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January 16, 1910

PHONE SERVICE VIA ROSEDALE.

New Cable Across Kaw, to Argen-
tine, Being Constructed.

The residents of Argentine, now the Seventh ward of Kansas City, Kas., whose communication over the Missouri and Kansas Telephone Company's lines to the rest of the city was cut off by the breaking of the company's trunk line across the Kaw river, when a pier and one span of the old Southern bridge went into the river Friday afternoon, are now getting service through the Rosedale exchange. The service was out only a few hours. Linemen are now at work stretching a new cable over the Kaw, and until that work is finished the operation of hte Argentine lines will be through the Rosedale exchange.

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December 10, 1909

HUNDREDS AT SCENE
OF ROSEDALE KILLING.

DEPUTY'S MURDERER HAD BEEN
DRINKING AND DANGEROUS.

Compelled Two Men at Point of Re-
volver to Imbibe, Then Carry
Suit Case of Ammunition --
No Funeral Arrangements.

Hundreds of persons yesterday afternoon in Rosedale went over the route of the running fight of Wednesday night which resulted in the murder of C. Q. Lukens, a Wyandotte county deputy sheriff, and the subsequent killing of Charles T. Galloway, the slayer. The home of M. E. Patterson, 3129 Bell street, Kansas City, Mo., where the besieged man was finally captured after a desperate battle with Missouri and Kansas officers, came in for a good share of attention.

In the investigation yesterday circumstances came to light which, had they been known at the time by Lukens, probably would have prevented the double killing. From many sources it was found that Galloway had been drinking heavily preceding the shooting, and was in a dangerous mood during the day. He had made numerous attempts to find his wife, Mrs. Anna Galloway, with the avowed intention of taking her life. At the point of a revolver he forced W. E. Tompkins and James Creason to drink with him and later to assist in carrying a suitcase full of ammunition.

ENTERED THE LAWYER'S HOME.

About 6 o'clock Wednesday morning he entered the home of Rush L. Fisette, the attorney who had brought divorce proceedings on behalf of Mrs. Galloway. the half crazed man insisted on searching every room in the house in the hopes of finding his wife. He left without causing any trouble, but with threats that he would kill his wife. It was Mr. Fisette who notified the sheriff's office in Kansas City, Kas.

Mrs. Galloway was prostrated yesterday by the events of the night before. The story of her fourteen years of married life included threats by her husband, who beat her and drove her from the house. Always following a hard drinking spell the man became half crazed and in this condition seized a gun or any weapon and attacked his wife. At other times he spoke in the most endearing terms to her. Mrs. Galloway remained yesterday at the home of her sister, Mrs. James L. Connor, 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale.

LUKENS WELL LIKED.

In Kansas City, Kas., and Argentine, where Lukens had been known for years, the man was respected and liked. At the home of his widowed mother in Argentine the aged woman refused to be comforted.

The body of Lukens had been removed to Simmons's undertaking rooms in Argentine. Funeral arrangements have not been completed. Charles Quincy Lukens was a member of the Brother hood of Railway Trainmen in Argentine and also was a member of Aerie No. 87, Fraternal Order of Eagles, in Kansas City, Kas.

POST-MORTEM EXAMINATION.

A post-mortem examination of the body of Galloway, conducted by Coroner Harry Czarlinsky yesterday morning at the Carroll-Davidson undertaking rooms, showed that the bullet entered his right side and taking a downward course pierced the liver and passed out the left side. A coroner's inquest will be held at 10 o'clock Monday morning.

In a letter received by Inspector of Detectives Edward P. Boyle yesterday afternoon from Chief of Police Wiley W. Cook of Kansas City, Kas., the chief said:

"Especially do I wish to express my highest commendation of Detectives Ralph Truman and J. W. Wilkens, who at the risk of their lives led the attack that effected Galloway's capture."

WANTED HIM TO DRINK.

W. E. Tompkins, employed at the Gates undertaking establishment in Rosedale and who lives at 505 Southwest boulevard, Rosedale, said he was passing in front of Galloway's home at 428 College avenue shortly after noon on the day of the double tragedy when he was accosted by Galloway and told to hold up his hands. At the same time Galloway pointed two large revolvers in the face of Tompkins and told him to follow him into the house. Tompkins followed.

When they reached the inside of the house James Creason, an electrician who helped Galloway on electrical work, was sitting there. Galloway insisted that Tompkins take a drink from a large quart bottle of whisky.

FEARED FOR HIS LIFE.

"I finally talked him out of that," Tompkins said, "but during the two hours he kept Creason and me imprisoned in the house Galloway drank at least three-fourths of the quart of whisky. He sowed us a Winchester shotgun and a Winchester rifle and a suitcase full of ammunition. He said to us: 'Do you know what I am going to do with these,' and when we answered negatively he said he was going to 'raise hell tonight.'

"We pleaded with him to let us go, as I was afraid every minute that he would get wild and kill both of us. He finally agreed to let us go if we would carry the guns and ammunition down to Creason's home on Bell street. Creason led two bird dogs and carried the guns, and I carried a heavy coil wire belonging to Galloway, and the suit case fu ll of ammunition. My load got heavy, though, and I left all of the stuff at Young's store at College avenue and Oak street. Creason, I suppose, took his stuff on down to his place, and then Galloway came back up and got what I had left."

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December 9, 1909

TWO KILLED AND
ONE WOUNDED IN
RUNNING BATTLE.

Charles Lukens, Wyandotte County
Deputy Sheriff, Shot Through
Heart by Charles Galloway, Drink
Crazed Rosedale Electrician, He
Tried to Serve With Injunction.

SLAYER HAD THREATENED
WIFE WHO SOUGHT DIVORCE.

After Killing Lukens, Galloway
Carried on a Retreating Fight
With Other Officers Until
Brought to Bay at 3129
Bell Street.

SHOT BY DETECTIVES, DIES
IN EMERGENCY HOSPITAL.

Double Tragedy Direct Result of
Domestic Difficulties of the Gal-
loways -- Wife, Who Sued for Di-
vorce, Feared for Her Life, Which
Husband Had Threatened -- Re-
straining Order Was to Keep Him
From Further Terrorizing Her.
Murderer of Peace Officer, Who Was Slain as He Fled From Posse.
CHARLES T. GALLOWAY.

Two men are dead and another wounded as the result of an attempt by Charles Quincy Lukens, a deputy sheriff of Wyandotte county, Kas., to serve a restraining order upon Charles T. Galloway, a drink crazed electrician of 428 College avenue, Rosedale, Kas., late yesterday evening.

Lukens was shot above the heart and instantly killed during a running fight with Galloway.

Galloway was later brought to bay in a house at 3129 Bell street, and after a desperate resistance was mortally wounded, dying at 11:30 o'clock last night as he was being placed upon the operating table at Emergency hospital.

JUST BACK FROM OKLAHOMA.

Deputy Sheriff Lukens left the Wyandotte county court house yesterday afternoon about 4 o'clock with an order from the district court restraining Galloway from annoying or in any way interfering with his wife, Mrs. Anna Galloway. The Galloways had been having trouble for several months, and November 23 Mrs. Galloway, through her attorney, Rush L. Fizette, 1255 Kansas City avenue, Rosedale, filed a suit for divorce, alleging cruelty, drunkenness and ill-treatment.

Since the filing of the divorce petition Galloway had beaten his wife and threatened her life. She then applied for an order restraining him from bothering her. The order was granted several weeks ago, but Galloway had been in Oklahoma during that time. Yesterday word was received at the sheriff's office that he was in town, and Lukens was sent to serve papers on him.

QUARTER-MILE RUNNING FIGHT.

Mrs. Galloway has been staying for the past few days at the home of her sister, Mrs. J. L. Connor, at 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale. The deputy sheriff and Marshal Drew thought perhaps they might find Galloway hanging around there, as he had visited the Connor home earlier in the day and made demands to see his wife and children.

The officers reached Kansas City avenue and Washington street about 5:30 o'clock, and met Galloway shortly after they stepped off the car. Marshal Drew spoke to Galloway and shook hand with him. Lukens then shook hands with Galloway, and told him that he had some papers to serve.

