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January 24, 1910

DEAD MAN'S HOARD
HIS LAST PILLOW.

FIFTEEN THOUSAND DOLLARS
IN SECURITIES IN CASHBOX
UNDER HIS HEAD.

Body of Oscar Schoen, Aged
70, Found Amid His
Savings.

With his head pillowed on a cash box containing $15,000 worth of negotiable securities, mostly government bonds and money orders, Oscar Schoen, a retired shoemaker, 70 years old, was found dead in bed in a squalid room at Missouri avenue and Main streets yesterday morning.

The old man's hand clutched a half emptied phial of morphine tablets while at his side lay a loaded 38-caliber revolver. One of the cartridges had been snapped but had failed to ignite.

Coroner Harry Czarlinsky, who was summoned, stated that death was due to morphine poisoning, whether taken as an overdose or with suicidal intent he was unable to state. He ordered the body taken to Freeman & Marshall's undertaking establishment.

MONEY ALSO IN ROOM.

Although Schoen had occupied the same room in which he was found for over two years, little or nothing was known about him by the owner of the rooming house. He was last seen alive on Thursday morning by Guy Holmes, the janitor of the premises. He told Holmes that he was feeling sick and that if it were not for the expense he would visit a doctor. He used to retire regularly at 6 o'clock every evening and rise at 8 in the morning, when he would go out and buy the daily papers, return and stay in his room. Rarely he made trips up to town.

Police headquarters was notified of the old man's death and Patrolman John P. McCauley, who was sent to investigate, made a further search of the room. Concealed behind an old stove in which Schoen had done his cooking was found $60 in bills and silver, and in an old carpetbag apparently discarded and thrown under the bed, the officer located several abstracts and deeds to Kansas City property in the vicinity of Thirty-first and Troost avenue, which are supposedly of considerable value.

WILL IN POCKETBOOK.

Schoen's last will and testament was also found in an old pocketbook. By its provisions all his property is bequeathed to relatives by the name of Goetz living in Kempsvile, Ill. Charles A. Schoen, a brother at Darlington, Ind., was named as executor. The police have telegraphed to all parties concerned.

One of the witnesses of the will was the manager of a local real estate firm, through whom Schoen had conducted his business. He stated that he know that the old man owned a great deal of property. Schoen at one time conducted a cobbler's shop at 2442 Broadway, but left there about four years ago, giving his reason for selling out and moving the fact that robberies were too common in that part of town.

Naturalization papers dated 1872 and taken out at Darlington, Ind., were found among Schoen's effects, together with several applications to different German provident associations.

Schoen had lived in Kansas City about twenty-two years. He has a sister, Mrs. Bertha H. Goetz, at Kempsville, Ill., and a niece, Mrs. Agnes Yak Shan, residing in Alaska.

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January 21, 1910

NO LOVE NOTES IN
THIS GIRL'S SUIT.

Cigar Stand Manager, Young
and Pretty, Sues Rich
Saloon Keeper.

Miss Mabel Reeder, young and pretty, manager of the cigar stand in the lobby of the Savoy hotel, yesterday filed a suit in the circuit court against John E. Johnston, a saloon keeper at 810 Main street, demanding damages in the sum of $25,000 for alleged breach of promise of marriage. Johnston is said to be well-to-do.

It was on December 1, 1905, Miss Reeder asserts in her complaint, that Johnston promised to marry her. Since then, she alleges, he has discontinued his attentions and has informed her that he does not intend to marry her.

According to the complaint, the engagement of Miss Reeder and Johnston became publicly known and, it is set forth, Johnston's failure to perform his part of the agreement embarrassed, humiliated and wounded her "in feelings, affections, womanly pride and sensibility," and, it is added, her "prospects for life and eligible marriage are blasted."

"This isn't one of those love letter cases," said Miss Reeder last night in her rooms at the Tomlinson apartments, Eleventh and Broadway, "because I haven't any love letters to present. I would just love to give you a story, but I can't for several reasons. One is that my lawyer, Frank P. Walsh, tells me not to talk.

KNEW HIM IN WICHITA.

"You see, Mr. Johnston and I are from the same town, Wichita, Kas. We have known each other a long time and it was there that we became engaged. He was the proprietor of a hotel and I was working at the cigar stand in the hotel. We both came to Kansas City a couple of years ago and Mr. Johnston started a saloon here.

"I am unable to tell you why Mr. Johnston broke off his engagement with me. I don't know whether there is another girl in the case. He has known that I contemplated bringing this suit, because he was notified. Really, now, there isn't anything sensational about this case, and I want to escape all the notoriety I can."

Johnston refused last night to discuss the action brought against him by Miss Reeder.

"Let Miss Reeder do the talking now," he said, "and I will have my say later."

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January 18, 1910

IN WAY, MAJOR'S
WIFE GETS DECREE.

Told She Hindered His Army
Progress, Returns From
Islands for Divorce.

When Mrs. Ruby B. Rutherford returned to the Philippines after a visit with her mother at Columbia, Mo., her husband, who is a major in the army, met her at the boat and frankly told her he was sorry she came back to hinder his progress as an ambitions officer. Mrs. Rutherford lost no time in returning to "the States." Yesterday a divorce was granted her by Judge Seehorn in the circuit court.

Mrs. Rutherford lives at the Brunswick hotel, at Eleventh street and Broadway. She introduced as character witness her brother, C. P. Bowling, cashier of the Exchange bank of Columbia, and Judge James E. Goodrich of the circuit court. Her daughter, Dorothy, aged 9 years, was not in court.

CALLS HIM INSOLENT.

The Rutherfords had domestic trouble before they went to the islands, and Mrs. Shepherd, wife of a captain, who often visited them at the Presidio, San Francisco, was a witness. Major Rutherford, she said, was insolent.

Mrs. Rutherford said most of her trouble had been at the Presidio, although she said the major stayed out nights after they went to the Philippines and was sorry when she returned to him after visiting at home.

A highball incident when Mrs. Rutherford gave a party at the Presidio was told in court. She said they ran out of whisky. She thought they had had enough, any way.

ANOTHER BOTTLE GOTTEN.

Another officer insisted, Mrs. Rutherford said, in going out for one more bottle. When he returned Mrs. Rutherford had her highball made "light," and Major Rutherford was angry because it wasn't the same strength as the drinks served the guests.

"When I insisted on a light drink," said Mrs. Rutherford, "my husband became angry because I did not drink as fast as he thought I should and he came and pured whisky into my glass until it ran all over me."

Mrs. Rutherford testified that while she liked to have a clean, neat house her husband, in his insolent manner, always made fun of her tidiness.

PUT FEET ON TABLE.

One of his delights, she said, was to finish his meal before his wife and then "rear" back in his chair and put his feet on the table.

When Major Rutherford, the wife testified, told her she was a "drawback," that she hindered his progress in the army and that he was downright sorry to see her back again, she left him, determined to sue for divorce.

Major Rutherford is connected with the medical corps and has an income of $4,000 yearly. They were married at Columbia, Mo., January 10, 1900, and Mrs. Rutherford left him February 14, 1909.

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January 10, 1910

HYDE PARK M. E. CHURCH
A REBUILT RESIDENCE.

Upper Floors Refurnished for
Parsonage -- Congregation Formal-
ly Takes Possession.

The congregation of the Hyde Park M. E. church yesterday formally took possession of their new house of worship at Valentine road and Broadway. This is probably the first instance in the history of religion of the transforming of an old residence into a church. For years the property was known as the Allen residence and a year ago it was bought for $20,000 by the congregation. At an additional expense of $5,000 the first floor was made over into an auditorium beautifully decorated and fitted out with comfortable pews and an attractive pulpit. The upper floors were re-decorated and refurnished for the parsonage and the basement arranged for sociables and a meeting place for the different church organizations. Three-fifths of the cost has been paid with out assistance from the public, and in bringing about this satisfactory condition the congregation has received generous support from George N. Neff, J. W. Vernon, Fred B. Houston and William S. Kirke.

