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January 25, 1910

POOR MAN'S SHAVE ATTACKED.

Barber College Law, Which Prohibits
Charging, Will Be Tested.

The "poor man's" shave may become a thing of the past. The State Board of Barbers is after the barber colleges that give a shave for a nickel. Complaint was made yesterday to the prosecuting attorney and information will be filed this week in the criminal court to test the validity of the barber law.

A barber college at Missouri avenue and Delaware street will be made the defendant. It is charged that the owner has placed a barber pole in front of his "school," and that he charges five cents for a shave. It is also charged that the owner, or "president," advertises in the newspapers and employs barbers.

The law requires that barber colleges shall not charge for shaves and hair cuts, the barber pole shall not be displayed and only the "students" shall work upon the "victims."

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November 7, 1909

HELD IN CHAIR AND SHAVED.

Customer Does Not Want Other Side
Finished, Barber Objects, Has His
Way, Then Stabs Defending Self.

As a result of a fight which took place in the barber shop at 902 East Fifth street, James Morley was stabbed five times in the back with a pair of scissors, and slashed once in the left arm with a razor and was then locked up in the police station, charged with disturbing the peace, while Mike Raffles, the barber who inflicted the wounds, escaped.

Morley, who is 20 years of age, but who wouldn't tell his residence, had been drinking when h e entered the barber shop at which Raffles is employed, wanting a shave. When Raffles had shaved one side of his face, Morley decided that he would let the other side go. Raffles remonstrated with him, and finally thourgh force managed to complete the job. As soon as Morley was released from the chair he attempted to start trouble. In self defense, Raffles grabbed a pair of scissors and in the melee which followed, stabbed Morley five times in the back. Morley still showed fight, and raffles slashed him with a razor.

Morley was taken to the emergency hospital in an ambulance, but fought with the doctor all the way to the hospital. When in the hospital he tried to fight everyone with whom he came in contact. Patrolman Miller was sent to quiet the belligerent patient, and Morley again wanted to fight, but one good healthy slap ended the trouble, and Morley was locked up on a charge of disturbing the peace.

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August 8, 1909

KILLS SISTER-IN-LAW
AND COMMITS SUICIDE.

GRANT SIERS SHOOTS MRS.
MARY SIERS AND HIMSELF.

Jealousy and Continual Quarreling
Alleged Cause -- Negro Witness of
Tragedy Says Woman Also
Used Revolver.

Jealousy and continual quarelling is the alleged cause of the death of Mrs. Mary Siers, 1025 Jefferson street, who was shot and instantly killed yesterday afternoon about 4:45 o'clock by her brother-in-law, Grant Siers, who then turned the pistol upon himself and sent a bullet into his head, dying before anyone reached his side. The only witness to the murder and suicide was Susie Richardson, a negro woman, who lives in a house in the rear of the Siers residence.

Siers had lived at the home of Mrs. Siers for the last two years, after being separated from his wife, who lives in Humeston, Ia. Mrs. Siers' husband is divorced and is an inmate of the Soldiers' home at Leavenworth, Kas. From boarders in the house and Chester Siers, a son of the slayer and suicide, it was learned that the couple quarreled most of the time. Jealousy on the part of both is said to have caused nearly all of the domestic trouble.

ORDERED TO LEAVE HOUSE.

About 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon Mrs. Siers was busy showing two real estate men over the house when Grant Siers returned home and began to quarrel with his sister-in-law. She told him to leave the ho use and he entered the hall to get his suit case. The woman threw the suit case at his feet with the admonition not to return. Siers requested time to get his clothing from his room, but she again told him to leave. His son, Chester, finally induced him to leave the house, and the two men went to a saloon at Eleventh and Jefferson streets. Later in the afternoon the father left his son at Eleventh and Main streets.

The next heard of Siers he was entering the yard at the Jefferson street residence. Instead of going in the back way, as was his custom, Siers entered from the front and went around the house to the rear door. A latticed porch is just off the kitchen door, and as Siers walked upon the porch Mrs. Siers appeared in the doorway. She ordered him off and according to the theory of the police he drew a revolver and shot three times. Two bullets entered her body, one on each side of the chest. The third bullet lodged in the wall back of her. Then Siers placed the muzzle of the pistol behind the right ear and killed himself.

SAYS WOMAN USED PISTOL.

The version of the double killing as given by the Richardson woman differs greatly from that of the police theory. She said she was standing in the yard and saw Mrs. Siers point a revolver at Siers and fire twice. Siers, she said, turned and fell, and while on the floor of the porch took a pistol from his pocket and fired at Mrs. Siers, afterwards shooting himself. However, when the deputy coroner, Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, examined the bodies only one revolver was found and that was under Siers. the body of Mrs. Siers was slaying in the kitchen and Siers's body was on the porch.