Almost instantly Galloway drew a revolver and opened fire on the officers, who, unprepared for such an emergency, had to unbutton their overcoats before they could get at their weapons. They at last got hold of their revolvers and opened fire on Galloway. A running fight was kept up for more than a quarter of a mile.

The fleeing man turned into alleys, turning back every few steps to fire upon the pursuing officers. He finally reached Rosedale avenue, and turning south ran toward the tracks of the Frisco railroad. When the officers reached the tracks he turned and fired at Lukens, hitting him directly over the heart.

LUKENS FALLS DEAD.

Lukens staggered, and after grasping a telegraph pole with both hands fell to the ground dead. Galloway then ran south, and after a vain attempt to make his escape on a horse, abandoned the horse, and fled to the woods on the hills around Gray's park.

Officer Drew ran to Lukens's assistance, but finding him dead, started to pursue Galloway. He fired the last shell from his gun, and then finding himself without ammunition sent a boy after some. A large crowd of persons had been attracted by the firing, and a number of them assisted in taking the body of Lukens to a barber shop at Kansas City and Rosedale avenues. The coroner was notified, and he ordered the body taken to the Gates undertaking rooms in Rosedale, where he performed a post mortem. It was found that the bullet had pierced the heart and lungs, and had gone entirely through the body, coming out near the middle of the back.

GALLOWAY BROUGHT TO BAY.

The sheriff's office was notified in Kansas City, Kas., and Under Sheriff Joseph Brady, deputies William McMullen, Clyde Sartin and George Westfall jumped into an automobile, driven by George E. Porter, an undertaker at 1007 North Seventh street and rode at break neck speed to Rosedale. The Kansas City, Kas., police were also notified and Chief W. W. Cook led a large force of uniformed men and detectives to the scene of the murder. The citizens of Rosedale also turned out in large numbers and the hills around Rosedale glittered with the lights as these posses scoured the woods in an effort to find the murderer.

At 9 o'clock last night Galloway was cornered in the home of M. E. Patterson, 3129 Bell street, Kansas City, Mo., which he took possession of forcibly.

Barricading himself in a closet upstairs he held his pursuers at bay for over two hours. A posse consisting of nearly 100 men guarded the house on all sides. the air was tense with tragedy, and the bitter cold of the winter night added to the unpleasantness of the whole affair. Every man knew that a desperate fight was inevitable and that Galloway would have to be taken either dead or helplessly wounded.

MISSOURIAN LEADS CHARGE.

A delay was occasioned by the fact that the Kansas officers were outside of their jurisdiction, and did not feel that they had a right to enter the house, which is built on Missouri soil. Missouri officers were summoned and arrived at about 10 o'clock. The plans were laid and great precaution was taken in every step taken, for the officers realized that they were at a great disadvantage in forcing their way into the house, which they knew held a man who had already killed one officer and who would not hesitate to kill others should they press him too hard.

Finally the attack was planned and at 11:30 o'clock a squad of detectives consisting of Joe Downs, Billy McMullin, Harry Anderson and J. W. Wilkens, the latter a Missouri officer, leading, forced their way into the house, and after cautiously searching all the downstairs rooms without finding Galloway, rushed up the narrow stairs to the second floor.

When the officers reached the second floor a volley of shots rang out. Another volley followed. Breaking glass and a great commotion could be heard in the street below.

LAST WORD FOR HIS WIFE.

Then a husky voice was heard to shout:

"We got him."

In entering a dining room the officers were reminded of the presence of Galloway by three shots fired in rapid succession. The officers responded with a dozen shots and bullets went whizzing in every direction, embedding themselves in the walls. One bullet passed through the sleeve of Detective Wilkens's overcoat and lodged in the thumb on the left hand of Harry Anderson, a Kansas City, Kas., detective.

Within a twinkling a bullet entered the abdomen of Galloway and he fell to the floor, rolling into a dark kitchen adjoining the dining room. Writhing in his great pain, the man rolled frantically about the floor.

"Oh my dear wife, my own wife, my darling wife," he moaned time and again. Then he pleaded for ice water, clutching his parched throat madly.

An ambulance was called and Galloway was taken to emergency hospital, where he died just as they were lifting him to the operating table.

ANOTHER WOMAN'S LETTER.

Drs. Harry T. Morton and C. A. Pond, who were in attendance, pronounced death due to a wound from several buckshot that had entered the left side of the abdomen and after penetrating the intestines came out of the right side.

His pockets were searched while on the operating table. The contents consisted of a pocket-book containing $55 in cash, a gold watch and chain, a pack of business cards, several boxes of revolver cartridges, a bank book on the Fort Worth, Tex., State bank, and a letter.

The letter, which was written in lead pencil, was so blood soaked that it was barely legible. As far as it could be deciphered it ran as follows:

"Dear Friend -- I hear that you are getting a divorce from Mrs. G. ----- she is selling all your things and ---- I don't see where Mrs. G. or the boys is at. They act disgraceful, never coming home. --- Good luck, your loving Nan."

Lukens, whom Galloway shot down, was one of his best friends and so was Marshal Billy Drew, whom he fired at time and again in an effort to kill.

ASKS FOR FOOD.

The house where the shooting occurred is a two-story frame structure containing four apartments. The front apartment is occupied by Cecil Patterson and his family, and the rear apartment of four rooms by J. E. Creason, his wife and their little daughter.

"It was about 8 o'clock when Galloway came to the house," said Mr. Creason. "He was greatly excited and told me he had been in a shooting scrape and had shot a man. He said that they, meaning the officers, were after him and he did not know what to do. I told him that the best thing for him to do was surrender. He said: 'No, I'm not ready yet.'


Mr. and Mrs. Creason, Who Fed Galloway and Tried to Persuade Him to Surrender.
MR. AND MRS. J. E. CREASON,
In Whose Home Galloway Took Forcible Possession and Held Out Against a Posse Until Forced to Run for His Life When a Bullet Ended His Career

" 'Give me something to eat first and I will think about it,' he said. I have known Galloway for several years and worked for him at my trade as an electrician. He had always been a good friend and I saw no wrong in giving him something to eat and told my wife to fix him something. She fried some chops and potatoes and made some coffee for him. He tried to eat, but he was nervous and he could hardly swallow.

THE POSSE COMES.

"All this time my wife and I tried to find out just who he had shot and what the shooting was about, but he would put us off with the one answer, 'I will tell you when I am ready.' After supper he sat in a corner and seemed to be in a deep study. He paid no attention to our little girl, who seemed to annoy him by her childish prattle.

"I did not know what to do, so thought I would take a walk in the fresh air. I had hardly gotten 100 feet from the house when I met some people from Rosedale. They told me that Galloway had killed the undersheriff and that they were after him. I told them that he was in my house, but warned them not to go after him, as I feared he might use one of the weapons he had there. I told the crowd that I would endeavor to get him to surrender. I went back to the house. Galloway was still sitting in the corner, but jumped up w hen I came into the room.

" 'They know where you are,' I told him. 'Why don't you surrender?' 'I am not ready yet,' he said. I could get nothing more from him. Half an hour later some of the officers came into the ho use. I went downstairs and told them that Galloway was upstairs, but that he was armed and that it would be dangerous for them to go up there at that time. My family was up there, too, and I did not want my wife or daughter to be shot in case Galloway or the officers started shooting.

REFUSES TO SURRENDER.

This turned the posse back for a while and I made another effort to get Galloway to surrender. He still refused and I called to my wife and daughter and we went to the front of the house in Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Patterson's rooms. We left the gas burning in the dining room and the hall. The bedroom, in the closet in which Galloway took refuge, opened from the dining room by big folding doors as you see. The gas mantle on this lamp was broken and it was not lighted. We all remained in the front room until the posse called to us to come out of the house. As we went out I again told Galloway to surrender; that the house was surrounded and he could not get away, or if he did that he would have to jump to the house next door and climb down the side of the house.

" 'I am not ready yet,' were the last words he said to me. I felt as if the officers would not take Galloway alive and I feared that several might be killed. I was so nervous I did know what I was doing or saying. All I thought of was to prevent any more bloodshed.

"After we left the house we went into Griffin's home next door. We had hardly gotten inside when the shooting began. I put my fingers to my ears so that I would not hear the shots.