Prior to yesterday the church society to the number of 100 have been conducting services in a store room at Thirty-seventh and Main streets and have had as their pastor for a year the Rev. Dr. Napthall Luccock, who resigned a $5,000 a year pastorate in St. Louis to come to Hyde Park to help it grow at a salary of $1,800 a year.

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December 30, 1909

FOUND DEAD IN A CELLAR.

George Dixon Stricken While at
Work Cultivating Mushrooms.

George Dixon, 66 years old, living in the Metropolitan hotel, was found dead in a cellar under the Last Chance saloon, Bridge street and Broadway, yesterday morning. Dixon, who cultivated mushrooms in the cellar, did not return to his home on Tuesday night, and his wife requested the police to make a search.

Coroner Harry Czarlinsky was summoned and after pronouncing death to be due to heart failure, ordered the body sent to the Carroll-Davidson undertaking rooms.

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December 8, 1909

BOYS IDENTIFIED AS
SPANGLER'S SLAYERS.

ROBBERS' VICTIMS RECOGNIZE
TRIO, ONE A BRIDEGROOM.

Elevator Operators, Ages 17, 19 and
21, in Downtown Dry Goods
Store, Are Arrested -- Youngest
Weeps, Others Indifferent.
Louis Dye, Ralph Clyne and Harry Shay, Suspects in the Spangler Murder.
LOUIS M. DYE, RALPH A. CLYNE AND HARRY SHAY,
Three Suspects Held by Police for Spangler Murder and Recent Holdups.
(Sketched at Police Headquarters Last Night.)

Working on the "boy bandit" theory, the police yesterday evening arrested three youths, two of whom were identified as having shot and killed M. A. Spangler and wounded Sam Spangler, his son, in their saloon at Twentieth street and Grand avenue on the morning of November 23. Their names are Louis Dye, 21 years old; Ralph Clyne, 19, and Harry Shay, 17. All are employed as elevator operators in a down town dry goods store. Dye is a bridegroom.

The arrest was made at 5:30 o'clock by Captain Walter Whitsett and Plain Clothes Officers E. M. Smith and E. L. Maston.

VICTIMS VISIT STORE.

The officers visited the store in company with several recent victims of holdups and rode in the elevators with the boys as they were at work. They were arrested and taken to police headquarters. Albert Ackerman, 502 1/2 Wyandotte street, the man who was in the Spangler saloon at the time of the shooting, was summoned and in Captain Whitsett's office identified Dye and Clyne as the two who shot up the saloon.

"That's the fellow that had the gun," Ackerman stated, pointing at Dye. "The other fellow was with him. Of course they are dressed differently now, but there is no mistaking their faces."

Four others who have been robbed recently visited police headquarters in the evening and in every case identified the boys.

DRUGGIST IDENTIFIES.

W. S. McCann, a druggist, living at 1405 East Tenth street, identified Dye and Clyne as the two men who attempted to rob his store at Twenty-seventh street and Agnes avenue on the night of November 25. He said they went in the store, and that Clyne pointed a revolver at his head while Dye attempted to rob the cash register. When he showed fight they fired four shots at him and ran. He thinks that Harry Shay is the man that was left outside as a look out.

Miss Stella Sweet, 529 Brooklyn avenue, and Mrs. C. L. Flaugh, 629 Brooklyn avenue, who were held up Thanksgiving night on the steps of the Admiral Boulevard Congregational church, identified all three of the boys as the robbers.

Edward C. Smith of the Smith-McCord-Townsend Dry Goods Company declared that the three boys had robbed him on Thirty-sixth street, between Locust and Cherry streets, on the night of December 3. They took a pocket book containing a Country Club bond for $100. At that time they had handkerchiefs tied over their faces, but Smith was sure that he recognized them.

SPANGLER TO SEE TRIO.

Captain Whitsett made no attempt to cross-examine the boys last night, but ordered them locked up until this morning when they will be confronted by further witnesses, the chief of whom will be Sam Spangler, who was discharged from the general hospital yesterday. The prosecutor's office was notified and representatives will be on hand today to take their statements.

"I am sure that we have got the right men this time," stated Captain Whitsett. "They answer the description of the gang that have been doing all the robbing lately, and I am sure that it was they that held up Joseph B. Shannon last week."

None of the boys would make any statement except that they were strangers in town, only having been working for a week. During the identification process both Dye and Clyne showed indifference, while the younger boy, Shay, broke down and cried.

Dye lives at 1921 Oakland, Shay at 1242 Broadway and Clyne at 1710 East Thirteenth street. Dye was married three weeks ago, shortly before the Spangler murder.

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November 14, 1909

ARCHBISHOP GLENNON LAYS
ST. TERESA CORNER STONE.

St. Louis Prelate Puts in Two Busy
Days in Kansas City -- Enjoyed
Every Moment.

Several hundred Knights of Columbus were present at the reception given in honor of Archbishop Glennon at their new hall at Thirty-first and Main streets Friday. After renewing many old friendships the archbishop left for St. Louis at 11 o'clock that night.

"It has been a busy two days," he said last night, "but I have enjoyed every moment of my visit. I only wish that I could remain longer. I thank the Lord for the good that He has enabled me to do in Kansas City."

As the result of the prelate's appeal to the public to aid the work that is being carried on by the House of the Good Shepherd, in his lecture at Convention hall last Thursday night, over $5,000 has been collected, and more has been pledged.

Yesterday morning Archbishop Glennon went to the old St. Teresa's academy at Twelfth and Washington streets and celebrated mass. After visiting Loretto academy he returned to St. Teresa's, where a musicale was given in his honor. In the afternoon he laid the corner stone of the new St. Teresa's academy building at Fifth street and Broadway. It rained hard throughout the whole service but over 300 people stood bare headed in the mud while the archbishop put the stone in place and blessed the building.

In the evening Archbishop Glennon was the guest of honor at a dinner given at the home of Hugh Mathews, 1014 West Thirty-ninth street, and attended by Bishop Hogan, Bishop Lillis, Brother Charles and Father Walsh. The party then attended the Knights of Columbus reception.

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October 31, 1909

TWO DEAD AS RESULT
OF FIRE AT LORETTO.

MISS MIMIE TIERNAN SUCCUM-
BED YESTERDAY MORNING.

She Had a Presentiment That Some-
thing Would Happen Before
the Programme Was
Finished.
Miss Mary Maley, Victim of Lorretto Fire.
MISS MARY MALEY.

Of the five young women injured in the fire at the Loretto academy on Friday night, two are dead and Miss Mary Maley has but a slight chance of recovery. Miss Ruth Mahoney and Miss Agnes Campion, the latter of Omaha, were but slightly burned and will recover.

Miss Mimie Tiernan, the 16-year-old daughter of Mrs. Elizabeth F. Tiernan of 3525 Broadway, one of the victims, died at 7:30 o'clock yesterday morning. Miss Tiernan had a strong presentiment that something was going to happen before the evening had passed. To several of her friends she kept repeating: "Girls, I don't feel right. I am sure that something awful will happen before we get through with the programme."

Miss Tiernan was a daughter of the late Peter H. Tiernan, president of the Tiernan-Havens Printing Company, now known as the Tiernan-Dart Printing Company, in which Mrs. Tiernan holds a large interest. Mr. Tiernan was for many years president of the upper house of the council.

Miss Tiernan is survived by a brother, Peter H. Tiernan, who is taking a course in engineering at Rolla, Mo. He was advised of his sister's death and arrived in the city last evening. Another brother, Curtis and two elder sisters, Josephine and Marie Isabella, are traveling in Europe. funeral services will be held in the academy at 9:30 o'clock this morning after which the body will be sent to St. Louis for burial.

Mrs. Tiernan, who was slightly burned in an automobile accident about a month ago, had rented her apartment at 3525 Broadway and had intended to go to her ranch near Joplin, Mo., in a few months.

Miss Virginia Owens, the second victim of the fire, never fully recovered consciousness. Miss Owens was the daughter of Joseph J. Owens, a real estate dealer of 404 South Spring street, Independence. Miss Owens willingly sacrificed her life in order to save the lives of those in danger as she was in the rear hall of the academy when the fire started and rushed forward and tried to extinguish the flames which enveloped the other girls. In this manner she was burned.