Mrs. Richardson said that Siers was asking for his clothes and that Mrs. Siers finally ordered him away and said:

"I'll see you dead before I will give you your clothes."

"My God, please don't kill me," Siers exclaimed, she said.

Immediately after this conversation Mrs. Siers began to shoot, according to the negro woman. She was positive two revolvers were displayed. As the police could only find one pistol, and that underneath Siers's body, the discredit the negro's story.

Dr. Czarlinsky also found five shells, which were for the pistol, in the coat pocket of Siers.

SON TELLS OF QUARRELS.

Chester Siers, who is a restaurant cook, said yesterday evening that his father did not own a pistol so far as he knew, but that his aunt had one. He said his father and aunt were in love with each other, but that he had never heard them discuss the subject of marriage.

W. L. Haynes and Charles Callahan, boarders,were in the parlor during the shooting and counted four reports of shots fired. Mrs. Moyer, housekeeper, was in another part of the house. The son of Siers said that in the past when his father had left home after a quarrel with his aunt she always sent him money to come back. About a month ago she had him arrested on a charge of disturbing the peace. He was sent to the workhouse, but after serving a short sentence, Mrs. Siers paid his fine, it is said.

Siers, who was 54 years old, was a barber and had a shop at the corner of Nicholson and Monroe streets. He leaves a widow and six children. The widow and three children reside in Humeston, Ia.

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May 23, 1909

THE WILL OF GOD IF
I AM HANGED: SHARP

LEADER OF RELIGIOUS FANATICS
DODGES RESPONSIBILITY.

Conflicting Testimony as to Who
Started the City Hall Riot
Brings Protest From
the Defendant.

SHARP TRIAL'S SECOND DAY: Defense still fails to indicate any trace of an insanity plea and continues to question along self-defense lines.
Sharp interrupts and contradicts Captain Whitsett, while latter testifies.
Patrick Clark, captain of police, tells of his fight, barehanded, with Sharp, who had both revolver and knife.
Testimony as to fight on river admitted only sparingly by Judge Latshaw.
Sharp gives out statement to effect that evidence which gets at the cause of the riot is being excluded. Also ridicules introduction of his overcoat as evidence, as not proving anything.

"If they sentence me to hang it will be the will of God."

With these words James Sharp was led back to his cell in the county jail after the second day of his trial on the charge of killing Michael Mullane, a patrolman, in the city hall riot. It was the first time during yesterday that he had mentioned religious matters.

The day closed with the evidence of the state two-thirds finished and with no more traces of an insanity defense than were shown on Friday. A. E. Martin, of counsel for Sharp, stated that he had not announced any defense and that his purpose would be to break down the testimony of the state's witnesses. All of his cross-questioning, however, as told in The Journal yesterday, was directed towards showing that the band of fanatics under Sharp's leadership did not provoke the riot, but that it was started by officers. Self-defense is the logical name for such a theory of the case. The state is expected to finish its testimony by Monday evening.

Police officers gave the greater part of the testimony yesterday. Of them, Captian Walter Whitsett was on the stand the longest time. Whitsett gave his age as 41, his service in the police department as twenty years and his residence as 2631 Gillham road. On the afternoon of the riot he was at his desk in the city hall as captain commanding the headquarters precinct.

CHILDREN WERE SHOOTING.

"I heard the shooting," testified Whitsett, "took my revolver out of my desk and ran to the street. I met Captain Clark, who had been wounded, on the stairs. When I got to the middle of the street I saw Mullane standing with a club in one hand and a revolver in the other. There was a man in front of him with a revolver. The women of the band also were near at the time. There was a man with a long beard standing on the opposite corner firing in the direction of Mullane."

"Who was this man?" asked Prosecutor Conkling.

"That's him right there," said the witness, indicating Sharp.

"What happened then?"

"I fired three or four shots at him and his revolver fell out of his hand. Two or three children came up behind and began to shoot at me. When I got back on the street, after going into the station for another revolver, I saw Mullane staggering toward headquarters and helped him in. Later we searched for Sharp but could not find him. We immediately sent his description to every officer in the city and notified the surrounding towns.

"On the evening of December 10 we got word from Olathe that Sharp was under arrest there. I went there that evening with Inspector Charles Ryan."

Court adjourned at noon with Whitsett still on the stand. In the afternoon he resumed his story of the trip to Olathe. He found Sharp there in the office of Sheriff Steed. Sharp's beard and hair had been cut and he was wounded in both hands. There was a hole through his hat.

"I talked to Sharp in the presence of Mr. Steed, Inspector Ryan and Hugh Moore, a newspaper man Sharp told us--"

Mr. Martin for the defense here objected to Whitsett's telling of Sharp's statement.

"If a written statement was taken that is the best evidence," said Martin.

