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January 24, 1910

BOY ACCIDENTALLY
KILLS STEPSISTER.

Carries Dying Child Into House
and Runs Mile and a Half
for a Doctor.

Sobbing with grief and carrying in his arms the unconscious form of Elizabeth Baumgarten, his little sister, who was bleeding form a bullet hole in her forehead, Willam Mudder, 16 years old, staggered into the home of his stepfather, Marten Baumgarten, Kansas City, Kas., yesterday afternoon.

Baumgarten, a carpenter, sat by the side of his wife, who is confined to her bed with a 2-weeks-old baby by her side in the bedroom of their little home. A number of old acquaintances were also in the room. It was while they were talking and laughing the boy entered with his burden.

"I didn't mean to do it papa," he shrieked. He hurriedly explained that he had shot the little girl accidentally with a .22-caliber target rifle. Bolting from the room, the boy ran a mile and a half to the office of Dr. David W. Thompson at Nineteenth street and Quindaro boulevard.

"Doctor, I shot my little sister accidentally, and I want you to come to her quick," he shouted as he entered the doctor's office.

Dr. Thompson hurried with the boy to the home. The bullet had entered the middle of the child's forehead and lodged near the base of the brain. She died about twenty minutes after the doctor arrived. Dr. Thompson notified Dr. J. A. Davis, coroner of Wyandotte county, who decided that an autopsy would be unnecessary.

The Mudder lad works during the week for his aunt, Mrs. John Smith, who runs a grocery at Twenty-seventh street and Bell avenue in Kansas City, Mo. He went home yesterday and began a romp with his four brothers and three stepsisters. He took a little target rifle belonging to the step father and, calling the children, started out in the back yard to shoot at a mark. All seven of the children walked down the back stairs from the porch. Elizabeth, 4 years old, was the last. Just as she reached the bottom step, by some unknown means which the lad himself cannot explain, the gun was discharged, the bullet entering the little girl's forehead.

Mrs. Baumgarten was prostrated over the little girl's death. The father, too, was grief-stricken. The Mudder boy was affected more than either. He could not be comforted and paced the rooms of the house back and forth. Dr. Thompson said last night that the boy was nearly crazed when he came to his office.

Martin Baumgarten, the boy's stepfather, said last night that William was absolutely blameless. "I am confident that the shooting was purely accidental," he said. "The boy loved his little stepsister just the same as if she had been his own sister. It was just one of those unfortunate, unavoidable accidents.

Funeral services for the little girl will be held tomorrow morning at the Church of the Blessed Sacramet in Chelsea place. Burial will be in St. John's cemetery.

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December 26, 1909

"BURGLAR" SAVED
AS POLICE COME.

Guest Mistaken by Roomers
for Robber, Imprisoned
in Guarded Closet.

"Come to 912 East Ninth street immediately," came a call late last night to police headquarters. "We've got a burglar locked in a closet."

The patrol wagon made a record run, but when it arrived only a crowd of badly frightened men and women roomers were found. There was no burglar.

"It was just one of the roomers," explained one of the crowd. "A man came out here tonight to visit a friend. He stepped out into the hall to look for a water cooler. The man had been drinking, and in his wandering through the dark halls stepped by mistake into a closet. A roomer, seeing the prowler, slipped up behind him and slammed the closet door."

The cry of "burglars" aroused the roomers. While the men rushed about in search of lodge swords and the women went for hat pins, one of the roomers stood guard with a revolver.

"Come out and I'll shoot," warned the guard in night robe, peering around his fortification, a chimney.

The prisoner took a drink. His courage restored, he shouted, "Help," thinking that he himself was the one being held up.

SOLID PHALANX.

The cohorts of the besiegers were now ranged in solid phalanx in front of the closet. There were all sort and manner of weapons. The men felt the edges of their lodge swords, and the women jabbed at supposed burglars, their forms outlined on the wall. The man with the revolver formed the advance line of attack. The rear was brought up by a boarder with a battle ax, used at a masquerade ball in the '60s.

"Help, burglars," came more audibly from the closet.

The friend in a nearby room was attracted by the noise. He came to the hall armed with a .44, not knowing that his guest was in trouble. He lined up behind the rear guard.

"Help, I'm suffocating," came another cry from the closet, this time more insistent and appealing.

GUARD CALLED OFF.

The roomer recognized the voice as that of his guest. The guard of nightie-clad roomers was called off. The guest with the jag was released.

A clanging of bells was heard in the front of the house. A squad of blue-coats came rushing in at the front door.

"Saved," cried the joyful man, emerging from his prison, mopping his brow.

"Stung," answered the chorus of nighties.

The police returned to headquarters empty-handed.

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December 18, 1909

DIDN'T DANCE FAST ENOUGH.

So Man With Revolver Shot Robert
Kimme Through Ankle.

According to a statement made by Robert Kimme, of 912 Bellefontaine avenue, as he lay on the operating table of the emergency hospital last night with his right foot shattered from a revolver bullet, there is an armed maniac roaming the down town district of Kansas City.

Kimme was found lying in an alley near Eighth and McGee streets by Patrolman J. Keenan. He declared that he was taking a short cut downtown from his home when a man armed with a revolver walked up to him and commanded him to dance. Kimme attempted to do so, but his efforts failed to please his captor, who shot him through the right ankle.

After receiving emergency treatment Kimme was taken to the general hospital.

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December 11, 1909

DENIED ENTRANCE, HE SHOOTS.

Man Claiming to Be Policeman
Wanted to Search House, Escapes.

When William Peterson, 9 East Seventh street, answered a knock at his door last night he was confronted by a man announcing himself a policeman and demanding the privilege of searching the house. Peterson asked for credentials and when they were not forthcoming he denied the man entrance.

At that juncture the alleged policeman drew a revolver and fired, two bullets piercing Peterson's right thigh and another shattering the thumb on the right hand. The assailant then fled. While making an effort to run on a slippery pavement he was seen by William Jones, proprietor of a rooming house across the street, to fall down and roll in the slush. He has not been arrested. Peterson was taken to the emergency hospital and treated.

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December 10, 1909

HUNDREDS AT SCENE
OF ROSEDALE KILLING.

DEPUTY'S MURDERER HAD BEEN
DRINKING AND DANGEROUS.

Compelled Two Men at Point of Re-
volver to Imbibe, Then Carry
Suit Case of Ammunition --
No Funeral Arrangements.

Hundreds of persons yesterday afternoon in Rosedale went over the route of the running fight of Wednesday night which resulted in the murder of C. Q. Lukens, a Wyandotte county deputy sheriff, and the subsequent killing of Charles T. Galloway, the slayer. The home of M. E. Patterson, 3129 Bell street, Kansas City, Mo., where the besieged man was finally captured after a desperate battle with Missouri and Kansas officers, came in for a good share of attention.

In the investigation yesterday circumstances came to light which, had they been known at the time by Lukens, probably would have prevented the double killing. From many sources it was found that Galloway had been drinking heavily preceding the shooting, and was in a dangerous mood during the day. He had made numerous attempts to find his wife, Mrs. Anna Galloway, with the avowed intention of taking her life. At the point of a revolver he forced W. E. Tompkins and James Creason to drink with him and later to assist in carrying a suitcase full of ammunition.

ENTERED THE LAWYER'S HOME.

About 6 o'clock Wednesday morning he entered the home of Rush L. Fisette, the attorney who had brought divorce proceedings on behalf of Mrs. Galloway. the half crazed man insisted on searching every room in the house in the hopes of finding his wife. He left without causing any trouble, but with threats that he would kill his wife. It was Mr. Fisette who notified the sheriff's office in Kansas City, Kas.

Mrs. Galloway was prostrated yesterday by the events of the night before. The story of her fourteen years of married life included threats by her husband, who beat her and drove her from the house. Always following a hard drinking spell the man became half crazed and in this condition seized a gun or any weapon and attacked his wife. At other times he spoke in the most endearing terms to her. Mrs. Galloway remained yesterday at the home of her sister, Mrs. James L. Connor, 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale.

LUKENS WELL LIKED.

In Kansas City, Kas., and Argentine, where Lukens had been known for years, the man was respected and liked. At the home of his widowed mother in Argentine the aged woman refused to be comforted.

The body of Lukens had been removed to Simmons's undertaking rooms in Argentine. Funeral arrangements have not been completed. Charles Quincy Lukens was a member of the Brother hood of Railway Trainmen in Argentine and also was a member of Aerie No. 87, Fraternal Order of Eagles, in Kansas City, Kas.

POST-MORTEM EXAMINATION.

A post-mortem examination of the body of Galloway, conducted by Coroner Harry Czarlinsky yesterday morning at the Carroll-Davidson undertaking rooms, showed that the bullet entered his right side and taking a downward course pierced the liver and passed out the left side. A coroner's inquest will be held at 10 o'clock Monday morning.

