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February 8, 1910

'A SWEDE IN PERIL'
IS WARD WAR CRY.

Scandinavians Flock to the
Standard of Gus Pearson.

"A Swede is in peril!"

That was both the watchword and the reason assigned for the meeting last night at the Stockholm hotel at 1024 West Seventeenth street, where about 300 Second ward Republicans indorsed Gus Pearson for another term as city comptroller.

The Scandinavian settlement in Kansas City has had two city comptrollers, and each has made good with his party, and the present comptroller, Gus Pearson, made good with the Democratic administration, too, but they have never had other representation, and now they are out for a member in the upper house of the council.

Last night these Second warders met to indorse Mr. Pearson and have a lunch, and they listened to Fred Coon and Judge Harry G. Kyle while they were awaiting the adjournment of the city council and a chance to tell Gus Pearson that they are for him.

Charley Lawson, who was chairman of the meeting, sounded the watchword: "A Swede is in peril."

Lawson and other speakers told how Pearson is to be rolled at the Republican convention February 25 because, as they declared, he has incurred the enmity of party bosses.

It appeared to be the sense of the meeting that Pearson is to be "rolled" by the bosses because he remained under a Democratic administration and the speakers declared that these same bosses offered to go into the courts to protect their places in the service when the Democrats ousted all of them but Pearson and kept Pearson merely because he is competent.

JUDGE KYLE TALKS.

Judge Harry G. Kyle, who expects to carry the Second ward with the aid of Mr. Pearson's friends there, said in part:

"The freeholders, in drafting the new city charter, and in creating the hospital and health commission department of municipal government brought the city government close to the needs and wants of the people. This department will have control of the city hospital and all institutions now or hereafter owned or controlled by the city for the care of sick and injured persons; for the confinement, support and maintenance of insane persons.

"This commission will have a competent man to act as superintendent of the hospitals and other kindred institutions. It will also have a competent health commissioner to direct inspection of every part of the city, with a view to maintaining good sanitary conditions; also to inspect dairies, meat, food stuffs and water supplies for drinking purposes and to enforce all pure food laws."

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February 5, 1910

"BOYS" FIND HOME FOR
PENDERGAST IN FIRST.

Ward Workers Jubilant Over Prac-
tical Certainty That the Alder-
man Will Run Again.

Alderman James Pendergast, 1100 Summit street, temporary abode only.

There is joy in the first ward. The boys have found a home for their patron and political saint, Alderman James Pendergast. After a long and wearisome chase the house hunters yesterday temporarily leased the unpretentious but comfortable dwelling at 1100 Summit street. It is located right in the heart of the First ward,and in a few days the alderman who for eighteen consecutive years has represented the ward in the lower house and gotten city jobs for thousands of the boys will be formally installed in his new domicile.

"Means you are going to be candidate for alderman again?" was suggested to the nestor of Democratic politics.

"Well, I told the boys that if they would find a home for me in the ward I might consider representing them again. Consider, mind you," replied Mr. Pendergast, "since my wife died, four years ago, I've been sort of a Gypsy, dividing my domicile between my farms in Kansas and Missouri and the home of my sister on Prospect avenue. I'm getting tired of calling home wherever I hang my hat.

"I want a place I can really call home, and the boys are going to install me in one in a few days. The boys would go to the end of the earth for me, and I suppose it us up to me to reciprocate."

"Hurrah! Jim is going to run for alderman again," gleefully shouted one of the boys.

"Qualify that with the word 'consider,' " interrupted the alderman.

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February 2, 1910

NEGRO ORATOR PRESIDENT.

Down Town Kyle-for-Mayor Club Is
Return for Advice Given.

C. H. Calloway, one of the best known negro orators in Republican ranks, has become president of a Kyle-for-Mayor club with headquarters at 815 McGee street. Dr. E. C. Bunch is secretary of the club.

The negroes reside in various wards, but opened a down-town workshop patterned after "Shootin' Gallery" Bill Green's work for Darius A. Brown in the Eighth ward, where the white Republicans have a down-town office, a permanent headquarters and an auditorium for blow-outs in the Spiritualistic church farther east in the ward.

The negroes formed a club to work for Judge Kyle in return for advice he has given them that the way to elevate their race is by patronizing negro businesses and professional men.

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February 1, 1910

JIM CROW BILL BEATEN.

Two Democrats Vote With Repub-
licans and Kill It.

Two Democratic aldermen, W. C. Culbertson and Isaac Taylor, voted with the Republicans in the upper house of the council last night and defeated an ordinance providing for separate street car seats for negroes.

Mr. Culbertson's reasons for voting against the ordinance were that he feared it to be a trouble maker, and that it was not sufficiently explicit as to how the negroes were to be separated from the whites when the cars and platforms were crowded. Mr. Taylor gave a like reason.

Here is the vote:

For the ordinance -- Steele, Wirthman, Titsworth, O'Malley, Logan, Gregory; total, 6, all Democrats.

Against the ordinance -- Edwards, Havens, Tillhof, Bunker, Republicans; Taylor, Culbertson, Democrats; total, 6.

Absent -- Cronin, Democrat; Thompson, Republican.

Eight votes were necessary to carry the ordinance.

Before the session opened Alderman James Pendergast came over from the lower house and loudly proclaimed opposition to the ordinance. He said that it could not be enforced, that it would be declared unconstitutional and under his breath he told Democrats it would be a bad move politically.

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January 31, 1910

FINAL "JIM CROW" ACTION TONIGHT.

Alderman J. E. Logan, Au-
thor of Measure, Disclaims
Any Political Motive.

The council is expected to take action tonight on the ordinance requiring the Metropolitan Street Railway Company to furnish separate cars for negroes, or if permitted to ride with white passengers, to designate certain seats for them. As the measure is championed by Democratic aldermen there is every probability that Republican members will permit them to do all the voting in favor of the passage of the ordinance. This is the sentiment in the upper house, but not altogether in the lower house, for if Alderman Frank Askew, a Republican, has not changed his mind he will second a motion to be made by Alderman Miles Bulger, a Democrat, that the ordinance be passed under suspension of the rules.

This will call for ten affirmative votes, and if they are not forthcoming the ordinance will have to go to a committee.

All of these possibilities depends of course on the action of the upper house. A special committee headed by R. L. Gregory, president of that branch of the council, will recommend the passage of the ordinance and this can be done with eight affirmative votes. There are nine Democratic aldermen in the upper house, and the tip has gone out that they have been lined up to vote for the ordinance. Some of the Democrats were hesitating on the propriety of passing the ordinance on account of "political policy," but it is now stated that they have been induced to see it differently.

In political circles the cry has been set up that the ordinance has been introduced at this time to cripple the candidacy of a Republican alderman, who is seeking the nomination for mayor, and who will be called upon to cast his vote either for its passage or defeat. Alderman J. E. Logan, a Democrat, who fathers the ordinance, denies this allegation.

"There is no politics or racial question involved in the ordinance," said Alderman Logan yesterday. "Similar laws are in effect in other cities where there are large negro populations, and they are entirely satisfactory to both races."

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January 31, 1910

HOW JUSTICE ROSS
MADE HIS FORTUNE.

DONOR OF MONEY TO MA-
HONEY CHILDREN WAS
ONCE A LAMPLIGHTER.

Formed Partnership With
John Mahoney Twenty-
Five Years Ago.

Justice Michael Ross, of Kansas City, who in the Wyandotte county, Kansas, probate court Saturday gave the children of his dead partner, John Maloney, $50,000, was born in Cincinnati, O., December 19, 1859. His father, Alexander Ross, came to Kansas City in 1866 to aid in the erection of the first gas plant the city had. In June a year later, the family followed him, coming from St. Louis by boat.

"The Missouri was full of boats in those days," said Justice Ross last night, "and was the principal means of navigation between here and St. Louis. Kansas City had a real wharf and it was a busy one."

