He had close friends far away as well as near, but among those who most revered him, which is an indication of the kind of man he was, are his neighbors, those with whom he came in contact in his everyday life. Every child in the neighborhood knew him and loved him.

WAS KIND TO ALL.

"He was ever willing to recognize his fellows as men, no matter what their station in life might have been. He was as careful to be considerate to the hod-carrier as he was to the banker.

"He would treat the washerwoman with as much consideration as the finest lady."

In finishing his characterization of his dead friend, Dr. Haley touched on Governor Crittenden's rare virtues as a husband and father, saying he was always careful to perform his public duties in the daytime, reserving the evenings for the society of his family.

Over the casket, during the funeral services, was draped the battle flag of the Seventh Missouri cavalry, which Governor Crittenden and Judge John F. Philips organized at the beginning of the civil war. The shot-torn banner was made by the women of Georgetown, Mo., and presented to the regiment. After the war it became the property of Judge Philips, who said it should drape his casket after his death.

NEGRO A MOURNER.

No mourner was more sincere than "Uncle" Dan Edwards, who was Governor Crittenden's "waitin' boy," as he styled himself, during the four years of the war. "Uncle" Dan is now pastor of the Metropolitan Negro Baptist church, at Ninth and Washington streets, Kansas City, Kas. He went to the Crittenden home in the early morning and asked for a last look at the face of his old "marster," and, as he said, "tuck dinner" there. He followed his master's body to Forest Hill, where it was buried.

Among those who came to the funeral was J. B. Waddell of Springfield, whom Governor Crittenden appointed as his adjutant general.

Enough floral offerings were sent to make a great mound at the grave. Members of the family, however, asked that the greater part of the flowers be sent to adorn graves that might go through Memorial day undecorated. Among the pieces sent was one from the children of the neighborhood bearing the card which read:

"Children of the Kentucky Block"

City officials and attaches in their offices also sent many beautiful floral pieces.

The pallbearers were Kelly Brent, John Hanley, W. W. Collins, S. L. Long, Daniel T. Blake, W. S. Cowherd, Porter H. Hovey and Leon T. Brown.

So profuse was the floral offering in memory of Governor Crittenden that Mrs. Crittenden requested that some of them be sent to various hospitals in Kansas City after the burial. The flowers were all left at the cemetery until late yesterday afternoon, when many were collected and sent to the following hospitals:

German hospital, new general hospital, old city hospital, Nettleton home, St. Joseph's hospital, St. Mary's hospital, and Mercy hospital.

RESOLUTION IN COUNCIL.

The council in special session yesterday passed the following tribute to the memory of the ex-governor:

"The death of former Governor Thomas Crittenden is a distinct loss, not only to our city, but to our state and nation. When a boy, following the dictates of his ancestral instincts, he dedicated his life to his country's service and took up his sword to defend its flag. To the closing of his rich and fruitful life, as soldier, congressman, governor, consul general and citizen he gave the best he had, his time, his talent, his eloquence, his energy to the state and nation. He was an illustrious example of American manhood. He was courageous and tender, courtly and constant, patriotic and modest. He honored women, trusted men and worshipped God. He belonged to the rare old school which held honor above wealth and virtue above life. He was every inch a Crittenden, which means that he turned his back to no foe and bended the knee to none but his Maker.

"He has fought the fight, he has finished the work, he has kept the faith and now takes his place full of honor among his distinguished ancestry.

"This city does not mourn alone. Today tears are falling nationwide. We, his neighbors, join with the multitudes in deploring his loss and extend to his sorrowing wife, his distinguished son, our mayor, and all the members of the grief-stricken family our earnest sympathy."

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

May 31, 1909

LOCKJAW CLAIMS VICTIM.

Joseph Reiner's Leg Was Crushed by
Train Ten Days Ago.