In a letter received by Inspector of Detectives Edward P. Boyle yesterday afternoon from Chief of Police Wiley W. Cook of Kansas City, Kas., the chief said:

"Especially do I wish to express my highest commendation of Detectives Ralph Truman and J. W. Wilkens, who at the risk of their lives led the attack that effected Galloway's capture."

WANTED HIM TO DRINK.

W. E. Tompkins, employed at the Gates undertaking establishment in Rosedale and who lives at 505 Southwest boulevard, Rosedale, said he was passing in front of Galloway's home at 428 College avenue shortly after noon on the day of the double tragedy when he was accosted by Galloway and told to hold up his hands. At the same time Galloway pointed two large revolvers in the face of Tompkins and told him to follow him into the house. Tompkins followed.

When they reached the inside of the house James Creason, an electrician who helped Galloway on electrical work, was sitting there. Galloway insisted that Tompkins take a drink from a large quart bottle of whisky.

FEARED FOR HIS LIFE.

"I finally talked him out of that," Tompkins said, "but during the two hours he kept Creason and me imprisoned in the house Galloway drank at least three-fourths of the quart of whisky. He sowed us a Winchester shotgun and a Winchester rifle and a suitcase full of ammunition. He said to us: 'Do you know what I am going to do with these,' and when we answered negatively he said he was going to 'raise hell tonight.'

"We pleaded with him to let us go, as I was afraid every minute that he would get wild and kill both of us. He finally agreed to let us go if we would carry the guns and ammunition down to Creason's home on Bell street. Creason led two bird dogs and carried the guns, and I carried a heavy coil wire belonging to Galloway, and the suit case fu ll of ammunition. My load got heavy, though, and I left all of the stuff at Young's store at College avenue and Oak street. Creason, I suppose, took his stuff on down to his place, and then Galloway came back up and got what I had left."

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December 9, 1909

TWO KILLED AND
ONE WOUNDED IN
RUNNING BATTLE.

Charles Lukens, Wyandotte County
Deputy Sheriff, Shot Through
Heart by Charles Galloway, Drink
Crazed Rosedale Electrician, He
Tried to Serve With Injunction.

SLAYER HAD THREATENED
WIFE WHO SOUGHT DIVORCE.

After Killing Lukens, Galloway
Carried on a Retreating Fight
With Other Officers Until
Brought to Bay at 3129
Bell Street.

SHOT BY DETECTIVES, DIES
IN EMERGENCY HOSPITAL.

Double Tragedy Direct Result of
Domestic Difficulties of the Gal-
loways -- Wife, Who Sued for Di-
vorce, Feared for Her Life, Which
Husband Had Threatened -- Re-
straining Order Was to Keep Him
From Further Terrorizing Her.
Murderer of Peace Officer, Who Was Slain as He Fled From Posse.
CHARLES T. GALLOWAY.

Two men are dead and another wounded as the result of an attempt by Charles Quincy Lukens, a deputy sheriff of Wyandotte county, Kas., to serve a restraining order upon Charles T. Galloway, a drink crazed electrician of 428 College avenue, Rosedale, Kas., late yesterday evening.

Lukens was shot above the heart and instantly killed during a running fight with Galloway.

Galloway was later brought to bay in a house at 3129 Bell street, and after a desperate resistance was mortally wounded, dying at 11:30 o'clock last night as he was being placed upon the operating table at Emergency hospital.

JUST BACK FROM OKLAHOMA.

Deputy Sheriff Lukens left the Wyandotte county court house yesterday afternoon about 4 o'clock with an order from the district court restraining Galloway from annoying or in any way interfering with his wife, Mrs. Anna Galloway. The Galloways had been having trouble for several months, and November 23 Mrs. Galloway, through her attorney, Rush L. Fizette, 1255 Kansas City avenue, Rosedale, filed a suit for divorce, alleging cruelty, drunkenness and ill-treatment.

Since the filing of the divorce petition Galloway had beaten his wife and threatened her life. She then applied for an order restraining him from bothering her. The order was granted several weeks ago, but Galloway had been in Oklahoma during that time. Yesterday word was received at the sheriff's office that he was in town, and Lukens was sent to serve papers on him.

QUARTER-MILE RUNNING FIGHT.

Mrs. Galloway has been staying for the past few days at the home of her sister, Mrs. J. L. Connor, at 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale. The deputy sheriff and Marshal Drew thought perhaps they might find Galloway hanging around there, as he had visited the Connor home earlier in the day and made demands to see his wife and children.

The officers reached Kansas City avenue and Washington street about 5:30 o'clock, and met Galloway shortly after they stepped off the car. Marshal Drew spoke to Galloway and shook hand with him. Lukens then shook hands with Galloway, and told him that he had some papers to serve.

Almost instantly Galloway drew a revolver and opened fire on the officers, who, unprepared for such an emergency, had to unbutton their overcoats before they could get at their weapons. They at last got hold of their revolvers and opened fire on Galloway. A running fight was kept up for more than a quarter of a mile.

The fleeing man turned into alleys, turning back every few steps to fire upon the pursuing officers. He finally reached Rosedale avenue, and turning south ran toward the tracks of the Frisco railroad. When the officers reached the tracks he turned and fired at Lukens, hitting him directly over the heart.

LUKENS FALLS DEAD.

Lukens staggered, and after grasping a telegraph pole with both hands fell to the ground dead. Galloway then ran south, and after a vain attempt to make his escape on a horse, abandoned the horse, and fled to the woods on the hills around Gray's park.

Officer Drew ran to Lukens's assistance, but finding him dead, started to pursue Galloway. He fired the last shell from his gun, and then finding himself without ammunition sent a boy after some. A large crowd of persons had been attracted by the firing, and a number of them assisted in taking the body of Lukens to a barber shop at Kansas City and Rosedale avenues. The coroner was notified, and he ordered the body taken to the Gates undertaking rooms in Rosedale, where he performed a post mortem. It was found that the bullet had pierced the heart and lungs, and had gone entirely through the body, coming out near the middle of the back.

GALLOWAY BROUGHT TO BAY.

The sheriff's office was notified in Kansas City, Kas., and Under Sheriff Joseph Brady, deputies William McMullen, Clyde Sartin and George Westfall jumped into an automobile, driven by George E. Porter, an undertaker at 1007 North Seventh street and rode at break neck speed to Rosedale. The Kansas City, Kas., police were also notified and Chief W. W. Cook led a large force of uniformed men and detectives to the scene of the murder. The citizens of Rosedale also turned out in large numbers and the hills around Rosedale glittered with the lights as these posses scoured the woods in an effort to find the murderer.

At 9 o'clock last night Galloway was cornered in the home of M. E. Patterson, 3129 Bell street, Kansas City, Mo., which he took possession of forcibly.

Barricading himself in a closet upstairs he held his pursuers at bay for over two hours. A posse consisting of nearly 100 men guarded the house on all sides. the air was tense with tragedy, and the bitter cold of the winter night added to the unpleasantness of the whole affair. Every man knew that a desperate fight was inevitable and that Galloway would have to be taken either dead or helplessly wounded.

MISSOURIAN LEADS CHARGE.

A delay was occasioned by the fact that the Kansas officers were outside of their jurisdiction, and did not feel that they had a right to enter the house, which is built on Missouri soil. Missouri officers were summoned and arrived at about 10 o'clock. The plans were laid and great precaution was taken in every step taken, for the officers realized that they were at a great disadvantage in forcing their way into the house, which they knew held a man who had already killed one officer and who would not hesitate to kill others should they press him too hard.

Finally the attack was planned and at 11:30 o'clock a squad of detectives consisting of Joe Downs, Billy McMullin, Harry Anderson and J. W. Wilkens, the latter a Missouri officer, leading, forced their way into the house, and after cautiously searching all the downstairs rooms without finding Galloway, rushed up the narrow stairs to the second floor.

When the officers reached the second floor a volley of shots rang out. Another volley followed. Breaking glass and a great commotion could be heard in the street below.

LAST WORD FOR HIS WIFE.

Then a husky voice was heard to shout:

"We got him."

In entering a dining room the officers were reminded of the presence of Galloway by three shots fired in rapid succession. The officers responded with a dozen shots and bullets went whizzing in every direction, embedding themselves in the walls. One bullet passed through the sleeve of Detective Wilkens's overcoat and lodged in the thumb on the left hand of Harry Anderson, a Kansas City, Kas., detective.

Within a twinkling a bullet entered the abdomen of Galloway and he fell to the floor, rolling into a dark kitchen adjoining the dining room. Writhing in his great pain, the man rolled frantically about the floor.

"Oh my dear wife, my own wife, my darling wife," he moaned time and again. Then he pleaded for ice water, clutching his parched throat madly.

An ambulance was called and Galloway was taken to emergency hospital, where he died just as they were lifting him to the operating table.

ANOTHER WOMAN'S LETTER.

Drs. Harry T. Morton and C. A. Pond, who were in attendance, pronounced death due to a wound from several buckshot that had entered the left side of the abdomen and after penetrating the intestines came out of the right side.