SURE HE WAS CRAZY.

"Galloway must have been out of his mind. He could have escaped from the house several times after he knew that the officers had him spotted and he could have held that staircase with his guns against 100 policemen. Why he refused to surrender and then retreated into the clothes closet where he was caught like a rat in a trap can only be explained by my opinion that he was crazy.

"Galloway brought the rifle and the shot gun over to the ho use this afternoon. He also brought a suitcase full of ammunition. This was before he did the shooting. He told us that he was going hunting and he wanted to leave his guns at our house. We had no objections to this as we had always been the best of friends. After we left the house he must have taken his rifle and gone into the closet. He left his shotgun in a corner in the kitchen."

THREATENED TO KILL WIFE FOR YEARS.

Mrs. Anna Galloway, wife of Charles Galloway, has been living with her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Connor, at their home, 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale, ever since she instituted divorce proceedings against her husband. For over forty-eight hours she has been a prisoner in that home, fearing even to step out, lest Galloway be near, ready to fire at her, as he had repeatedly threatened to do.

When seen last night after the killing of Deputy Sheriff Lukens, she was nearly in a state of nervous prostration. She had witnessed the start of the tragic escapade from a window in her room . She saw the officer attempt to serve papers on her husband. She heard the ensuing shots and then fell in a swoon.

"Oh, I knew it would come to this terrible end -- I knew it, I knew it," she moaned, as she paced nervously up and down the floor. "Charlie has had murder in his heart for thirteen years and I have always realized that it would only be a matter of time until the impulse would control him. He wasn't sane; he couldn't have been.

"Five times since Priests of Pallas week he has threatened to kill me, and from one day to another I never knew if I would see daylight again. Today some stranger 'phoned from a saloon to be extremely careful, as he had heard Charlie say that this would be the last day I could live. Marshal Drew remained with me to protect me and he has been in our house here all day.

"The first time Mr. Galloway ever threatened me was thirteen years ago. I should have left him then, but I thought he would get over his insane notions and I wanted to make a success of our married life if at all possible. He did reform and was better to me for some time, but when our two children, Harvey and Walter, were old enough to run around a great deal he began abusing me terribly and many times told me he would kill me. He became a harder drinker every year and would get in such a condition that no one could manage him at all.

"Many times as he choked me, and more than once has the end seemed so near that I could not possibly escape, but God has been with me for my children's sake I guess."

VICTIM WELL KNOWN IN WYANDOTTE.

Charles Quincy Lukens was 33 years old. He lived with his widowed mother, Mrs. Sarah Lukens, 336 Harrison street, Argentine. He was unmarried. He was appointed deputy sheriff by Sheriff Al Becker about one year ago. Before his appointment Lukens was constable and later marshal of Argentine for several terms. He had also served on the Argentine fire department. "Charley" Lukens was known by everyone in Argentine, both old and young, and also had a wide acquaintance thorugout the county. He was regarded as a very efficient officer, and had a reputation for fearlessness.

Besidses his mother he is survived by four sisters and four brothers. The sisters are: Mrs. Lydia Jones of Girard, Kas., Mrs. Beulah Robinson of 1108 East Twenty-fourth street, Kansas City, Mo., Mrs. C. A. Hare of Faircastle, O., Mrs. Leonard Eshnaur of Terminal Isle, Cal. The brothers are J. R. Lukens of Oklahoma City, Ok., and L. B, J. E., and F. D. Lukens of Argentine.

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December 7, 1909

BOILER KILLS FOUR,
RIPS BUILDING OPEN.

DRIVER THROWN FROM PASS-
ING WAGON, DIES.

Explosion Occurs While Steamfitters
Are at Work -- Other Men In-
jured -- Pickets Blown Off
Fence Across Alley.
Results of a Boiler Explosion at 908-10 Broadway.
EXPLOSION WHICH COST FOUR LIVES.

By the explosion of a boiler in the basement of the six-story building at 908-10 Broadway at 11 o'clock yesterday morning, Michael Frawley and James Cox were killed outright, and Andrew Meyer and Essie Williams, a negro porter, so badly burned and otherwise injured that they died before nightfall. Two others were badly hurt, and three stories of the rear portion of the building were wrecked. Considerable damage also was done to adjoining structures.

Within two minutes business men and pedestrians in the neighborhood ventured to enter the front door of the building bent on rescuing those who were hurt. The flooring on the first and second stories had been splintered and a heavy partition in the middle of the building had toppled over. Every window glass on two stories had been blown out. Heavy timbers, torn from their places, hung over overhead, and for a time a general collapse of the rear section of the interior of the structure was feared.

The cause for the explosion is not known. Steamfitters employed by Val Wagner & Co., 3918 Main street, were adjusting a steamcock on the boiler, and were preparing to clean out the pipes. They had started to work last Saturday and yesterday morning they put fire under the boiler in order to do the cleaning. There was no forewarning of anything being wrong with the apparatus, and when the explosion occurred Michael Frawley, one of the steamfitters, was on top of the boiler. The boiler had not been in use for some time, and it is supposed that this is accountable for the very bad condition it was in when the workmen began the repairing.

ONE DRIVER IS KILLED.

James Cox, a driver for the Stewart Peck Sand Company, happened to be driving through the alley and had just reached the building when the explosion occurred. He was thrown bodily from the wagon and dashed to death against the brick pavement. C. R. Misner, another driver in the employ of the same firm, sat beside Cox. He too was hurled from the seat, but escaped with a fractured shoulder. Essie Williams, a negro porter, was in the boiler room at the time of the accident, and he was scalded from head to foot by the escaping steam. H e was hurried to the General hospital and died at 3:45 o'clock yesterday afternoon.

Andrew Meyer and W. H. Straubmeyer, plumbers, were at work on the boiler. Both seemed at first to have received minor injuries but Meyer was suffering from shock so he was sent to St. Mary's hospital. He did not rally, and it later developed that he was internally injured. He died at the hospital at 5:40 o'clock.

WHO THE DEAD MEN ARE.

Michael Frawley, 2040 Madison avenue, was unmarried, an orphan, and 28 years old. He has lived in this city all his life. Two brothers, John and Emmett and two sisters, Mary and Kate Frawley, survive. His body was taken to the Wagner undertaking rooms.

Meyer, Forty-third and Hudson streets in Rosedale, was well known in Atchison, Kas., where he had worked as a steamfitter off and on for many years. He came to Kansas City recently and went to live with a brother at the Hudson street address in Rosedale. He was 45 years old and unmarried. His body was also taken to the Wagner undertaking rooms.

If James Cox, 1416 Central street, has relatives living they were not found last night, and it is almost certain they do not live in this city. He was about 35 years old. It is said he was single, but there is another rumor that he has a wife and child somewhere.

Edward Booker, business manager of the local steamfitters' union, said last night that none of the men killed or injured bore union cards. Frawley, he said, was merely a steamfitter's helper. He had once applied for a card in the union, but did not keep up with the requirements, and his membership was finally cancelled.

Essie Williams, 505 East Sixth street, the negro porter, was also a fireman. The whereabouts of his survivors have not yet been ascertained. His body was taken to the Countee undertaking rooms.

The wrecked building is the property of the Homestead Realty Company and is in the charge of David Bachrach, who as the agent, had the renting of the rooms. The block had been unoccupied recently, but the H. K. Mulford Company of Philadelphia was preparing to move its stock in on the third floor.

"It was a terrific shock which seemed to shake the foundation of our building from under us," said C. M. Lyon, president of the Lyon Millinery Company, which occupies the building adjoining on the south. "Several plate glasses crashed and I ran to the front door and out on the street fearing that possibly a second explosion might occur. the damage we suffered was comparatively small, but the fright we were given was large."

The picket fence surrounding the home of Mrs. Thomas E. Moran, 916 Bank street, just across the alley from the wrecked building, was partly demolished by the concussion and many pickets were torn from the fence and blown several feet away.

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November 8, 1909

OLD FOLKS' DAY AT
CHURCH IN ROSEDALE.

