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February 5, 1910

BLANKETS FOR THE BABIES.

Generous Response to the Appeal for
the Mercy Hospital.

As the result of an announcement in the Journal that babies at Mercy hospital were sadly in need of blankets to keep them warm these cold nights, blankets for the babies were contributed yesterday by the following generous hearted women:

Miss Inez Wagner, 3127 Woodland avenue.
Ruth Beall Smith, 3915 Walnut street.
Mrs. John H. Leidigh, $6 in cash in lieu of blankets.
Mrs. Dreyfoos, 2101 Wabash avenue.
Miss Isidore Westheimer.
Miss Edna Stone.
Mrs. Rose A. Price, 4032 Warwick boulevard.
The Doress Circle, Independence Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church.

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February 3, 1910

ASKS AID FOR PARISIANS.

French Consular Agent Wants Com-
mittee Appointed to Raise Funds.

The co-operation of Mayor Crittenden was asked yesterday by Emile S. Brus, French consular agent in Kansas City, in the appointment of a committee to solicit funds for the relief of the people of Paris who are in dire distress on account of the overflow of the Seine. The mayor expressed full accord with the proposed movement, and will have another interview this morning with W. T. Bland, president of the Commercial Club, and Mr. Brus, to outline a course of action.

Mr. Brus stated that Baron H. De St. Laurent, the consul in Chicago, had urged the taking of subscriptions in Kansas City.

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January 31, 1910

WATER BOTTLES WARM TOTS.

Lack of Blankets at Mercy Hospital
Forced Substitute.

Every bottle, jug, or other vessel that would hold hot water was in use at Mercy hospital Saturday night, and for the unusual purpose of raising the temperature in the rooms to compensate, to some extent, for lack of blankets.

In numerous instances it necessary to place little patients in the glass-enclosed balconies where they can have the benefit of plenty of fresh air and be isolated from other inmates. But, while fresh air is necessary in these cases, it is also essential that their bodies be amply protected from the cold. It was the lack of adequate bed clothing that nearly drove the nurses distracted Saturday night, and after using everything available, the hot water vessels were resorted to.

Mercy hospital needs fifty pairs of blankets and needs them right now. That it will get them is practically assured, for Kansas City is quick to respond to any appeal from this worthy charity. In making the appeal the officials of the institution state that they prefer donations of money with which to purchase the necessary equipment. The blankets in use at Mercy hospital are made to order, of a certain size and weight, and are purchased at a much smaller figure than individual buyers can secure them.

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January 14, 1910

FUND ONE-FIFTH COMPLETED.

Mercy Hospital for Children Still
Needs $4,000 for Extension.

One-fifth of the $5,000 needed by the Mercy hospital to furnish the second floor of their hospital for children, has been received and several other donations promised. "We have to have the money to furnish this floor," said Dr. Alice Graham, superintendent of the hospital, last night. "A short time ago we had all the patients that we could care for. I consider that $5,000 will furnish this floor and leave enough funds to pay the help for the year. We have no private income. We received a check the other day from a woman in Detroit, Mich. One large room is to be fixed up for the permanently afflicted children."

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January 12, 1910

ITS MOST SUCCESSFUL YEAR.

Girls' Industrial Home Cared for
1,927 Persons in 1909.

At the annual meeting of the Industrial Home for Girls Association held at the home, 2940 Highland avenue, it was stated that the year 1909 was the most successful in the seventeen years of the home's existence. During the year it has cared for 1,925 girls, one boy and one old woman.

The Industrial Home, which was formerly the Door of Hope, organized originally to care for wayward girls. A year ago it bought the premises it now occupies for $7,000, of which all but $300 is paid. the report for the year shows receipts of $4581.20 and expenses $4,347.97.

The new officers elected yesterday were:

President, Mrs. E. L. Chambliss; vice president, Mrs. John B. Stone; recording secretary, Mrs. George r. Chambers; corresponding secretary, Mrs. George E. Ragan; treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Moore; board of managers, Mrs. J. W. Stoneburner, Mrs. George A. Wood, Mrs. William Waltham, J. M. Givvons, E. R. Curry, Miss E. Ellis, Miss Ella Albright, Miss W. H. Buls, Mrs. W. Matthews, Mrs. J. Fulton and Miss Foster.

Trustees -- R. D. Middlebrook, Judge J. H. Hawthorne, J. N. Moore.

Advisory board -- I. E. Burnheimer, H. R. Farnam, Porter B. Godard, Rev. W. F. Sheridan, Judge E. E. Porterfield.

House surgeon -- Dr. H. O. Leonard.

Matron -- Mrs. S. E. Dorsey.

The retiring president, Mrs. George A. Wood, expressed her thanks to all who helped to give the girl inmates a merry Christmas.

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January 9, 1910

WORK AND WAGES FOR
DESERVING UNEMPLOYED.

Mayor Formulates Plan to Provide
Living During Present Cold
Weather for All Worthy Needy.

"Kansas City intends to be kind to the needy and unfortunate temporarily out of work," observed Gus Pearson, city comptroller, yesterday, "but we first are going to find out who is worthy of our time and kindness.

"This wail about the starving and homeless unemployed has been magnified. Investigation shows that on many of the coldest nights of the winter there were a whole lot of vacant beds in the Helping Hand institute, and I have it from the management that they had twenty-four more calls for work for men than could be filled.

"The trouble is that a great many well meaning people are imposed upon and their sympathies wrought up by classes of individuals who are continually preying on the purse strings of the charitable, but will not work unless the work meets with their particular tastes."

Mr. Pearson had a conference yesterday with William Volker, chairman of the pardons and parole board. They discussed the plan proposed by Mayor Crittenden of making an additional appropriation of funds to temporarily tide over the unemployed by giving them work at the municipal stone quarries in Penn Valley park and the municipal farm at Leeds. This will be done as quickly as possible after Messrs. Pearson and Volker have conferred with the heads of charitable institutions and the police in reference to the character of men considered really deserving.

"Bums and loafers who stray into Kansas City just to spend the winter and live off the charitable must move on or go to the workhouse," said Mr. Pearson. "We feel that we have a citizenship of our own who should receive our little acts of kindness in times of distress, and so far as the present city administration is concerned, there will be no deserving man or boy without a place of shelter or a meal."

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January 8, 1910

FREE DANCE HALL
FOR POOR GIRLS.

PUBLIC INSTITUTION, PROPERTY
CONDUCTED, FAVORED BY
PROBATION OFFICER.

Working Girls Would Be At-
tracted From Vicious and
Immoral Resorts.

A free public dance hall for the poor girls of Kansas City, to be built and maintained by the city or by some charitable institution, thinks Dr. I. E. Mathias, chief probation officer of the juvenile court, would be an agency of reform that would do an inestimable amount of good.

"Perhaps I am not orthodox, and maybe this scheme looks somewhat sensational, yet I think that it would do an immense amount of good," said Dr. Mathias yesterday. "Girls will dance, and so will boys. How much better it would be that they should have their good times in a free public hall, where they would be protected from rowdies and immoral young men, than in the public dance halls where there are temptations and immoral surroundings, that work to their downfall."

The probation officer was discussing conditions in Cincinnati, where he and Judge E. E. Porterfield of the juvenile court went last month to attend a national meeting of juvenile court officers.

"This meeting was held in a church that maintained a free dance hall," Dr. Mathias continued. "Everybody is allowed to attend the weekly dances at the church, as long as they conduct themselves properly. There are no toughs and thugs, and the dance is as orderly as any social affair conducted by society people.

"In the ordinary public dance halls of Cincinnati liquor is sold, and the dances usually end in fights or drunken brawls. It was to give the poor girls and young men a chance to attend respectable dances that this church put in a dance hall.