His pockets were searched while on the operating table. The contents consisted of a pocket-book containing $55 in cash, a gold watch and chain, a pack of business cards, several boxes of revolver cartridges, a bank book on the Fort Worth, Tex., State bank, and a letter.

The letter, which was written in lead pencil, was so blood soaked that it was barely legible. As far as it could be deciphered it ran as follows:

"Dear Friend -- I hear that you are getting a divorce from Mrs. G. ----- she is selling all your things and ---- I don't see where Mrs. G. or the boys is at. They act disgraceful, never coming home. --- Good luck, your loving Nan."

Lukens, whom Galloway shot down, was one of his best friends and so was Marshal Billy Drew, whom he fired at time and again in an effort to kill.

ASKS FOR FOOD.

The house where the shooting occurred is a two-story frame structure containing four apartments. The front apartment is occupied by Cecil Patterson and his family, and the rear apartment of four rooms by J. E. Creason, his wife and their little daughter.

"It was about 8 o'clock when Galloway came to the house," said Mr. Creason. "He was greatly excited and told me he had been in a shooting scrape and had shot a man. He said that they, meaning the officers, were after him and he did not know what to do. I told him that the best thing for him to do was surrender. He said: 'No, I'm not ready yet.'


Mr. and Mrs. Creason, Who Fed Galloway and Tried to Persuade Him to Surrender.
MR. AND MRS. J. E. CREASON,
In Whose Home Galloway Took Forcible Possession and Held Out Against a Posse Until Forced to Run for His Life When a Bullet Ended His Career

" 'Give me something to eat first and I will think about it,' he said. I have known Galloway for several years and worked for him at my trade as an electrician. He had always been a good friend and I saw no wrong in giving him something to eat and told my wife to fix him something. She fried some chops and potatoes and made some coffee for him. He tried to eat, but he was nervous and he could hardly swallow.

THE POSSE COMES.

"All this time my wife and I tried to find out just who he had shot and what the shooting was about, but he would put us off with the one answer, 'I will tell you when I am ready.' After supper he sat in a corner and seemed to be in a deep study. He paid no attention to our little girl, who seemed to annoy him by her childish prattle.

"I did not know what to do, so thought I would take a walk in the fresh air. I had hardly gotten 100 feet from the house when I met some people from Rosedale. They told me that Galloway had killed the undersheriff and that they were after him. I told them that he was in my house, but warned them not to go after him, as I feared he might use one of the weapons he had there. I told the crowd that I would endeavor to get him to surrender. I went back to the house. Galloway was still sitting in the corner, but jumped up w hen I came into the room.

" 'They know where you are,' I told him. 'Why don't you surrender?' 'I am not ready yet,' he said. I could get nothing more from him. Half an hour later some of the officers came into the ho use. I went downstairs and told them that Galloway was upstairs, but that he was armed and that it would be dangerous for them to go up there at that time. My family was up there, too, and I did not want my wife or daughter to be shot in case Galloway or the officers started shooting.

REFUSES TO SURRENDER.

This turned the posse back for a while and I made another effort to get Galloway to surrender. He still refused and I called to my wife and daughter and we went to the front of the house in Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Patterson's rooms. We left the gas burning in the dining room and the hall. The bedroom, in the closet in which Galloway took refuge, opened from the dining room by big folding doors as you see. The gas mantle on this lamp was broken and it was not lighted. We all remained in the front room until the posse called to us to come out of the house. As we went out I again told Galloway to surrender; that the house was surrounded and he could not get away, or if he did that he would have to jump to the house next door and climb down the side of the house.

" 'I am not ready yet,' were the last words he said to me. I felt as if the officers would not take Galloway alive and I feared that several might be killed. I was so nervous I did know what I was doing or saying. All I thought of was to prevent any more bloodshed.

"After we left the house we went into Griffin's home next door. We had hardly gotten inside when the shooting began. I put my fingers to my ears so that I would not hear the shots.

SURE HE WAS CRAZY.

"Galloway must have been out of his mind. He could have escaped from the house several times after he knew that the officers had him spotted and he could have held that staircase with his guns against 100 policemen. Why he refused to surrender and then retreated into the clothes closet where he was caught like a rat in a trap can only be explained by my opinion that he was crazy.

"Galloway brought the rifle and the shot gun over to the ho use this afternoon. He also brought a suitcase full of ammunition. This was before he did the shooting. He told us that he was going hunting and he wanted to leave his guns at our house. We had no objections to this as we had always been the best of friends. After we left the house he must have taken his rifle and gone into the closet. He left his shotgun in a corner in the kitchen."

THREATENED TO KILL WIFE FOR YEARS.

Mrs. Anna Galloway, wife of Charles Galloway, has been living with her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Connor, at their home, 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale, ever since she instituted divorce proceedings against her husband. For over forty-eight hours she has been a prisoner in that home, fearing even to step out, lest Galloway be near, ready to fire at her, as he had repeatedly threatened to do.

When seen last night after the killing of Deputy Sheriff Lukens, she was nearly in a state of nervous prostration. She had witnessed the start of the tragic escapade from a window in her room . She saw the officer attempt to serve papers on her husband. She heard the ensuing shots and then fell in a swoon.

"Oh, I knew it would come to this terrible end -- I knew it, I knew it," she moaned, as she paced nervously up and down the floor. "Charlie has had murder in his heart for thirteen years and I have always realized that it would only be a matter of time until the impulse would control him. He wasn't sane; he couldn't have been.

"Five times since Priests of Pallas week he has threatened to kill me, and from one day to another I never knew if I would see daylight again. Today some stranger 'phoned from a saloon to be extremely careful, as he had heard Charlie say that this would be the last day I could live. Marshal Drew remained with me to protect me and he has been in our house here all day.

"The first time Mr. Galloway ever threatened me was thirteen years ago. I should have left him then, but I thought he would get over his insane notions and I wanted to make a success of our married life if at all possible. He did reform and was better to me for some time, but when our two children, Harvey and Walter, were old enough to run around a great deal he began abusing me terribly and many times told me he would kill me. He became a harder drinker every year and would get in such a condition that no one could manage him at all.

"Many times as he choked me, and more than once has the end seemed so near that I could not possibly escape, but God has been with me for my children's sake I guess."

VICTIM WELL KNOWN IN WYANDOTTE.

Charles Quincy Lukens was 33 years old. He lived with his widowed mother, Mrs. Sarah Lukens, 336 Harrison street, Argentine. He was unmarried. He was appointed deputy sheriff by Sheriff Al Becker about one year ago. Before his appointment Lukens was constable and later marshal of Argentine for several terms. He had also served on the Argentine fire department. "Charley" Lukens was known by everyone in Argentine, both old and young, and also had a wide acquaintance thorugout the county. He was regarded as a very efficient officer, and had a reputation for fearlessness.

Besidses his mother he is survived by four sisters and four brothers. The sisters are: Mrs. Lydia Jones of Girard, Kas., Mrs. Beulah Robinson of 1108 East Twenty-fourth street, Kansas City, Mo., Mrs. C. A. Hare of Faircastle, O., Mrs. Leonard Eshnaur of Terminal Isle, Cal. The brothers are J. R. Lukens of Oklahoma City, Ok., and L. B, J. E., and F. D. Lukens of Argentine.

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November 23, 1909

MIDNIGHT ROBBER
KILLS SALOON MAN.

M. A. SPANGLER MURDERED BE-
HIND HIS OWN BAR.

Drops Dead With Bullet Through
Heart -- Son Shot in Pistol Duel
With His Father's
Slayer.

While trying to grasp the revolver of one of two robbers who "stuck up" his saloon at the northeast corner of Twentieth street and Grand avenue at 12:45 this morning, M. A. Spangler was shot across the bar and instantly killed.

In a pistol duel with his father's murderer, Sam Spangler was shot through both arms.

He believes he shot the robber. The latter and his companion escaped.

The murder and holdup occurred in Spangler's saloon at the northeast corner of Twentieth street and Grand avenue about 12:45.

The Spanglers were getting ready to close the saloon for the night. Sam Spangler had removed the cash from the register and was reading the totals from the detail adder, while the father was writing them on a card.

There were two men in the saloon, Al Ackerman, a friend of the Spangler family, and an old man whose identity is not known. Both were seated at tables in front of the bar.

SHOT THROUGH THE HEART.

At this juncture two men, one short and heavy set and the other tall and thin, entered the saloon. They were roughly dressed, and sauntered up about the middle of the room. The tall man walked as far as the big cannon stove at the rear of the bar, but the short man walked up to a point in front of Spangler.

Whipping out a revolver, the short man flourished it and commanded Ackerman and the old man, "Hands up and line up alongside the bar every one of you."

Ackerman and the old man and young Spangler lifted their hands in a hurry to obey the order. Not so old man Spangler. He had been in the street lunch stand business for years and he was not to be bluffed by the sight of a gun.