The burial of Miss Owens will take place Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock. The funeral will be from St. Mary's Catholic church, of which the deceased was a communicant. Miss Owens was the youngest child and for the past two years had been attending the Lorreto academy in Kansas City. Mrs. Owens, mother of the girl, was informed yesterday morning of the accident and told of the death of her daughter.

While Mrs. Owens was aware that her daughter had been burned, the fatal ending was not made known to her until yesterday morning, owing to her ill health. the shock of the news prostrated her, and for this reason the funeral of the unfortunate girl was placed for Tuesday, in the hope that the bereaved mother might be able to attend.

Mr. Owens, the father of the girl, is a retired capitalist, and was with her shortly after the accident took place, but kept from his wife the possible consequence of the accident.

Miss Mary Maley is in a serious condition, but at a late hour last night she was reported by Dr. J. A. Horigan, who is attending her, as much improved and there is a fair chance of her recovery. She was badly burned below the waist and probably will be injured for life. Miss Maley is the daughter of S. A. Maley, a contractor of 1200 West Fortieth street. She is still at the academy, as the physicians did not think it advisable to move her.

In the evening before the fatal fire the Sisters were complimenting themselves on the healthiness and fine conditions of the academy. Many of them are confined to their rooms as a result of the shock of the disaster.

The statement that Miss Ruth Mahoney, who was taking a part in the performance, had been seriously burned is a mistake. She escaped without injury. Miss Mahoney is a sister of Mrs. Phillips, wife of Captain Thomas Phillips. Mrs. Phillips was in the audience and when she realized the dangerous predicament of her sister she ran forward, removed her from the way of harm and ruined two coats in whipping out the flames that enveloped the stage.

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October 30, 1909

FOUR GIRLS HURT IN
A HALLOWE'EN FIRE.

JACK O' LANTERN CANDLE IG-
NITES THEIR COSTUMES.

Fleecy Cotton Used by Esquimaux at
Loretto Academy North Pole
Night Flashes Into
Flame.

Three girls seriously burned and a third slightly is the result of the overturning of a jack o'lantern last night during a Halloween celebration at the academy of the Sisters of Loretto, West Prospect and Thirty-ninth street, which set the costumes of the girls on fire.

The most seriously burned are:

Mimie Tiernan, 3525 Broadway.
Mary Maley, 1200 West Fortieth.
Virginia Owen, 3633 Prospect.

Slightly burned:

Ruth Mahoney, a niece of Alderman C. J. Conin.

It was stated early this morning that three of the girls were possibly fatally burned. There are little hopes of Misses Owen and Tiernan recovering. Miss Maley is reported to be in danger, though not as seriously burned as the other two. All the victims were conscious and suffering greatly. All but Miss Mahoney were burned over their bodies, and on the arms and legs.

The girls were giving a Hallowe'en entertainment in the corridor on the first floor. The stage at the end of the hall was decorated with jack o'lanterns and bunting.



They planned a "North Pole" entertainment, and were dressed as Esquimaux. They wore white trousers, covered with cotton to represent snow. Their waists also were covered with cotton. No boys had been invited.

It was 8:20 o'clock when Maley walked across the stage. She was laughing gaily and chatting with a crowd of girls walking at her side. They were all talking of the beautiful decorations and the novel decorations.

Miss Maley stumbled on a jack o'lantern. From the candle the cotton on her Esquimaux dress was ignited. The flame spread over her entire body. Misses Teirnan, Owen and Mahoney, walking at her side, rushed to their friend's help. There were screams and cries for help. Some of the girls fainted, others grew hysterical.

The flames spread from Miss Maley's costume to the three girls who had rushed to her aid. In a moment the four were a mass of flames. The clothing was burned entirely from Miss Maley's body. The cotton burned as if it were saturated in oil. The three girls, who came to her assistance, were burned from head to foot. The fire spread to the clothing of the four.

It was 8:26 o'clock when the fire department at station No. 19, Westport, received the call. Before the firemen arrived the flames were put out. The fire did not ignite the other decorations nor the building.

INFORMATION DENIED.

Captain Flahive of No. 5 police station, and Officer Wood went to the academy. Considerable persuasion was required to gain an entrance. When the mother superior was asked for the names of the injured this information was denied.

Drs. B. H. Wheeler and Horrigan were summoned. All the cotton bandages in the drug store at Thirty-ninth and Genessee were bought outright. It was necessary later to send to Westport for more medicine and bandages. The physicians remained at the bedsides of the injured girls through the night.

The school authorities refused to make any details of the accident public. To all questions as to names and the extent of the injuries, those in authority replied that there was absolutely nothing to give out.

"We have the story," the reporters told them.

"Well, if you publish anything about this, we will sue your paper for libel."

The girls at the academy had planned for a Hallowe'en dance this evening at Little's hall in Westport but because of the occurrence last night, the party has been cancelled.

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September 26, 1909

FATHER O'DONNELL'S
SILVER SACERDOTAL.

LONG SERVICE IN THE PRIEST-
HOOD IN KANSAS CITY.

Friends to Commemorate the Event
on November 1 -- Came From
Tipperary to the West on
Advice of a Friend.
Roman Catholic Priest Father Patrick J. O'Donnell.
FATHER PATRICK J. O'DONNELL,
FOR 25 YEARS A PRIEST HERE.

In 1885 St. Joseph's hospital was an unpretentious structure, a building which now forms a small wing to the greater buildings constructed adjoining it. In one corner of the hospital grounds there stood a little frame building which was used by the druggist attached to the hospital.

In addition to the hospital buildings the grounds now contain a finely appointed church. The priest is the Rev. Father Patrick J. O'Donnell. He has been there twenty-four years. The church building has succeeded a modest chapel in which Father O'Donnell first celebrated mass when he was given charge of the chapel. It was his second charge in the priesthood.

On November 1, Father O'Donnell will celebrate his silver sacerdotal. At least, his friends have advised him that they will celebrate it for him. They have arranged a reception with Father O'Donnell as honor guest in the chapel hall at Eighth and Penn streets for the night of the day which will mark his twenty-fifth anniversary as a priest of the Roman Catholic church.

Father O'Donnell was born in Tipperary in May, 1862. He left Ireland when 14 years old and lived for four years with an aunt in New York. In 1880, he returned to Ireland and attended St. John's Theological seminary at Wexford. He completed the course of religious instruction there in 1884 and came direct to Kansas City.

The reason for his choosing Kansas City as a field for religious work was that a classmate in the Irish school had been ordered to the St. Joseph diocese and had written Father O'Donnell of what a fine country the Western part of the United States is. Kansas City at that time was a part of the St. Joseph diocese. The Right Reverend John J. Hogan, now bishop of Kansas City, was bishop of the St. Joseph diocese. Afterward, when the Kansas City diocese was created, Bishop Hogan became spiritual head of the Kansas City diocese and administrator for St. Joseph.

Father O'Donnell's first religious work in Kansas City was as an instructor in the parochial school of the Cathedral near Eleventh street and Broadway. He taught in the school for several months. In November, 1884, he was ordained as a priest in the Cathedral.

The first charge given Father O'Donnell was in Norborne, Mo. At the time of his ordination, Father O'Donnell was too young to be admitted to the priesthood, but a papal dispensation was granted. He remained in Norborne, Mo., until 1885, when he was appointed chaplain to St. Joseph's hospital and celebrated mass each alternate Sunday at Lee's Summit. He retained the Lee's Summit charge for two years.

Father O'Donnell was asked to build a church in Sheffield. He worked for several years to bring it about. After the church was built he celebrated mass in it. Two years ago it was made a separate charge. In the meantime, the new church at the hospital building was erected. It now serves many parishioners in addition to the convalescents at the hospital.

Father O'Donnell is of genial disposition. He is known as "a man's priest" because of the strong interest he invariably has held in athletics and his liking for the society of men. He is a member of the Kansas City lodge of the Elks, being the only member of the order among the priests of Missouri.