"Many churches have built expensive gymnasiums for the boys. Charitable institutions here as well as in other cities have made ample provisions for the reform of bad boys. But these good people forget about the girls. Perhaps there is a sewing room set aside for them, or a kitchen where they are taught to cook. These things are all right. But how about their good times? The boys have their gymnasiums, their summer camps and their night schools.

"Did it ever occur to you that a girl enjoys a good time the same as a boy? She does not care for gymnasiums, summer camps or the like. The young woman's chief amusement is dancing, but the young men can do things and go places where girls cannot.

"What is left for the poor working girl? She can go to these public places where there is every influence to drag her down, but if she has any pride or self-respect she will prefer to remain at home and do nothing. Of course we do not have the evil surroundings in the public dance halls of Kansas City that the young woman finds in those of the large eastern cities, but here they are not what they should be.

"The city probably could not build a dance hall. The erection of such a building and its maintenance would be more in the province of the charitable institutions or churches. I think one or more of them in Kansas City would do much to better the conditions of the poor working girl, even more than some of the other philanthropic ideas that have been advanced in the uplift of the poor young men and women of this city."

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January 2, 1910

DEPOT MATRON'S GUESTS.

Mrs. Everingham Cared for 9,120
People During the Year 1909.

About twenty-five persons a day have been cared for through the office of the matron at the Union depot, according to the report tabulated yesterday by Matron Ollie Everingham, and which will be submitted today to the depot officials. A total of 9,120 persons made use of this department last year. this was done with an expenditure by her of $110.80. Of this amount she personally donated $7.54. The total cost as given is exclusive of her salary. A fund box which she tacked up for donations last July received $11.10, and the balance was contributed by travelers. Her report shows a balance on hand of $1.13.

There were but two deaths in the depot during the last year. One was in April and the other in July. This despite the fact that a total of 1,046 sick persons received the personal care of the matron. But four women required the attention of the matron because of drunkenness. The matron's report does not show any runaway girls, while eight boys are given credit for having tried to run away by way of the Union depot. Fifteen young girls were sent to their homes, but there is no record of any boys being sent that way.

The matron's report classifying the people cared for through her department included:

Blind cared for, 76; babies left, 1; children cared for, 1,010; directed to address, 1,209; directed to hotels, 670; families cared for, 67; funeral parties, 9; insane cared for, 64; lost articles restored, 52; mutes cared for, 63; old ladies cared for, 1,096; old men cared for, 241; poor helped and fed, 191.

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January 1, 1910

VOLUNTEERS GIVE A TREAT.

Needy Folk Fill Oak Street Hall On
New Year's Eve.

The large hall at 1416 Oak street, occupied by the Volunteers of America, was crowded to its utmost capacity last night when Major R. A. Davis, who recently took charge of the institution, opened the New Year's eve services with prayer and song.

Between 200 and 300 men, women and children of the poorer classes enjoyed the entertainment of songs and New Year's recitations. A large tree, around which were piled the treats of the evening, stood at one end of the hall.

Each one present was given a bag containing oranges, candy, nuts and cakes.

"We will serve coffee and rolls after services Sunday night," said Major Davis.

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December 26, 1909

BEST OATS BRING
BIG HORSE LAUGH.

NEW MEANING GIVEN PHRASE
AT CHRISTMAS FEED FOR
POOR "COBS" AT HALL.

Rules Given Masters and "Black
Beauty" Books Also Distri-
buted by Humane Society.

A new meaning was given yesterday to the "horse laugh." From 1,000 to 1,500 horses in Kansas City not accustomed to a square meal stood in their stalls, free from work and protected from the weather, and munched full portions of the best oats the market affords.

And these horses laughed. It was Christmas day and they were enjoying a Christmas celebration planned especially for them.

The "feed' for poor work horses was given by the Kansas City Humane society as the result of a plan evolved by Mrs. E. D. Hornbrook and Mrs. E. H. Robinson, members of the board of the society.

For the purpose of carrying joy to the hearts of the poor animals which struggle under burdens on the streets of Kansas City every day and which are indifferently fed and kept, largely because of the poverty of their owners, the Humane society purchased a half dozen tons of the best white oats and did the grain up in five and ten pound sacks, giving out these packages to owners of horses whose cases had been investigated by the society and to whom tickets previously had been given.

THOUSAND TICKETS.

About 1,000 of these tickets were given out and sacks of the grain were also given to others who had not received tickets. Provision was also made for still other cases and an automobile furnished by the Kansas City Rapid Motor Transfer company will take "feeds" to the cases which were reported too late to be cared for as were the others.

It was at Convention hall that the Christmas dinners for the poor horses were given out and the committee in charge of the distribution was composed of Mrs. F. D. Hornbrook, J. W. Perkins and E. R. Weeks, president of the Humane Society.

The sacks containing the oats were placed on long tables and when horse owners applied for the "feeds" they were required to present their tickets, give their names and the names of their horses. They were then given the sacks of feed, a tag which they promised to read and a copy of "Black Beauty." Where owners had sick horses they were also given blankets for the disabled animals.

RULES FOR MASTERS.

The tag which each owner promised to read contained this "horse" talk:
"What is good for your horse is good for his master.
Your horse needs good care as well as good food.
Never work your horse when he will not eat.
Water your horse often. Water should always be given fifteen minutes before feeding grain.
Daily grooming will improve the health as well as the looks of your horse.
Give your horses rock salt, and head shelter from the heat.
Economize by feeding good oats and good hay.
Good drivers are quiet, patient and kind, and have little use for a whip..." and so on.

EXAMPLE IS SET.

"This horse dinner means a great deal more than most people think," said Mrs. Hornbrook. "It is intended to show the horse owners that their animals must be cared for and to set an example for them to follow. Some of the papers have made a humorous affair out of it, when it is anything but humorous and has a most humane object.

"It is not intended simply to fill the empty stomach of some poor animal for the time being," said Mr. Weeks, "but is to create a kindly sentiment for dumb animals. We show the horse owners what a sample meal is and that is something some of them know very little about. The ten pounds of oats we give them is a double portion of a standard feed. The owners of all the big fine animals we see hitched to drays on the streets feed their horses five pounds of the best oats at a meal. Along with the oats we give out, we also give the horse owners a copy of 'Black Beauty' and the tag containing advice about the care of horses an d we hope your Christmas dinner for the horses will do good."

To many horse owners, who called for feed at Convention hall between 9 a. m. and 6 p. m., Mr. Weeks, Mrs. Hornbrook and other workers agents of the Humane Society gave good advice. Some of the callers were persons with whom agents of the society had come in contact in their work and there were scores of promises, such as "well, we'll take better care of our horses from now on."

Posted about the corridor in Convention hall yesterday, were copies of new cards issued by the Humane society. They read, "Be kind to your horse. Do not forget his water, feed and shelter."

Christmas day was the most notable day for the poor work horse in the history of Kansas City. No wonder a new meaning was given to the slang expression, a "horse laugh."

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December 25, 1909

8,000 KIDS YELL
SANTA GREETINGS.

POLICE IN BATTLE ROYAL WHEN
GIFTS ARE ANNOUNCED AS
READY FOR CHILDREN.

Officials of Mayor's Christ-
mas Tree Well Pleased
With Its Success.

Santa Claus, the magnanimous patron saint of good will, was the hero of the hour in Convention hall yesterday afternoon when 8,000 needy, little children were happy objects of his unbounded generosity.

For the second time the mayor's annual Christmas tree was brought forth loaded with playthings and goodies for the poor youngsters, who otherwise would not know of the joys of the giving spirit of the Yuletide. Every child, irrespective of color or race, was made the recipient of a sack filled with things that gladden the juvenile heart.