"Throw up your hands quick," was the second command, this time directed to Mr. Spangler. The latter evidently had been gauging the distance across the bar. Instead of throwing up his hands he lunged forward, grasping for the revolver. He missed the gun and that instant the robber pulled the trigger.

"Oh!" Spangler cried, and collapsed.

Another shot was fired at him, but it missed. The first one had passed through his heart.

SON TRIED TO AVENGE HIM.

Sam Spangler at the first shot pulled open a drawer in the back bar and grabbed a huge navy revolver. Turning around he faced the robber, and began firing. Both emptied their revolvers, the robber retreating toward the front door as he fired his last shot. Meanwhile the tall, thin robber, who had gotten half way behind the bar, turned and fled toward the rear, when young Spangler started shooting. He escaped through a rear door.

Ackerman, who had been standing near the front of the saloon, ran out of the door at the first shot. When the shooting inside ceased he started back but was met by the robber with the revolver who pressed it against his abdomen.

"Get out of my way before I kill you," cried the robber.

Ackerman got out of the way, and returning to the saloon asked for the big revolver.

Young Spangler put a shell in it by this time and Ackerman started after the robber. He chased him to McGee street and half way down to Twenty-first street pulling the trigger several times on the shell, which proved defective and failed to explode.

When he returned to the saloon, he found Sam Spangler bending over the body of his father. He had been shot in both arms and his blood was mingling with that of his father's.

WHO GOT THE MONEY?

It could not be positively ascertained this morning whether the robber got the money which Spangler had taken from the cash register and placed in a glass. During the excitement it is believed that the money was replaced in the register. This was locked and the keys were taken in charge by the police. The sum is said to have been in the neighborhood of $50.

A riot call was sent to No. 4 police station and a squad of police under Sergeant H. L. Goode drove to the saloon. Young Spangler was taken to the general hospital, where his injuries were dressed.

The body of Mr. Spangler was taken to the Stewart undertaking establishment.

M. A. Spangler was about 50 years old. He lived with his family at No. 1322 1/2 Wyandotte street. He leaves a widow and two sons, Sam and William, both grown. The widow and some relatives are in Glasgow, Mo. A telegram was sent to them immediately after the shooting.

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November 22, 1909

WOUNDED MAN WON'T
TELL WHO SHOT HIM.

HARRY BONNELL MAY CARRY
HIS SECRET TO DEATH.

Revolver Found in Room of Former
Wild West Show Rider; Wom-
an May Prove an Impor-
tant Witness.
Harvey Bonnell, Rooming House Shooting Victim.
HARVEY BONNELL.

Lying on the floor in a dingy rooming house at 509 East Sixth street, with a bullet wound in his breast, Harvey Bonnell was found yesterday afternoon.

Although he knew that he was in a dangerous condition, Bonnell refused to tell how he received the wound. At the general hospital, where he was rushed in the police ambulance, he refused to talk to Norman Woodson, an assistant prosecuting attorney, who attempted to get a dying statement.

"I'm not going to tell how it happened," he declared. "Perhaps I'll die, but I'm not going to give anyone away."

He then turned over and then refused to utter another word.

When the police arrived at the scene Sadie Gear, proprietress of the rooming house, was seen going upstairs. She was agitated and declared that she was not in the room at the time. At police headquarters she maintained the story.

Sergeant Robert Smith sent several officers to the building, where everyone was questioned closely. Mrs. Gear was brought to the station with several roomers.

Patrolman Gurney Shaw, after a long search, found the pistol in a room on the third floor, which was occupied by Lee Rarick, formerly a rough rider with Miller Bros.' Wild West show.


ADMITS HEARING SHOT.

Though Rarick denied at first that he knew anything about the affair, he admitted that he heard a shot, and a few minutes later, Harry Gordon, one of the roomers, had brought the revolver to his room.

Mrs. Sadie Gear.
SADIE GEAR,
Considered an Important Witness by Police.

"I loaned it to Mrs. Gear a week ago," he said. "because I didn't want to keep it up here in my room. I'm sure I don't know who did it.

Gordon would make no statement to the police. Mrs. Gear was in a defiant mood when she faced Captain Whitsett. She asserted that she had frequently quarreled with Bonnell, who abused her.

"But I don't know a thing about the shooting today," she declared, "I got up for a moment and went out and then I heard the shooting. I went upstairs, and then they told me that Bonnell had been shot. Yes, that's the same revolver that was given me to keep by one of my roomers."

Captain Whitsett asserted last night that he expected the mystery would be cleared up quickly.

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October 27, 1909

JAMES M'MAHON
CONFESSES GUILT
OF TRIPLE MURDER.

Declares that He Alone Killed His
Two Sisters and Brother-in-Law,
Alonzo Van Royen, at Their
Home on the Reidy Road.

MURDER OF RELATIVES
PLANNED FOR MONTHS.

Despite James's Exoneration of Pat-
rick McMahon, Both Brothers Are
Arrested and Hurried to Lansing
to Prevent Possible Lynching.

"CRAZY JIM" McMAHON, WHO
CLEARS TRIPLE MURDER MYSTERY.

James McMahon, 35 years old, commonly known to his associates as "Crazy Jim," admitted to County Attorney Joseph Taggart yesterday that on Tuesday, October 19, at the Van Royen farm, five miles west of the Kansas City, Kas., limits in Wyandotte county, he slew his brother-in-law, Alonzo R. Van Royen, and his sisters, Mrs. Margaret Van Royen and Miss Rose McMahon.

Expressing inability to give any reason for his act, McMahon calmly told in minute details the facts in regard to this triple tragedy.

Going to an isolated section of the farm, where Van Royen was chopping wood, McMahon said that he first gave Van Royen a drink of whisky out of a bottle, then, when the latter's back was turned, shot him four times. Assured that the man was dead, he picked up his body, carried it across a small stream and deposited it in a narrow, lonely ravine, which was shadowed by a great oak tree.

Half a mile away was the home of Van Royen, and there, as McMahon knew, were the two women. The murderer proceeded immediately to the Van Royen home, opened the door without knocking and confronted Margaret and Rosie. A quarrel ensued, the nature of which he says he cannot remember.

Within a few minutes he drew the revolver from his pocket, and standing within two feet of Margaret, shot her dead. Turning the weapon on the terror-stricken Rosie, who was a few feet away, he shot her through the heart.

Without stopping, McMahon returned his attention to the prostrate form of Margaret and fired two more bullets into her body. Rosie lay motionless, but to make sure of his work the slayer directed the revolver at her again and shot until it was empty of shells.

Then he reloaded and fired three more bullets into the form of his unmarried sister.

After completing the triple butchery McMahon went to his own home, hitched his horse and drove to Kansas City, Kas. He visited the grocery store of Reitz & Reitz, 1005 Minnesota avenue, paid a bill and returned to the farm. The shooting of Van Royen occurred about 2 o'clock. The murder of the women was accomplished about three-quarters of an hour later.


TOOK RINGS FROM BODY.

Upon his return to the farm McMahon ate supper, and after it was dark he returned to the Van Royen house, carrying a lighted lantern, and by its dim rays inspected the house, taking such valuables as were in sight so as to give the impression that the motive of the murder was robbery.

From the fingers of Margaret McMahon he removed a diamond ring and a wedding ring. Around her neck was a little bag in which she had some little trinkets of value. He removed this, too, and taking his booty, carried it over to his own home and hid it along with the revolver and unused cartridges, in a corn shock about 100 feet from the McMahon house.

For seven days, while the authorities were bending every effort in an endeavor to establish the identity of the murderer, Jim McMahon kept his secret. For seven days he held his head up, talked frequently and freely to officials and reporters and offered no word that would tend to solve the mystery.


TRAPPED INTO CONFESSION.

The stolen property, hidden in the corn shock, was McMahon's undoing.

If McMahon committed the murder the jewelry is hidden about the farm, was the theory upon which Sheriff Becker and his deputies directed their work. That they must find the stolen property and work upon that to force a confession was the decision of the officers.

J. W. Elkins of Beloit, Kas., a friend of McMahon's who is also a friend of the sheriff's was invited into the game of unraveling a mystery. And the plan decided upon and which was successfully executed was for the friend to go to McMahon and inform him that the officers intended to search every part of the premises.

"If these things are hidden here give them to me; let me take them over to my house," was the suggestion offered and McMahon stepped into the trap.

He showed the man the hidden articles and gave them to him. This was a 7 o'clock yesterday forenoon.

Two hours later, after McMahon had ample time to reflect, he went to his man to beg for the return of the evidence, but Elkins was not at home.

After his unsuccessful mission, McMahon drove to the home of his aunt, Mrs. Ellis, and there nervously awaited the fate which he knew was bound to come.


NERVED TO THE CRIME BY WHISKY.

In his confession, James McMahon exonerates his brother, Patrick, who has been under surveillance ever since the tragedy.

"He didn't help me; he knew nothing about it," the murderer insisted, when questioned by the officers. "Nobody knew anything about it; I did it myself; no one advised me, and I don't know why I did it."