W. I. DAVIS, 65, AND WIFE, 62,
ONLY PIONEERS PRESENT.

Aggregate Age of Thirty-three Per-
sons Who Attended Is 2,280
Years -- Two Weeks' Special
Service Is Inaugurated.
The Original Rosedale Methodist Church.
ROSEDALE'S METHODIST CHURCH THIRTY YEARS AGO.

Mrs. Susan Weller, who is 90 year of age, was the oldest person to attend the old folks' reunion in the First Methodist church, Rosedale, yesterday morning. The oldest man in attendance was William S. Garrett, who is 81. The aggregate age of thirty-three persons who attended this unique gathering is 2,280 years.

The Rosedale church was organized thirty three years ago and the original enrollment showed just thirty members. Out of that original membership there were only two of the pioneers present yesterday. These were Mr. andMrs. W. I. Davis. Mr. Davis is 65 years old while his wife is 62. The husband is still active and is an engineer at the Swift packing plant.

The First Methodist Church in Rosedale as it Is Now.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AS IT APPEARS TODAY.

In the thirty years that the church has been in existence there have been many changes. The original church was a small frame structure which cost $1,000. The present edifice is a magnificent stone structure, which cost $25,000 and which is one of hte most imposing buildings of the kind in the state. Its membership has grown from a meager thirty to more than 250 and its debt is more than half paid.


CUSTOM IS POPULAR.

Twelve years ago the custom of holding an old folks' reunion each autumn was establisheda nd this event has proved a popular one. H. W. Gates always has supplied buggies and carriages and Amos Martin and S. B. Bell, Jr., have provided automobiles. With these the persons who are too feeble to walk to the service are taken to church.

The features of yesterday's service was a sermon by Rev. I. V. Maloney, the pastor, who took for his text: "Thou shalt come to old age like as a shock of corn cometh in the season," Job v. 26.

The church was decorated with autumn leaves and foilage and the choir rendered a special music programme.

At the church last night a two weeks' special service was inaugurated. There will be services every night, the pastor being assisted by the Rev. Marion Donleavy of Kansas City, Kas.

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November 4, 1909

PEGASUS AIDS EDUCATION.

Rosedale Boy Who Expects to Pay
Way in College Writing Poetry.
James P. Cannon, Aspiring Writer.
JAMES P. CANNON.

James Cannon, a member of the junior class of the Rosedale high school, hopes to win his way through the Kansas university next year by writing verse and short stories for the magazines. Some of his work has already been published and found favor, especially with the faculty of the school where he is known as "the judge."

The boy is 19 years old and when considerable younger developed a remarkable aptness in getting up short sketches of Kansas life, stories of the legal profession and essays on serious subjects. One poem entitled "The Day of Judgment," written a year ago, brought many favorable comments to the youthful author. It follows:

There shall be exact fulfillment
Of the prophecies of old.
Every act of simple kindness
Shall be paid a hundredfold;
Every stranger that we've sheltered
From the cold, and wind, and rain,
Shall become our intercessor
After we have plead in vain;
And the foods wherewith the beggars
In our charity we've fed
Shall be offered in atonement
As the Sacred Wine and Bread;
And the poor shall be exalted
O'er the lords of greed and gold --
There shall be exact fulfillment
Of the prophecies of old.

Cannon became known as "the judge" in rather a peculiar manner. Last winter three boys who became acquainted with him while he was working in a restaurant at 920 Southwest boulevard were arrested for gambling with dice and thrown into the Rosedale holdover. They had no money to employ counsel for their trial in police court and as a last resort sent for Cannon who, with a very limited knowledge of law, won the case over the city attorney. "The judge" has stuck with him since and bids fair to remain his permanent sobriquet. He says that if he ever becomes known in the literary field it will be his nom de plume and that he intends to make it famous.

Last Friday night when consternation reigned in the High school over the non-appearance of Juvenile Judge Ben B. Lindsey, of Denver, to fill a Chautauqua date with an assembled audience of about 600 patrons of the school, Cannon was elected by the principal to take his place. His knowledge of current events made this possible and when he at last sat down after a half hour's discourse on the delinquent magistrate he was greeted with a demonstration that would have been complimentary to any orator.

James Cannon is the son of John Cannon, a real estate agent of 1709 Kansas City avenue, Rosedale. At the death of his mother several years ago he left his home with the object of making his way in the world and incidentally in literature.

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October 12, 1909

NIGHT SCHOOL OPENS.

FIRST EVENING 119 PUPILS ARE
IN ATTENDANCE.

Commercial Arithmetic Class So
Crowded It Is Divided Into
Two Sections -- Prim-
ers Distributed.

The opening of the night high school at the high school building in Kansas City, Kas., last night, was marked by the attendance of 119 pupils, whose ages ranged from 17 to 45 years. Principal E. L. Miller and the assisting teachers divided the pupils into 12 classes. The recitation periods were made from 7:30 to 8:20, and from 8:20 to 9:10 p. m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday nights.

The pupils were given the choice of two of the following twelve subjects: Chemistry, English, Latin, German, geometry and algebra, commercial arithmetic, grammar and spelling, penmanship, book keeping, stenography, woodwork and mechanical drawings.

The commercial arithmetic class was so crowded Mr. Miller had to make two sections of it. Book keeping, penmanship and chemistry were the next three most popular classes. A large number of graduates of the high school en rolled in the language classes to complete work they had failed to finish while in school.

NINE LEARNING TO READ.

The most interesting class of all was that of nine Polish young men, who are attending the school to learn to read and write the English language. The young men live in the neighborhood of St. Margaret's hospital, and work in the packing houses during the day. They became interested in the school through the efforts of Charles W. Szajkowski, a cabinet maker, who has lived in America nineteen years, and who received a training in English in the night schools of New York city.

A teacher had not been designated for this class and M. E. Pearson, superintendent of the schools, volunteered to start the class in their studies. He began by attempting to call the roll, but was forced to call Mr. Szajkowski to his aid.

The following were the pupils enrolled in this class: Andrzoj Kominick, Cypryan Lauter, John Pasik, Alex Mimeszkowski, Anton Catrowski, Stamstan Butklewicz, Joseph Wiskiewski, Michael Kryska, and John Balamat.

After the roll call Mr. Pearson distributed primers and prepared for foreign students, and after reading over simple sentences, had the class repeat them. Notwithstanding the fact that none of the class knew anything of English, within half a half hour they were reading such sentences as "Five cents make a nickel," and "Ten dimes make a dollar."

WRITE SIMPLE WORDS.

The class was next sent to the blackboard, and after Mr. Pearson had written simple words on the board, the class was told to copy them. It was surprising how well they wrote the words.

Mr. Pearson and Mr. Miller were gratified with the results of the first session of the school.

"I am certain the school will be a success," Mr. Miller said. "The pupils all appear earnest and I believe will improve their opportunity. At least fifteen pupils told me that they would bring another pupil with them at the next session."

Mr. Pearson was very much interested in the class of foreigners. "I am very glad, indeed, that we are enabled to take up this work," he said. "I studied night school for foreigners in the East two years ago and from what I learned there I know they pay."

BOYS ARE EARNEST.

"Our own American pupils will have to look out or the Polish boys will beat them when it comes to earnestness and ability to stick with their studies. Mr. Szajkowski told me after class tonight that he expects to have at least seventy-five Polish young men enrolled within two weeks."

All of the students attending the school pay a monthly tuition of $2. This fee will be used to pay the teachers, except Mr. Miller, who gives his services to the school. The pupils come from all over the city. One pupil enrolled from Mount Washington, a suburb of Kansas City, Mo. Several more enrolled from Kansas City, Mo., and one from Rosedale.

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September 5, 1909

DRANK POISON BY MISTAKE.

Mrs. Ruby Johnson, 17, Victim of
Carbolic Acid.

Mrs. Ruby Johnson, 17 years old, wife of Joseph Johnson, a boilermaker of 15 North Benton street, Rosedale, Kas., died yesterday morning from carbolic acid poisoning. Mrs. Johnson had been sick for several months and was in the habit of taking her own medicine and drank the acid, thinking it was her medicine.

In a statement made to friends before she died she said that she drank a quantity of the acid before she discovered her mistake. The acid, she said, had been used about the room for antiseptic purposes. Dr. O. M. Longnecker was summoned, but arrived too late to be of any assistance. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

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July 17, 1909

TO WED LOVER IN HOSPITAL.