By 2 o'clock the bill hall was crowded with boys and girls from every portion of the city, and for fully an hour the expectant thousands were entertained by a band organ, furnished by the Hippodrome, and a clown band which marched about the hall playing the most tuneless tunes imaginable, but doing antics that amused all.

Mayor T. T. Crittenden was slated for a speech, but in the attempt failed, owing to the impossibility of inducing the anxious auditors to desist in their yelling. However, the mayor was able to yell "A Merry Christmas" occasionally during the distribution of presents, and this laconic well-wishing accomplished all that could be asked, for every child left the hall with smiling faces which revealed the joyousness they were experiencing.

MAYOR SATISFIED.

"Isn't this going some?" smiled the mayor as he took a view of the remarkable scene. "Just so every one of these poor children get something, I will be satisfied. It is a grand sigh and a gloriouis manifestation of the great Kansas City spirit, which we all love to see.

"It's a greater success than ever," declared Steve Sedweek, a member of the executive committee. "It is one of the biggest charitable undertakings in the country to care for so many needy children, and I am sure the whole committee feels gratified in noting the remarkable demonstrations in evidence here this afternoon."

At times during the big event it was not an easy task to keep the guests properly marooned for their own safety and comfort. Every child present wanted to get his or her present first and the police, under the direction of Sergeant Charles Edwards, had their troubles, but handled the crowds well. Most of the officers present were attired in Santa Claus make-up. In fact, Saint Nick was there six times strong in the persons of Jack Darnell, S. F. Cox, James F. Campbell, A. D. Royer, Joe McCormick and Elvin Gray.

The idea of having a mayor's tree for the poor children every Christmas was conceived by Steve Sedweek, who outlined his plan at an Eagle banquet over a year ago. Mayor Crittenden forthwith promulgated the scheme, and now the affair is to be annual and of increasing success, no doubt.

Yesterday afternoon there were representatives from twelve different cities of the Middle West present to witness the distribution of gifts to the poor. These men came with the view of seeing how Kansas City made its needy ones happy on Christmas and to take the idea back home in the hopes of starting the same kind of wide-spread charity. The mayor's tree is strictly a Kansas City institution and bids fair to be in vogue in many other cities ere many years.

POLICE WERE BUSY.

It was no easy matter even for a dozen military policemen under the careful personal direction of their drill master, Sergeant Charles Edwards, to keep the 8,000 children in their places in the hall yesterday when the line was formed for the distribution of presents. Between boxes, in which the visitors sat, and the gallery seats, where those really interested in the affair were penned in, was a four-foot fence of iron. It did not look very high to the boys, but it looked even smaller to the cops. To the latter it looked infinitely long, however, for at the first call for gifts a scrambling mass of children swept over it, inundating the boxes below and surging out into the hall. For a space of a minute the line seemed actually in danger. The policemen rushed forward, brandishing their clubs and shouting. A dozen members of the reception committee joined hands and formed a wall near the threatened quarter. The mayor raised his deep bass voice in mild disapproval.

Just then, at the crucial moment, the reserves threw their ponderous weight into the fray and the regiments of insurgents broke for cover like the old guard in the rout of Waterloo. The victorious newcomers were the six big officers doing duty as Santa Claus close to the Christmas trees and their tinsel had a better moral effect than the regulation uniforms or the white committee badges. There were no youngsters in that host who wanted to endanger their good standing with St. Nicholas and his assistants. Not much!

There was just one way in which gifts were classified according to the age of the child receiving them yesterday. The presents were in flour sacks, each bearing the label, "Mayor's Christmas Tree, 1909." On the sacks containing gifts calculated for older children the letters were printed in blue, while on the others they were in red. There were eighteen persons at each "gift bench" handing out the sacks.

MOURNER'S BENCHES FOR THE LOST.

A great number of visitors at the mayor's Christmas party wondered why two long benches ere arranged alongside the trees. They were told by ushers that these were the mourners' benches. This was proved to be true later in the day when children who had somehow got lost from their parents or elders lined up from one end to the other. Two little girls, Edith Shoemaker, 2311 Euclid avenue, and Menie Marcus, who said she lived near Eighteenth and McGee streets, were prominent among the mourners.

Edith's tear-stained face and Menie's extraordinary composure seemed to attract the attention of everyone. They had never seen each other before, but they were two lost little girls whose ages were on the tender side of 10 years, and in that circumstance there was union. With arms locked about each other's neck, they sat for an hour until Mayor Crittenden personally took charge of Edith, and Jacob Billikopf of Menie, and sent them home, loaded with presents.

Two wagon loads of toys arrived at the hall after the crowd had been treated and were only partially disposed of. The sum of the donations for the tree amounted to $4,880. It was announced last night by Albert Hutchins, chairman of the finance committee, that $200 of the money has not been used. The presents remaining after yesterday will be distributed at the Grand theater Monday night.

Several instances of highway robbery, in which large boys despoiled smaller ones of their trinkets or tickets were reported to the committee of distribution during the afternoon.

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December 24, 1909

MAYOR'S CHRISTMAS
TREE IS ALL READY.

CANDY AND TOYS FOR THOU-
SANDS OF CHILDREN.

Convention Hall Doors Will Swing
Open at 1 o'clock Today to
Admit the Eager
Youngsters.

Nimble fingers, hastened and made dexterous by kind hearts, effected a transformation in Convention hall yesterday, and today the great auditorium is a Santa Claus land for the poor children of Kansas City. At 1 o'clock this afternoon the doors of the hall will swing open for the mayor's Christmas tree, and at 2:30 they will close, while Santa Claus distributes Christmas presents to at least 7,000 little boys and girls who, by force of circumstances, might otherwise have had no Christmas.

Notwithstanding unceasing efforts, the committees of the Mayor's Christmas Tree Association have been unable to locate all the poor children in the city to give them the tickets which are necessary to entitle them to gifts, and these children who have been overlooked are asked to apply at Convention hall this morning from 8 o'clock until noon. Tickets will be supplied these children any time between those hours.

The Fraternal Order of Moose caught the Christmas spirit in earnest yesterday and notified the Mayor's Christmas Tree Association that it would have twenty-five wagon loads of coal at Convention hall at noon today for distribution among poor families. Each wagon will contain two tons of coal.

WORKED ALL DAY.

Poor families who need fuel are requested to notify the mayor's office by 'phone or in person up to 11 o'clock this morning. These cases will be investigated and if the applicants be found worthy the coal will be delivered at their homes at noon. The offer from the Order of Moose was made by W. A. McGowan, secretary of the local lodge.

That the Convention hall association is heart and soul in the Christmas tree project was shown when Manager Louis W. Shouse and the directors placed the whole Convention hall force at the disposal of the Christmas Tree Association. As soon as the railroad ball was over Wednesday night, Manager Shouse put a force of men to work taking up the dance floor and before 6 o'clock yesterday morning the building was ready for the decorating committees of the Christmas tree.

Steve Sedweek was the first of the association workers to appear on the scene. He arrived at 6 o'clock and within a short time a large force was at work, setting up the Christmas trees, decorating them and packing the gifts into sacks ready for distribution. The committees worked all day and this morning they will have the hall ready for the great event.

That the people of Kansas City may inspect the work of the "best fellows" a general invitation is extended to any who care to do so to stop into the hall during the morning hours, up to noon today.

THE GIFTS IN SACKS.

Among the busy people at the hall yesterday were Captain John F. Pelletier, A. E. Hutchings, Steve Sedweek, Captain W. A. O'Leary, Hank C. Mank, the Rev. Thomas Watts, Gus Zorn and a Mr. Bennett of Wichita, who is here to gain ideas for a similar event to be inaugurated in his city next year.