Father O'Donnell's family lives in Kansas City, they having removed from Ireland several years after he was assigned to the charge at Norborne. His various charges in Jackson county have given him a wide acquaintance here, while he is one of the few priests ordained at the Cathedral who has retained a parish in the city. As a result of his long residence here, the reception planned for him is to be made notable by his friends.

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September 3, 1909

UP FIRE ESCAPE SIX STORIES.

Patrolman, Weighing 275, Rescues
Girl Locked in Factory.

Patrolman Herman Hartman, who weighs 275 pounds, climbed the fire escape of the Cluett-Peabody Shirt Company at Eighth street and Broadway and rescued Lucy Henkensmeier, 15 years old, from the sixth floor where she had accidentally been locked in at closing time.

Lucy called up police headquarters over the telephone and between sobs said taht it looked like she would have to stay there all night unless help was sent at once. She had been in and adjoining room, she said, and the floor manager concluded that all had left when he locked the door. Ivan Knuedsen, a patrolman, accompanied Hartman to the scene.

In hopes of picking the lock of the building, Hartman was equipped with burglar outfits found in the station. A "jimmy" was of no avail, he found, and no skeleton kep would work. A charge of nitroglycerine was the only alternative, the two "cops" concluded. Just then a girl's sob drifted down from an open window.

"I can't stand that," said Hartman. "I'm going in the building."

Five feet above was the fire escape, just high enough to be hard to ascend from the ground. With a cat-like spring and a twist of the body, the fat policeman managed to get on the first rung and then the ascent was easy. He soon disappeared in the building and reappeared a moment later. He helped the girl down the ladder and she jumped in safety to Knuedsen's arms at the bottom.

Hartman perspired freely when he reached the ground.

"I guess that will take the fat off me about as good as drilling in Convention hall," he said.

The girl, who lives at 1811 Charlotte street, was hardly able to talk when she reached the ground.

"I was afraid to try the fire escape," she said.

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August 27, 1909

DYNAMITE ENOUGH TO
WRECK A SKYSCRAPER.

WHEN ARRESTED MEN HAD
FORTY SIX INCH STICKS.

Joseph Monroe and Edward Sanford
Found in vicinity of New South
Side Apartment House --
Stories Conflict.

In the arrest of two suspicious characters at Thirty-sixth street and Broadway about 10 o'clock last night the police believe they averted what was intended to be by far the biggest, most costly and most destructive job of dynamiting ever pulled off in Kansas City or vicinity.

Shortly after 10 o'clock Patrolman E. C. Krister and D. B. Harrison, plain clothes men working out of the Westport police station, saw two men at the corner of Thirty-sixth street and Broadway. One was lighting a cigarette and the officers noticed a small suit case in the hands of the other. When they began to close up the men began to accelerate their speed and only the command "Halt or we'll shoot," stopped them.

The officers did not know what they had until they got the men to the station house and Lieutenant O. T. Wofford carelessly opened the small, cheap suit case. What he believed to be a wire sticking through a hole in the end of the case attracted his attention. When the package was opened it was found to contain forty six-inch sticks of dynamite. Each was marked 40 per cent nitroglycerin -- Hercules No. 2. The "wire" proved to be a fuse and it was attached to two of the sticks of the explosive, in the center, with a cap imbedded deeply into each stick.

ONE HAD LOADED PISTOL.

The men gave the names of Joseph Monroe and Edward Sanford. The latter had in his possession a 44-caliber Derringer pistol, loaded. Monroe said he was a lineman and Sanford insisted that he was a common laborer.

The stories of the prisoners, who were separated by Lieutenant Wofford and questioned soon after their arrival, differ in many respects as to how they came to be in that neighborhood with such a package. While Lieutenant Wofford was in a room alone with Sanford he turned his head to answer a telephone call. Hearing a noise Wofford looked up and the prisoner had all but reached the club of Sergeant Harry Moulder which hung on an opposite wall. Wofford dropped the telephone and grappled with the man. Sergeant Moulder then entered the room and no further trouble occurred. A door was only a few feet away and had he succeeded in clubbing the lieutenant Sanford could have easily escaped.

When Monroe was questioned he said he, Sanford and a man named Charles Hogan had "bummed" their way from Denver. He claimed they arrived Tuesday morning, while Sanford said Sunday morning. Monroe said that last night he and his partner were walking down Grand avenue when they came upon Hogan at Thirteenth street.

"Do you want to make a piece of money?" Monroe says Hogan asked.

"We told him yes," Monroe went on. "We were both broke, hungry and dry. He then introduced us to a man named Anderson, Charles, I believe he said his first name was. He said he would give us $5 to carry a grip out on the Westport car line. We were to stay on the car until it made the second turn to the left. Then we were to get off and meet Anderson or some man who would be there waiting for us. We got off and had walked down the street a little ways when we were arrested. Anderson said to be careful that there was an explosive in the suitcase . That's all I know and I'm innocent of any wrong."

HOW DYNAMITE WAS TO BE USED.

Sanford, who tried to escape, said they arrived with Hogan two days earlier than Monroe stated.

"We went to the Stag hotel opposite the city hall," he said, "and this morning we met Hogan there. He asked us if we wanted to make a piece of coin and told us to meet him on Grand avenue this evening. He introduced us to Anderson and he was gone a long time after the grip. We met there about 7 o'clock."

"What was the dynamite for?" asked Lieutenant Wofford quickly.

"He said it was to blow up a scab job. No, we were not to do it. That was for the fellow who was to meet us, I guess. Yes, I knew there was an explosive in the grip and I knew I was doing wrong."

Sanford also said, when asked later, that he was to give the derringer to the stranger -- or Anderson -- who was to meet him. Both described the mysterious Anderson after they had been locked up within talking distance as "a man 35 years old, six feet tall, weighing 170 pounds. He wore a black mustache and had black hair and a dark complexion. He was dressed i a dark suite, black derby hat and black shoes."

ENOUGH TO WRECK SKYSCRAPER.

Sergeant Moulder also said he learned from inquiry along Westport avenue, that there had been much talk among the union men about the big apartment being a "scab job," and "a rat job." There appeared to be much discontent on account of the immense job being done by an "open shop," he said he gathered from talks with saloonkeepers.

Experts who were called in to examine the package of dynamite said that, properly placed, there was enough to wreck any skyscraper in the city and damage buildings for blocks around.

After the men were locked up they were in a position to talk to each other. William Hicks, a patrolman, sat near the door and heard Monroe upbraid Sanford for being such a dunce as to get his dates mixed on the time of their arrival here and their final meeting with Hogan and the mysterious Anderson. The men are being held for investigation.

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August 18, 1909

BOARD FEARED A TRICK.

So a Valuable Land Gift to the City
Was Declined.

"Where is the brick? Dig deep and you will surely find a nicely plated one," observed R. L. Gregory, chairman, at yesterday's meeting of the board of public works, when a communication was read offering to deed that city a strip of water front land forty feet wide west from Broadway to the state line.

"It is too liberal a gift," suggested Lynn Brooks.

"Mark it most respectfully declined and mail it back to the bounteous giver," recommended Wallace Love.

This will be done. A man who is creating a levy within the boundaries so described made the proposition, but the board concluded that should it accept it would mean an expense incurred by the city to provide protection for the other fellow's property.

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July 12, 1909

JOE MARKS STOPPED FIGHT.

Ability as Linguist Helped Him to
Put and End to Quarrel.

The versatility of Joe Marks, a cigar salesman, prevented guests at the Coates house last night from witnessing what might have proved a battle royal, when he intervened between two men, neither of whom could speak English, who were about to "mix it up" in the street at Tenth street and Broadway. Joe speaks seven languages and he said last night it helped him a lot. He lives at the Coates house.

The men were quarreling with their wives. The women knew each other, but the men were not acquainted and neither could speak English intelligently. A misunderstanding occurred when they met and were introduced. One of the belligerents was an Italian and the other a Bohemian. In an aside to his wife the Italian said something the Bohemian believed derogatory. They tried to explain in English, but it was useless.