Nellie Lylee Will Marry James Bar-
ton, 'Tho He Can't Recover.

One of the prettiest romances of the year will culminate tonight in the marriage of James T. Barton and Nellie E. Lyle at the Bell Memorial hospital in Rosedale, Kas. The hospital is to be the scene of the wedding because the groom is an inmate of the institution and not able to leave his bed.

While working in a stone quarry at Mankato, Kas., in 1906, a rock fell upon Barton's back and broke it. His life was despaired of, but he recovered sufficiently in March, 1907, to be taken to the Bell Memorial hospital, where he has been ever since. Physicians give no encouragement for his ultimate recovery and so far have only succeeded in keeping him alive.

Soon after the groom was brought to Rosedale there arrived in the Kansas suburb Miss Nellie E. Lyle from Moberly, Mo. She was the stricken man's fiance, and desired to be near her sweetheart. Securing employment she has lived near the injured man, and has done much to make his life in the hospital pleasant.

W. A. Drew, city marshal of Rosedale, yesterday appeared at the court house in Kansas City, Kas., and secured a marriage license for James T. Barton, 32 years old, of Corbett, Wyo., and Nellie E. Lyle, 26 years old, of Moberly, Mo. A nurse at the hospital last night confirmed the rumor of the marriage tonight, but the superintendent said he knew nothing about it.

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July 16, 1909

HACKMEN FIGHT AT FUNERAL.

Harry Vaughan Sustains Fracture of
Skull and Recovery Doubtful.

Harry Vaughan, 17 years old, a hack driver living at 818 East Fourteenth street, Kansas City, Mo., and employed by the Wood Bryant and E. Landis Livery Company, Fifteenth and Campbell streets, was probably fatally injured yesterday during a quarrel with Tom Harper, a driver employed by the J. W. Snoddy Livery Company. Vaughan was struck on the head with a rock and his skull fractured at the base of the brain. He was removed to the South Side hospital where the attending physicians said his recovery was doubtful. Harper escaped after striking Vaughan and at a late hour last night had not been captured.

The two men with their carriages had been engaged to attend the funeral of Mrs. W. I. Davis in Rosedale. While services were being held at Kansas City and Rosedale avenues and the carriages were in line ready to take up the funeral procession, the two men had an altercation. Harper, it is alleged, threw a brick, striking Vaughan in the head and while the latter was still staggering Harper lifted a large rock with both hands and struck his victim again. He then ran and the last seen of him he was making his way toward Argentine. The injured boy was given emergency treatment by Dr. O. M. Longnecker and Dr. B. T. Sharp.

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June 5, 1909

ROSE TAKES MURPHY'S RIG.

Officers in Rosedale Put Abrupt End
to Her Brief Ride.

The hankering after horses of Rose Smith, a woman living at Thirtieth street and Southwest boulevard, who "just loves to drive," yesterday afternoon for the second time caused her arrest.

Rose climbed up on Thomas Murphy's hack, which was standing near Summit street on the Southwest boulevard, and whipping up the horses, drove away toward Rosedale. When Murphy came out of a store he discovered that his hack was gone, but he had no trouble in following. Rose was arrested in Rosedale by the city marshal, who delivered her to the Missouri officers.

"I just loves to drive horses," was the woman's explanation. "I wasn't going to steal them at all -- just out for a little drive."

Rose Smith was arrested in Kansas City, Kas., a month ago for undertaking a trip which differed very little from yesterday's feat. On the former occasion she took a horse and buggy.

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April 15, 1909

MURDER AND SUICIDE
END SIEGE OF MONTHS.

ENRAGED ROSEDALE HUSBAND
KILLS WIFE AND HIMSELF.

Breaking Into Home in the Early
Morning, Frank Williams Slays
Sleeping Wife -- Shoots Him-
self Under Fire.

Although the members of the family of Frank Williams, a laborer, have been living at 65 Clinton street, Rosedale, Kas., in a state of siege of nearly three months, and have never during that time retired for the night without placing loaded revolvers beneath their pillows, Williams smashed in the door of his home at 4:40 o'clock yesterday morning, killed his wife, Addie Williams, as she lay sleeping, and committed suicide by sending a bullet into his own brains, after being fired upon by his stepson.

Because of brutal treatment of his stepchildren and his wife, Williams had often been arrested, and upon the last occasion his stepson, James Goodell, refused to allow him to return home. Mrs. Williams on February 11 brought suit for divorce, and from that time began to hear of threats by Williams to exterminate his family and commit suicide. He lived in a tent only a few rods from his home, and was often seen skulking around the house.

WIFE KILLED WHILE ASLEEP.

Mrs. Williams lived in a cottage of four rooms with her son, James Goodell, her daughter, Mrs. Emma Clute, her son-in-law, Oscar Clute, and a grandson, Johnnie Aldine, who is four years old. The pistols were kept under the pillows of three of the members of the household for use should the husband and stepfather attempt to carry out his threats.

Shortly before 5 o'clock yesterday morning James Goodell was awakened by the crash as Williams broke down the kitchen door with a battering ram. Realizing that it was his stepfather, bent upon a murderous mission, Goodell seized his revolver and rushed into his mother's room, which adjoined the kitchen. Before he was able to reach the room, Williams had fired twice, both bullets striking his wife in the forehead. Williams then ran into the kitchen and Goodell fired three shots at him, none taking effect.

The murderer then placed the pistol to his forehead and fired, the bullet splitting and making it appear as though he had been struck by two bullets. Clute and his wife, who occupied the front room, did not reach Mrs. Williams's side until after Williams had committed suicide. Mrs. Williams was killed instantly and probably was asleep when she was shot. The suicide lived for an hour after he shot himself but was unconscious until the end. The grandson was sleeping with hie grandmother and saw Williams fire the shots.

GRANDSON WITNESSED MURDER.

According to Goodell, not a word was spoken by any of the parties during the shooting. Afterwards the little grandson said he saw his grandfather shoot his grandmother. Last night Goodell said he had expected a killing for two months, but believed that it would be his stepfather who would be killed.

Mrs. Williams was 40 years old and her husband 51. They had been married nineteen years.

Coroner J. A.Davis of Kansas City, Kas., was notified soon after the shooting, and took charge of the bodies. He ordered them removed to the Gates undertaking establishment, where he will hold an autopsy this morning. In the afternoon an in quest will be held for the purpose of ascertaining all of the facts leading up to the tragedy.

"The fact that Williams's stepson, James Goodell, fired three s hots at him while he was retreating from the house," said Coroner Davis, "leaves some little doubt as to whether Williams fired the shot that ended his life or was killed by one of the three shots fired at him by Goodell. This will be easily determined at the post mortem examination, as one of the revolvers was of 38 and the other of 32-caliber."

After the bodies were removed from the Williams home, Dr. Davis locked the doors and took possession of the keys. It is probable the coroner's jury will visit the premises today. The surviving members of the Williams family spent the night at the home of neighbors. They were indignant over the coroner's action in locking up the house. Dr. Davis stated last night that he took possession of the premises because both heads of the household were dead, and he did not want any trouble to arise over the disposition of whatever property was there.

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March 26, 1909

HAD BAD MONEY AND
COUNTERFEITING KIT.

MAN AND WOMAN ADMIT
MAKING THE "QUEER."

Secret Service Men and City Detect-
ives Discover and Break Up a
Local Plant and Arrest
the Operators.

ROOM AT 621 PENN STREET WHERE KING, THE COUNTERFEITER,
AND HIS WOMAN COMPANION WERE CAUGHT.

The operations of a gang of counterfeiters in Kansas City came to a sudden end yesterday with the arrest at Seventh and Penn streets by a United States secret service agent and city detectives of a man and woman giving their names as Charles King and Mary Cook., and the discovery of the apparatus used in making the spurious coin. Both admitted that bad dollars had been made for the past month.

For the past few weeks Charles A. Adams, United States secret service man in Kansas City, has received complaints of bad coins being circulated. He paid particular attention to the arrest of Daniel Kelly in Kansas City, Kas., March 19 for passing a bad dollar on William G. Smith, a grocer at 1700 North Third street. At the time of his arrest Kelly had three irregular coins in his possession. In police court Judge Sims fined Kelly $500 for vagrancy.