Two brothers, William J. and James Ross, and a younger sister constituted the children at that time. James was drowned while swimming in the Missouri river in 1872.

"We attended a little frame public school down in the East Bottoms just opposite what was known as Mensing Island," said Justice Ross. "Later we went to Washington school which still stands at Independence avenue and Cherry street. A ward school education was as high as one could go in those days unless he went away, and that was all we received."

After the erection of the gas plant Justice Ross and his brother William secured positions as lamp lighters. It required them to get up at all hours of the night, according to the condition of the weather and the fullness of the moon, both to light and turn out the street lamps. After doing this work at night Justice Ross worked all day on an ice wagon for J. E. Sales. Later on he worked in the old Davis brick yard, which stood about where the Zenith mill now stands in the East Bottoms.

Justice Ross always had in view the day when he would go into business for himself -- be his own boss. With his savings and some help from his mother he started a little grocery and general store on the levee at First and Campbell streets in 1874. After a time his brother, William, was taken into partnership, but remained but a few years. The latter for several terms was a member of the city council.

BOUGHT OTHER STORES.

As the city began to grow away from the river, Justice Ross saw better opportunities and opened a grocery store at 1401-3 East Fifth street, at Lydia avenue, and later another at 1100-2 East Fifth street, at Troost avenue. These two stores were money makers and enabled him later to branch out along other lines.

In September, 1888, Justice Ross was married to Miss Bessie Egan. All of their children, seven boys and four girls, are living, the oldest daughter being away at school near Cincinnati, and the oldest boy at St. Mary's, Kas. Six of the nine children at home attend the Woodland school.

"I knew John Mahoney from the day he came here with the C. & A. railroad," Justice Ross said. "He was doing small jobs of grading in those days and his mother went with him over the country. They used to trade with us at the little store on the levee and when in town Mahoney and his mother stopped at our home."

It was almost twenty-five years ago that Mahoney and Ross went into partnership and the latter has been a silent partner ever since, Mahoney seeing to most of the details and looking after the work. Justice Ross also had other interests, such as tree planting, and planted the trees around the finest residences and along many of the prettiest boulevards. In speaking of some of the work done by himself and Mr. Mahoney, the justice said:

"We built all of the Southwest boulevard, also Fifteenth street, doing the grading work. Roanoke boulevard is another piece of our work, as was the ill-fated Cliff drive, where poor John and his wife met such a tragic fate. We did lots of work on the country roads in Jackson county and built almost all of the roads in Wyandotte county, besides many of the brick-paved streets.

LARGE CONTRACT WORK.

"We also did much work away from here, such as government work on the levee at New Orleans, county roads in Southern Indiana and railroad grading in Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Colorado. Mahoney was a man who made friends wherever he went. I just received a letter from Indiana asking if he and McGuire were the same men who were there asking for all particulars."

As Justice Ross's business ventures thrived he found it impossible to give the time required to his two grocery stores, and a few years ago he disposed of them. Previous to that, however, he had established the Missouri Carriage and Wagon works at 308-10 Broadway, which he still operates.

For many years he has been buying property and erecting modern flats thereon. He does not build flats to sell, but he keeps them for what they bring in. When Admiral boulevard was cut through at Virginia avenue, Justice Ross owned a big row of old flats immediately in the right of way. They are brick and their moving back was the biggest job of that kind ever done in this city. He made them modern and is erecting more flats near them.

The prettiest and most costly structure erected by Justice Ross is a flat building at Benton boulevard and St. John avenue, on a promontory overlooking the entire city. He owns forty or more pieces of improved property in the city.

In the fall of 1898 Michael Ross ran for justice of the peace on the Democratic ticket and was elected. Since then he has held the office for three terms, twelve years, winning each time with ease. He said last night, however, that he would not seek the office again. He intends to build a big home in the southern part of the city and he and Mrs. Ross will devote their time to their children. He now lives at 626 Troost avenue.

"John Mahoney almost decided to go to Jacksonville, Fla., with our party," said the Justice. "The ground was frozen and he could not work. But he was such a home-loving man he hated to leave his family, even for a day. I had a premonition when I left that something would happen. When I got the wire the first thing I thought of was his automobile. We did not get the particulars, however, until we got a paper at Memphis, and did not get full particulars and learn that McGuire was killed and the others hurt until we got The Journal at Paola, Kas.

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January 25, 1910

JIM CROW CARS
PLAN REVIVED.

ALDERMEN SHY AT ORDINANCE
AND SPECIAL COMMITTEE
IS APPOINTED.

Success in Southern Cities
and Negroes Approve,
Mr. Logan Said.

When an ordinance was introduced in the upper house of the council last night by Alderman J. E. Logan, making it obligatory on the Metropolitan Street Railway Company to operate cars for negro passengers, or to designate a part of the car for their use if they are to be carried with whites, there was a perceptible dodging of the aldermen to assume responsibility for having a hand in the legislation.

"I'd like to have the ordinance go to the streets, alleys and grades committee," proposed Alderman Logan.

"The streets, alleys and grades committee has all it can attend to now," replied Alderman Wirthman.

"Public improvements committee," suggested somebody.

"That's no place for such an ordinance," pleaded Alderman Baylis Steele. "It should go to the sanitary committee."

DODGING GETS LIVELY.

"The judiciary committee should pass on it," recommended Alderman W. C. Culbertson.

"Alderman Logan is chairman of that committee and he doesn't want it," volunteered Alderman W. A. Bunker.

The dodging began to get livelier.

"How would you like to have me appointed to a special committee, Alderman Logan?" interrogated President R. L. Gregory.

"That would suit me."

"Would you ask that I be put in the committee?"

"Yes, sir."

Gregory took an inventory of the aldermen.

"How do you stand on this proposition?" Gregory asked of Culbertson.

"As I have said before, it looks like a trouble-maker, but," Culbertson was saying when Gregory interrupted.

FAVORS ORDINANCE.

"You have killed yourself," he said, "and I appoint Alderman Thompson, Republican, and Alderman O'Malley, Democrat, and myself on that committee. I'm for the ordinance heart and soul. I think negroes and whites riding on street cars should be separated."

"I'd like to be excused from serving on the committee. I surrender to Alderman Logan," said Alderman Thompson.

"You don't want to serve?"

"No, sir."

"Well, I would like to have a Republican on the committee. How about you, Alderman Bunker?"

"I'm much obliged, but you'll have to excuse me," spoke up Bunker.

"How about you Alderman Tilhoff?"

"What is it you want to know?" innocently asked the alderman.

"We are going to put the negro where he belongs," answered Gregory.

TILHOFF UNWILLING.

"No, I do not wish to serve on the committee," promptly interposed Tillhoff.

"I'll put you on the committee, alderman," addressed Gregory to Alderman Logan. "I had hopes that we should make the committee non-partisan, but I can't get a Republican to serve, so, therefore, I'll draft Alderman Thompson on the committee." Thompson smiled, and did not object to being drafted.

The ordinance was drafted by Walter M. Lampkin, an associate city counselor. He explained its provisions, providing for separate cars for negroes, designation for them in the car if they ride with whites and placing authority in the conductor to seat passengers to fit conditions.

"Suppose passengers will have to stand. How about that?" asked Alderman Culbertson.

TO HAVE MORE CARS.

"That won't happen. We're going to have more cars," replied Counselor Lampkin.

"What's a passenger to do that wants to go forward to the lobby to smoke?"

"I had expected such questions, but I am not prepared to answer them."

"Have you prepared separate straps for negroes and whites?"

Lampkin appeared confused, and Alderman Logan came to his rescue.

"This is no joking matter," said Logan. "No political or racial prejudices should obtain. It is simply intended to facilitate the convenience and comfort of travel in the street cars. It is a success in Atlanta, Birmingham, Jacksonville, Mobile and other Southern cities. Whites as well as negroes vote it a welcome convenience, and if the ordinance is enforced negroes will be grateful recipients.