Among the most valued workers were the members of the committee of twenty. Their duties consisted of the packing and arranging of the gifts in sacks. They worked from early morning till late at night and ate luncheon and dinner in the hall. Mayor T. T. Crittenden was present at the luncheon and sat at the head of the table, commending the women for their work.

The workers were assisted by seven men from No. 6 hook and ladder company, Thirty-first and Holmes, detailed for the duty by Fire Chief John C. Egner. Chief Egner had intended detailing twenty men, but the fire in the Rialto building made it impossible for him to do so.

The giant Christmas trees, which will be among the objects of chief interest to the children, were decorated in magnificent fashion by the employes of the Kansas City Electric Light Company and the Webb-Freyschlag Mercantile Company.

The presents for the children will be arranged in sacks bearing the inscription, "Mayor's Christmas Tree, 1909." The sacks for the boys will be placed on the east side of the arena and those of the girls on the west side. The sacks for children up to 8 years of age are printed in blue and those of children from 8 to 12 are printed in red.

Each child will receive two suitable toys and candy, nuts and fruit, all arranged in Christmas style.

A CLOWN BAND, TOO.

The programme for the mayor's Christmas tree will be a simple one. The doors will open at 1 o'clock, when the children can come in to feast their eyes upon the great Christmas trees and enjoy a fine musical entertainment. The doors will close at 2:30, so that it will be necessary for the tots to be in the hall by that time.

Preceding the distribution of the presents, the Eagles' clown band will give a dress concert on the arena and a large electrical organ will also furnish music. Old Santa Claus, who, it is said, resembles very much in appearance Captain John F. Pelletier, will be present and he will have six assistants with him to mingle among the children. At 2:30 o'clock Santa will introduce Mayor T. T. Crittenden, who will make a short talk, and the presents will then be distributed.

"We have plenty of funds and plenty of gifts for all the city's poor children," said A. E. Hutchings, "and if they do not come and get their share it will not be the fault of the committees, which have labored incessantly to get in touch with every child entitled to the pleasures of the tree."

Although it was announced that no more funds were needed, and that no further cash donations would be received, the financial committee of the association was forced to decline donations yesterday to the amount of several hundred dollars.

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December 18, 1909

CLOWN BAND AND
ORGAN FOR CHILDREN.

LOTS OF MUSIC AND FUN AT
MAYOR'S CHRISTMAS TREE.

A. Judah, Manager of the Grand,
Has a Surprise in Store and It
May Be City's Poor Good Boys
and Girls Will See Theater.

A mammoth organ is to be installed in Convention hall to furnish music for the thousands of little children who will be given presents from the mayor's Christmas tree. The Clown band of the Eagles also will furnish instrumental cheer. The musicians will be dressed in grotesque costumes. A. Judah, manager of the Grand, also has a surprise in the amusement line in store for the tots, and he might repeat this year his generosity of last year by inviting the children who seldom see the inside of a place of amusement to his theater for a performance and a liberal candy distribution.

"I'm always the happiest when I am doing something for girls and boys that the sun of plenty does not shine upon," said Mr. Judah at yesterday's meeting of the Mayor's Christmas Tree Association. Then he chipped in $25 to the fund, which has now reached the encouraging sum of $3,124.10.

"We'll double that amount when we hear from the people we have asked subscriptions from," declared A. E. Hutchings, who, with other warm-hearted and self-sacrificing men and women, are giving their time and means to provide Christmas cheer and joy for the thousands of poor children in Kansas City. And these faithful workers are going right ahead with their commendable work, regardless of envious and malicious ones who belittle the association by referring to it as the "Public Tree."

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December 17, 1909

CHRISTMAS FEED FOR
CITY'S POOR HORSES.

NEGLECTED COBS AND FALLEN
THOROUGHBREDS INVITED.

Humane Society to Be Host at Con-
vention Hall Where Equine
Event Will Show Sufferings
to Local Philanthropists.

The poor horses of the city will be fed to satiety at least once this year. By arrangement with the directors of Convention hall yesterday, the Humane Society, in conjunction with Mrs. Emma W. Robinson, 3208 East Tenth street, and Mrs. E. D. Hornbrook, 3229 East Eleventh street, will give a feast of oats, bran and ground corn, with trimmings of real hay, to the neglected cobs and fallen thoroughbreds of all sections in the big Auditorium Christmas day.

"It will not be an equine quality event," Mrs. Hornbrook said yesterday, "but it will be on invitations, anyway. This is to prevent spongers from feeding a team at our expense. The money will be raised by subscription. We are asking the wholesale houses to donate enough feed for several hundred animals."

The invitations are being printed today. They read:

"Christmas dinner for the workhorse,
Given by the Humane Society,
Call at Convention hall Christmas day between 9 a. m. and 6 p. m .

The plan of giving one good meal to the horses is original with Mrs. Robinson. She always has been interested in the dumb animals, and is a member of long standing of the Humane Society. She said last night:

"Someone has got to take up the horse's end of this charity proposition. It is not right that people should go on year after year giving alms to the human derelicts and entirely ignoring man's best friend, his horse. The scheme to give old work horses at least one square meal has been carried out to perfection in Norway, and someone should try it here. I suppose it will be scoffed at by some, but that is because it is new. In a few years, when through such humble means the attention of the world is directed toward the old horse and his suffering, it will be looked upon in a different light."

Edwin R. Weeks, president of the Humane Society, is in favor of the "banquet."

"Not for itself," he said yesterday, "but merely as a means to bring the suffering of our four-footed friends before local philanthropists. The Chicago idea of tagging the horses that are misused or underfed is not a poor one, but this one will get emaciated subjects of charity together by the hundred, in one hall, and let people see them."

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December 13, 1909

ORPHANS TO BE AT MATINEE.

Benefactor Ill, Boys Will Depend on
Charity for Christmas.

The boys of the Kansas City Orphans' home will be the guests of Oscar Sachs at the matinee at the Orpheum tomorrow afternoon. The boys will be chaperoned by Mrs. Lee Lyson, Mrs. Ferdinand Heim, Mrs. Oscar Sachs, Mrs. J. W. Wagner, Mrs. S. Harzfeld and Mrs. A. D. Cottingham. Mrs. John C. Tarsney, the benefactor of the home, has been ill for some time and so the boys expect that good people will take an interest in them and remember them on Christmas. About 130 orphans are cared for at the home, which is in the charge of sisters of the order of St. Vincent de Paul.

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December 7, 1909

HOMELESS MEN CITY'S WARDS.

Cold Weather Causes Influx -- Will
Be Worked in Quarry.

The approach of winter is bringing to the city the usual influx of penniless and homeless, and the charitable institutions are beginning to realize it. Yesterday George W. Fuller, a former member of the park board and representing the municipal labor committee in an official capacity, told the park board that Saturday and Sunday night 150 men out of work and money applied to the institute for food and lodgings. Mr. Fuller suggested that the plan of last year, whereby the city and park board co-operated, be followed this year, of working the unemployed in mining rock and crushing it for road building in Penn Valley park. Single men could be fed and lodged at the institute, and men with families could be given supplies on the basis of a dollar's worth a day.

Last year the experiment cost the city $4,918, and about 90 per cent of the rock is piled up and has not been used.

W. H. Dunn, superintendent of parks, said that the idea was a good and commendable one, but the question that confronted the city was what is to be done with the unused rock quarried last year. He said that some of it could be used, but advised that if the city was going into the quarrying business again some disposition should be made of the rock on hand.

Gus Pearson, city comptroller, urged the board to take up the proposition another year.