"Did you meditate on this crime?" he was asked.

"I've thought of doing it for the last three months. It was in me to do this thing. I knew I would do it."

"Did you ever start to do it before?"

"Yes, several times, but I lost my nerve."

"How did you get your nerve up, finally?"

"Whisky got my nerve up. I had a bottle the day I killed them. I took several drinks out of it. I gave a drink to Lon before I killed him. That nerved me up to it."

"Where did you get the revolver?"

"I bought it about a week before the killing. I told the folks I wanted to practice with it."


NO GRUDGE AGAINST VICTIMS.

"Had you ever quarreled with these people you killed?" McMahon was asked.

"Not to any extent."

"Have any grudge against Lon or your two sisters?"

"No, Lon and I always were friends."

"Can you advance any reason at all for this act?"

"I can not; I was out of my head, I guess."

In a little over an hour the McMahons and Patrick Lamb, an employe at the McMahon farm, were in the county jail, once the officers decided to make the arrest. The officers are confident that Lamb had no connection with the crime, and are holding him only as a witness.

As to Patrick McMahon's status in the case that is a matter that will have to be decided later. Patrick McMahon maintained yesterday that he had no part in the tragedy and knew nothing about it. At the jail James McMahon was the only prisoner subjected to a severe sweating, and the county accepts his statements as true.


AUNT SAYS, "TELL THE TRUTH."

While the inquiry was in progress the outer door of the jail was kept locked and hundreds of persons, apprised of the arrest, stood anxiously about the jail yard and wondered what the termination of the case would be.

During the inquiry Under Sheriff Joseph Brady and Henry T. Zimmer, a deputy sheriff, who had arrested James McMahon, emerged from the jail building and rode north of Seventh street in an automobile. Presently they returned in company with Mrs. Ellis and she was taken into the sheriff's home. The prisoner had asked for her repeatedly and said that his statement would depend upon what she said.

Mrs. Ellis, a nervous wreck as the result of the ordeal to which she had been subjected to for a week, asked McMahon what he wanted her to do. He said he wanted her advice as to what he should say.

"Tell the truth," said Mrs. Ellis.

It was after this that McMahon yielded to the entreaty of the county attorney, and told the story of his crime.

THEIR UNCLE ASTOUNDED.

James Downs, uncle of the McMahon boys, was astounded yesterday when he heard that James McMahon had confessed to the murder.

"I was absolutely confident of their innocence," said Mr. Downs, "and I can give no explanation of it. The boy must be insane."

In regard to a statement that had criticised Sheriff Becker and his deputies for the manner in conducting the inquiry, Mr. Downs said:

"I did not harshly criticise the sheriff and had no intention of doing so. I wanted the boys to talk to him at all times and urged them to tell him everything they knew, to tell the whole truth. I did object to the sheriff and his men harassing the mother, as she is in poor health, and I feared that the examinations, if made before her, might cause serious results."

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October 20, 1909

YELLS SAVE HIS VALUABLES.

Burglar Flees After Commanding
Real Estate Man to Keep Quiet.

A beam of light from an electric torch shining in his eyes awoke E. A. Norris of 3427 Campbell street, real estate dealer and formerly county assessor, from a dreamless sleep early yesterday morning.

Sitting up in bed, Norris looked down the barrel of a big revolver, backed by a rough command to "lay down and keep quiet."

A series of yells on the part of Norris for the police were sucessful in putting the intruder to flight before he had a chance to make away with anything of value.

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September 28, 1909

SHOT A NEIGHBOR, THEN
ACTED GOOD SAMARITAN.

German Woman Gardner Attempted
to Frighten Victor Marten With
Gun That Wasn't Loaded.
Mrs. Mary Wilsdorf, Who Shot Gardener.
MRS. MARY WILSDORF.

After emptying the contents of a shotgun into the left thigh of Victor Marten, a gardener, Mrs. Mary Wilsdorf, 46 years old, wife of a gardener at Seventy-seventh street and Walrond avenue, yesterday afternoon got on a Marlborough street car and came to the city and gave herself up to Chief of Police Frank F. Snow.

Before leaving her home she gave the wounded man a glass of water and left him lying on the ground near her house in charge of her husband, Carl Wilsdorf, who was later arrested by Mounted Patrolman E. B. Chiles.

Mrs. Wildorf and Marten are neighbors, each owning a ten acre tract of land.

From the facts elicited from the woman through Dr. George Ringle, surgeon at the Emergency hospital, who acted as interpreter for the police, the shooting followed a quarrel, about Marten's horses getting into the truck garden of the Wilsdorf's.

She said the horses frequently trampled the vegetables. One of them wandered over from the Marten field yesterday to the Wildorf land and was locked up in the barn.

When Marten went to the Wilsdorf house to get his horse he was asked to pay a small amount of money for alleged damages. A dispute arose and Mrs. Wilsdorf said that Marten held aloft a potato digger and threatened to kill her.

She said she then ran into the house and got her husband's shotgun, and returned to the yard. When within five feet of Marten the gun was discharged and the contents of one barrel entered the left thigh of Marten. He fell to the ground and asked for a drink of water which was given to him by Mrs. Wilsdorf.

Her husband told her she had better go to town and give herself up to the police, which advice she took. when she first entered police headquarters she was a little excited, and, not being able to speak good English, was misunderstood. The patrolman she met believed her to say a man shot her in the leg, so he directed her to the Emergency hospital. At the hospital Dr. Ringle took her in charge, and, learning that she was the person who did the shooting, took her back to the police station. She was turned over to Chief Snow.

Mrs. Wilsdorf informed the police that the man was still lying in the yard at her home and needed medical attention. Dr. George Todd, 4638 Troost avenue, attended to the man's injuries. Dr. Todd called an ambulance from Freeman & Marshall's and had the man taken to the University hospital.

The woman told Captain Whitsett that she had never before handled a shotgun and did not know exactly how to use it. The one she got in the house was broken at the breech and as she was running with it toward Marten she was trying to replace it. Suddenly the gun snapped into place and was discharged. She said she really did not think it was loaded, but was only trying to scare Marten. She was locked up in the matron's room.

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September 25, 1909

CATTLEMAN KILLS
PARTER IN HOTEL.

SEXTON BAR TRAGEDY FOL-
LOWS QUARREL OVER RANCH.

Eugene Hayes of Elgin, Kas., Puts
Three Bullets Into Brain of
Edward Hayes of Paw-
huska, Ok.
Eugene Hayes, Kansas Cattleman Accused of Murder.
EUGENE HAYES.
Kansas Cattleman Who Killed Edward
Hayes, His Partner, in the Barroom
of the Sexton Hotel Last Night.

Following a quarrel concerning the affairs of their 40,000 acre ranch in Osage county, Oklahoma, Eugene Hayes of Elgin, Kas., a cattleman reputed to be worth half a million dollars, shot and killed his partner, Edward Hayes of Pawhuksa, Ok., in the bar of the Hotel Sexton at 7:45 o'clock last night.

Edward Hayes was shot three times, almost in the center of the forehead. He died instantly Eugene Hayes, who is held at police headquarters, says he shot in self defense.

The shooting was witnessed by Edward Lewis, and Lewis Weisenbacher, bartenders; Lee Russell, a millionaire cattleman from Ft. Worth and Lee Rogers, a Kansas City real estate dealer who is an ex-cowman.

L. C. Thompson, another Kansas City real estate man and former cattle raiser, was in the crowd, but says he did not see the shooting.

The five men entered the hotel together about 7:30 o'clock last night, and sat around a table in the front end of the saloon. About fifteen minutes later Eugene and Edward Hayes went to a table in the rear and against the wall opposite the bar.

THREE BULLETS INTO BRAIN.

Before dinner was served they began quarrelling about business affairs, but the conversation was not overheard by anyone unless it was Lee Russell, who is said to have been standing near the small table at which the partners were sitting.

Suddenly Eugene Hayes, who was facing north, leaped from his chair and running around the end of the table began firing. The first shot struck Edward Hayes in the forehead. Two more were effective, almost in the same spot.

Edward Hayes fell back in his chair, dead, and Eugene, taken in charge by a friend, walked towards the front door after placing his pistol, an automatic gun, in his hip pocket. As he rounded the glass screen at the end of the bar Patrolman Arthur Kennard arrested him.

Edward Lewis, the bartender who saw the shooting, said Edward Hayes reached towards his hip pocket first. As he did so, Lewis said, Eugene got up and pulled his pistol, and began firing as he stepped toward Edward. Edward Hayes did not succeed in getting his revolver out of his pocket. The coroner removed it, and took charge of it until an inquest is held. It was a Luger rapid fire gun, the magazine holding seven cartridges.

"I BEAT YOU TO IT."

"I beat you to it," the witness declared Eugene Hayes said as he put away his revolver.