KANSAS CITY DIFFERENT.

"The purport of the ordinance is the greatest good to the greatest numbers. they have no such law in Northern cities as they they have not the preponderance of negro population that Kansas City has."

Alderman Isaac Taylor asked Counselor Lampkin if the city had a legal right to pass such an ordinance when there is no similar law in force in the state.

Mr. Lampkin answered that his first impression was that the city did not have the right, but upon consulting authorities he found that the city, under the laws of police powers, has the right. He cited the Florida supreme court as giving the cities of that state the authority, under police powers, to enact laws similar to the one proposed for Kansas City, and said that the supreme court of Massachusetts had ruled that school directors could segregate white and negro children attending public schools.

"I can see where good results would obtain by the enforcement of such an ordinance, but it looks like a trouble breeder to me," observed Alderman Culbertson.

LIKE SOUTHERN LAWS.

The ordinance is patterned after the law in force in Southern cities, and provides a fine of $25 for a person refusing to take a seat assigned him by the conductor or after refusal to leave the car for non-compliance of the rule. The company is subject to a fine of $500 if it fails to operate the separate cars, or comply with the required designation.

Should the ordinance become a law the New Orleans plan will be followed. The conductor will designate the seats in accordance with the prevailing conditions. It is proposed to have negroes occupy the front part of the car. Seats for their use will be appropriate labeled, and they must occupy no others. When their allotment of seats becomes filled, and standing in the aisles is necessary, they must keep within the limits of these seats. They must not seat themselves in seats reserved for whites, and any violation of this rule will necessitate the immediate retirement of the offender from the car or his arrest and punishment by a fine of $25 in the municipal court. The same rule applies to whites occupying reservations for negroes.

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January 20, 1910

TWO SERGEANTS STEP UP.

Commissions as Lieutenants for
James and Anderson.

The first promotion of any moment to be made by the present police board took place nar the close of the meeting yesterday when Sergeants Robert E. L. James and Frank H. Anderson, who have given the better parts of their lives to the service, were made lieutenants. Anderson is said to be a Republican and James is a Democrat. Neither man got much encouragement from former boards though their records are both clean.

Anderson, now assigned to desk work at No. 3 station on the Southwest boulevard, went on the force November 9, 1889. On account of his intelligence and adaptability for the work he was assigned for m any eyars to duty in the city clerk's office where he served papers in condemnation suits and did clerical work. On January 9, 1907, while H. M. Beardsley was mayor, Anderson was made a sergeant by a Democratic board. His promtion is said to have been due to former Mayor Beardsley's efforts.

Lieutenant James went on the department as a probationary officer July 22, 1889, a few months before Lieutenant Anderson. As a patrolman James has walked every beat in Kansas City. On July 22, 1902, he was promoted to sergeant.

James early showed particular efficiency in handling large crowds. While outside sergeant at No. 2 station in the West Bottoms during the destructive flood of June, 1903, James distinguished himself.

Last July, when still a sergeant, James was assigned by the police board to Convention hall as instructor in the matter of police duty. This pertained to the old men, already on the force as well as new recruits. In all 241 policemen were instructed in groups of from twenty-five to seventy and their instruction lasted from seventy-two to ninety hours per group. Lieutenant James also had charge of the initial opening of Electric park a few years ago. For two weeks he has had charge of the desk at No. 7 station in Sheffield. Lieutenant James was born at Tipton, Cooper county, Mo., October 17, 1867. His father, Dr. P. T. James, was assistant surgeon general to General Sterling Price of the Confederate army. Some time after the war the family moved to Holden, Mo.. Lieutenant James is married and has four children. He is a brother of Dr. Samuel C. James, a member of the general hospital staff of visiting surgeons and physicians.

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January 16, 1910

MAYOR CRITTENDEN
NOT A CANDIDATE.

Makes Formal Statement
That He Will Not Accept
a Renomination.

"I shall not be a candidate for mayor." -- Mayor Crittenden.

This terse and positive statement, stripped of all provisos and conditions, was made yesterday by Mayor T. T. Crittenden.

"I have made up my mind and there is no changing it," he told Alderman James Pendergast, with whom he had a conference. Alderman Pendergast labored long and unsuccessfully in an effort to get the mayor to reconsider his attitude. The same declaration had gone to J. B. Shannon and other leaders of the Democratic party a few days ago and the mayor turned a deaf ear to their pleading to again be a candidate. Men representing civic and commercial bodies also petitioned the mayor to withhold his letter of declination until February 1, but he kindly yet with much emphasis said there was no use.

"I shall not be a candidate for mayor," he repeated and thereupon dictated the following statement:

THE MAYOR SAYS NO.

"No, I shall not be a candidate for mayor. I would not accept the office if it were tendered me without opposition. It is a distinguished honor and should be passed around, and then I can no longer afford to remain away from my business. I have given the city two of the best years of my life. I have worked ceaselessly day and night for the people of Kansas City, at a great financial sacrifice to myself. I have done my duty as I have served without prejudice or favor.

"I did not seek the nomination and only accepted it at the solicitation of friends. When I entered upon my high duties I was ambitious to keep faith with my pledges and make a fight for the upbuilding of Kansas City, and today I can look the world in the face and say that I have kept the faith and fought the fight. No man can truthfully say that I have violated a single political pledge and the work I have accomplished will speak for itself."

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January 16, 1910

KYLE RENTS HEADQUARTERS.

Candidate Will Erect Electric Sign
at Eighth and Walnut.

The Kyle canvass for mayor promises to take on a spectacular hue. The entire second floor of the Gumbel building, Eighth and Walnut streets, has been leased as campaign headquarters and they will be opened Wednesday night with music, song and oratory.

An immense electric sign of red, white and blue lights, having in the center a profile of Judge Kyle, is to be strung across Walnut street. Beneath the picture of the candidate will be the words, "The Man of the People -- Harry G. Kyle, Republican Candidate for Mayor."

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January 3, 1910

DID NUDE VISITOR
BECOME SENATOR?

KANSAS CITY DETECTIVE TELLS
OF EDITOR-POLITICIAN'S
HUNT FOR CRIME.

Covered With Mud, He Broke
Into Station, but Later
Showed Big Roll.
Detective Joe Halvey Narrates a Tale.
HALVEY SMOKES UP.

Murder was in the air in the detective bureau rooms of Central police station -- murder, along with other things, particularly tobacco smoke. This is said to be the atmosphere of a police secret service department the world over.

It is stronger when there is a story telling contest on and the sweating of a murder suspect in an adjoining room. Detective Joe Halvey had elected to while away the time until the end of the secret conference. His audience consisted of newspaper men, Inspector of Detectives Edward Boyle and Detectives Robert Truman and Dave Oldham.

"It was a late spring night three years ago," said Detective Halvey. "One of those chilly early mornings when reporters love to sit about the 'phone in the lobby and call up instead of going out after their stories," he added, with a ponderous wink.

A SCRIPTURAL WIND.

"It was a very cold night and a wind like the one spoken of in the scriptures was blowing down Missouri avenue."

"What kind of a thing was that scriptural wind?" inquired the reporter.

"I don't see why you intellectual cubs never seem to have had a religious bringing up," scornfully broke in Inspector Boyle, who prides himself in having maintained a Bible in his home since his marriage twenty years ago. "I think it is in Psalms where a March wind is spoken of that blows the straw hat wherever it listeth while many a good man and strong sweareth thereat."

The silence which followed the inspector's quotation was profound. The narrator took advantage of the lull.

"Well, it was getting along toward the second owl car. Michael O'Brien had just brought in a 'drunk' and booked him under the charge of investigation and Pat O'Brien and I were toasting our shins by a warm fire in this same office. I remember every detail, you see, just as though it was yesterday.