Joseph Reiner of Eldon, Mo., died early yesterday morning at Bethany hospital in Kansas City, Kas., from lockjaw. Reiner's left leg was crushed about ten days ago by a train and he was taken to the hospital, where he was attended by Dr. J. O. Millner. The physician had hopes of his recovery, but tetanus developed and the patient died shortly before midnight. The body will be taken to his home in Eldon for burial.

Labels: , , ,

May 22, 1909

ADAM GOD TO DROP
PLEA OF INSANITY?

EARLY TESTIMONY INDICATES
SELF-DEFENSE.

Sharp's Mental Condition Is Not
Seriously Considered -- Witnesses
Describe the City Hall
Riot Scenes.

That the defense of James Sharp, the religious fanatic, charged with the killing of Patrolman Michael Mullane, is to be self-defense was made evident on the first day of the trial, which opened yesterday in the criminal court.

It had been announced and it was the theory of the state that insanity would be pleaded. but during all the evidence heard yesterday there was no mention of Sharp's mental condition save alone in the statement of Virgil Conkling, prosecuting attorney, in which he outlined what the state expects to prove.

Perhaps it was because through Mr. Conkling's statement, reciting incident after incident of Sharp's life, from his religious doings in Oklahoma and Canada, through the city hall riot here December 8 and the subsequent flight of Sharp, ran the suggestion that Sharp was not insane, but, on the contrary, sane and exceptionally acute of mind. Out of every action on the part of Sharp the prosecutor deduced a refutation of the insanity idea.

THE MAYOR A WITNESS.

At the rate of progress made yesterday, it is likely that the trial will consume a greater part of next week. It is the practice of Judge Ralph S. Latshaw to open court early, to take one hour at noon for recess and to adjourn at 5 o'clock. Much time was spent yesterday over each witness.

It was while Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., was on the stand yesterday afternoon that the defense showed its change of front. In arguing for permission to ask the mayor certain questions, A. E. Martin of counsel for the defense said to the court:

"We propose to show that the police and the probation officer incited a riot at the city hall and followed the same persons who participated in the riot and killed one of them in a boat on the river."

The court refused to admit testimony as to what happened on the river front, as happening there were fifteen minutes later than the fight which resulted in the death of Mullane.

DEFENSE'S STATEMENT LAST.

Touching elbows with John P. Mullane, brother of the man with whose death he stands charged, Sharp heard George M. Holt, probation officer, give his testimony. The defense took advantage of its right to reserve its statement until the state shall have finished with its witnesses.

Holt gave his age as 46, his address as 3027 East Nineteenth street and his occupation as probation officer. At noon of the riot, he said, he saw Mrs. Sharp and the children of Louis Pratt singing on the street at that point. He watched them about five minutes, when they started north on Main. Mrs. Sharp, during the meeting, was inviting the public to a gathering at the Workingmen's mission that night. There was a hat on the sidewalk and coin in it. Mrs. Sharp took the hat.

"I followed the band and inquired about whose children they were," said Mr. Holt. "She went into the Workingmen's Mission and I followed about a minute later. Sharp was there talking to his wife when I came in.

"I asked him if this was his wife and children and he said yes. He told me he was Adam God, the father of Jesus Christ."

Hot told Sharp that he would have to keep the children off the streets if he meant to keep them in Kansas City.

THREATENED TO KILL.

" 'What authority have you?' Sharp asked me.

" 'I am an officer,' said I.

" 'Well, you blue coated -----,' said Sharp, 'I'll kill you or any other ----- blue coat that comes in here and interferes with my work in this city.'

"Immediately afterwards, Sharp pulled out a pistol from under his vest. Louis Pratt, who also was there, pulled out a revolver and so did Mrs. Sharp. Her husband put his pistol under my face and forced me out of the mission and as I went out hit me on the head. He called to someone to come out. Then I went to the police station to report. Before I had finished reporting, the shooting had begun."

"What part of the shooting did you see?" asked Mr. Conkling.