"It segregates the man who will work from the fellow who will not," said Mr. Pearson.

"And it means that whatever the city gives the Helping Hand to care for the poor and lowly, it will get back in labor and rock," argued Mr. Fuller.

On motion of D. J. Haff the board set apart $2,000 from the West park district fund with which to pay for the rock that is to be quarried and broken at the rate of 80 cents a cubic yard.

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December 6, 1909

CHRISTMAS TREAT FOR
POOR CHILDREN PLANNED.

Large Tree Will Be Prepared in
Convention Hall -- Names Should
Be Addressed to the Mayor.

The Mayor's Christmas Tree association, which was suggested and carried out last year for the first time in the history of Kansas City, is preparing to give the deserving poor children of this city a great treat this Christmas. Elaborate plans are being worked out by the committee. Headquarters have been opened in the Reliance building at Tenth and McGee streets, where contributions will be received, and also the names of the poor. The city will be canvassed during the next three weeks for the names of the children to be placed on the list. Several large Christmas trees will be prepared in Convention hall where the big event is to take place on the night of December 24, and under the direction of the distribution committee the presents will be given to all children who are deemed entitled to receive them.

Names, or suggestions as to distribution of presents, should be addressed to the mayor, and all checks and remittances for the mayor's Christmas tree should be plainly marked and mailed to the city comptroller, Gus Pearson, treasurer of the association for this year.

The members of the executive committee are Thomas Watts, Louis W. Shouse, Jacob Billikopf, M. G. Harman, A. E. Hutchings, Dave McDonnell, Henry Manke, Rev. Charles W. Moore, Steve Sedweek, T. T. Crittenden, John F. Pelletier, Franklin D. Hudson, A. Judah, George F. Damon, Justin A. Runyan, Gus Pearson, H. E. Barker and George C. Hale.

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November 19, 1909

HER FRIENDS LOYAL IN DEATH.

Mrs. Healy to Be Interred in a Man-
ner Befitting Her Worth.

"I always had friends," Mrs. Margaret Healy used to say, "Sure, haven't I always been friendly?"

Death as a charity patient in St. Joseph's hospital did not rob Mrs. Healy of friends. Yesterday a funeral was arranged for her that would have satisfied her most exacting wish. The "lay sister" of the West bottoms, whose personal services and sacrifices among her poor neighbors made her of note, is to be laid to rest today by the side of little George Traynor, an orphan whom she took into her care when his parents died, in St. Mary's cemetery.

Father Dalton is to celebrate high mass at the Church of the Annunciation, Linwood and Benton boulevards, at 9 o'clock. Many persons who lived near Mrs. Healy and who since have seen better fortune than she, will attend the services as a mark of respect for her useful life.

Men who knew her and her endless charities will act as pallbearers. Mrs. Ellen Hughes, who cared for Mrs. Healy the last six years of her life, and several men who were adopted as boys by her, will be the mourners. The pallbearers will be: John Kelly, Robert E. Donnely, John Doherty, Bryan Cunningham, John Coffey, Patrick O'Rourke.

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November 19, 1909

MOTHER CORNELIA DIES.

Assistant to Superioress at House of
Good Shepherd Passes Away.

Mother Cornelia, assistant to Mother Elizabeth, superioress of the House of Good Shepherd, died yesterday at the home, Twentieth street and Cleveland avenue.

Mother Cornelia had been ill for months, but continued with her work at the House of Good Shepherd until last Thursday. Mother Cornelia was Cornelia Thompkins of St. Louis. The family is one of the most wealthy and widely known in St. Louis. A sister, Mrs. Philip Scanlon, died several weeks ago in St. Louis.

The body of Mother Cornelia will be taken in a special car to St. Louis this morning by her parents, who are in Kansas City. In taking up her work among the inmates of the House of Good Shepherd, whose lives the sisters try to correct, Mother Cornelia gave up her family and prospects for a life of personal help and self-abnegation.

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November 18, 1909

PROPOSE $14,000 HOME FOR
THE CRITTENTON MISSION.

Fireproof Building at Thirtieth and
Woodland Will Be Ready by Next
Summer.

Captain J. H. Waite, at the head of the Florence Crittenton mission and home, located in an old dwelling at 3005 Woodland avenue, made the statement last night that by next summer the institution hopes to be in a new fireproof building. It is to be erected, he said, on the corner of Thirtieth street and Woodland avenue, where they own 156 feet fronting on the latter street.

"The foundation should be laid within the next ninety days," said Captain Waite, "so that work on the super-structure may begin in the spring. We have planned a building to cost between $10,000 and $14,000. As we want to make it absolutely fireproof and of reinforced concrete, we anticipate that the cost will be nearer $14,000. It is a grand institution and has done and is doing the noblest kind of work."

The Florence Crittenton Mission and Home for unfortunate girls was started in this city on February 4, 1896, with an endowment of $3,000 from Charles N. Crittenton, the millionaire philanthropist of New York, who died suddenly in San Francisco Tuesday. It first was situated on the northeast corner of Fourth and Main streets in a large three-story brick building which now has been torn down to make space for a city market.

After being at the original location for a short time it was decided to abandon the downtown mission work and establish a home. The institution then moved to Fifteenth street and Cleveland avenue into rented property. In June, ten years ago, the property at the southeast corner of Thirtieth street and Woodland avenue was purchased for the home.

"A debt hangs over our heads for some time," said Miss Bertha Whitsitt, superintendent of the home yesterday, "but now we have 156 feet frontage on Woodland avenue on which we expect soon to erect our new building.

"Since the beginning of the mission and home," continued Miss Whitsitt, "we have cared for 582 young women, the majority of them with children. Just during the last year we cared for twenty-eight young women and twenty-three children. When totaled the number of days spent in the home by all of them amounts to 4,612, which we record as so many days of charity work."

Captain J. H. Waite, who has been at the head of the home for many years, said that Mr. Crittenton had given the home and mission $3,000 to start on. When the property at 3005 Woodland was purchased the National Florence Crittenton Home at Washington gave about $1,500 toward buying and improving the property.

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November 14, 1909

LIKES KANSAS CITY PLAN.

Cincinnati Will Soon Have Juvenile
Improvement Association.

CINCINNATI, O., Nov. 13. -- As a result of the visit of Kansas City men interested in juvenile reform, Cincinnati soon wi ll have a juvenile improvement association patterned after that of Kansas City. Delegates from other cities to the convention of juvenile court attaches also were interested in the pardons and paroles board of Kansas City.

E. E. Porterfield, judge of the Kansas City juvenile court and president of its juvenile association, created a favorable impression by his description of the plan by which boys are kept in school through charitable persons paying them a salary equal to what they could make if employed.

The speech of Jacob Billikopf of the Kansas City pardon and parole board, in which he gave concrete examples of the work being done for families of persons conditionally paroled from the city workhouse, caused much discussion among the delegates. Dr. E. L. Mathias, juvenile officer in Judge Porterfield's court, took part in the discussion and told of the work done by him. The three Kansas City delegates have left Cincinnati for their homes.

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November 5, 1909

CITY'S UNEMPLOYED
TO HAVE NEW HOME.

HELPING HAND INSTITUTE AC-
QUIRES ADKINS HOTEL.

With Aid of Four Story Building
1,000 Men Can Be Cared For --
Plenty of Light, Baths --
Has Disinfecting Room.
New Helping Hand Institute Building.
NEW QUARTERS AT FOURTH AND WYANDOTTE STREETS.

With the acquisition of the old Adkins hotel at the southeast corner of Fourth and Wyandotte streets, the Helping Hand Institute has solved the problem of taking care of the city's unemployed. Carpenters are now at work overhauling the four-story structure and by the beginning of cold weather it is believed that the building will be ready for occupancy.