YELL AND A SOB.

"Suddenly there came from somewhere on Fifth street near the Helping Hand institute, a blood curdling yell ending in a sort of a sob, as though some man was being choked.

"There were twelve good men in different parts of the station, wherever there was a heating stove, and all jumped at once. There had been a good many holdups during the winter months and of course the first thing we thought was that some villain had made a touch under the eaves of the station. We were not going to stand for that, no sir-e-e-e.

"I was about the first of the officers to reach the big folding doors in the north end of the station. My six shooter was in my hand and there was blood in my eye, I can tell you. If there was something going on I wasn't bound to let the blue uniformed mutts with the brass buttons do the pinch act to the discredit of the detective department.

"Just as I had reached the last step the doors flew open in my face. There was just enough time for action and no time for thought. A lean white streak had started to unwind itself up the stairway when I dropped on it like a thousand bricks.

NAKED, SHIVERING MAN.

" 'Look out below!' I yelled, grabbing it by the neck and bearing it to the linoleum. Then I made a careful analysis. what I was holding was a naked man shivering with the cold and dirtier than any tramp from having been dragged in the mud. 'Great thunder,' said I, 'this must be Adam returned to look after his Eden interests. Who are you, anyway?'


THOUGHT IT WAS ADAM.

"It didn't take much tugging and hauling after I got up off of him to get him in front of the desk sergeant and it took still less time for the entire force to see that he was in the last stages of destitution. He didn't have a finger ring left and his clothing was mud.

" 'What's your name?' the sergeant asked.

" 'You can put me down John Smith,' said 'Adam' with a groan. 'I ain't got any other name, for political reasons. Gentlemen, what I want is clothes, clothes, clothes.'

CLOTHES OBTAINED.

"The nude wonder somehow looked respectable and we could see that he was right about what he wanted. Half a dozen of us took him into the sink room and gave him a bath, while the rest of the shortstops went in search of clothes. He was not a very tall man and very slim, while the officers we had to draw from were all big, so when we got done with dressing him he looked like a Populist of the short grass country the year of the drought.

"I can't help but laugh when I think of him sitting there in the detectives' room with the waist band of the sergeant's extra trousers drawn up under his arm and his feet in shoes the size of four-dollar dictionaries.


LOOKED BETTER CLOTHED.

"But for all his togs he couldn't help but look respectable. Every time he opened his mouth he emitted an idea by the double handful, which was strange considering his appearance when we first saw him. He was no ordinary man, that was a cinch. He was a genius.

ASKS FOR REPORTERS.

"About the time we were settling back into the humdrum of waiting until morning the unknown quantity took a hitch on himself and asked: 'Where are the reporters? Seems like there ought to be one or more around. It isn't time for the second mail edition yet.'

"We told him there was a little reporter named Billings in the room allowed for the use of newspaper men and that he was probably at that moment writing a story of how a naked, insane man had broken into the police station with the intent to murder the captain.

" 'I'll risk it,' he said with a laugh, 'send him to me.'

"We sent for Billings and it was evident that the two would be kindred spirits. The very first thing the stranger said to the reporter was what he refused to tell the sergeant, and that was how he had come to be naked. We had set him down to be a sort of a crank with spells of lucidness who had undressed and run into the station on a bet, but now we knew better.

HELD UP AND ROBBED.

" 'I was held up and robbed because I got into bad company trying to have a good time when I ought to have been decent,' he told Billings. 'I am sure none of this I tell you will get into the papers because I am a fellow newspaper man.

" 'Now what I want is clothes. I haven't got a cent but plenty of credit. I can get $10,000 anywhere when the banks open. I want you to strike some second-hand clothing store where the proprietor sleeps in the rear and get me a complete suit. I'll pay you when pay day comes.'

"Billings did not answer at once, and we could see he was studying hard. He had the money, for it was Saturday, the day he got paid, but he appeared not to like the idea of lending so much on such a short acquaintance. Finally an idea seemed to come to him. He looked sharply at the stranger and asked rather quick: 'What's thirty?' Now 'thirty' is a newspaper term that few people understand, but this one answered in a second, grinning from ear to ear: 'It means to chuck work and go home,' he answered.

REPORTER BUYS SUIT.

"Well, sir, the reporter did just as he said and got a whole outfit for $14.50 and the stranger left at daybreak telling us all to stick around until he could get another and better rig and return.

"In three or four hours he was back. He had on a brand new suit of the best ready-made clothes in town, patent leather shoes and a plug hat. Also he had a roll of $100 bills so large that they wouldn't go into his inside coat pocket without a special effort. He was showing us that he had the credit he had boasted about.

"This time when we saw him he was feeling better toward the world and would talk more about himself, but he wouldn't tell his name, although I have since suspected the reporter knew it. He told us, though, that he was a prominent Missouri editor with aspirations to the United States senate.

"He had been in politics for years with his paper and never wanted anything so bad as that Senate plum. His platform from the start, he said, had been the cleaning up of the state morally.

WANTED TO FIND TRUTH.

" 'I have preached against immorality so much," he explained, 'that I just had to get out and find the truth about the other side. If my political enemies get hold of last night's caper it will be my undoing.'

"After he had gone the reporter looked at me and said: 'Well, we have promised never to mention this and it is safe, I guess. But my! what a story it would be for some newspapers I know.'

"The reporter is out of town now. By the way, Billings wasn't his name, either. I wonder which United States senatorial candidate that was?"

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December 31, 1909

SILVER CITY TO
BECOME A WARD.

ARGENTINE TO BE MERGED INTO
KANSAS CITY, KAS.,
TOMORROW.

Population 7,000; Its Debts Assumed
and Assets Absorbed -- Will Soon
Have Gas Supply.

At 12 o'clock, noon, tomorrow, Argentine, the Silver City, of which great things were expected in the early '80s, will merge its identity into that of Kansas City, Kas. This additional territory will be known as the Seventh ward and will be represented in the Kansas City, Kas., council by two councilmen to be appointed by Mayor U. S. Guyer. By the annexation of Argentine and the extension of its city limits Kansas City, Kas., will have graduated into the class of metropolitan cities. It is estimated that the additional territory will increase the total population of Kansas City, Kas., to something in excess of 135,000. Steps have already been taken by the city authorities to assume active charge of the former city's affairs. Two police sergeants and eight patrolmen will afford police protection for the new ward.

Argentine was organized as a city of the third class in 1881. The city covers an area of six square miles and has a population of 7,000. It is on the south of the Kaw river and just south and west of the Sixth ward of Kansas City, Kas. The majority of Argentine's residents are hard working, industrious home owners. The city has a bonded debt of about $126,000, in addition to special improvement bonds to the amount of $70,000 and school bonds for a like amount.

There is also $60,000 in outstanding warrants. The consolidated city assumes all these debts. While the new territory is in debt to no inconsiderable amount, there are many advantages to be gained by its annexation. Argentine has two miles of bitulithic pavements and also two miles of macadam paving. In addition to this there are about fifteen miles of paved sidewalks. A fire wagon and a team of good horses, also 3,000 feet of new hose, are among the assets.

HAS FINE SCHOOL EQUIPMENT.

Many commendable things can be said concerning the system of schools in the new ward. There is a high school recently completed and five ward schools averaging eight rooms each. The teachers in these schools will be continued in their respective positions by the Kansas City, Kas., board of education.

Among the industries in the newly acquired territory are the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroad shops, the Kansas City Structural Steel Works, the Santa Fe Car Iceing Company and the United Zinc and Chemical Company. Of these the Santa Fe employs the larger per cent of the people of the city. Two of the largest grain elevators in the state are located at the Argentine terminals of the Santa Fe, one with a capacity of 1,000,000 bushels and the other, one-half that size.

COULD NOT GET GAS.