Just as the men were rolling up their sleeves Marks appeared on the scene. He acted as interpreter general and finally succeeded in quieting all parties. His thanks came in three languages.

Marks was returning from the Union depot to the hotel when he overheard the argument.

"If the flood had not tied up the trains I might have been on my way to Iowa," he said, "and in that case someone would surely h ave been hurt. The women were sure to have gotten into it if a fight had occurred."

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June 9, 1909

IS WIFE OF A MILLIONAIRE.

Grace La Rue, Kansas City Vaude-
ville Actress, Weds in London.

Grace La Rue, a vaudeville actress, who formerly lived in Kansas City, was recently married to Byron D. Chandler, a millionaire of New Hampshire. The marriage took place in England and was known to only a few close friends of the couple.

Miss La Rue was a Miss Parsons and lived with her mother, Mrs. Lucy L. Parsons, at 1319 Broadway, Kansas City, Mo. She ran away from home when a child and joined a vaudeville company at St. Louis. Later she married Charles H. Burke, from whom she was divorced several years ago.

Mr. Chandler was recently divorced from his first wife and married Miss La Rue shortly after leaving America. Mr. and Mrs. Chandler are at a hotel in London. The announcement of the marriage was made accidentally while Mr. Chandler was being interviewed upon his scheme of driving a coach in opposition to Alfred G. Vanderbilt, between London and Brighton.

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June 7, 1909

WALDO CHURCH IS
DEDICATED.

Bishop Quayle Conducts Services at
Broadway Methodist Edifice.

The new Broadway Methodist Episcopal church in Waldo, at the corner of Seventy-fourth street and Broadway, was dedicated yesterday and nearly $10,000 was raised to liquidate the congregation's indebtedness. The total cost including the lot, amounts to $14,200. The edifice is of stone. The Rev. H. G. Humphrey is the pastor. Bishop W. A. Quayle of Oklahoma conducted the dedication at both the morning and afternoon services and was assisted by the pastor and District Superintendent S. B. Campbell.

In 1907 a Sunday school was organized and was held in a blacksmith shop. The Rev. O. M. Stewart, who had charge of the work in Waldo, took the first subscriptions for a church and later the Sunday school was removed to Pitkin hall at Seventy-fifth and Broadway.

In October of 1907 the church was organized and in March of the following year, the contract for the new building was let. Dr. C. B. Hewitt and wife presented the church with a lot of nearly an acre as a site, valued at $1,350. In April of the same year the Rev. H. G. Humphrey was assigned to the church at the Springfield conference. The cornerstone was laid last August and addresses were made by the Rev. C. C. Cissel and Dr. John Punton.

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May 28, 1909

BOUNDARIES FOR TENDERLOIN.

Tenement Commission's Advice Con-
cerning "Red Light" Districts.

In a letter to the board of police commissioners yesterday the tenement commission advised the board that conditions on Twelfth street in the neighborhood of Central high school were not ideal, and that many hotels and rooming houses in that neighborhood were frequented by an undesirable class of inmates.

The commission also advised that the "red light" district be segregated to definite boundaries, south of Twelfth street. The letter advised that the boundaries of the district be fixed at Main street on the west, McGee street on the east, Eighteenth street on the south and Fourteenth street on the north. The district in the North End should be bounded on the north by Second street, on the east by Wyandotte street, on the south by Fifth street and on the west by Broadway.

Commissioner Marks was delegated to make an investigation of the matter, and report at the next meeting.

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April 21, 1909

BEHEADED BY LOCOMOTIVE.

Switch Engine Derailed by Clothing
of Night Watchman Killed
on Belt Line Track.

L. Hougardy, night watchman for the Cypress Incubator Company, was decapitated and his body mangled by switch engine No. 2118 about 100 feet east of Penn street on the Belt Line tracks at 9:45 o'clock last night. Money in the man's pockets, together with his clothing which wadded up in front of the wheels, derailed the engine.

Engineer William White and Fireman Stoiver, by their combined efforts, could not dislodge the body, so No. 3 police station and the coroner were notified.

"I was keeping a sharp lookout on all sides because of the rain," said Engineer White. "I did not see the man, and can not yet understand how he came in front of the engine unnoticed, unless he had been murdered and laid across the rails or had been hit by another engine. The first notice I had of the accident was the jolt of the front wheels leaving the rails."

Engineer White has the reputation of being a careful engine driver of many years' experience. He lives at 2107 Belleview. Fireman Stoiver lives at 2719 Holly street.

Hougardy's identity was learned through his failure to pull the Western Union hourly call box. He lived near Broadway and Southwest boulevard.

An autopsy will be held today.

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March 26, 1909

HAD BAD MONEY AND
COUNTERFEITING KIT.

MAN AND WOMAN ADMIT
MAKING THE "QUEER."

Secret Service Men and City Detect-
ives Discover and Break Up a
Local Plant and Arrest
the Operators.

ROOM AT 621 PENN STREET WHERE KING, THE COUNTERFEITER,
AND HIS WOMAN COMPANION WERE CAUGHT.

The operations of a gang of counterfeiters in Kansas City came to a sudden end yesterday with the arrest at Seventh and Penn streets by a United States secret service agent and city detectives of a man and woman giving their names as Charles King and Mary Cook., and the discovery of the apparatus used in making the spurious coin. Both admitted that bad dollars had been made for the past month.

For the past few weeks Charles A. Adams, United States secret service man in Kansas City, has received complaints of bad coins being circulated. He paid particular attention to the arrest of Daniel Kelly in Kansas City, Kas., March 19 for passing a bad dollar on William G. Smith, a grocer at 1700 North Third street. At the time of his arrest Kelly had three irregular coins in his possession. In police court Judge Sims fined Kelly $500 for vagrancy.



IN A BASEMENT ROOM.

Adams, who visited Kelly in prison, says Kelly confessed making the coins and said his assistants were living at 621 Penn street in Kansas City, Mo.

Adams gave the facts to the police department and Andy O'Hare and Samuel Lowe, detectives, found that the couple were living in the basement of the brick house at the number which Kelly gave. Though the detectives watched the place last Sunday, nothing worth mentioning was discovered. The coins which the couple passed were good ones and could not excite suspicion.

Adams himself watched the house yesterday morning. About 10 o'clock the woman came out and got on a Roanoke car and at Southwest boulevard changed to the Rosedale line. The secret service man, of course, was following her. In Rosedale the woman alighted and entered a grocery store and asked if the clerk could change a dollar.



MARY COOK.

The clerk looked at the coin critically and returned it.

"It's no good," he said, and the woman hurried out.

She walked a short distance when she met a little girl.

"Have you the change for $1?" she asked.

The child shook her head, and she passed on. When Mrs. Cook came to the baker of Mrs. Florence Catley, 1142 Kansas City avenue, she entered and again attempted to pass one of the dollars and was again refused. Out on the sidewalk, Adams stopped the woman.

"You are under arrest," he said.



SHE BLAMED KELLY.

"Why, I didn't know that it was a bad coin," she protested. "It certainly looks like one, doesn't it?"

But she accompanied Adams up town and as they were walking up the front walk to the rooming house, Detectives O'Hare and Lwe came out with King. She broke down and in the presence of King told the whole story.


CHARLES KING.

"It was all Kelly's fault," she sobbed. "We came here from Denver four weeks ago and there wasn't a job in sight that my husband could get. At last he fell in with Kelly, and then they began to make the bad dollars. But today is the first time that I tried to pass one of the coins. Last night we ate the last food in the house, and I had to do something. I went out and tried to pass one of the coins to keep from starving."

The man hung his head during the recital, and at her conclusion corroborated her statements. He said that they had heard of the arrest of Kelly in Kansas City, Kas., and destroyed the molds at once. In an old vault at 512 Broadway where several buildings have been torn down, he told the officers that they might find the broken pieces.