Inspector E. P. Boyle sent Detectives Ralph Trueman and Denver D. Mitchell to the hotel as soon as he was informed of the killing. Detectives Keshlear and McGraw followed.

Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky was notified, and after viewing the body had it removed to Stewart's undertaking rooms, where he performed a post mortem.

Immediately after the shooting the hotel management called Dr. A. L. Porter, who lifted the dead man out of the chair and laid him on the floor.

Eugene Hayes was taken to police headquarters by Patrolman Kennard. He gave the patrolman his pistol while on the street car.

When taken before Lieutenant James Morris to be booked for investigation Hayes was recognized by Patrolman "Jack" McCauley, who asked him what he was arrested for.

"Just killed my partner, Ed Hayes, up at the Sexton hotel.

"What for?" asked Lieutenant Morris.

QUARREL OVER RANCH AFFAIRS.

"Well, he was going to kill me if I didn't. I had to do it. That's all."

To Captain Walter Whitsett, and Norman Woodson, assistant prosecuting attorney, Hayes made no attempt to conceal anything except details of the shooting. He refused to say anything more until he could see John Hayes, former chief of police.

"He's a relative of mine, you know," he kept saying during the conversation. "I'm a ranch owner in Oklahoma," began Hayes. "I'm a pretty well known man, and John Hayes, who was formerly chief of police, is a cousin of mine, and he comes down to the Territory and hunts on my place. This man Ed Hayes is no kin of mine. I simply took him into a partnership wit me and he owes me $5,000. He didn't pay anything into the place.

At police headquarters last night the police took off of Eugene Hayes a diamond ring which is valued at $1,000. Deputy Coroner Czarlinsky took possession of a gold watch, a gold pen, $5.50 in money, and a a revolver taken from Edward Hayes. He wore a Knights of Pythias watch charm.

Ex-Chief John Hayes denied last night that he was any relative of the prisoner. "He is not even distantly related," Hayes said. "I have known him for years and have hunted on his place down in Oklahoma. I don't know why he should claim to be some relative of mine."

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August 27, 1909

DYNAMITE ENOUGH TO
WRECK A SKYSCRAPER.

WHEN ARRESTED MEN HAD
FORTY SIX INCH STICKS.

Joseph Monroe and Edward Sanford
Found in vicinity of New South
Side Apartment House --
Stories Conflict.

In the arrest of two suspicious characters at Thirty-sixth street and Broadway about 10 o'clock last night the police believe they averted what was intended to be by far the biggest, most costly and most destructive job of dynamiting ever pulled off in Kansas City or vicinity.

Shortly after 10 o'clock Patrolman E. C. Krister and D. B. Harrison, plain clothes men working out of the Westport police station, saw two men at the corner of Thirty-sixth street and Broadway. One was lighting a cigarette and the officers noticed a small suit case in the hands of the other. When they began to close up the men began to accelerate their speed and only the command "Halt or we'll shoot," stopped them.

The officers did not know what they had until they got the men to the station house and Lieutenant O. T. Wofford carelessly opened the small, cheap suit case. What he believed to be a wire sticking through a hole in the end of the case attracted his attention. When the package was opened it was found to contain forty six-inch sticks of dynamite. Each was marked 40 per cent nitroglycerin -- Hercules No. 2. The "wire" proved to be a fuse and it was attached to two of the sticks of the explosive, in the center, with a cap imbedded deeply into each stick.

ONE HAD LOADED PISTOL.

The men gave the names of Joseph Monroe and Edward Sanford. The latter had in his possession a 44-caliber Derringer pistol, loaded. Monroe said he was a lineman and Sanford insisted that he was a common laborer.

The stories of the prisoners, who were separated by Lieutenant Wofford and questioned soon after their arrival, differ in many respects as to how they came to be in that neighborhood with such a package. While Lieutenant Wofford was in a room alone with Sanford he turned his head to answer a telephone call. Hearing a noise Wofford looked up and the prisoner had all but reached the club of Sergeant Harry Moulder which hung on an opposite wall. Wofford dropped the telephone and grappled with the man. Sergeant Moulder then entered the room and no further trouble occurred. A door was only a few feet away and had he succeeded in clubbing the lieutenant Sanford could have easily escaped.

When Monroe was questioned he said he, Sanford and a man named Charles Hogan had "bummed" their way from Denver. He claimed they arrived Tuesday morning, while Sanford said Sunday morning. Monroe said that last night he and his partner were walking down Grand avenue when they came upon Hogan at Thirteenth street.

"Do you want to make a piece of money?" Monroe says Hogan asked.

"We told him yes," Monroe went on. "We were both broke, hungry and dry. He then introduced us to a man named Anderson, Charles, I believe he said his first name was. He said he would give us $5 to carry a grip out on the Westport car line. We were to stay on the car until it made the second turn to the left. Then we were to get off and meet Anderson or some man who would be there waiting for us. We got off and had walked down the street a little ways when we were arrested. Anderson said to be careful that there was an explosive in the suitcase . That's all I know and I'm innocent of any wrong."

HOW DYNAMITE WAS TO BE USED.

Sanford, who tried to escape, said they arrived with Hogan two days earlier than Monroe stated.

"We went to the Stag hotel opposite the city hall," he said, "and this morning we met Hogan there. He asked us if we wanted to make a piece of coin and told us to meet him on Grand avenue this evening. He introduced us to Anderson and he was gone a long time after the grip. We met there about 7 o'clock."

"What was the dynamite for?" asked Lieutenant Wofford quickly.

"He said it was to blow up a scab job. No, we were not to do it. That was for the fellow who was to meet us, I guess. Yes, I knew there was an explosive in the grip and I knew I was doing wrong."

Sanford also said, when asked later, that he was to give the derringer to the stranger -- or Anderson -- who was to meet him. Both described the mysterious Anderson after they had been locked up within talking distance as "a man 35 years old, six feet tall, weighing 170 pounds. He wore a black mustache and had black hair and a dark complexion. He was dressed i a dark suite, black derby hat and black shoes."

ENOUGH TO WRECK SKYSCRAPER.

Sergeant Moulder also said he learned from inquiry along Westport avenue, that there had been much talk among the union men about the big apartment being a "scab job," and "a rat job." There appeared to be much discontent on account of the immense job being done by an "open shop," he said he gathered from talks with saloonkeepers.

Experts who were called in to examine the package of dynamite said that, properly placed, there was enough to wreck any skyscraper in the city and damage buildings for blocks around.

After the men were locked up they were in a position to talk to each other. William Hicks, a patrolman, sat near the door and heard Monroe upbraid Sanford for being such a dunce as to get his dates mixed on the time of their arrival here and their final meeting with Hogan and the mysterious Anderson. The men are being held for investigation.

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August 17, 1909

REVOLVER DISPLAYS MISSING.

Wilson Law Gives Pawnbrokers'
Windows New Appearance.

The displays of revolvers in downtown pawnshop windows disappeared yesterday.

The anti-revolver law went into effect Sunday night at midnight. It permits the display of such weapons only inside a store and they must not be visible from the street. A fine of $50 to $500 or imprisonment from one to six months are the penalties. "Gun toting" is made a felony, punishable by two years in prison or fines from $100 to $1,000. The judge of the criminal court and the prosecutor's office intend to enforce both laws vigorously and inquirers yesterday were told to stick closely to the letter of the law.

A question as to how much would be loaned on a standard weapon, put to three brokers , all met with the reply that they were not loaning anything on revolvers now.

"Gun men will have to go to Kansas City, Kas., after this," said one Main street man, who said he was going out of the revolver trade.

"It has not been worth engaging in," said this pawnbroker, "since Judge Hugh Brady began fining men $300 for carrying them. That was the beginning of the end. There was a dragling trade, though, but the new law kills the last possible hope for it to longer continue."

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August 8, 1909

KILLS SISTER-IN-LAW
AND COMMITS SUICIDE.

GRANT SIERS SHOOTS MRS.
MARY SIERS AND HIMSELF.

Jealousy and Continual Quarreling
Alleged Cause -- Negro Witness of
Tragedy Says Woman Also
Used Revolver.

Jealousy and continual quarelling is the alleged cause of the death of Mrs. Mary Siers, 1025 Jefferson street, who was shot and instantly killed yesterday afternoon about 4:45 o'clock by her brother-in-law, Grant Siers, who then turned the pistol upon himself and sent a bullet into his head, dying before anyone reached his side. The only witness to the murder and suicide was Susie Richardson, a negro woman, who lives in a house in the rear of the Siers residence.

Siers had lived at the home of Mrs. Siers for the last two years, after being separated from his wife, who lives in Humeston, Ia. Mrs. Siers' husband is divorced and is an inmate of the Soldiers' home at Leavenworth, Kas. From boarders in the house and Chester Siers, a son of the slayer and suicide, it was learned that the couple quarreled most of the time. Jealousy on the part of both is said to have caused nearly all of the domestic trouble.

ORDERED TO LEAVE HOUSE.