IN A BASEMENT ROOM.

Adams, who visited Kelly in prison, says Kelly confessed making the coins and said his assistants were living at 621 Penn street in Kansas City, Mo.

Adams gave the facts to the police department and Andy O'Hare and Samuel Lowe, detectives, found that the couple were living in the basement of the brick house at the number which Kelly gave. Though the detectives watched the place last Sunday, nothing worth mentioning was discovered. The coins which the couple passed were good ones and could not excite suspicion.

Adams himself watched the house yesterday morning. About 10 o'clock the woman came out and got on a Roanoke car and at Southwest boulevard changed to the Rosedale line. The secret service man, of course, was following her. In Rosedale the woman alighted and entered a grocery store and asked if the clerk could change a dollar.



MARY COOK.

The clerk looked at the coin critically and returned it.

"It's no good," he said, and the woman hurried out.

She walked a short distance when she met a little girl.

"Have you the change for $1?" she asked.

The child shook her head, and she passed on. When Mrs. Cook came to the baker of Mrs. Florence Catley, 1142 Kansas City avenue, she entered and again attempted to pass one of the dollars and was again refused. Out on the sidewalk, Adams stopped the woman.

"You are under arrest," he said.



SHE BLAMED KELLY.

"Why, I didn't know that it was a bad coin," she protested. "It certainly looks like one, doesn't it?"

But she accompanied Adams up town and as they were walking up the front walk to the rooming house, Detectives O'Hare and Lwe came out with King. She broke down and in the presence of King told the whole story.


CHARLES KING.

"It was all Kelly's fault," she sobbed. "We came here from Denver four weeks ago and there wasn't a job in sight that my husband could get. At last he fell in with Kelly, and then they began to make the bad dollars. But today is the first time that I tried to pass one of the coins. Last night we ate the last food in the house, and I had to do something. I went out and tried to pass one of the coins to keep from starving."

The man hung his head during the recital, and at her conclusion corroborated her statements. He said that they had heard of the arrest of Kelly in Kansas City, Kas., and destroyed the molds at once. In an old vault at 512 Broadway where several buildings have been torn down, he told the officers that they might find the broken pieces.

Following his instructions, the officers found five sets of plaster moulds, a quantity of tin and antimony, and a moulding pot. All the material was taken to the federal building and will be held as evidence. The prisoners were taken to police headquarters, where the woman was placed in the matron's room and the man in the holdover.

In the matron's room the Cook woman said that she had formerly lived in Kansas City. She said that she had purchased a home on the installment plan at 2044 Denver avenue, and had made six payments, until last December. She separated from her husband, Thomas Cook, about a year ago, she said, and went to Denver. There she met King, who was working for a gas company.

"We came back to Kansas City because times were hard," she said, as she wept, "but he couldn't get any work here, and he fell in with Kelly. I didn't know for some time that they were making the bad money. Today is the first time that I tried to pass one of the coins."

The couple will be turned over to the United States authorities today. None of the neighbors suspected anything wrong. The family of John Pulliam, who lived on the same floor in the basement, thought that the man and his wife were employed down town. Kelly and king, the woman said, generally made the coins at night. They were such poor imitations that it is doubtful if many were passed.

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February 19, 1909

TO TEACH THE PUBLIC
ABOUT TUBERCULOSIS.

IMPORTANT EXHIBIT WILL BE
ON TWO WEEKS.

More Than 2,000 Persons Attend
on Opening Day -- Kansas Univer-
sity Medical Department
Well Represented.

The exhibit of the National Society for the Prevention of Tuberculosis opened in the Scarritt building, Ninth street and Grand avenue, yesterday and will continue for two weeks under the auspices of the Jackson county society. W. L. Cosper, who has charge of the exhibit, said last night that in the matter of first day's attendance, Kansas City had broken all records, over 2,000 people visiting it yesterday afternoon and evening.

While the rooms were opened to the public during the afternoon, the exhibit was opened formally last night by Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., who made a short address.

The mayor said that before many weeks model play grounds for children would be completed here. That, he said, is a step toward health and happiness. He told the audience that the city had voted $20,000 of bonds for the erection of a tuberculosis sanitarium on the hills east of the city, and the building of bungalows there for the convalescent. He also told of the work of the tenement board, and said said that its members, all busy citizens, should be thanked for giving their time and labor to the city for nothing. The mayor also stated that his hospital and health board was now strictly enforcing the spitting ordinance, which had long been neglected.

TELLS OF TUBERCULOSIS.

"If a policeman yanks you down to the station for spitting on a street car," he said, "don't lose your temper. He is only doing his duty, and you must agree that it is right."

Frank P. Walsh, president of the Jackson county society, presided. In the absence of Dr. W. S. Wheeler, health commissioner, he introduced E. W. Schauffler, who told what tuberculosis is, and how it may be cured if taken in time.

"It is contracted," he said, "generally in inhaling the germ which is blown into your face with the dust of the street, in the workshop or at the room. It is often introduced through food and sometimes by contact. It always produces death of tissue or bone. Three things are essential for its cure -- pure air, sunshine and good food."

The doctor said that "the American people are the greatest spitters in the globe, possibly made so from the tobacco chewing habit."

On account of the breaking of a lense Mr. Cosper was unable last night to give the steropticon lecture. Tonight, however, and every night for the next two weeks, views will be shown and prominent physicians will speak.

The meeting today will be in charge of the tenement commission. Walter C. Root, chairman, will speak on housing conditions in Kansas City, and the inception and spread of tuberculosis. Dr. Oh. H. Duck will speak in the evening. It is expected that Dr. McGee of Topeka, Kas., may be here with his stereopticon lecture on tuberculosis.

SPITS INTO GUTTER NOW.

That the exhibit alone, without the lectures, has begun to bear fruit, was shown by a little incident yesterday afternoon. Two men emerged from the room talking. One of them cleared his throat and was just in the act of expectorating on the sidewalk when he stopped.

"I guess I'll spit in the gutter after this," he said to his friend, "I've just learned something."

The University of Kansas, Rosedale, has several interesting specimens on view, such as tuberculosis glands, kidneys, hearts, etc. One jar shows a healthy lung, another the organ after being attacked by tuberculosis, and a third jar of a lung which had been affected and later cured of the disease.

A physician from the school explained the exhibit last night. In his pocket he carried a small tube in which he said "are as many tubercle bacilli, the germ which causes tuberculosis, as there are sands in the sea."

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February 18, 1909

HOMEOPATHS ARE BARRED.

Are Not Allowed Priveleges of Gen-
eral Hospital Clinics.

Denying recent published statements connecting homeopathic physicians and members of the faculty of the Hehnemann School of Medicine at Tenth street and Troost avenue with the general hospital investigation, Dr. William E. Cramer, dean of the college and chairman of the local association of homeopathic physicians, declared yesterday that they had no part in the general hospital controversy. Both the college and the local association deny positively any connection with the specific charges brought by members of the Modern Woodmen.

Dr. Cramer said yesterday: "We have nothing whatever to do with the charges brought from other sources against the general hospital staff or the individual physicians regularly employed there or connected with the institution.

Dr. Cramer declared that to Kansas City the courtesy of holding clinics in the public hospitals had been denied Homeopathists. He said:

"For twenty-one years we had the privileges of surgical clinics at the general hospital. Our students were permitted to witness these clinics, and paid the customary fee into the city treasury.

"However, since the new hospital and health board was appointed we have been denied these surgical clinics at the general hospital, although repeated attempts have been made to get them.
At the same time the courtesy is extended to the medical department of the University of Kansas at Rosedale. The Kansas students are allowed to come into Kansas City when we citizens and taxpayers are denied.

"There is not one Homeopathic interne or Homeopathic physician regularly employed int he institution."

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December 26, 1908

GAVE PRESENTS
TO 5,700 CHILDREN.

MAYOR'S CHRISTMAS TREE WAS
A TREMENDOUS SUCCESS.

LATE COMERS
GOT NOTHING.

BUT THEY WILL GET THEIR
SHARE OF GIFTS TODAY.

Little Ones Came From Suburban
Places and Swelled the Throng
Beyond Expectation -- More
Toys Have Been Bought.