"All I saw was someone in the chief's office shooting at Louis Pratt, who was on his knees on the street. Pratt fell."

"How long did the shooting last?"

"Less than five minutes. About twenty-five or thirty shots were fired."

TO REVOLUTIONIZE THINGS.

The Rev. Sherman Short of Clarence, Mo., was at Fifth and Main streets when he heard the children sing and stepped up close enough to hear Mrs. Sharp say:

"The prophet will preach tonight at the Workingmen's mission."

Dr. Short testified yesterday that his curiosity was aroused.

"I went up to the mission and there was Sharp," said Dr. Short. "I asked him if he was the prophet and he said:

" 'My name is Sharp. I am supposed to be King David in the spirit. I am the Lord of the Vineyard myself and the people will soon find it out, for I expect to revolutionize things around here.' "

"Did he talk to you about force or violence?" asked Mr. Conkling.

"No."

"What happened then?"

"While we were talking the Pratt children and came in and said to Sharp: 'The humane officer is after us.' Then Holt came in and asked Sharp if these were his children. Sharp said yes and Holt told him they would have to be kept off the streets, if Sharp proposed to remain in Kansas City. I saw Sharp hit Holt and put him out of the mission. I saw him have a knife and a revolver.

"Sharp then waved his revolver and called out: 'Come on, children!' Mrs. Sharp and Louis Pratt and the two oldest Pratt girls all took out revolvers. They went on the street and formed a circle, facing the west sidewalk on Main."

"What did you do?"

"I went to the police station. I saw police coming out of headquarters. Patrolman Dalbow shook hands with Sharp and they stood there a minute. Then some other man came up. He was in citizen's clothes and he pulled out a revolver. Then there was shooting."

PRATT FIRED FIRST.

"Who fired the first shot?"

"Louis Pratt."

"And then what did you see?"

"I didn't stay long after that. I ran across the street. As I turned around I saw a man lying on the car track, shot. I learned afterwards that it was A. J. Selsor. Later I saw Mrs. Sharp and one of the Pratt girls brought into the station.

"When they formed their circle in the street Sharp, his wife, Pratt and the two oldest Pratt girls had revolvers in their hands. Sharp also had a knife."

Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., said that he was in a council chamber on the fourth floor of the city hall when the riot began. He saw Louis Pratt kneeling, steadying his aim with both arms, shooting at Mullane. There was a little girl near Pratt, holding toward him a revolver, loaded with fresh cartridges. The mayor saw Pratt fall over, as if shot. Then the mayor went downstairs to police headquarters and out on the street.

"My purpose of going towards the river was that I had heard talk of lynching and wanted such an action to be avoided," said the mayor in explanation. He was not allowed to tell what happened at the river front.

MULLANE'S WIDOW ON STAND.

Mrs. Hannah Mullane, weeping quietly on the witness stand, told how her husband had left home on the morning of December 8, 1908, at 6 o'clock, in good health. Mullane died Decemberr 10, two days after the riot.

There was some delay when court opened in the afternoon, while attachments were served on physicians who were state's witnesses, but who failed to be on hand at the proper time.

Dr. William A. Shelton, 3305 Wabash avenue, was the second witness. He is a police surgeon. On the day of the riot he was called to treat Mullane at the city hall and later attended him at St. Joseph's hospital. Mullane, he said, had a bullet wound through his left hand and one through his chest just above the heart. The latter bullet struck Mullane in the back. Dr. Shelton probed for it, but could not locate it. He finally found the bullet on the operating table. The bullet was shown to the jury over objections of Sharp's attorneys.

Dr. Eugene King, surgeon at St. Joseph's hospital, examined Mullane at police headquarters and at the hospital. He testified as to the wounds and said he found the bullet in the patorlman's underclothing on the operating table. The course of the ball, he said, was from front to back. Dr. Shelton came from in a few minutes later, said Dr. King.

THE MORNING SESSION.