About 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon Mrs. Siers was busy showing two real estate men over the house when Grant Siers returned home and began to quarrel with his sister-in-law. She told him to leave the ho use and he entered the hall to get his suit case. The woman threw the suit case at his feet with the admonition not to return. Siers requested time to get his clothing from his room, but she again told him to leave. His son, Chester, finally induced him to leave the house, and the two men went to a saloon at Eleventh and Jefferson streets. Later in the afternoon the father left his son at Eleventh and Main streets.

The next heard of Siers he was entering the yard at the Jefferson street residence. Instead of going in the back way, as was his custom, Siers entered from the front and went around the house to the rear door. A latticed porch is just off the kitchen door, and as Siers walked upon the porch Mrs. Siers appeared in the doorway. She ordered him off and according to the theory of the police he drew a revolver and shot three times. Two bullets entered her body, one on each side of the chest. The third bullet lodged in the wall back of her. Then Siers placed the muzzle of the pistol behind the right ear and killed himself.

SAYS WOMAN USED PISTOL.

The version of the double killing as given by the Richardson woman differs greatly from that of the police theory. She said she was standing in the yard and saw Mrs. Siers point a revolver at Siers and fire twice. Siers, she said, turned and fell, and while on the floor of the porch took a pistol from his pocket and fired at Mrs. Siers, afterwards shooting himself. However, when the deputy coroner, Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, examined the bodies only one revolver was found and that was under Siers. the body of Mrs. Siers was slaying in the kitchen and Siers's body was on the porch.

Mrs. Richardson said that Siers was asking for his clothes and that Mrs. Siers finally ordered him away and said:

"I'll see you dead before I will give you your clothes."

"My God, please don't kill me," Siers exclaimed, she said.

Immediately after this conversation Mrs. Siers began to shoot, according to the negro woman. She was positive two revolvers were displayed. As the police could only find one pistol, and that underneath Siers's body, the discredit the negro's story.

Dr. Czarlinsky also found five shells, which were for the pistol, in the coat pocket of Siers.

SON TELLS OF QUARRELS.

Chester Siers, who is a restaurant cook, said yesterday evening that his father did not own a pistol so far as he knew, but that his aunt had one. He said his father and aunt were in love with each other, but that he had never heard them discuss the subject of marriage.

W. L. Haynes and Charles Callahan, boarders,were in the parlor during the shooting and counted four reports of shots fired. Mrs. Moyer, housekeeper, was in another part of the house. The son of Siers said that in the past when his father had left home after a quarrel with his aunt she always sent him money to come back. About a month ago she had him arrested on a charge of disturbing the peace. He was sent to the workhouse, but after serving a short sentence, Mrs. Siers paid his fine, it is said.

Siers, who was 54 years old, was a barber and had a shop at the corner of Nicholson and Monroe streets. He leaves a widow and six children. The widow and three children reside in Humeston, Ia.

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July 26, 1909

SORRY SHE TOOK A
SHOT AT HUSBAND.

MRS. FRANK O'NEILL'S BULLET
JUST GRAZED HIS NECK.

Wife Says She Was Nervous and
Excited, and That Shooting in
Muehleback Brewery Was
Only to Frighten Him.

A daintily dressed woman talking through the grate of the cashier's window in the general office of the Muehlebach Brewing Company to her husband, a bookkeeper, at 7:30 o'clock last night, attracted little attention from the beer wagon drivers who happened to be about. Sharp words between members of the opposite sexes in the vicinity of Eighteenth and Main streets even at such an early hour in the evening are not unusual.

Suddenly the woman, Mrs. Mary O'Neill of 431 Ann avenue, Kansas City, Kas., opened her chatelaine bag and inserted her hand.

"Mary, what are you going to do?" asked her husband, Frank P. O'Neill, of 3719 Woodland avenue. Mr. and Mrs. O'Neill have been separated since January 1.

The woman drew a small revolver from the bag and fired at close range, the bullet grazing Mr. O'Neill's neck beneath his right ear and lodging inside the neck band of his shirt. Mrs. O'Neill then dropped the weapon and gave herself up to John Glenn, night watchman of the brewery.

JUST SHOOT TO SCARE HIM.

At No. 4 police station Mrs. O'Neill occupied a cell but a few feet from the operating table where Dr. J. M. McKamey was dressing her husband's wound. She was highly excited, nervous and penitent.

"I did not mean to kill him at all," she said, "but he has mistreated me every time I have approached him for money for my support, and I could not help but be on my guard all the time. When he told me to get out of the office tonight I got excited and fired when I only wanted to frighten him.

"My husband and I were married in a Catholic church two years ago," Mrs. O'Neill went on. "He married me without letting me know that he had been married twice before, and that both of these former wives are still living. During the last days of December last year I was sick and somewhat of a burden to him. On the evening of the New Year he left me sick in bed and never came back.

"I have since kept house for my brother, John Semen, at my home on Ann avenue, Kansas City, Kas. The two trips I have taken to see my husband and ask for money from him to buy clothes for myself have not been successful.

NOT SURE HE'LL PROSECUTE.

Frank O'Neill was not sure last night that he would prosecute his wife. His father, Sergeant F. P. O'Neill of No. 6 police station, however, said he would prosecute.

"I have never mistreated my wife," said the son. "It is true that I have been married before. Mary's shooting at me without warning from her, although my mother called me over the telephone half an hour before, and said Mary was on the way to the brewery to kill me."

Dr. McKamey said that O'Neill's would would easily heal.

Mrs. O'Neill is 28 years old.

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July 19, 1909

SIX MEN HELD UP
IN A SINGLE NIGHT.

IN EVERY INSTANCE ROBBERS
SECURE MONEY AND ESCAPE.

Five Highwaymen With Revolvers
Get Dollar Apiece From One Vic-
tim -- Diamonds and Watches
Among the Loot.

Six holdups occurred in Kansas City Saturday night and Sunday morning. In every case the robbers succeeded in getting money, and some of the victims gave up their watches.

Frank Serrett, 829 South Valley street, Kansas City, Kas., the first victim to complain to the police, reported that two men held him up in the alley between Main and Walnut on Ninth street. While one of the highwaymen searched his pockets, the other man kept him covered with a pistol A watch and $10 comprised the booty.

At 10 o'clock Saturday night George Mangoe, 115 1/2 Central street, Kansas City, Kas., reported that he had been robbed by two men, and his watch stolen. The robbery occurred at Ninth and Wyoming streets.

It took five men to stop and rob James Bone, 4413 Bell avenue, at about 11 p. m., at Forty-first and Bell avenue, at about 11 p. m., at Forty-first and Bell avenue. According to Bone, all of the robbers were armed with revolvers and held them in sight. He gave up $5 to the brigands.

A watch at $7 were taken from J. W. Brown, 1326 Grand avenue, at Thirteenth and Franklin streets by two men.

H. A. Lucius, 215 West Fourteenth street, reported to the police that he had been robbed or $50 near 2854 Southwest boulevard.

G. W. Shaw, Strong City, Kas., entered police headquarters early Sunday morning and informed the police that he had been robbed in front of a saloon near McGee and Third streets. He reported the loss of an Elk's tooth and two unset diamonds.

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July 13, 1909

FOUGHT OVER 10-CENT MEAL.

Railroad Man and Restaurant Pro-
prietor Land in the Holdover.

A free-for-all fight occurred yesterday afternoon in Main street in front of the city hall, when Harry Fox, a railway laborer, was thrown out of Peter Scando's restaurant, 420 Main street.

The police took all the participants in the fight to headquarters.

Fox, who had been out of employment for several days, as standing in Henry Miller's saloon at 402 Main street when he saw John B. Davis, a clerk for the Burlington camp near St. Joseph. He had worked for Davis two years ago.

"I haven't had anything to eat for two days," declared Fox as he shook hands with Davis. "My pal hasn't had anything either."

Davis consented to buy the two men "the best 10-cent meal in the city," and stopped at 420 Main street. He paid the cashier, and Fox and his friend proceeded to eat.

Both started to leave when they had finished. Alex Feandos, the cashier, halted them at the door.

"Pay me," he said. "Not a step until I get 20 cents."

Fox started to remonstrate when the proprietor jerked off his hat and refused to return it.

"You've eaten about 50 cents worth of food anyway," he said.

Fox picked up a chair and was starting for the cashier when a bottle of ketchup struck the wall near his head. Then Scandos chased him into the street with a double barrel shotgun when the cashier threw him to the sidewalk. He had cocked both barrels of the gun, when Charles Chadwick, a fireman from the station across the street, interfered and took the gun away.

Fox had received a severe beating and was locked up with the proprietor of the restaurant.

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July 10, 1909

KANSAS CITY GIRL SHOT.

Alice Robinson Probably Will Die as
Result of Accident.

SHREVEPORT, LA., July 9. -- Miss Alice Robinson, a vaudeville singer of Kansas City, stopped over here last night to see some friends who were playing at the summer park. She was on her way to New Orleans to fill an engagement.