One of the urgent reasons for annexation from the Argentine standpoint was the inability of the people of that city to obtain natural gas. This condition of affairs will be remedied by the merger. The Wyandotte Gas Company will extend its mains to the new ward.

C. W. Green, the last mayor of Argentine, during his four terms in office had much to do with the progressing of public improvements.

As to just what the effect of the Annexation will be on the complexion of politics is problematical. Persons in a position to know declare that the Democrats and Republicans are about evenly divided.

At a special meeting last night of the Kansas City, Kas., council the Democratic members refused to confirm the appointment of C. W. Green and J. W. Leidburg as councilmen for the new ward. Mr. Green is at the present time mayor of Argentine and Mr. Leidburg is a councilman in that city.

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December 1, 1909

FATHER DALTON ON FRANCHISE.

To Beat It a Public Calamity, He
Declares.

"I am for the extension of the Metropolitan street railway franchise. It would be a public calamity to have it beaten," said Father W. J. Dalton, pastor of the Church of the Annunciation, yesterday.

"Many opinions have been advanced why the franchise should pass, but none has appealed so strongly to me as the appeal of the banking institutions of the city. They represent the heart throbs of the commercialism and progressiveness of Kansas City. How any man can in the face of this common sense presentiment of the issue vote against it is a mystery to me.

"If Kansas City is to grow, it must have adequate street car and transportation facilities. The Metropolitan has been one of the greatest factors in the development of the city. It has spent its millions in paving the way for the great city we have, and it will spend millions more in the development of a greater and more powerful Kansas City if it is but given the chance."

Father Dalton is one of the oldest clergymen in the city, and has always been known as a public spirited citizen, actively identified with every movement for the good of Kansas City.

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November 29, 1909

"JOE" SHANNON IS HELD UP.

Lawyer-Politician, Robbed of $48
and Watch in Home Ward, Saves
$250 by Clever Trick.

Joseph B. Shannon, lawyer and politician, was held up about 2:30 o'clock Sunday morning on Fifteenth street between Holmes and Charlotte streets, in his home ward, by three young men who wore dark clothing and stiff hats, and had handkerchiefs tied over their faces.

Mr. Shannon was relieved of $48 in money and a gold watch and would have suffered a heavier loss had it not been for his presence of mind. When he first realized that he was about to become a victim of hold-up men he took a roll of bills containing $250 out of his pocket and dropped it on the pavement. The $48 and his watch remained in his pocket, and of course became the property of the highwaymen.

Mr. Shannon says that one of the robbers "covered" him with a gun while the other two searched him and after taking what valuables they could find they fled down an adjacent alley. Later Mr. Shannon returned to the scene of the robbery and recovered the $250 he had dropped.

He immediately reported the matter to the police, who are trying to locate the perpetrators.

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November 29, 1909

ITALIANS FAVOR FRANCHISE.

Canvasser Says He Did Not Hear
Any Talk of Money Being Used.

Edward B. O'Dowd, 2404 Paseo, an insurance agent with offices in 501 Kemper building, is one of the legally appointed canvassers for the board of election commissioners in obtaining names of voters disfranchised by change of residence. It so happened that he and his colleague have just finished some of the precincts in the Seventh ward.

"When canvassers were appointed," said Mr. O'Dowd last night, "all were instructed that they were named for the sole purpose of finding out who had moved away. Under no circumstances were we to attempt to get the sentiment of the voters. A. C. Perkins, my colleague, and I have obeyed this instruction to the letter.

"Most of our work has been down in what is known as 'Little Italy,' " continued Mr. O'Dowd. "While neither of us asked for an expression of opinion many of the men volunteered their sentiments on the Metropolitan franchise question and without doubt the most of them appear to be in favor of it. During all of the canvass I never heard even the mention of money being used to buy votes in 'Little Italy" and, if it is such common talk down there some of 'the more ignorant sort,' as the Star calls these working men, certainly would have expressed themselves while we were making the rounds. while many were free to give expressions of favor of the four-cent fare franchise, as it appeared to appeal to them most, not one as much as suggested that money was being used."

Mr. O'Dowd said that the story printed in the Star is not true. The Star story was that "canvassers were told in 'Little Italy' that many of the Italian voters of the more ignorant sort are expecting to be well paid for their votes. One Italian leader said: 'Money will do most anything. It will carry this ward for the franchise.' "

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November 10, 1909

SUFFRAGETTES GO TOO FAR.

Scottish Woman Visitor Has No Sym-
pathy for Militant Sister.

Mrs. George Romanes, wife of the distinguished Scottish scientist, who spent yesterday in Kansas City on her way to Salt Lake City, is not a suffragette. She has come to America at the special invitation of the Episcopal church to deliver lectures in different cities.

"I am not a suffragette," said Mrs. Romanes. "Of course, I have no particular antipathy to a woman's right to vote, but our women have carried the thing to the extreme. I'm not in the least in sympathy with them."

The party took a trip over the boulevards yesterday morning in a motor car and were thoroughly delighted.

"The prettiest drives that I've seen in America," declared Mrs. Romanes.

She is accompanied by F. J. Romanes, a son, who recently graduated from Oxford and Miss Helen Watkins of London. The party left last night for Lawrence, where Mrs. Romanes lectured and the son is a guest of several friends who are attending the university of Kansas.

Young Romanes has decided to spend about two years in America and probably will teach in some Episcopal college.

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November 3, 1909

INDEPENDENCE VOTED BONDS.

$30,000 Will Be Expended in Build-
ing City Hall.

At the special election held in Independence yesterday for the purpose of voting to increase the bonded indebtedness to the extent of $30,000 for the purpose of erecting a city hall, the bonds carried by a majority of 456, leaving a few votes to spare, a two-third majority being required. The council met last night, canvassed the vote and decided at once to have plans and specifications drawn for the new building.

The building likely will be erected on South Main street, just across from the Masonic building. The city has secured an option on this property, which will cost $10,000, leaving $20,000 to be expended for the new structure.

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October 30, 1909

CLEAN POLITICS SAFE
IN WOMAN'S HANDS.

MORE CAPABLE TO VOTE THAN
THE AVERAGE MAN.

Ten Years to See Nation-Wide Equal
Sufferage Says Mayor Critten-
den to Woman's Ath-
letic Club.

"I believe the average woman is more capable of clean, honest politics than the average man, and should vote on all local issues. The matter of keeping a city's life clean physically and morally should be entrusted to a woman's hands. It is my firm conviction that within the next ten years this country will have woman suffrage from one end to the other."

These were some of the remarks of Mayor Crittenden before the regular business meeting of the Kansas City Women's Athletic club, in the gymnasium at 1013 Grand avenue, yesterday afternoon. The speech was made on the invitation of Mrs. S. E. Stranathan, president of the club.

"I know that a great many women, as well as the majority of men, are against a suffrage movement or any other movement which would lead the gentler sex into the ungentle game of politics. It has been customary for men to assume that a woman could never understand the tariff; that the value of ship subsidies and river navigation would floor her, and that she is far too impulsive to be of value as a factor in our national government.

"These great issues, however, are not necessarily local. It might take time for the average matron or maid to grasp their details, but give them a few years of experience in town and city or perhaps state politics and it is my opinion that their vote would be as honest and as intelligent as any deposited in the box election day.

"There was a time when I did not believe in women voting, but that was before I held public office and dealt with committees of both sexes."

About seventy-five women, members of the club, heard Mayor Crittenden's remarks and applauded him at his conclusion.

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October 16, 1909

REED ENTERS RACE
TO SUCCEED WARNER.

FORMER MAYOR ASPIRES TO BE
UNITED STATES SENATOR.

His Candidacy the Result of Con-
ferences Held Here Last Week
Between Local and Out-
side Party Leaders.

Among the Democrats of Kansas City, Jackson county and portions of the state it was given out yesterday that James A. Reed has entered the race for United States senator to succeed Major William Warner.