With the old building at 408 Main street, where the main offices are located, the Helping Hand institute will be prepared to take care of more than 600 men without the least crowding. In extremely cold weather little difficulty will be experienced in caring for 1,000 men.

Current Helping Hand Location.
PRESENT HOME OF THE INSTITUTE.

But the new building will have many features not possessed by the old quarters on Main street. Plenty of light, the best of ventilation, high ceilings, a laundry, shower baths and disinfecting room will make it very little inferior to the municipal lodging house in New York city. On the north side of the building are forty-one windows which makes the light and ventilation problem easy.
INSTALLING SHOWER BATHS.

But the main feature is the shower baths and disinfecting room. On the lower floor the plumbers are at work installing baths that will accommodate twenty-five men at one time. No one will be allowed to go to bed without first taking a bath and allowing his clothes to be placed in the disinfecting room, where they will remain over night. The laundry in the basement will keep the linen clean and eventually save the institution hundreds of dollars. Particular care will be exercised in guarding against tuberculosis. Before the year is over it is hoped that a physician will examine every man who applies for a bed.

Without doubt Kansas City will have as good a system for taking care of her unemployed as any municipality in the country. It is true that many of the large cities in the East, particularly New York and Philadelphia, have larger municipal lodging houses but they suffer disadvantages. In most cities bread lines are formed and the man without employment does not feel obliged to work for a night's lodging. In Kansas City, however, the city and county have made the Helping Hand an official charity institution.

WORK IS PROVIDED.

Men are not allowed to sleep in saloons or in other public places where the conditions are not sanitary. There is no other avenue for the unemployed man but to go to the Helping Hand institute, where he is given a chance to work for his meals and lodging. The mere fact that he must work keeps the professional "moocher" from making his headquarters in Kansas City.

The credit for the acquisition of the Adkins building belongs mainly to William Volker, one of the directors of the institute. Mr. Volker clearly recognized the need of more room for the institute, and believing that the employment system is the best, he used his influence in getting the building. E. T. Brigham, superintendent of the Helping Hand, is directing the work.

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October 31, 1909

SWOPE MONEY AND
LAND TRANSFERRED.

INSTITUTE'S NAME CHANGED IN
HONOR OF BENEFACTOR.

Thousands of Dollars Contributed
After Announcement That Re-
quired $50,000 Had
Been Obtained.

No longer is it the Franklin institute. Satisfied with the great response made to the institute's appeal for aid, S. W. Spangler, agent for Thomas H. Swope, who gave $50,000 in land and cash conditionally to the institute, and John J. Paxton and S. S. Fleming, administrators of the Swope estate, yesterday gave to the directors of the institute the deed to the land on which the Thomas H. Swope Institute is to be built, and Mr. Swope's pledge of $25,000 in money. The deed was filed yesterday afternoon.

The officers of the institute received about $55,000 in the canvass for funds. there was $9,101.29 in cash and the rest in pledges. Ralph P. Swofford, president of the institute, Fletcher Cowherd, treasurer; and Benjamin B. Lee, H. D. Faxon, Herbert V. Jones, D. L. James, directors, and James T. Chafin, head resident of the institute, took the certificates of deposit and the pledges to Mr. Spangler's office yesterday. Mr. Paxton and Mr. Fleming, Mr. Swope's nephew, arrived soon after.

ENTIRELY SATISFIED.

"We are satisfied entirely with the result of the campaign and with the pledges," Mr. Paxton said. "Speaking for Mr. Fleming and myself, I wish to say that every one of the Swope family sympathized with your effort to raise the fund and with the purpose for which Mr. Swope made the gift."

"My uncle was deeply interested in the institute," Mr. Fleming said. "I am glad you were successful and trust that you will be able to make the institute all that you wish it to be."

A photograph of Mr. Swope was given the institute officers. It will be framed and placed in the new institute, which is to be named for Mr. Swope. Thousands of dollars were given to the institute fund yesterday after the announcement was made that the fund was complete. The latest mail yesterday brought more and it is believed that the flood of subscriptions which started Friday will not end for several days.

DR. WOODS GIVES $500.

Dr. W. S. Woods, of the Commerce Trust Company, gave $500 after the fund was complete. The Kansas City Live Stock Traders' exchange considered a motion to give $100 to the fund. A member suggested that a collection be taken instead. The collection was $225. The Kansas City Live Stock exchange also gave $100. More than that amount was given by the employes of Emery, Bird, Thayer's, when nearly 300 persons working in the store gave 25 or 50 cents each, after the fund had closed. Six church societies, half of them Christian Endeavor bodies, also contributed.

"Personal Help," by Churchill Bridgeford, a live stock commission man, netted the institute $1,-34 from the stock yards district in the campaign. The board of trade raised $450 and its members gave, or solicited, $2,500 for the fund.

Officers of the institute will visit other cities for ideas before the plans of the new institute will be agreed upon. One of the great needs of Kansas City, the officers say, is a modern creche. The institute now cares for children 2 years old and more, but has not been equipped to care for infants. It has been necessary to refuse to care for the babies of several mothers who are employed because of this. It is probable a creche will be added to the activities of the institute in the new building.

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October 25, 1909

FIFTEEN SLEEP IN CHAIRS.

Helping Hand Institute's 500 Beds
Not Enough for Cold Nights.

Every bed in the Helping Hand Institute was occupied at 1 o'clock yesterday morning and fifteen men, for whom the officers could find no accommodations, slept in the chairs of the assembly hall. The drop in temperature Saturday night was responsible for the large number of applicants.

Indications now are that the plan to add 600 more beds will fall through. At present there are accommodations for 500 men. The officers expected to double the number of beds. The officers had gone as far as to order some new equipment.

The building on Fourth street between Walnut and Main, owned by the city, the officers expected to get. The city, however, has refused to donate the use of this building. Consequently the plan of increasing the number of beds has been abandoned.

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October 10, 1909

COLONEL SWOPE LEFT AN
ESTATE OF $3,000,000.

ENTIRE INSTRUMENT WRITTEN
IN HIS OWN HAND JUNE 15, '05.

Full Text of the Paper as Filed in
Independence Shows the Wide
Extent of Kansas City's
Benefactor's Holdings.

An estate of $3,000,000, by the provisions of the will filed yesterday in the Independence division of the probate court was left by Colonel Thomas H. Swope to his near relatives, friends and to charity. The greater part of his property is bequeathed direct to his blood relations. City lots left to the Humane Society is the largest gift to charity.

The will was filed for probate by J. G. Paxton, an attorney of Independence, Mo., who framed it June 17, 1905. Mr. Paxton since has been its custodian. In filing the will, Mr. Paxton was accompanied by Stuart S. Fleming, Mr. Swope's nephew, who lives in Maury county, Tenn.

Colonel Swope named Mr. Paxton, Mr. Fleming and James M. Hunton of Independence his executors, and requested that they be allowed to serve without bond. George B. Harrison, Arthur F. Day and F. T. Childs, all of whom live here, signed as witnesses. The three men were present yesterday morning in court to attest their signatures.

A "HOLOGRAPHIC WILL."

The instrument states that "this is my holographic will." This is to indicate that it was written by Col. Swope. There were no changes in the instrument as written by him.

The bequests to charity are as follows: To Humane Society, two lots in Turner Company's addition; to Park College, two lots in West Kansas addition; to the Women's Christian Association, $10,000 cash; to Young Women's Christian Association, $10,000 cash; to Young Men's Christian Association, $10,000 cash; to the Provident Association, $25,000 cash.

After providing for charity and making specific bequests to his near relatives and friends, the balance is left to his nephews and nieces, to be divided share alike.