The dramatic incident of the morning session yesterday occurred while Mr. Conkling, in his opening statement, was arraigning Sharp as a religious grafter. While the prosecutor was in the middle of the sentence, Sharp jumped up and said:

"Your honor, these words this man speaks he will have to get witnesses to prove."

"Sit down, Mr. Sharp," said Judge Latshaw. "If you have any objections to make, do so through your counsel."

"I want this jury to hear the truth," persisted Sharp. "I didn't take up collections at my meetings."

Then sharp started to leave the court room but was brought back by a deputy marshal.

A short time afterwards, while Mr. Conkling was telling of the death of Patrolman Albert O. Dalbow, Mrs. Dalbow fainted and was carried from the courtroom. With her were a son, 8 years old, and a baby of fourteen months. She sat near the jury, close to a son and daughter of A. J. Selsor, who was killed in the riot.

Before Conkling began his address to the jury, there were brought into the courtroom gruesome reminders of the December tragedy. A rifle used by Mrs. Pratt in her fight on the river when she, with her daughters, Lena and Lulu, tried to escape. Lulu was killed by bullets fired from the bank. Then there were five revolvers, Sharp's large knife and ammunition. Also there was a shotgun and a rifle found in the houseboat of the band. the whiskers Sharp left in the Mulberry street barber shop, neatly garnered into an envelope, also were put on the table in plain view of the jury. In the afternoon the display of weapons was removed.

SHARP MAY TESTIFY.

With a changed plea, it is not so certain now that Adam God will be put on the witness stand. It was the first intention to make him back up the plea of insanity, but with a changed method of attack, this plan may be altered. Sharp is firm in declaring that he will be a witness, and as he seems at times to be not under the control of his counsel, he may make his statement before the evidence closes.

The riot of December 8, it will be remembered, occurred on the northwest corner of the city hall. There were wounded and subsequently died the following: Albert O. Dalbow and Michael Mullane, patrolmen; A. J. Selson, a spectator; Louis Pratt, a member of the religious band. Patrick Clark, a sergeant of police, was slashed on the face by Sharp and lost his right eye.

The trial will be resumed this morning.

At yesterday's trial the bible, which is his constant companion, lay on the table before Sharp, who sat facing the east windows, and therefore with his profile to the audience. From time to time he glanced curiously about him, but if it was with an y emotion, the feeling was not depicted by expression. Most of the time he sat with hands folded, elbows close to his side. Occasionally he stroked his beard or with his fingers combed tangles from his long moustache.

COURT ROOM WAS CROWDED.

Not an any trial since Judge Ralph S. Latshaw has taken his place has there been such a throng to see a trial. Not only all the chairs in the courtroom, but also the aisles, already narrowed by extra seats, held their capacity. Conspicuous among the number were a dozen or more well dressed women, who followed every step of the proceedings with interest. Among these was Miss Selsor, daughter of A. J. Selsor, killed in the riot. As the day wore on the crowd tended to increase rather than diminish.

The orderly quiet of it all was not lost on Adam God. Accustomed for years to rough treatment from crowds and officers of the peace, he seemed to feel the different attitude of the spectators in the court room where he is on trial for his life. Defiance of the law and its officers seemed to have passed from his mind, leaving him although perhaps not resigned to his fate, yet with the feeling that he was among those who meant to treat him fairly. At noon he told the deputy marshal who took him to his cell:

"That's a fine judge. He certainly will see that I get a fair trial."

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

May 19, 1909

NEW $150,000 CATHOLIC
HOSPITAL IS DEDICATED.

St. Mary's has 250 Beds, and Sev-
enty-Two of These Will
Be Free.

St. Mary's hospital at Twenty-eighth and Main streets was dedicated yesterday morning. Solemn high mass was celebrated by Rev. Father O. J. S. Hoog, vicar general of St. Louis. All of the Kansas City Catholic clergy, and about fifty priests from outside, participated. After mass a breakfast was served and addresses were made by Bishop Thomas F. Lillis, Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., and Frank P Walsh. A public reception was held in the afternoon and at night.