Was it a success, the first Mayor's Christmas tree in Kansas City? It was, even more than a success, and if the committee had counted on delegates from Kansas City, Kas., Armourdale, Argentine, Rosedale, Olathe, Kas., Independence, Holden and Pleasant Hill, Mo., and a few from Chicago, Ill., all would have gone off swimmingly. As it was there were more present than presents.

The women sacked and separated 5,000 bags for boys and girls, and 2,500 sacks lay on tables on each side of the hall. Besides those, about 700 Christmas bags had been prepared specially for children in hospitals and those who were ill at home and could not come to Convention hall. It was the intention to deliver them by wagons late yesterday afternoon.

In one short hour every sack was gone, including the ones prepared for the hospitals, and many children were still in line. Over 700 tickets were given to them to come to the hall at 2 o'clock this afternoon when an effort will be made to supply them. Captain J. F. Pelletier of the purchasing committee bought toys, candies and nuts last night and a committee of tired women will be at the hall at 8 o'clock this morning to prepare them. It is estimated that fully 1,000 children who were last in line failed to get a Christmas sack.


CAME HOURS TOO SOON.

It was stated that he doors to the main floor would be opened at 1 p. m. and that the distribution would begin at 2 o'clock. But the children began gathering at 10 o'clock, and as the wind was raw, they were admitted to the balconies of the hall.

Shortly after 1 o'clock some one gave the word "Ready" and the girls and boys rushed from the balconies and jammed into one living mass before the entrance to the arena. The wee ones were being smothered and, in order to save lives, the crowd had to be admitted to the floor.

On the right side was a big placard reading "BOYS" and on the left another reading "GIRLS." Instead of mingling about the hall and looking at the trees and watching the antics of the five Santa Clauses under the two great evergreens, the boys massed before the chute leading to their side and the girls did likewise on the other side.

Patrolmen William M. Meyers, Elvin Gray, T. L. Savidge, George H. Moseley and Thomas McNally, who were rigged in full regalia as the five Saints Nick did all they could to detract the attention of the children, but they had their eyes on those Christmas bags, and the lumbering antics didn't even win a grin.

There was nothing to do but start the ball, and start it they did. The first boy to get his goodies was George Cook, 11 years old, of 115 North Prospect avenue. A committeeman placed the imprint of a little Christmas tree on the back of George's left hand with a rubber stamp and indelible ink. He grabbed his sack, sailed through the chute and squatted immediately outside the door to see what he had. He was soon followed by a mob of other boys, just as curious, and soon the doorway had to be cleared by a policeman as there was a boy to every square foot.


SHE HAD A DOUBLE LOAD.

At the head of the girls' line stood Ester Cronkhite, 11 years old, 1700 Fremont avenue. In her arms she carried her 2-year-old sister, Alice. Both were given appropriate sacks and, heavily laden, little Ester labored on. The children were given street car tickets home. One ticket entitled tow to a ride.

Most attention was paid to the boys, as it was believed that they -- the little scamps --- would do some duplicating. Soon after it was seen that their hands were being stamped several boys appeared in line with gloves on. And so did some of the girls. When the jam on the boys' side got beyond control Detective Thomas Hayde mounted a box and, in stentorian tones commanded, "Here, you kids, quit that pushing. Don't you see you're smothering these kids here in the front? Stand back there. Quit that."

"Hully chee," said one boy, "dere's de chief. Skedoo back kids and beehave er we won't git nuttin."

From that announcement there was a line formed out of the boys and there was little crowding. "De chief's here," went down the line. "See 'im hollerin' on de box dere." That settled it with them.

SHOVED POLICE ASIDE.

On the girls side there was nothing short of chaos. About nine stalwart coppers -- out of thirty detailed at the hall -- under Captain John Branham, could no t keep them in line. They actually shoved the police to one side. "O'm demmed, eh? Oi aint timpted tuh give 'em the loight schlap," said one policeman, who had been shoved about ten feet by the little girls, "but 'twudn't do, all being gerrels, ye know."

While the bulk of the eagle eyes were on the boys to see that they played no tricks and did no repeating, the girls did a rushing business on that very line. At the head of the line were bags for little girls, and the big ones got theirs further on. Many of the "mediums," which could pass for both, got both. One was seen to get a sack, hold it under her cloaK with one hand, while with the other hand she gratefully received another.

Still others would get their sack and immediately pass it over the chute to a waiting companion on the outside while she passed on and got a second present from another woman. Many of the sharp boys whose hands had been stamped and who could not get back in line were seen to do this same thing.

"GIMME 'NOTHER, MISTER."

"Gimme 'nother for my little brother what's sick at home an' can't come. Gimme one fer my sister with th' mumps. Gimme one fer my little cousin what has fits an' can't come. Gimme 'nother one fer my half little brother what's visitin' an' won't be home 'till New Years. Gimme 'nother, please, fer a kid what lives by me an' sprained his leg so he can't git his shoes on any more this year."

The foregoing excuses were given by the boys and girls in line, and there were possibly a hundred others. No one could refuse them, as many cried to make the play strong.

Many little ones got lost from brothers and sisters, and the five Santa Clauses were kept busy carrying them about hunting for relatives and companions with whom they had come. All were crying. R. S. Crohn found a little fellow's brother for him three times, and when he got lost again turned him over to Santa Claus. Finally a room was set apart for the lost ones and by the time the festivities were over all lost children had been restored.


THE MAYOR WAS LATE.

Mayor Thomas T. Crtittenden, Jr. , mistaken in the time he should have been there, arrived at Convention hall with Franklin Hudson, just as the last of the bags had been given out to the children. There was to have been an entertainment, with a speech by the mayor, but that had to be left out. Devaney's orchestra furnished music while the children were waiting.

"It's the happiest day of my life," said the mayor. "I wouldn't have missed the little I have seen for anything. We will know better how to proceed next year, however, and will begin earlier. Another thing we will know is just how many children will be here and just what sort of presents to put up for them. Other cities may profit by our example next y ear and relieve us of such an unfortunate incident as took place today. We have more money, however, will buy more toys, more nuts, candy and fruit, and will be ready for the leftovers Saturday at 2 p. m."

"It was more than what we bargained for," said Franklin Hudson, chairman of the executive committee. "We were counting on our own children only -- but what's the difference, they are all children anyway."

"I don't care if they came here from Europe," said Captain J. F. Pelletier. "We were not looking for 1,500 outsiders, but as they weere here we are glad of it. I wish all the kids on earth had been here. At one time I thought at least half of them were here.

Another large bundle of Santa Claus letters were received at the hall yesterday, some of them being handed in by the children who came. They will be classified by districts and an effort made as far as possible to give each child just hwat it asked for. It may take several days yet, but the committee says: "We are not going to do this thing by halves."

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December 16, 1908

GOING TO GOTHAM BY GOAT.

Man From San Diego Reaches Rose-
dale in His Slow Journey.
Captain Vivian Edwards Makes His Way Across the Country by Goat
CAPTAIN VIVIAN EDWARDS AND HIS TEAM OF ANGORAS.

From San Diego to New York, in a diminutive buggy drawn by a four-in-hand team of Angora goats, constitutes the unusual transcontinental journey, already more than half accomplished, by Captain Vivian Edwards, who reached Rosedale yesterday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock.

Captain Edwards, or "Santa Claus," as the children have dubbed him along the route on account of his horned team, is a cripple, having completely lost the use of his lower limbs, from paralysis. He is accompanied by J. R. Johnson, a globe trotter with a traveling record, according to himself, that embraces every corner of the known earth except Australia and New Zealand, and Cecil Fleener, a 14-year-old New Mexican, who has ambitions to visit all of the countries seen by his older mate, with the addition of the two antipodal exceptions.

Both companions of the goat driver are on foot and have walked every step of the way from California to Missouri, aside from about fifty feet which they rode through an Arizona mudhole. The camp paraphernalia of the party is borne by three pack burros.

Edwards is a great goat driver. He is making this long journey to further familiarize himself with the fidelity, endurance, magnamity and mental endowments of the creature. Then he's going to write a book on "Some Goats I Have Met," or "From Golden Gate to Gotham by Goat," or some such alluring title. That's the secret. The idea is to come rambling back, like Ezra Meeker did, and like the Alaskan and his dogs are doing, like they all do, in fact.