The close political and personal friends of Mr. Reed last night confirmed the report that he is a candidate and added that his candidacy is the result of several conferences held in this city during the week with representative Democrats of Jackson county and throughout the state.

"All of Mr. Reed's old friends and many new ones were present at these conferences, and they all promised support and encouragement to his cause," said a well known politician.

"Mr. Reed goes into the fight in much better shape than he was in when he sought the governorship against Joseph W. Folk. Then he had a divided Democracy against him in his own county, but now he starts out on his senatorial canvass with every element of Jackson county Democracy at his back. Delegates from throughout the state that came to the conferences and which resulted in Mr. Reed coming out full fledged for senator, stated that the report is being circulated over the state that he has built up a large law practice and does not want to be senator. While it is true that Mr. Reed has a big practice it is of that kind and character that will not suffer by his becoming senator. The out-of-town supporters of Mr. Reed were authorized to make such a statement and to add emphasis among their constituency that Mr. Reed is an aspirant for the high honor."

Mr. Reed was prosecuting attorney of Jackson county when in response to the demands of the Democrats of Jackson county he resigned to accept the nomination for mayor. He was elected by the biggest majority ever given a candidate for that office and two years later again succeeded himself. Were it not that he entered the race for governor he could have had a third nomination for mayor. Two years ago he was solicited to run for congress but declined on account of his law practice.

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September 14, 1909

'CAP' PHELAN, SOLDIER
OF FORTUNE, IS DEAD.

NAME GRAVEN IN WAR HIS-
TORY AS BLOCKADE RUNNER.

Staunch Irish-American Patriot
Mixed in Many Attempts to Free
Ireland -- Stabbed for Expos-
ing Clan ne Gael Plot.
Captain Thomas Phelan, Soldiler of Fortune.
CAPTAIN THOMAS PHELAN.

The death of Captain Thomas Phelan, Irish-American patriot and soldier of fortune, which occurred at 2:30 o'clock last Saturday afternoon, in Bremerton, Wash., ended a life full of romance and a checkered career in war and politics. Early in life he was bitten with the wanderlust, and during the early 60s and 70s helped to make history, not only in America, but in Canada and Ireland. Captain Phelan was 76 years old and leaves a widow and four children.

Being a native of Ireland, Captain Phelan throughout his life and did all in his power to bring freedom to Erin. He was born near the town of Tipperary and came to America about 1857, locating at Independence, Mo. He married Miss Alice Cox of that city.

During the early part of Captain Phelan's life he was embroiled in many attempts to free his native country from the yoke of England. Shortly after his marriage in Independence he enlisted as a volunteer in the Seventh Missouri regiment of the Union army and fought with that regiment throughout the war. He rose from the ranks to a captain. He was in many of the important battles.

NAME IN WAR HISTORY.

One of his daring acts committed during the progress of the war was at the siege of Vicksburg. It was necessary to take a steamboat loaded with cotton and other products, and munitions of war, down the river and Captain Phelan was delegated to run the blockade.

Transferring bales of hay for cotton around the edge of the boat he succeeded in getting safely through the lines. His name appears in Civil war history as that of the man responsible for breaking the blockade.

In the late 60's he gained fame and notoriety by engaging in the Fenian raid from the United States into Canada in a futile attempt to occupy Canada and make it a base of supplies from which to carry on warfare with England for the freedom of Ireland.

The Irish in America congregated about Ridgeway, Canada, for the purpose of an uprising and gaining a stronghold in the Canadian country. Some 1,400 Irish left the United States for this purpose, but boats on the waterways cut off a portion, and they failed to land in Canada. A battle in which many persons were killed on both sides was fought by the Irishmen against the Queen's Own regiment.

While making a visit to his home country, Captain Phelan learned that the Clan na Gael was planning to blow up an English ship named the Queen. Although against England, Captain Phelan did not believe in destroying innocent passengers, and therefore notified the English ship people. In some manner his part became public, and O'Donovan Rossa, editor of the Irishman of New York, attacked his loyalty in the paper.

STABBED THIRTEEN TIMES.

The incident occurred during the term as mayor here of Lee Talbot. Captain Phelan was called to New York to be given an opportunity to explain matters relative to his informing the British of the intended blowing up of the Queen.

Close friendship had before existed between Rossa and Phelan, and the latter did not realize that he was to be the victim of a trap. He went to New York and entered Rossa's office. While there an endeavor to assassinate him was made by an Irishman living in the East. Captain Phelan was stabbed thirteen times and received a broken arm in the attack. He was confined in a hospital in New York for many months on account of his injuries. The news that he gave the information to the English leaked out through a story of the plot printed in Kansas City and written by Frank P. Clarke, a former newspaper man, now living here.

Between the years of 1882 and 1888 Captain Phelan was superintendent of the Kansas City workhouse. He was greatly interested in politics and was a staunch Republican all of his life. When the criminal court was instituted in Jackson county he was appointed clerk of the court and was the first to fill this position. Under Mayor John Moore he served as superintendent of public works. While Colonel R. T. Van Horn was a member of Congress Captain Phelan received the appointment of captain of police of Washington, D. C.

CHALLENGED COUNT ESTERHAZY.

After the civil war he organized Company D of the Third Regiment and was a captain in the regiment for many years. Later he organized Battery B. For the last seven years he had been in charge of a navy yard at Bremerton, Wash., where ships of the United States are repaired. He was holding this position when he died. Captain Phelan belonged to the G. A. R., but was not a member of any other organization.

Captain Phelen also figured very prominently in a duel which was never pulled off. The participants were to have been a Captain McCafferty and Captain Phelan. Rifles were the weapons chosen, and seconds and grounds had been picked when friends interfered.

At one time a number of Irish left America to aid Ireland, whose sons were to rise against England upon a certain day. Chester, England, was the place of the rendezvous for the Irish-Americans. Arms had been secured for their use.

The English troops, however, got wind of the threatened uprising and were sent out in such large forces that the Irish were overawed. The difficulty between Captains McCafferty and Phelan arose out of the means to be used at this time in trying to free Ireland.

Captain Phelan's family resides at 3205 Washington street. Dr. Y. J. Acton of Bremerton notified the family of the death. The body was buried yesterday afternoon in the Soldiers and Sailors' cemetery at Bremerton, Wash., by Captain Phelan's special request.

For many years Captain Phelan traveled over the country giving exhibitions of shooting and fencing. He was a crack shot with pistols and rifles, and was a famous swordsman.

Captain Phelan, while the Dreyfus affair in France was at its height, challenged Count Esterhazy, accuser of Dreyfus, to a duel with swords, to be fought anywhere in the world.

Besides his widow, Mrs. John Young and Miss Annie Phelan, daughters, and two sons, Robert Phelan, a police detective, and Thomas Phelan, survive.

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September 10, 1909

NEW DEPOT WINS
BY BIG MAJORITY.

OF 26,368 VOTES CAST ONLY 700
WERE AGAINST.

Kansas City declared in favor of progress at the special election yesterday to decide whether or not the voters favored a new $30,000,000 Union station near Twenty-third street and the Belt Line, and freight and passenger terminals which form a part of the plan.

The vote in favor of progress was almost unanimous. The total vote in the fourteen wards of the city and in the newly added precincts caused by the recent extension of the city limits shows in a general way a uniform expression of opinion by the voters.

The main proposition voted upon was that granting the Kansas City Terminal Company, which is to build the new Union station and terminals, a franchise for 200 years. It was necessary to put this before the voters owing to the state constitution limiting franchises to thirty years. The vote on this was 25,668 in favor of the proposition and 700 against it.

Two other propositions were offered the voters. The most important of these to the people of the entire city was that amending the charter so that the park board would be empowered to sell to the Terminal company certain lands needed for the widening and improvements on the present tracks on the Belt Line. The vote on this proposition was 24,644 for and 639 against.