While she was walking behind the scenes a fancy shot turn was being performed by the Neill pair. There was a miss bullet fired by Miss Neill which hit her friend in the temple, shattering the skull and penetrating the brain.

Miss Robinson is still alive, but no hopes are entertained for her recovery.

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July 7, 1909

NEGROES MAINTAIN GUARD.

Grizzled Veterans With Springfields
Patrol Dynamite District.

Two ancient negroes, A. L. Jones and Percy Williams, last night did sentry duty in front of the row of cottages on Highland avenue, between Twenty-seventh and Twenty-eighth streets. It was in this vicinity that a house was wrecked by dynamite early Monday morning after it had been let to negroes.

The negroes who mounted guard last night had both seen service in the civil war in the capacity of teamsters. They were armed with old regulation Springfield rifles. As they paced slowly up and down the plank sidewalk they swapped stories of war times, or kept step to "hay-foot! straw-foot!" according to a system said to have been employed by the drill masters of '61.

"Seems powerful lonely out here," said one of the sentinels, bringing his weapon to parade rest when accosted by a lone reporter in the twilight of a flickering arc lamp.

"When are you relieved?" was asked.

"Not until morning."

"Going to carry that heavy rifle around with you all the time?"

"Certainly; this is soldiering," was the answer.

No clues as to the dynamiting have been discovered by the police of No. 6 station.

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July 5, 1909

ESCORTS RAN FROM
HOWARD'S REVOLVER.

BOTH LEFT THEIR COATS AT
THE AMBERSON HOME.

Alone, Clara Amberson and Her
Sister Fought a Losing Fight
With Murderer -- Girl Dies
After Four Hours.
Alfred Howard, Who Shot Miss Clara Amberson and Took His Own Life.
ALFRED HOWARD.

Miss Clara Amberson, who was shot in the right temple by Alfred Howard, a rejected suitor, in the dining room of her home, 735 Kensington avenue, just before midnight Saturday, died at 4:20 a. m. yesterday. She did not regain consciousness.

In an unlighted room, and deserted by the young men who escorted them home, and who fled when Howard appeared with his revolver, Miss Amberson, assisted by her sister, Mrs. Mamie Barringer, battled in vain with Howard for possession of the weapon. Finally throwing Miss Amberson to the floor, Howard jumped on her, and then, as Mrs. Barringer seized him about the neck, he pulled the trigger.

The bullet struck Miss Amberson just back of the right temple and she collapsed. Believing that he had killed her, Howard turned the weapon on himself and sent the second shot through his own brain, and fell lifeless beside her. Surrounded by her mother, sister and friends, sthe wounded girl passed away four hours later.

In the light of subsequent events, it is believed that Howard contemplated the murder and suicide Saturday afternoon. It is known that he saw the young women at Forest park in the evening in company with young men, when he had been denied the privilege of escorting them or even calling at their home, and it is believed that the sight of the girl who was all the world to him, encircled in the arms of another man on the dancing floor, maddened him.

Four years ago Alfred Howard, then 22 years old, came to Kansas City from Iola, Kas. He secured a position in a railroad freight office, and roomed and boarded with Mrs. Anna Amberson, mother of the girl he killed. Miss Amberson was then a child of 13.

WANTED TO MARRY HER.

They were together a great deal. Howard assisted her with her studies, and when she was graduated from high school last year he declared his love for her, and asked her to be his wife. This was objected to by her sister and her mother because of her youth.

Six months ago Howard left their house, and shortly afterward went to Hot Springs, Ark. In the meantime Miss Amberson entered a wholesale millinery establishment and was rapidly perfecting herself in that line when he returned three weeks ago.

Howard had been in poor health since his return, but this did not deter him from declaring his ardent love for the girl whom, he told his friends, no other could replace. Miss Amberson found many excuses for not making engagements. Thursday he called her on the telephone and to his several requests for an evening she replied that she had previous engagements.

Saturday evening he called at the Amberson home and asked Miss Amberson to accompany him to a park or that she spend the evening with him as she chose. Miss Amerson smilingly told him that she had an engagement for the evening and that she was sorry. During the conversation he showed the sisters the revolver which he later used. No thought of violence crossed the minds of either girl.

SHADOWED TO FOREST PARK.

Miss Amberson and Mrs. Barringer were unaccompanied when they walked to Forest park, a short distance from their home. There they met several friends, among them Orville Remmick of 5212 Independence avenue, and Ed Doerefull of 4621 East Seventh street.

It is believed that Howard shadowed the sisters to the park. H e arrived at the Ambrose home shortly before 10 o'clock in the evening. The noise he made when he withdrew a screen from a window in the kitchen of the Amberson home and clambered in was heard by Mr. and Mrs. Joe Wharton, roomers on the second floor, but they ascribed it to a parrot. For almost two hours Howard lay in wait. He chose as his hiding place the bedroom of the sisters, which opens from the dining room to the north.

On their way home, Deorfull, who escorted Miss Amberson, and Remmick, who escorted Mrs. Barringer, suggested that they eat some ice cream. They stopped at the Forest Park pharmacy and chatted for a few moments with O. Chaney, the druggist.

RAN FROM REVOLVER.

It was warm and the young men carried their coats over their arms. When they arrived at the Amberson home, they conversed for a few moments on the porch just outside the dining room, when the suggestion that they get a drink of water was made. the quartet entered the dining room. Miss Amberson and Doerfull going to one window seat while Mr. Remmick took a chair. Mrs. Barringer went into the kitchen for the water, when suddenly Howard sprang out of the bedroom.

Holding a revolver which he pointed at Miss Amberson, he cried:

"Throw up your hands and don't scream!"

"It's Alf! Help!" cried Miss Amberson.

Doerfull was first to see the revolver and the first to get out of the room. He was closely followed by Remmick. Both left their coats and hats. The cry for help brought Mrs. Barringer back to the room. By this time Miss Amberson had grappled with Howard and had clutched the revolver. Then began the battle for possession of the weapon and the shooting.

HAD PLANNED THE CRIME.

Screaming for help, Mrs. Barringer, after the shooting, fled to the sidewalk. Neighbors hastened to the scene. Doctors declared Miss Amberson fatally wounded, and said that Howard's self-inflicted wound had caused instant death.

The police who searched his clothing found the note which he had evidently written some time during the evening in which he declared that "Mamie" (Mrs. Barringer) was the cause of the anticipated double tragedy, and asked that Miss Clara and he be buried side by side.

ESCORTS DIDN'T WAIT.

Ed Doerfull, the escort of Miss Amberson, told a reporter for The Journal last evening that he had never been frightened as badly in his life as he was when he looked at that shiny steel barrel and heard the command to throw up his hands.

"I didn't wait to learn any more about who the fellow with the revolver was," said Mr. Doerfull. "Mr. Remmick and I had escorted the girls home and stepped inside the house to get a drink of water. I was close to the door and when I heard the command to throw up my hands and I saw that shiny steel barrel of the revolver, I concluded that I had better play checkers and move.

"I did not stop to grab my coat or hat, but ran. I don't know how I got home, for I was badly frightened. I lay awake all night and got up around 6 o'clock and went over to Remmick's house to see if he got home all right.

"I did not know until then that anyone had been shot, as I was too far away from the house when the shots were fired to hear the noise of the reports.

"I don't know why I ran away and did not notify the police about the man with the gun, but I guess most anybody would act the same as I did if they looked into the business end of a revolver and were ordered to throw up their hands.

GOT THEIR COATS SUNDAY.

"I got my coat and hat this morning at the same time Mr. Remmick got his. We saw Miss Amberson's body then and we will probably go to the funeral together.

"I did not know the young lady very well, having only met her a few times at the park. I did not go back to the house today, as I had an engagement to go to a picnic at Swope park, and it was too late when I got back this evening."

Orville Remmick, who was with Doerfull when Howard entered the room with the revolver in hand, told his parents that he was taken by surprise, and that when he heard the command to throw up his hands and he saw the revolver, his first thought was for his personal safety. He said that he ran for the door and ran home.

REMMICK HEARD REPORTS.

Half a block away he heard the muffled reports, and when he got home he telephoned to the Amberson home and learned of the double tragedy. He feared for a while, he said, that his companion, Doerfull, had been shot. Remmick left his coat and hat at the Amberson home and called for them yesterday morning. He spent yesterday afternoon at Forest park and yesterday evening at Electrick park.

Miss Amberson was 17 years old. She was the youngest of three children. Besides her sister, Mrs. Barringer, and her mother, she leaves a brother, Will, who is in the navy. An effort was being made yesterday to notify him by wire and hold the funeral until his arrival, if possible. The Ambersons came to Kansas City from Salida, Col., six years ago.

Howard had been rooming for the last two weeks at the home of Mrs. Ellen Harper, at No. 801 Cypress avenue, just a block from the Amberson home. That he planned the murder and suicide is believed by Mrs. Harper, as his trunk was locked and contained all of the small articles which he kept about his room.

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