The goat driver's able bodied companion talks long and uninterestingly about the trip, which, for one of its kind, appears to have been extraordinarily devoid of incident and adventure.

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December 11, 1908

'ADAM' SHARP IS
TAKEN IN KANSAS.

JOHNSON COUNTY SHERIFF CAP-
TURES RELIGIOUS FANATIC.

IS WOUNDED IN BOTH HANDS.

BROUGHT TO KANSAS CITY AND
LOCKED IN HOLDOVER.

Offers No Resistance and Declares
He's Glad That His Fight Is
Over -- Abjures His "Faith."
City Hall Guarded.
James Sharp, Leader of Religious Fanatics
JAMES SHARP,
Religious Fanatic Who Styles Himself "Adam God."

After fifty hours' search by the local police and officers of nearby towns, James Sharp, who styles himself "Adam" and "King David," was captured three miles south of Zarah, Johnson county, Kas., yesterday afternoon at 3 o'clock. It was James Sharp who started a riot at Fourth and Main streets Tuesday afternoon, resulting in the death of Patrolmen A. O. Dalbow and Michael Mullane; bystander A. J. Selsor; and Louis Pratt, one of the religious band, and his 14-year-old daughter, Lulu.

News of Sharp's arrest reached police yesterday afternoon about 5 o'clock and Chief of Police Daniel Ahern sent Captain Walter Whitsett and Inspector Charles Ryan to Olathe, Kas., after the prisoner.

A farmer named W. C. Brown living eight miles northwest of Olathe telephoned to J. S. Steed, sheriff of Johnson county, about 11 o'clock yesterday morning that a man resembling the description of the fanatic, James Sharp, had been seen in that neighborhood Wednesday night and yesterday morning. He said that the suspect had spent the night at the home of Joseph Beaver, a farmer living about two miles from him. Beaver, he said, was in Olathe and the sheriff could talk to him and get a good description of the man.

Sheriff Steed found Beaver and after having him describe the stranger who had stayed at his home decide that the man was Sharp and drove to the Brown farm, leaving Olathe about 1 o'clock yesterday. When he reached the Brown farm he deputized a young man who worked on a nearby farm, and the two men started a search for the mysterious stranger.

ASLEEP IN STRAW STACK.

A large wood pasture was first gone over, and then the officers separated and searched the ravines for several miles. A straw stack in the middle of an old wheat field was seen by the sheriff's deputy and, going around it, he found a man sleeping under the straw.

When Sheriff Steed reached the straw stack the man was called and told to come out. As he rolled from under the stack the men noticed he kept his hands in his pockets, and when they made him take them out they saw that he was wounded in both hands. After being searched by the sheriff, Sharp was placed in a buggy without being handcuffed and driven to Olathe.

Sharp told his captors that he was praying and contemplating while he was in the haystack as to what he should do. Weary with the long tramp from Kansas City and exhausted for the want of food, Sharp welcomed arrest and surrendered without any show of making a fight.

He was taken into the office of the county jail and his wounds, which had not been treated, were washed and bandaged by Sheriff Steed. He was then given a supper, which he devoured with eagerness.

ANXIOUS TO GO BACK.

While he was eating his meal the police officers from Kansas City arrived. Sharp greeted them and said he was anxious to go back with them. After finishing eating he told of his trip from Kansas City to the place of his capture.

"I shot five times at the police and when I had emptied my revolver I went into the saloon there on the corner and gave my pistol to the bartender. I told him that I was through, that I was not sure of the Lord, and asked him to take me to a policeman.. The man seemed to be frightened and did not move. I then tried to load the gun, but my two hands were wounded, so I could not do it. The cylinder would not turn. I was going to put the barrel in my mouth and blow off the top of my head."

Sharp said he then walked outside and stood in the crowd and watched the police and citizens gathering around Pratt across the street. Continuing Sharp said, "God then directed my steps south on Main street to Fifth street, and west up Fifth street. I went on down Fifth street to the bottoms. When I reached a barber shop I went in and had my hair clipped. I told the barber that my hands were frozen. Leaving the shop the Lord's will seemed to take me farther away from the shooting scene and I walked and walked.

"I WAS LOSING FAITH."

"I was losing faith in my religion because things had not come about as the revelation made it out. I continued walking all that night. In the morning I slept in the woods. That evening I went to a house and asked for something to eat and a place to sleep. The people gave me my supper, but said they did not have any place to put me for the night. They directed me to a house about 300 yards distant, to a cousin's. I stayed there all night and had my breakfast there.

"I could not use my hands and the man fed me. They asked me what was wrong with my hands, and I told them that I was paralyzed. I told them I was a peddler and that my partner had left me. I was afraid they would suspect that I was wanted in Kansas City and left as early in the morning as possible.

"After leaving that house, which was the Beaver farm, I went to that straw stack and hid. At first my only intention was to get away, to escape. Then I began to fear that I had done wrong and was debating whether I should go to some farmer and pay him to take me to a town and give me up. I had money to pay the man for my trouble.

"When the officer arrested me it seemed like I was going to heaven. I was so worried and had lost such a quantity of blood. I told the sheriff that I was glad he had me and the j ail would not be a bad place for me."

HAD PLENTY OF MONEY.

When the officers searched Sharp he had a number of cartridges in his pocket and a large knife, which he carried in his left hand and cut Sergeant Patrick Clark in the eye with. A large roll of bills containing $105 and a purse with $4.92 in it was also found in his pockets.

A large crowd of persons gathered in the jail yard at Olathe, and attempted to get into the room where the prisoner was. Everybody in the city wanted to see the man that caused so much grief by inciting his followers to murder and riot.

Captain Whitsett and Inspector Charles Ryan left Olathe and Sharp at 9 o'clock last night over the Frisco railroad, and arrived in Kansas City at 10 o'clock. The officers with their prisoner left the train at Rosedale and took a street car to Fourth and Wyandotte streets. They were afraid that friends of the dead and wounded officers who might have heard of Sharp's capture would attempt a demonstration against the prisoner. When the officers and prisoner got off the car he was placed between the two and hurried to police headquarters, where a large force of policemen and detectives were inside the station and also guarded the doors.

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November 27, 1908

NOT A HUNGRY PERSON LEFT.

If There Was, It Wasn't the Fault
of Givers of Dinners.

Amid the general rejoicing and feeling of goodfellowship incident to a perfect Thanksgiving day, the less fortunate inhabitants of the city were not forgotten. At every charitable institution in the city a dinner was provided for the inmates. The Salvation Army, Franklin institute, Union mission and other organizations of like character fed hundreds of poor persons, and sent many baskets of provisions to deserving families who were unable to attend the dinners.

The Union mission, at Eighteenth and McGee streets, provided a dinner and fed over 400 persons. Special invitations had been sent out and persons from Rosedale, Argentine, Kansas City, Kas., and country districts attended the dinner. Everything in the way of eatables was provided, and if any person in Kansas City went without a Thanksgiving dinner yesterday it was not because of a lack of opportunity.

"It was certainly good to see those poor persons eat," said the Rev. Mrs. Rose Cockriel, the pastor of the mission. "Those who came to the dinner ranged in age from 7 weeks to 33 years, and they all appeared to enjoy themselves. Six little boys, the oldest one 10 years of age, walked in from beyond the Blue river. We gave them their dinner and a basket of provisions to take to their home."

At the Old Folks and Orphans' home the day was celebrated with an old-fashioned dinner, turkey, cranberry sauce, pumpkin pies and everything that should be eaten on that day. At the Perry Orphan Boys' home 130 boys partook of the good things that had been provided for them.

At the Working Girls' hotel there was really a day of thanksgiving, not alone because of the excellent dinner, for in addition to that some unknown friend donated a high grade piano to the institution. From the standpoint of charity and general cause for thankfulness, the day was very much a success.

At the county jail Marshal Al Heslip provided a dinner for the prisoners, of whom there now are fewer than 200. All the trimmings went with the spread. Eatables out of the ordinary also were served at the Detention home, where juvenile prisoners are confined.

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