The Sisters of St. Mary of St. Louis, which order maintains hospitals in St. Louis, St. Charles, Jefferson City and Chillicothe, launched the project for a similar institution here. The Sisters met with the energetic co-operation of Kansas City men and women in building the hospital.

Together with the grounds the building cost $150,000. It is four stories high and measures 222x76 feet. It contains 250 beds. Of these, seventy-two are free. The medical staff has not been chosen.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

May 19, 1909

DYING MAN IS BAPTIZED.

Waldo Fox Submerged in Bath Tub
Just Before Death Came.

Before slipping away into endless sleep, Waldo Fox, a street car motorman, was baptized in a bath tub full of water at the Post Graduate hospital Monday night.

Mr. Fox had bee ill several weeks with typhoid fever, and knew he was to die in a short time. The baptismal ceremony was performed by the Rev. James Small, pastor pro tem of the Independence Boulevard Methodist Episcopal church, in the presence of the elder Mr. Fox, who came here from Granby, Mo, and hospital attendants.

Funeral services ere held at Wagner's undertaking rooms yesterday afternoon. The body was taken to Granby, Mo., for burial last night. Mr. Fox was unmarried and lived at 1311 East Forty-sixth street.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

May 9, 1909

MERCY HOSPITAL IS
OPENED TO PUBLIC.

$10,000 BUILDING DONATED BY
CHARITABLE PERSONS.

Distinctive Kansas City Institution
Is Now Prepared to Care for
More Patients -- Its
Great Record.

After some years of hard work on the part of the directors of Mercy hospital, the handsome new hospital building has been finished and yesterday afternoon and evening it was thrown open to the public for inspection. The new building, outside of labor and many donations of work, was erected and furnished at a cost of something over $10,000, the whole sum being donated by charitable persons. Those who attended the reception yesterday were struck with the appearance of the new hospital building and were unanimous in their belief that the money had been well spent.

Mercy hospital is a distinctive institution in Kansas City. The only patients it will take are the sick babies and children of parents who cannot afford to secure competent medical attention. Mercy hospital has a record for the past four years, having lost but two patients who were over two years of age.

ITS WORK WELL KNOWN.

The little babies taken there range from a few hours in age to several months. The greatest death loss has, naturally, been of the newborn babies.

So well was the work of Mercy known to the public that the old building was constantly filled with patients. It had a capacity of eighteen patients and then the nurses and attendants had to live in halls and corners. Each day, in the old building, applicants had to be turned away because of the lack of facilities.

The new hospital has a capacity of 100 patients and the nurses and attendants will occupy the old building which adjoins. The new building is three stories in height containing all of the latest appliances for hospitals and a great amount of equipment which is used for children only.

On the first floor the most noticeable room is the children's playroom. Heretofore, when the weather was bad, the children have had no place for their games. The new playroom has been fitted with toys, blocks and some gymnastic apparatus.

The second floor is given over to wards entirely, one noticeable ward being the room allotted to the incurable cases so that the children need not be sent away from the hospital because they had stayed so long a time and could not be cured.

FLOODED WITH LIGHT.

Bordering the entire second floor is a sixteen-foot sun porch, which is to be filled with a long line of little white iron beds for those children who need the outdoor air.

The third floor is also given over to wards, but there the nurses' dining rooms are located.

The whole building is flooded with outdoor light, and the ventilating system is of the most modern type. The institution is run wholly by the charity of the people of Kansas City, having no endowment whatever.

Yesterday morning the twenty-one little patients were moved from their old, cramped quarters into the new and roomy wards. They were greatly delighted and entertained by the many visitors who went to Mercy hospital to see the good work of the directors and the people of the city. Only those infants who are dangerously ill were kept in the old building.