The third proposition concerned the proposed change of grand of three streets crossing the present Belt line. It will be necessary, in building the passenger and freight tracks of the terminal company, to depress the grades of three crossings, so as to allow vehicle and foot traffic under the railroad tracks. As property owners concerned presented a majority remonstrance, the new city charter provided that the voters should pass upon the proposed plan.

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September 9, 1909

GET IN LINE EARLY AND
VOTE "YES."

Vote Today.
KANSAS CITY UNION STATION SPECIAL ELECTION TODAY.

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August 20, 1909

PEOPLE DEMAND MORE MUSIC.

Alderman Lapp Bears a Message to
Mayor From Constituents.

"The people out my way in the Seventh ward are demanding two more weeks of music in the parks," said Alderman J. G. Lapp to Mayor Crittenden yesterday.

"And I am happily in accord with the people not only of the Seventh ward, but in every ward of the city on the band proposition," replied the mayor, "but it is a question of finances. I am not fishing for a deficit in the treasury, and I know the good people of the city are of a like opinion. If I could have my way about it $10,000 would be appropriated ever year for music in the parks, but there are so many things that the city must look after we have to nurse and be careful of the revenues.

"I'm sure if you would use your influence with Gus Pearson, city comptroller, he would dig up the money from somewhere. Two more weeks of band music would cost only $1,026," urged Lapp.

"All right," promised the mayor, "I will see what I can do with the comptroller in the morning. I'm for music in the parks so long as the weather will permit."

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August 17, 1909

"BAD" MAN BUSINESS
DOESN'T PAY, SAYS COLE.

Former Bandit Tells Politicians It's
Best to Walk the Straight and
Narrow Path.

Less than 5,000 people attended the Lone Jack picnic yesterday, which is a considerable crowd to gather up in the farthest corner of Jackson county, but nothing to the crowds which have gone there in days of yore. On the speakers' list were Congressman Borland, Representative Holcomb, former County Judge George Dodd and Cole Younger. Ex-Criminal Judge W. H. Wallace started for the picnic, going past F. M. Lowe's house in his automobile and inviting that congressional candidate to go with him, but something must have happened for there was no Judge Wallace at the Lone Jack all day. Sam Boyer, county clerk, was the only Republican official who reported, but there was a herd of Democratic officials. Circut Judge E. E. Porterfiled and Thomas J. Seehorn, both of them with records of never having missed the August pilgrimage, were given ovations. the speeches were tame, Cole Younger's being the possible exception. The well known old guerrilla has a lecture he reads, which is a little classic. It is moral in that there is not a cent nor a good night's sleep in being a "bad" man, and the only people who think there is are those who do not know the man who was "bad," while they who do know him always remind him that he was off the reservation once and cannot get all the way back on.

The weather was torrid, hundreds of buggies stopping short of the destination. Automobiles which carried the Kansas City contingent passed derelicts at almost every shade tree on the way. It was 100 in the shade but nobody on the way to the picnic had any shade to get under.

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August 16, 1909

HUGH C. WARD DIES
IN NEW YORK CITY.

APOPLEXY FOLLOWED HEAT
PROSTRATION A MONTH AGO.

Mrs. Ward and Judge PHilips at His
Bedside -- With Family Was
Spending Summer at Bass
Rooks Point, Mass.
The Late Hugh C. Ward, Prominent Kansas City Attorney.
HUGH C. WARD.

Hugh C. Ward, one of the most prominent attorneys of Kansas City, and a member of a pioneer family of Western Missouri, died from a stroke of apoplexy in New York yesterday morning.

An attack of heat prostration which he suffered in Chicago a month ago was one of the causes which led up to the death of Mr. Ward. He had never fully recovered from this attack, although his condition had improved sufficiently to permit him to continue his journey to New York, accompanied by his wife. With Mr. Ward at his death were Mrs. Ward, Judge John F. Philips and several relatives.


WESTERN TRIP FATAL.

Mr. Ward had taken a cottage for the summer at Bass Rocks Point, near Gloucester, Mass., and he left for that place in June with Mrs. Ward and their four children. Business matters required the presence of Mr. Ward in Kansas City and he came home for a few days in July. He left again for his summer home on July 13, but became ill as a result of becoming overheated in Chicago.

Mrs. Ward was called to his bedside by telegraph, and after a week his physician pronounced him able to travel. Mrs. Ward and her mother, Mrs. J. C. James, started for the East with Mr. Ward, but it was found necessary to make a stop in New York where Mr. Ward was taken to a hospital and given the attention of some of the best specialists of the city.


SUDDEN CHANGE FOR THE WORSE.

His improvement was slow, but a telegram from Mrs. Ward to her father, J. C. James, on Tuesday announced that he was much better. A sudden change occurred, however, and at 4 o'clock Saturday afternoon Mr. James received a message that Mr. Ward had grown much worse. Mr. James left at once for New York.

The announcement of the death of Mr. Ward came in a telegram from L. T. James, Mrs. Ward's uncle, who landed in New York yesterday morning from a European trip.

The funeral services and interment will occur in Kansas City, the details for these to be arranged as soon as Mr. James reaches New york.

In addition to his wife and the children, Hugh Campbell, Jr., James Crawford, Francis and John Harris, Mr. Ward is survived by his mother, the widow of Seth E. Ward, and his brother, John E. Ward.


LEGISLATION AND POLITICS.

Hugh C. Ward was born March 10, 1864 at Westport. His parents were Seth and Mary Frances Ward. Hugh was reared on the farm and received his elementary education at a private school in Westport and his collegiate education at William Jewell Collete, Liberty, Mo., and at Harvard University. He was graduated with honors from Harvard, a bachelor of arts, in 1886. He then entered the St. Louis Law School and in June, 1888, received his diploma. He then was admitted to the bar in Kansas City.

In recognition of his ability as a lawyer came in 1894 his appointment as receiver for the John J. Mastin & Co., banking business, on dissolution of partnership. The property involved consisted mostly of real estate, and amounted to more than $3,000,000.

Aside from his profession Mr. Ward was known in business circles as a director of the National Bank of Commerce, Commerce Trust Company, Kansas City Railway and Light Company, and of the Kansas City Home Telephone Company.

He was long influential in Democratic circles, and in 1892 was elected to the state legislature where he did much work in connection with constructive measures.

In case preparation Mr. Ward was known as thorough and exhaustive, and in presentation before a judge or jury clear and vigorous in expression, and intensely earnest.

As a politician he was equally successful and well known. In the legislature in 1892 besides being made vice chairman of the judiciary committee, he was appointed chairman of the committtee on conditional amendments.

In 1898 he was appoointed police commissioner by Governor Stephens, who also made Mr. Ward a member of his staff, and placed in his hands the organization of the Missouri National Guard. He resigned as police commissionier and retired from politics in 1902.

SOCIAL AND PERSONAL SIDE.

Mr. Ward was a member of the Society of Colonial Wars, deriving his eligibility through the lineal descent from Seth Ward, a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses. H e was also a member of the Elks lodge, the Country Club, the Commercial Club, the Harvard Club of the Southwest and the American Bar Association.

Mr. Ward was married October 26, 1898, to Miss Vassie James, a graduate of Vassar college and a daughter of J. Crawford James.

One of Mr. Ward's last acts was to give $25,000 to the Young Women's Christian Association of Kansas City.

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August 13, 1909

JAMES MORAN SHOT
BY JACK O'DONNELL.

POLITICS SAID TO HAVE CAUSED
THE QUARREL.

After Shooting, O'Donnell Disap-
peared, but Later Surrendered
to Police -- Moran Not Dan-
gerously Wounded.

Enmity said to have grown out of a factional fight in the Democratic party in the Second ward last night culminated in a quarrel between Jack O'Donnell, a cigarmaker, who lives at the Century hotel, and James Moran, formerly proprietor of a saloon in the Washington hotel, in which Moran was shot in the neck and painfully injured by O'Donnell. The shooting occurred in the Century hotel about 8:30 o'clock.