Following his instructions, the officers found five sets of plaster moulds, a quantity of tin and antimony, and a moulding pot. All the material was taken to the federal building and will be held as evidence. The prisoners were taken to police headquarters, where the woman was placed in the matron's room and the man in the holdover.

In the matron's room the Cook woman said that she had formerly lived in Kansas City. She said that she had purchased a home on the installment plan at 2044 Denver avenue, and had made six payments, until last December. She separated from her husband, Thomas Cook, about a year ago, she said, and went to Denver. There she met King, who was working for a gas company.

"We came back to Kansas City because times were hard," she said, as she wept, "but he couldn't get any work here, and he fell in with Kelly. I didn't know for some time that they were making the bad money. Today is the first time that I tried to pass one of the coins."

The couple will be turned over to the United States authorities today. None of the neighbors suspected anything wrong. The family of John Pulliam, who lived on the same floor in the basement, thought that the man and his wife were employed down town. Kelly and king, the woman said, generally made the coins at night. They were such poor imitations that it is doubtful if many were passed.

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March 15, 1909

DEAD SISTER'S HAIR IN CHAIN.

Highwaymen Gave It Back, but They
Kept the Watch.

Two unmasked white men held up and robbed Edward S. Frances of 2317 West Prospect avenue at 8 o'clock last night near Broadway and Southwest boulevard. Both highwaymen had revolvers. After relieving Frances of $1.70 in small change one of them was about to slip his gold watch into his pocket when the victim interposed.

"Look at that chain," he said. "It isn't worth much to you, is it? Well, it's made out of my dead sister's hair. Will you give it back?"

The robber obligingly detached the chain and it was the only article about Frances's person he was allowed to keep. Both then hurried away.

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February 4, 1909

AL HATCH'S NARROW ESCAPE.

Bullet Whizzed Through Saloon
Man's Bed Room.

The loss of a woman's comb came near resulting in the escape of a prisoner from the police at police headquarters at 1 o'clock this morning and the shooting of a man or his wife who were sleeping in their room almost a block from the station. John Slivins and Jennie Nelson were arrested at Twelfth and Broadway for disturbing the peace. They were taken to police headquarters in a patrol wagon. As the man and woman, in charge of Patrolman Hugh Dougherty, started to enter the station the woman said she had lost her comb. As Dougherty started back to the patrol wagon to look for the comb, John Slivins turned and ran. The patrolman pursued him and fired one shot. Slivins ran into the arms of Patrolman Pat Boyle a block from the station and was returned to the station.

The bullet from the patrolman's revolver entered the bedroom of Mr. and Mrs. Al Hatch at 429 Walnut street. The window was smashed and the bullet passed 18 inches over the bed where Hatch and his wife were sleeping and was embedded in a dresser across the room. Hatch reached for his revolver and ran downstairs. He said that Mrs. Hatch was terribly frightened and crawled under the bed. He went to police headquarters, where it was explained to him the reason for the shot.

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January 30, 1909

MOOCHERS HERE ARE PLENTY.

They Infest Certain Streets and Con-
tinually Annoy People.

Beggars infest certain streets in Kansas City near the business districts and annoy people passing along those thoroughfares, especially at night. Along the streets where they ply their trade a policeman is rarely ever seen. Along Central avenue, between Ninth and Tenth street, and along Eleventh street from Broadway to Wyandotte, there are from six to eight beggars stationed every night.

They are a prosperous looking set of hoboes, too. Some of them are able-bodied, healthy, well-dressed young men, who evidently seek the cover of night to beg for dimes.

"Just a dime, please, to get a cheap bed," is their plea. One fellow has a story to tell about being on the way to his home in Iowa and was robbed of all his money. Now he is forced to ask assistance. He has been working the same street for three weeks. He dresses well, too, so he must be prospering.

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January 8, 1909

GREEKS AND SERVIANS
HAVE LATE CHRISTMAS.

JANUARY 7 IS THE DAY THEY
CELEBRATE.

Calendar Is Thirteen Days Behind.
Kansas City Colonies of the
Two Nations Make
Holiday.

Christmas day was observed yesterday by the Servians and Greeks of Kansas City thirteen days later than the American and English Christmas. The day was made a holiday and none of the Greeks and Servians in the Kansas City colonies in the North End and West Bottoms failed to observe the day in some manner. Gifts were exchanged and there was general feasting and merrymaking.

Christmas means the same to the Greeks and Servians as it does to other people, namely the celebration of the birth of Christ, but the calendar used by them is thirteen days behind the calendar in general use. There is one great difference between the manner in which the people observe the day. No gifts are given or expected by anyone not an immediate family member. Friends do not give presents in token of their friendship.

Santa Claus is called "Callkagary," and he is supposed to be a tall man of dark complexion with merry black eyes, who visits all the little children on the night or during the week before Christmas day. He doesn't live at the North pole, but inhabits the clouds.

GATHERED IN GROUPS.

The Greeks, there are about 1,000 of them in a colony around Fifth street and Broadway, gave up the entire day yesterday to revelry and fun. There were no particular ceremonies, the colony has no church, but the men gathered in groups in halls and saloons, while the women and children visited each other.

New Year's day is really the day for gifts by the Greeks, but Christmas day does not lack any of its charm because of that. New Year's day will be one week from yesterday, the first of January, according to the Greek calendar. The Christmas season among the Greeks and Servians is supposed to last during three days, but the colony here will not make today and tomorrow festive days.

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October 29, 1908

CAPTAIN WILLIAM J. MORLEY,
OF POLICE FORCE, IS DEAD.

Brave and Efficient Officer, and Had
Been in City's Service
Many Years.

After an illness of more than two months, William James Morley, captain at No. 5 police station, died yesterday afternoon about 5 o'clock. He had been for twenty-two years one of the most efficient members of the police force of the city. He was 57 years old.

Captain Morley was born in Ireland, but emigrated to this country at the age of 18 years. He became a railroad man and soon rose to the position of assistant yardmaster at Binghampton, N. Y. It was there that he married and then moved to Kansas City, coming in at the same time that the C. B. & Q railway did, thirty-two years ago.

He was made yardmaster, a position which he held for ten years. At the end of that time he gave up his position to become a policeman, and was assigned to the Central police station. He was a brave and capable officer and made a number of good captures. At the end of ten years' service as a patrolman he was made a sergeant and stationed at No. 4 station. Seven years ago, as a reward for faithful service, he was made a lieutenant in charge of the desk at the Walnut street station. There he remained until September, 1907, when he was made captain and placed at the Westport station.

Captain Morley was wounded in the service fo the city once, that being during a fight in the West Bottoms, in which he was accidentally shot in the left shoulder by a brother officer while trying to arrest a burglar.

Captain Morley was singularly fortunate in his business ventures. Many years ago he bought a strip of land in the West Bottoms, which the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul railway bought from him at an increased price. He also invested in other real estate, and he invariably made a handsome profit on every transaction. Hhis fortune is estimated at $15,000. At the time of his death he owned some business property on Grand avenue and several houses, besides farming land.

Captain Morley's private life was happy. He lived many years in the ho use where he died at 3418 Broadway, an old-fashioned frame house set far back in the yard. Besides his wife his family consisted of five children. Katherine is now in Binghampton, N. Y.; Mrs. P. E. Fagan loves in Kansas City. Louis C. is a steamfitter; John is a farmer in Jackson county and William J. Morely, Jr., is a miner in Ely, Nev. Two grandchildren also survive. Captain Morley was a devout Catholic and a member of the Annunciation parish. He belonged to the order of Heptosophs.

"I worked with Captain Morley for fifteen years," siad Captain Thomas P. Flahive last night, "and I always found him honest, fearless and efficient as well as considerate and kind hearted. The police force of Kansas City has lost one of its finest and truest men."

The funeral services will be held Friday morning at the home, but the exact time has not been determined. Catholic rites will be used.

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October 17, 1908

POPULAR HOTEL CLERK DEAD.

Irving W. Doolittle Had Been at the
Baltimore Many Years.