S. W. Spangler, attorney for Mr. Swope, has prepared a conservative estimate of the values of some of the real estate bequests made in the will. The values are as follows:

One-half of the two story building at 1017-1019 Main street, left to Ella J. Plunket, $75,000; the other half of the same property, left to Gertrude Plunket, $75,000; the undivided half of lots Nos. 10 and 12 on East Fourth street, left to Felix Swope, $13,250; the northeast corner of Hickory and Joy streets, now occupied by the John Deere Plow Company's warehouse, left to James Hunton, $40,000; the northeast corner of Twelfth and Walnut streets, 85-115 feet, left to Margaret Swope's five unmarried children, $400,000; 1112-1114 Walnut street, left to the same children, $190,000; 916-918 1/2 Main street, to the same children, $120,000; the northwest corner of Mulberry and Eleventh streets, to the same five children, $50,000; the southeast corner of Twelfth and Campbell streets, left to the five children, $60,000; 915 Walnut street, left to Frances Swope, $87,500; 120 acres, to the south half of the ground occupied by the Evanston Golf Club, to Thomas H. Swope, Jr., $240,000; the eight-story building at the southeast corner of Eleventh street and Grand avenue, to his nine nephews and nieces, $400,000.

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October 9, 1909

DEATH OF MRS. E. CORRIGAN.

WELL KNOWN KANSAS CITY WOMAN
SUCCUMBS TO LONG ILLNESS.
Mrs. E. Corrigan
MRS. E. CORRIGAN.

Mrs. Edward Corrigan, one of the best known women in Kansas City in earlier years, died Monday at the home of a sister in Sandy Hill, N. Y., after an illness of eight months. She was 64 years old. The body will reach Kansas City at 7:16 this evening and will be taken to the home of Mrs. Matt Kinlen, a relative, at 3312 Flora avenue.

Funeral services will be from Mrs. Kinlen's residence at 10:30 Sunday morning, and from St. Vincent's Catholic church, thirty-first street and Flora avenue, at 11 o'clock Burial will be in Mount St. Mary's Cemetery.

Mrs. Corrigan lived in Kansas City for about twenty years, during which time she was at the forefront of almost all Catholic charities and was associated with others in non-sectarian undertakings. She was prominent in church work, one of her munificence being the high alter in St. Patrick's church. Since leaving Kansas City the home of Mrs. Corrigan has been in Chicago, but she has paid frequent visits to her friends here.

Mr. and Mrs. Corrigan had no children. A brother of Mrs. Corrigan, Daniel Quinn, lives in Kansas City. Mr. Corrigan is a brother of Bernard Corrigan, president of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company, and Patrick Corrigan, a retired business man.

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October 7, 1909

SWOPE PROVIDED FOR
AGED, POOR AND NEEDY.

ORPHAN'S HOME AND CHILD-
REN'S OUTINGS REMEMBERED.

Will Gives $25,000 to Provident As-
sociation and Contains Other
Charitable Bequests,

PUBLIC BEQUESTS BY COLONEL SWOPE:

To the Humane Society of Kansas City, Mo., I give, grant, devise and bequeath in trust forever lots 1 and 2 in clock 43 of Turner & Co.'s addition to Kansas City, Mo., the proceeds of the rental thereof to be used by said Humane Society in the entertainment of children in Swope park, near Kansas City, annually, forever.

To Park College, situated in Platte county, Missouri, I give lots 15 and 16 in block 3, West Kansas addition No 2 to Kansas city, Mo.

To the Women's Christian association I give the sum of $10,000.

To the Young Women's Christian Association of Kansas City, Mo., I give the sum of $10,000.

To the Young Men's Christian Association of Kansas City, Mo., I give $10,000.

To the Provident Association of Kansas City, Mo., I give the sum of $25,000 to be known as the "Swope Fund," and to be used for the benefit of the poor and needy of Kansas City, Mo.

Before the body of Colonel Thomas H. Swope was removed from the family home in Independence, Mo., yesterday afternoon to be brought to this city to lie in state in the rotunda of the public library building, J. G. Paxton, an attorney who had possession of the philanthropist's will, gave out the public bequests mentioned therein. They are enumerated above.

"It was thought befitting," he said, "that bequests made to public institutions and to charity should be published before the funeral. The complete will, enumerating private as well as public bequests, will be filed for probate Saturday."

The lots left to the Humane society are situated at the southeast corner of Union avenue and Mulberry street in the West Bottoms. The corner lot is occupied by the Union Avenue Bank of Commerce. Good rentals are secured from the two buildings of the property.

"The bequest of Colonel Swope to the Humane Society is not a surprise to me," said E. R. Weeks, president of the society last night. "Colonel Swope had a life membership in the society and for several years has been its first vice president. He has been identified with the work for more than twenty-five years and was our closest friend.

WROTE PORTION OF WILL.

"Several years ago Colonel Swope sent for me to come to his office. When I arrived he told me that he intended to remember the society in his will which he intended writing himself. At his suggestion I wrote that portion of his will which he later copied. That is why it is no surprise. There is a provision regarding this bequest to the effect that the society may sell this property at any time it deem necessary or advisable."

The property left to Park college, Parkville, Mo., also is situated in the West Bottoms and is said to pay a good annual rental.

The Women's Christian Association, to which Colonel Swope left $10,000, has charge of hte management and maintenance of the Gillis Orphan's Home and the Armour Memorial Home for Aged Couples, Twenty-third street and Tracy avenue. Colonel Swope gave the land on which the orphanage is built. It is a large tract and later Mrs. F. B. Armour built the home for aged couples which bears her name. Sometimes it is known as the Margaret Klock home, named for Mrs. Armour's sister.

"We had hoped that we might be remembered in a small way," said Mrs. P. D. Ridenhour, acting president of the Women's Christian Association, when informed of the $10,000 bequest. "But this comes to us as a most pleasant surprise, and I might say that it comes at a time when we need it most. We had not expected anything so handsome as our benefactor has given us and to express our thanks would be the smallest way in which we can show our gratitude. In honor of his memory we will endeavor to do the greatest good with what he has left us.

Y. W. C. A. GIRLS REJOICE.

"Have you heard of the $10,000 left the Y. W. C. A. by Colonel Swope?" a young woman at the association rooms was asked over the telephone last night.

"Humph," she replied quickly, "he gave us $50,000."

"But this is over and above the $50,000," she was informed. "This is a bequest in his will."

"Oh, goody, gracious, goodness, isn't that just scrumptiously grand," she cried, dropping the telephone to fairly scream the glad news to other young women present. "Won't we have a dandy home, now, God bless him."

At that moment someone began a song of praise in honor of the welcome news. The telephone was forgotten.

"This certainly comes to us as a glad surprise," said Miss Nettie E. Trimble, secretary for the Y. W. C. A.

"Colonel Swope was so good to us when we were struggling for our new building that we had no idea of getting a bequest from his will. Years ago when the building of a home for the Y. W. C. A. was mentioned, he said he wanted to have a part in it. While committees were out working he sent us $25,000 unsolicited. Toward the close, when it looked as if we would not reach the $300,000 mark by the time set, he sent for me and asked how much we lacked. When told that we needed $22,000 to complete the figure he promptly gave us $25,000, making a total of $50,000 which he gave toward our new home.

AN ENDOWMENT FUND.

"As we have plenty of money to complete our home it is possible that Colonel Swope's bequest of $10,000 will be made a nucleus for an endowment fund to carry on industrial and Bible work. The industrial department never has been self sustaining and teachers for both have to be hired and paid. That the name of Colonel Swope will forever remain dear to the members of the Y. W. C. A. goes without saying."