Moran with several friends was standing at the bar in the hotel saloon when O'Donnell and Joseph Donnegan, manager of the Century theater, entered the place.

Moran and O'Donnell began quarreling and Harry Friedburg, who was with the Moran party, endeavored to quiet them. He told O'Donnell that there would be trouble if he stayed int he saloon and that it was best that he leave. O'Donnell went into the lobby of the hotel and was followed by Moran, who again started to upbraid O'Donnell. According to witnesses Moran threatened O'Donnell.

BULLET LODGED IN NECK.

"I'll just get you before you have a chance to do anything to me," is the reply credited to O'Donnell, who drew a revolver and fired at Moran, who had turned and was running from the lobby. As Moran dodged into the bargershop from the lobby, O'Donnell, who was following, fired a second and third time. One bullet struck the fleeing man in the back between the shoulders and ranged upwards and to the left, lodgining in the neck. One bullet lodged in the wall and the third went through the door.

Moran ran out of the barger shop and fell on the sidewalk in front. He was carried into the hotel and Dr. J. D. Griffith was summoned. O'Donnell was caught by Friedberg and John Campbell. A police ambulance with Dr. H. T. Morton from the emergency hospital removed the injured man to St. Joseph's hospital. H is wound is not dangerous and he will be out of the hospital in a few days.

COULDN'T LOCATE O'DONNELL.

The police were notified but when they arrived on the scene O'Donnell had disappeared and they were unable to locate him. Inspector of Detectives E. P. Doyle detailed Detectives Kinney and Jennings on the case. After going to the hotel the men went to the hospital to see Moran, who refused to tell anyone who s hot him. The detectives telephoned the inspector that they could not find O'Donnell, but that Joseph Donnegan informed them that O'Donnell would give himself up the first thing int he morning.

Another officer was informed that O'Donnell was in the Century hotel and would give himself up in the morning. His reason for delaying was said to be because Captain Walter Whitsett disliked him and would place him in the holdover without a chance of securing bond. When Captain Whitsett heard that O'Donnell was at the hotel he instructed Lieutenant M. E. Ryan to send Sergeant Robert Greely to arrest him.

FOLLOWED ANOTHER FIGHT.

The quarrel last night followed one in the afternoon during which O'Donnell struck Moran in the mouth and further bruised the ex-saloonkeeper. This fight occurred in Wisman's saloon, Twelfth and Oak streets. Bert Striegel, a deputy constable named Caulfield, Joseph Donnegan and Moran were in the saloon when Jack O'Donnell came in. The men had a drink together and then Moran, it is claimed,, accused O'Donnell of throwing down politically Michael O'Hearn. Other charges were made by Moran and finally, it is said, he called Edward O'Donnell, a policeman and brother of Jack, a name which Jack resented. The men engaged in a fight. Wisman separated them and put the crowd out, as he said he would not allow a fight in his place.

SURRENDERED TO POLICE.

It was midnight before the police could locate O'Donnell and then he voluntarily gave himself up. He rode by himself in a carriage to police headquarters and surrendered to Lieutenant M. E. Ryan. He was not asked about the shooting by the officers in charge and was placed in the matron's room. He did not mention the shooting nor offer any explanation for it.

The trouble between the men, it is alleged, grew out of the fact that O'Donnell and Donnegan were out of the town on the last election day and Moran and his friends accused the two of being faithless to O'Hearn. The breach between the men was widened more by O'Donnell's brother arresting a barber on election day.

The shooting scrape of last night is not the first in which O'Donnell has figured. He was shot in the back by J. D. Cosby, proprietor of the Cosby hotel, following a fight in the hotel. At the same time J. P. Hayes, who was with O'Donnell, was shot twice in the back. The shooting was in February, 1908.

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July 31, 1909

CORNELIUS MURPHY
SUCCEEDS O'HEARN.

MAYOR CRITTENDEN NAMES
NEW SUPERINTENDENT.

Confirmation at the Hands of the
Upper House of the Council
Is Expected Monday
Night.
Cornelius Murphy, New Workhouse Superintendent.
CORNELIUS MURPHY.
Appointed Superintendent of the Workhouse to Succeed Patrick O'Hearn.

Cornelius Murphy was yesterday appointed superintendent of the workhouse by Mayor Crittenden to succeed Patrick O'Hearn, whose resignation has been demanded and accepted. Mr. Murphy will have to be confirmed by the upper house of the council, and it is thought that this will be done at the meeting Monday night.

Mr. Murphy is a man of good judgment, a fine disciplinarian and thoroughly understands the handling and treatment of prisoners of the stripe that are confined in the workhouse," was the statement given out by the mayor.

For fifty-two years Mr. Murphy has been a resident of Kansas City and during that time has been active in Democratic politics. In the earlier days he was identified with the Marcy K. Brown wing of the party, and later when "the rabbits," under the generalship of J. B. Shannon, put Brown off the political map Murphy cast his lot with the Shannon bunch. He is a brother of Daniel Murphy, a former presiding judge of the county court.

During his political career Mr. Murphy served two terms as county marshal, was superintendent of mails when George M. Shelley was postmaster and for two years was inspector of detectives while Colonel L. E. Irwin was chief of police. In recent years Mr. Murphy has been conducting a livery and sales stable.

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July 27, 1909

HELPED MAKE HISTORY
IN KANSAS CITY KAS.

BYRON JUDD, RESIDENT SINCE
1857, IS DEAD.

Held Many Positions of Trust and
equipped First Horse Car Line
in the City -- Was 85
Years Old.

In the death last night of Byron Judd, a pioneer resident of Kansas City, Kas., the city was deprived of perhaps its most widely known and lovable characters. He was a man of rare ability, and was noted for his keen, incisive mind. Every enterprise of worth which marked the early transition of a straggling Indian village into the metropolis of the state is closely interwoven with the name and personality of Byron Judd. Although his advanced age of late years prevented his active participation in the affairs of the city, his mind retained the vigor of youth and his counsel upon questions of moment was highly valued and eagerly sought.

ANCESTORS IN MAYFLOWER.

Byron Judd was born August 13, 1824, at Otis , Berkshire county, Mass. His parents were farmers and pointed with pride that their ancestry could be clearly traced to the landing of the Mayflower. He received his education at the state normal and at Southwick academy. As a young man in his ho me town he held many minor offices, among which were school commissioner, township assessor and selectman.

In 1855 he left his native state and journeyed westward to Iowa, being made deputy land recorder at Des Moines, a position he held until his removal in 1857 to Kansas City, Kas., or, as it was then known, Wyandotte. In 1869 he was elected a member of the board of aldermen of the city. In 1863 he was elected county treasurer of Wyandotte county. He was married in 1865 to Mrs. Mary Louise Bartlett.

During the early days of Wyandotte he engaged in the banking and land business which he carried on for many years, having been the first land agent in the city. He was president of the council in 1868 and was elected mayor in 1869. This administration was remarkable for the spirit of enterprise displayed and was in fact the beginning of that civic pride which has since characterized the city.

EQUIPPED FIRST HORSE CAR.

Mr. Judd was made United States commissioner in 1870. In 1871 he organized the First National bank of that city and served as president and cashier of the institution. He remained a director in the bank for many years. In connection with W. P. Overton and Luther Wood he went to St. Louis and purchased the material and equipment for the first horse car line in the city.

He was elected state senator in 1872 and served in that capacity until 1876. Although a staunch Democrat, he was not in sympathy with the border warfare and many of the outrages committed during that period were fearlessly denounced by him.

His is survived by his only daughter, Mrs. Sarah Judd Greenman, public librarian of Kansas City, Kas.

Funeral arrangements have not been made.

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