Irving W. Doolittle, 48 years old, chief clerk at the Hotel Baltimore, died yesterday morning at his home in the Lorraine apartments, 1014 Broadway. Mr. Doolittle was born in Antrim, N. H., and came West while a young man of 28. He had been clerk in hotels in the East, and became chief clerk at the Throop hotel, Topeka. While there he married the daughter of the proprietor of the hotel.

She died, and three years ago Mr. Doolittle married again. He came to Kansas City several years ago and became clerk at the Midland hotel, but two years ago was transferred to the position which he held at the time of his death.

Besides his wife he leaves a brother, Arthur Doolittle, officer in the navy, now stationed at Portsmouth, and another in New York. The body is at the home of W. B. Johnson, his brother-in-law, 2825 Independence avenue. The funeral arrangements have not been made.

Mr. Doolittle was unquestionably one of the most popular hotel clerks in the country. There isn't a traveling salesman this side of the Rockies but knew him and liked him for his unusual patience and courtesy. For all these Mr. Doolittle always had a smile and a hearty handshake when they came in. If rooms were scarce he always gave assurances that set at rest the impatient traveling salesman.

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October 10, 1908

FARMERS SHOOT A
COCAINE CRAZED MAN.

RICHARD GREENWOOD STOLE A
GUN AND HORSE.

Defended Himself, Behind Breast-
works of Baled Hay Near Swope
Park -- Back and Legs
Filled With Shot.

Just as bales of cotton looked fine to Andrew Jackson of New Orleans, so bales of hay appealed as ramparts to Richard Greenwood near Swope park yesterday. Greenwood has a fondness for cocaine and, cherishing delusions that he was being pursued, he fled from the North End into open country, perhaps by street car. He was in no condition yesterday to tell.

At any rate, early in the morning he appeared at the farm house of C. C. Cole, about five miles east of Swope park. Whatever delusions the Cole family may have cherished that he was in search of information as to how to make $1,000 from an acre in six months were quickly dispelled when Greenwood ran into the house and took a shotgun which hung on the wall.

With the gun he hurried down the road to where R. C. Hutcheson was looking after the horses in his barn . Pointing the business end of the weapon towards the farmer, he induced the latter to put bridle and saddle on a horse. Then Greenwood rode away. Hutcheson got busy with the telephone and every farmer in the neighborhood was soon out, each armed with a shotgun.

In the meantime, Greenwood had discovered that the gun he carried was of the ancient pattern called "Zulu." It had only one barrel and but one cartridge. So at the home of C. S. Brown the raider stopped and induced Mrs. Brown to give her five shells. He threatened her with the gun.

By this time the farmers were in full cry after the North Ender. Soon after leaving the Brown farm, Greenwood forsook his steed and made for a field. There he made a rude breastwork of baled hay. Behind this he defied capture. His pursuers fired and he returned the fire. Right there the "Zulu" took revenge. Greenwood was unable to extract the first shell from the gun and before he was otherwise able to defend himself he had been captured.
Martin Roos, a deputy marshal, brought Greenwood to the jail hospital. He had shot in his back and legs. A charge of robbery in the first degree was filed against him in Justice J. B. Shoemaker's court.

When searched at the county jail cocaine was found in Greenwood's pockets. He said some one had given him the drug. Last spring he was treated at the general hospital for the drug habit. Of late he had been working at 507 Broadway.

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October 4, 1908

MAD MOTORISTS CAUGHT.

NORRIS AND THOMPSON CONFESS TO
DRIVING FATAL CAR.

The Two Men Arrested While
Hiding Near Troy, Kas.

TROY, Kas., Oct. 3. -- (By telephone.). Thomas Norris and James Thompson, the "mad motorists" whose speed mania sent one person to death and seriously injured four others in Kansas City last Tuesday night, were arrested on a farm near this city early this morning.

They immediately admitted their identity and confessed that they had driven the car which killed Pearl Gochenour. They are now in charge of Kansas City detectives and are returning to Missouri without requisitions. It is probable that they will reach Kansas City this afternoon. Both men are badly frightened and despondent.



Shivering from the cool morning blasts on their cots in a tent on an isolated portion of a farm five miles south of Troy, Kas., Thomas Norris and James Thompson were arrested at daybreak yesterday morning by Sheriff M. C. Kent and Deputy Sheriff Griffin of Doniphan county. The "mad motorists" have been hidden away on the Carpenter farm for the past two days and seemingly felt secure from pursuit in their retreat. They were taken to St. Joseph, Mo., and were brought to Kansas City yesterday afternoon by Detectives Wilson and Ghent, who have been working on the case since the night of the automobile tragedy in which little Pearl Gochenour was killed and four other people seriously injured.

Captain Walter Whitsett had set his net so thoroughly that the fleeing chauffeurs have never had a chance of making their escape. The captain of police got in communication last night with Sheriff Kent of Troy over the telephone and instructed him to go to the farm five miles away where he would catch the two men wanted so badly in Kansas City for criminal negligence.

Norris, who was a chauffeur for the Woodward Automobile company, and Thompson, recklessly drove a car, going at a speed of forty miles an hour, into a frail spring wagon on Broadway, near Hunter avenue, last Tuesday night. Of the occupants of the wagon, 10-year-old Pearl Gochenour was instantly killed and Mrs. Jennie Bucher of Forty-seventh and Holly streets was seriously injured. Robert Gochenour was internally injured, but will recover. Miss Florence Bucher and Mrs. Alice Gochenour sustained severe bruises.

Without waiting to ascertain the extent of the havoc they had wrought, the motorists sped away laughing over their shoulders at the picture of the writhing victims they had brought about. After returning the car to the Woodward garage at 1929 Grand avenue, Norris and Thompson fled to the home of Norris's mother in Kansas City, Kas., where they spent the night. At an early hour Wednesday morning they set about eluding the officers and succeeded until last night, when it was learned that they might be near Troy, Kas., where Thompson's father lived on a farm.

Norris and Thompson were seen in Brenner, a small village three miles from Troy, Thursday afternoon, where they were purchasing several days' provisions for their camp on the Carpenter farm two miles from the town. They bought everything in the way of eatables from spring chicken to flour, and were continually joking about the long stay which they expected to make in their camp. Sanford Thompson, the father of one of the chauffeurs, occupies a portion of the Carpenter farm, and it was on this portion that the tent had been pitched. According to the information received over the 'phone the young men were much excited when they were informed that they were under arrest, but they gave in without attempting to escape. They will be held without bail until they can be given a hearing.

Automobile men of the city are clamoring for the prosecution of the mad drivers, as well as the general public. It may fare harder with Norris than with Thompson, as it was he who drove the car and who had taken it without permission from the Woodward garage. Since their arrest both have grown despondent and refuse to talk of the tragedy which resulted in the death of Pearl Gochenour.

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September 30, 1908

MOTOR CAR KILLS
ONE, HURTS FOUR

COLLIDES WITH LIGHT SPRING
WAGON ON BROADWAY.

RUNNING AT 40 MILES HOUR.

RECKLESS CHAUFFEUR SPEEDS
AWAY IN THE DARKNESS.

LAUGHS AT HIS VICTIMS.

PEARL GOCHENOUR DEAD; MRS.
BUCHER MAY DIE.

Women and Children Hurled High in
Air When Crash Came -- Dam-
aged Car May Lead
to Detection.

No more heartless indifference to suffering and death has been exhibited in Kansas City than occurred last night, when a furiously driven big red touring automobile crashed into a light spring wagon on Broadway, near Hunter avenue, killing a girl of 14 years and badly injuring five other people, two women, two girls and a boy.

The impact of the collision was heard a block away.

When the motor car struck the wagon, tearing it to pieces, women and children, screaming with fright and pain, were hurled high into the air and fell in a heap on the hard curbing, with bits of splintered wood falling all about them. It is said the men in the motor car -- there were two -- looked at the death and suffering they had caused, laughed, turned on more speed and glided away into the enveloping darkness.

HOW ACCIDENT OCCURRED.

The accident occurred at 8:45 o'clock. Besides little Pearl, who was instantly killed, the other four occupants were seriously injured and at least one fatally so. In the spring wagon were Mrs. Jennie A. Bucher, her daughter Florence and Mrs. Frank Gochenour and and two children, Robert and Pearl.