Henry M. Beardsley, president of the Y. M. C. A. was out of the city and James. B. Welsh, a member of the board of directors, was notified of the bequest of $10,000 to that association.

"Good, good," he cried, "that comes to us at a time when we need it most. We have been in pretty hard straits to complete our new building and this most gracious gift will put us on our feet under full sail. The association, no doubt, will take appropriate action when notified officially of the bequest. I will sleep better tonight and so will many others."

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October 4, 1909

COLONEL SWOPE DIES
OF PARALYTIC STROKE.

END COMES AT INDEPENDENCE
AFTER 5 WEEKS' ILLNESS.

Millionaire Philanthropist Gifts
to Kansas City Alone More
Than $1,500,000 -- Many
Other Benefactions.
The Late Thomas H. Swope.
COLONEL THOMAS H. SWOPE.

Colonel Thomas H. Swope, multi-millionaire philanthropist, whose gifts to Kansas City included Swope park, alone worth $1,500,000, died at 7:25 o'clock last night at the home of his sister-in-law, Mrs. L. O. Swope, in Independence, following a stroke of paralysis at 10 o'clock yesterday morning. Colonel Swope never regained consciousness. He was in his eighty-second year.

Colonel Swope was stricken while reading in the Kansas City and Independence papers of the death of his cousin and friend, Colonel James Moss Hunton, who died in the same house Friday and whose body rested in an adjoining room, awaiting burial today.

Ten years ago Logan O. Swope, a brother of Colonel Swope, died in the same house, of paralysis.

"Let me have the papers and read what they have to say about my old friend," Colonel Swope said to the nurse.

The papers were taken to him as he lay in bed and he read part of the obituary notices, while tears ran from his eyes and his form shook with emotion. He told the nurse he would read the rest later. These were Colonel Swope's last words. With a faint cry of pain his body stiffened and he became unconscious.

Dr. B. Clark Hyde of Kansas City, who had been in almost continuous attendance for the past five weeks, was present, but despite all efforts of the physicians the patient remained unconscious to the end.

RELATIVES AT DEATH BED.

There was present at the death bed Mrs. Logan O. Swope, widow of the colonel's brother, Dr. B. C. Hyde, Mrs. B. C. Hyde, Miss Chrisman Swope, Lucille Swope, Thomas Swope and Margaret Swope, cousins of the dead man.

The illness which resulted in death had been of five weeks' duration. One morning Colonel Swope was walking across the room at his home when he collapsed and fell heavily to the floor. He was put to bed and his strength and vigor seemed to leave him. While physically weak he continued mentally strong and up to a few days ago was able to discuss extensive business affairs with his manager, S. W. Spangler.

Three days ago the colonel was out for a drive of several hours, accompanied by a nurse, and the fresh air and sunshine seemingly helped him. He commented on the pleasure he had derived in being able to again be out of doors, and observed that if he continued to improve he would be strong enough to dispose of some important matters he had in mind. Those who know say they believe he was contemplating making some large bequests to charitable and public institutions not already provided for in his will drawn by himself three years ago. Judge C. O. Tichenor, a life long friend, it is said, volunteered to assist him in the preparation of the will, but the colonel declined the offer. The original will is said to be on file in Independence, and will not be opened until after the funeral.

WON'T DISCUSS WILL.

It is said that relatives have been liberally provided for, and it was announced in Independence last night that they are familiar with its contents. They refused to discuss the matter.

Some time ago it was publicly stated that Colonel Swope had in contemplation the endowment of an art gallery and an industrial school, but it is not known whether he made nay provisions for these in his will.

Since the death of his brother, Logan O. Swope, ten years ago, Colonel Swope made his home with his brother's widow in Independence. He made no provision for a resting place for his body after death. He has two sisters living. They are Mrs. Elizabeth Plunkett, living on a farm near Nashville, Tenn., and Mrs. Margaret Fleming of Columbia, Tenn. It is not expected they will attend the funeral.

FOR A PUBLIC FUNERAL.

No funeral arrangements have been made by the immediate relatives, and none will be made until after the funeral today of Mr. Hunton. Upon learning of Colonel Swope's death, Mayor Crittenden called up the bereaved relatives at Independence and said that if they desired Kansas City would co-operate in the obsequies. The mayor stated that city hall here would be closed on the day of the funeral.

It was suggested last night that the funeral should be held under the direction of the people of Kansas City, but no formal step was taken. There will be meetings today of civic and commercial organizations to take formal cognizance of the death of Kansas City's greatest philanthropist, and the idea of the people as a whole being the mourners and conducting the funeral will be discussed.

There was a sentiment prevalent last night that the body have its resting place in some beautiful spot in Swope park and that an appropriate monument be erected, to be paid for by popular subscription. A mask of the features of Colonel Swope will be taken today for use in the erection of the monument.

TO KANSAS CITY IN 1857.

Thomas H. Swope was born in Lincoln county, Ky., in 1827 and received a common school education in that neighborhood. Later he attended Central university at Danville, formerly Center college, and was graduated from that university in the year 1848 in the class with Senator George Graham Vest. He then entered the senior year at Yale and graduated that spring. The profession of a lawyer attracted him and he went to Gainesville, Ala., where he studied law under Judge Reavis. Although proficiently equipped for the practice of his profession he did not follow it.

When 30 years of age Mr. Swope came to Kansas City and has been a resident of this county ever since, although not maintaining his legal residence here. He came here in the year 1857 and engaged in the real estate business. His investments in late years have returned him large incomes. Before settling in Kansas City permanently he migrated to Montana and engaged in mining. While in the West he explored the Rocky mountains and made large investments there. He also laid out the town of Butte City while in the West.

Thomas H. Swope descended from a long line of ancient and honorable ancestors. His ancestors settled in Kentucky a few years before the signing of the Declaration of Independence. A record of his family preserved by his relatives name the Rev. Benedict Swope as his direct ancestor. He was a minister of the Reformed church and during the war he had charge of the Second Reformed church of Baltimore. Family traditions say he was born in York, Pa., but public records speak of him as being born in Germany. He settled in Logan's Station, Ky., in 1774.

KENTUCKY HIS RESIDENCE.

The oldest of seven children, Thomas H. was born of the union of John Brevett Swope and Frances A. Hunton of Virginia. His mother was from one of the wealthiest and most influential and prominent families of the mother state. The Swope family has always counted itself among the F. F. V. Being born in Kentucky, Colonel Swope naturally maintained his affection and sympathies with his native state, and has always held his legal residence in Woodford county, Kentucky. He has maintained a magnificent home in the Bourbon state.

A bas relief of Colonel Swope, done by Miss Maud Miles of Kansas City and first shown in Baltimore at the Baltimore Memorial Art Society, was placed on exhibition in the club rooms of the Commercial Club. The philanthropist heard that a monument of stone was to be carved from the model and discountenanced the idea. It was planned to raise $25,000 for this purpose but was discontinued after his remonstrance. The monument was to have been placed at the entrance to Swope park.
RANKED WITH STEPHEN GIRARD.

While he made many donations known to the public he made many more that never reached the public ear. It was characteristic of the man to be reserved and silent as to his benefactions. One of the best illustrations of this fact is the lack of information regarding the man to be found in the histories of Missouri and of Kansas City men.

He never paraded his charitable and philanthropic donations and always disapproved of public notoriety given to his bequests. In a speech made by the late ex-Governor Thomas T. Crittenden it was said that Kansas City did not appreciate the greatness of the man who had by his gifts to the city placed himself alongside Girard of Philadelphia and others well known to the public. Kansas City would applaud his goodness and laud the man years after his death, he said, because then the worth of his gifts would begin to be appreciated.

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