Labels: , , , ,

May 4, 1909

WAITING FOR MASTER'S VOICE.

But Broken Ankles Prevented John-
son Reaching His Mangy Pup.

The attention of many people who passed the new St. Mary's hospital at Twenty-eighth and Main streets yesterday was attracted to a small, mangy looking pup of the all-wool variety, who sat near the areaway leading into the boiler room. Occasionally the pup looked skyward and howled dismally. Sisters from the hospital were seen tempting the little watcher with pans of milk and other delectables, but he steadfastly refused to desert his post, and last night laid down with an eye on the areaway.

While looking for a place to sleep Saturday night, Gabriel Johnson, the owner of the faithful pup, fell down the areaway and broke both ankles. He was found Sunday and taken to the general hospital where the broken bones were set, but the dog did not see his master leave St. Mary's hospital as he was not taken through the areaway.

Johnson says he works for John Wolf, a quarryman of Centropolis. His condition was improved yesterday.

Labels: , , , , , ,

April 23, 1909

CROSSED THE PLAINS
TOGETHER IN 1858.

FORMER COMRADES MEET FOR
FIRST TIME SINCE.

George W. Friend and Ferd Smith
Fought on Opposite Sides in War
and Both Were in Battle
of Lexington.

Curiosity on the part of a young man who desired to witness the meeting of two old soldiers of the same war, but who fought under different flags, last night brought together two men who crossed the plains in company in 1858, but who had not heard of each other since. George W. Friend of Anderson, Mo., and Ferd Smith of 3339 Morrill avenue were the principals in the meeting.

It was in 1858 that the men joined the same train of freighters from Kansas City to Fort Union, N. M., and drove teams of oxen and fought Indians on the plains for ninety days. On the return of the freighters to Kansas City they were disbanded and them men went back to their farms. They lost track of each other until last night.

MEET AT HOSPITAL.

An operation being necessary to save the life of his son, George W. Friend came to Kansas City several days ago and took his son to Wesley hospital. About the same time a nephew of Ferd Smith became ill and went to the hospital. The nephew met Mr. Friend and last night when his uncle called to see him the nephew introduced the old men.

"Smith, Smith. You are not the Smith from Lafayette county, are you?" Mr. Friend asked.

"Yes, I joined the Confederate army at Lexington," Smith replied.

"A man named Smith crossed the plains with me in '58," Friend remarked.

"That's me," Ex-Freighter Smith answered.

"What, are you 'Pudd' Smith?" Friend asked, and when he was told that the old soldier was the same man who crossed the plains with him, he led the way to two chairs on the veranda where there was a great talk-fest.

During the conversation the friends discovered that they were both engaged in the battle at Lexington,, one fighting for the Confederacy and the other on the side of the Union.

TRIED TO KILL EACH OTHER.

"I did my best to kill you, Friend," Smith informed his friend.

"Same here, Pete," was the rejoinder made by Friend.

The old soldiers have arranged to see each other every day while Friend is in town. The first t rip across the plains made by Friend was for Anderson & Hays of Westport, in 1857, and he freighted to Fort Union. Thereafter he crossed the plains twelve times, most of his trips being to Fort Union, although he made one to Santa Fe and another to Denver.

Mr. Friend is 71 years old and his friend of the plains is 72 years old.

Labels: , , , ,

Google
 
Web vintagekansascity.com
Share on Facebook
Get the Book
Vintage Kansas City Stories ~ Early 20th Century Americana as Immortalized in The Kansas City Journal
Vintage
Kansas City Stories


More Books

SYNDICATE

Get this feed on your RSS reader

The History and Heritage of Vintage Kansas City in Books
Vintage Kansas
City Bookstore

Powered by Blogger

Vintage Kansas City.com

Vintage Antique Classics ~ Vintage Music, Software, and more Time Travel Accessories

In association with
KC Web Links.com ~ The Ultimate Kansas City Internet Directory