Mrs. Bucher was driving the horse when the accident occurred. The two families are neighbors and often go driving together in the evening. Last night they started to go to Levanthal's bakery, 1819 Grand avenue. The horse was being driven north on Broadway and in order to avoid speeding automobiles Mr. Bucher was driving close into the curbing.

They had passed Hunter avenue and were proceeding at a slow trot when suddenly the front wheels of the wagon were struck by an automobile, and without any warning the women and children were thrown out. The wagon crashed the front part of the wagon against the curbing, leaving it in splinter. Mrs. Bucher and Mrs. Cochenour and Robert Gochenour were thrown up onto the parkway, falling on top of each other. Miss Florence Bucher fell beneath the rear wheel. Little Pearl Gochenour, who had been sitting on her mother's lap, fell beneath the seat of the wagon and the horse was knocked over on top of her, crushing her.

FATHER WAS STUNNED.

Frank Gochenour, the father of the dead child, is a stonemason and resides on Forty-seventh street between Holly and Mercer streets. Mrs. Bucher conducts a grocery store at 825 West Forty-seventh street and her husband, Henry Bucher, is a bartender at the Valerious cafe. Mrs. Bucher is 42 years old, Florence Bucher is 14, Mrs. Alice Gochenour is 37, Robert 14 and the little girl was only 10 years of age. Rober Bucher, 14 years old, had been visiting with Robert Wilson, Thirty-fourth street and Broadway, and was on his way home when he heard the noise the collision made and ran to where the crowd was quickly gathering. He was much affected when he learned that his mother and sister were injured.

As soon as Mr. Bucher heard of the accident, he hurried to the emergency hospital, but his wife was unconscious.

A few minutes after he arrived his two daughters who had stayed at home arrived. They said they had gone to Mr. Gochenour's house and told him of the accident. He was alone in the house with his 3-year-old baby girl and could not leave to go to the hospital. The Bucher girls said that Mr. Gochenour did not seem to realize that his little girl was dead.

HEARD THE CHAUFFEURS LAUGH.

J. D. Skinner, 3508 Baltimore avenue, did not see the accident, but did hear the crash and saw the disappearing automobile. He was on Hunter avenue at the time and running to the corner could see two men in the machine. He said it was running at a rate of forty-five miles an hour when it passed over Hunter avenue and possibly faster after the accident. Many women living in the vicinity came out of their houses in time to see the automobile flying down the road. Some of them said they heard the two men in the machine laugh.

When the police were searching the street around the spot where the wagon was demolished they found part of an automobile lamp and broken parts of glass of the light reflector. Sergeant James A. Jadwin of No. 5 police station telephoned a description of the auto and the men to eleven police stations, and the men in several districts were given the descriptions. Kansas City, Kas., police were also notified.

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September 22, 1908

PROHIBITION'S OPENING GUN.

Eugene W. Chafin, Candidate for
President, Will Open Campaign.

The opening gun of the Prohibition party's campaign in Jackson county and Missouri will be fired at the New Casino hall, 1021 Broadway, tomorrow night. Eugene W. Chafin, Prohibition candidate for president, will be here then to deliver one of his campaign speeches on "The Platform of the Prohibition Party."

Mr. Chafin is returning to the East from a tour of the Pacific coast states and the Northwest, where he has been campaigning. Ex-Governor John P. St. John of Kansas and Dr. C. B. Spencer, editor of the Christian Advocate, will preside at the meeting.

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September 12, 1908

HANGED HERSELF, BUT LIVES.

Mrs. Harry Woodruff Made a Rope
of Police Station Bedding.

Frustrated in her attempt to throw herself into the Missouri river early Friday morning, Mrs. Harry Woodruff, Fourth street and Broadway, hanged herself in the cell in the matron's room at police headquarters four hours later. Mike Mullane, a patrolman, saw the woman running toward the river in an excited manner. He gave chase and caught her. While taking her to Second and Main streets the woman broke from him and tried to throw herself in front of a passing freight train. Again the patrolman rescued her and called the patrol wagon from police headquarters. It took four officers to put the maniacal woman in the wagon.

All the way to the station the woman said that she would not live for twelve hours and she defied the officers to save her life. After she had been locked in the matron's office it was thought she was quieted. At 7 o'clock yesterday morning a passing officer heard strange sounds coming from the cell in the matron's room. Entering the room he saw the woman hanging by a cloth rope from the bars. She was taken down almost unconscious and later sent to the Door of Hope.

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August 6, 1908

EXCESSIVE HEAT KILLS TWO.

Both Victims Were Men and Both
Were Found Dead in Bed.

Two men died in Kansas City yesterday as the result of excessive heat. Both were found dead in bed, and autopsies held by the coroner developed the fact that they died of heart failure, but heat prostration is given as the contributory cause.

One of the men was Arthur J. Shera, 37 years of age, a carpenter from San Diego, Cal. He was found in his room at the Hotel Convention, Twelfth street and Broadway, at 6:30 o'clock. The second man was Patrick Kearny, 45 years of age, a laborer, found in his room at 24 East Third street, at 7 o'clock.

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May 5, 1908

POLICE FIND OWNERS
OF CANNED JEWELS.

BOY'S DISCOVERY BRINGS GLAD-
NESS TO ONE HOME.

Porch Climber Had Stolen Watches
on December 26, 1906, and
Buried Them in a To-
mato Can.

By a thorough search of police records Fred G. Bailey, secretary to the inspector of detectives, yesterday located the owners for most of the jewelry which was found Saturday night at Nineteenth and McGee streets. The valuables were found by John E. Linings, 317 East Nineteenth street, a boy who was digging for worms. It was all safely planted in an old rusty tin can which, according to the record, had been in the ground just one year, four months and two days when found. The can, which was delivered to Lieutenant Hammil at the Walnut street station, contained four gold watches, one gold cross, one gold cuff button, two brooches, one an old came; one gold and one enamel heart, and one string of three-strand gold beads.

Bailey began at January, 1906, and it was not until he reached December 26 of that year that his efforts were rewarded. On that night porch climbers entered the home of E. H. Stimson, 3145 Broadway, while the family was in the siting room below. The thief or thieves secured two ladies' gold watches, one an open face watch, with E. A. S. on the case in big letters, and the other marked "Emmett to Olive." They also got a long gold watch chain and five gold rings.

On the same evening the home of C. M. Gilbert, then living at 3129 Washington street, was entered, probably by the same "climbers" as it was in a similar manner. There three gold watches were stolen. One, an open face watch, had "1876" engraved on it and there was a long chain to it. Another was engraved "Annie B Gilbert" and the last was undescribed. The thief also got a black seal card case and $40 in cash.

The gold engraved cross, the cuff button, two brooches and two hearts have not yet been identified. Detective Ralph Trueman was sent out to locate the robbed families and tell them of their luck. He found Mr. Stimson still living at the same number but Mr. Gilbert, he said, had left the city. Neighbors said the family had moved to Ohio. They believed it was Dayton. Secretary Bailey will endeavor to locate Mr. Gilbert and make him happy.

Mr. Stimson, who is a real estate man, was very much pleased when told of the find. "I recall the night we were robbed," he said. "It was the night after Christmas and about 8 o'clock. The thieves climbed the front porch and ransacked the two front rooms. The watch marked 'E. A. S.' is the property of my daughter, Edith Aileen Stimson. She will be more pleased than anybody as she was broken hearted over her loss."

Many conjectures have been made as to how and why the can of jewelry was buried in the ground and especially why it was left there. Many police believe that the thief, after burying his loot, fell into the hands of the law and may now be doing time in some prison. Others think the man who put the can there must be dead.

It is not an unusual thing for burglars to bury plunder, especially watches and other jewelry which is easily identified. After it has been buried long enough for the police to cease to look for the lost valuables they can easily be dug up and either sold or pawned with less chance of detection. If the thief is in prison the police believe he would have some day returned and disposed of his loot.

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