The statement was shown to Captain Whitsett and identified by him. Weapons used in the city hall riot then were introduced in evidence. First there was Sharp's .45 caliber Colt revolver, the handle scarred by a shot. Sharp told Whitsett the weapon was shot out of his hand. Then there was a .45 caliber colt which Louis Pratt had carried.

"I was told by Sharp that Pratt had bought his weapon in Kansas City," said Whitsett, but Sharp spoke out sharply in court to the witness:

"I didn't say that. Why do you want to tell such stuff as that?"

"I don't know. He might have bought it up the river," responded Whitsett.

EXHIBITED THE WEAPONS.

Then was shown the 38-caliber Colt, which Sharp said his wife brought in her bosom from the houseboat. Lena Pratt's 32-caliber pistol was then exhibited and identified, and the knife, with its four-inch blade.

"What was the purpose of all these weapons, as Sharp told it to you?" asked Mr. Conkling.

"He said it was to resist any officer who might interfere with his preaching. He said he also had two rifles and a shotgun and another revolver, the latter used by Lulu Pratt."

The overcoat worn by Sharp the day of the riot was then shown to the jury, as were the remnants of Sharp's beard.

"Don't see why they want to show the coat," said Sharp to W. S. Gabriel, assistant prosecutor. It doesn't prove anything."

On cross-examination, Captain Whitsett was asked about happenings at the river, following the street fight, but the state objected successfully to most of the questions. Just after an objection had been sustained, Sharp spoke up and said:

"Your honor, can I have a word? This man wants to tell what happened there, and he is cut off. Now ---"

"Make your objection through your attorneys, Mr. Sharp," answered Judge Latshaw.

BARBER TESTIFIES.

Inspector Charles Ryan followed Captain Whitsett on the stand. He recounted substantially the same details of the shooting and the trip to Olathe.

George Robinson, 2905 Wyandotte street, a barber at 952 Mulberry street, was the next witness, and told how Sharp came into his shop sat in the chair of Chester Ramsey and had his hair and whiskers cut off.

"He didn't take his hands out of his pockets. He said: 'My hands were frosted up North, where I've been fishing. I want this job done in a hurry. I want to meet a friend and have to get on a train.'

"When the job was done, Ramsey took a purse out of Sharp's pocket and took 40 cents out of it. Then Sharp went away."

The defense objected to the testimony of Robinson on the plea that the state had given no notification that he would be called as a witness. The objection was overruled. Robinson was not cross-examined, but will be recalled by the defense to give further testimony.

Then came William Thiry, a farmer who lives near Monticello, Kas. "On the evening of December 9 Sharp came to my house," said Thiry. "My son opened the door and then I went out on the porch. Sharp was standing there. He said, 'Brother, I want to tell you my circumstances. Wait till I sit down,' and he sat down on the edge of the porch. 'I'm paralyzed, brother,' he resumed. 'I lay down over there on a strawstack and tried to die, but the laws of nature were against me.'

"He kept his hands in his overcoat pockets and asked for food and a night's lodging. 'I am no ordinary bum,' said he. 'I have money to pay for my keep over night.' I consulted with my wife and we decided we could not keep him, but we took him and fed him. I telephoned Mr. Beaver, my brother-in-law, who lives a quarter of a mile from me and Mr. Beaver said he could keep him. While I was telephoning, Sharp came into the ho use and listened to the conversation.

"At supper he spoke of being a peddler and that his partner had turned him down because he was paralyzed in his hands. He said he wanted to get back to town to a good hospital. It was 8 o'clock when he left my house. I fed him myself. He didn't take his hands from his pockets."

"I am willing to acknowledge anything this man says," remarked Sharp. "He treated me alright while I was there."

The defense fought the introduction of this testimony on the same theory it had advanced in the case of Robinson. It objected further to Thiry's relating some of the conversation. Mr. Conkling insisted it was relevant as combating a defense of insanity, if such was to be the defense.

"We have never announced what our defense would be," said Martin.

"You have done so repeatedly in open court while applying for continuances in this case," said Mr. Conkling.

Court was adjourned after the defense had secured permission to bring a number of witnesses from Lebanon, Mo.

OTHER WITNESSES.

In the course of the morning session Captain Clark, who lost an eye in the riot, gave his testimony. He lives at 538 Tracy avenue, and has been on the police force for twenty-one years. He was sergeant in immediate charge of headquarters station the afternoon of the riot. Testimony was also taken from Howard B. McAfee, business manager of Park college at Parkville, Mo., who was making a purchase on the Fourth street side of the city market when he heard children singing on Main street and went toward the gathering. He saw Dalbow come from the station and shake hands with Sharp. Then someone behind Sharp fired. He saw Mullane trying to get away from the women, who seemed to be pursuing him. then he saw Sharp and Clark in their encounter. He helped Clark into the station and when he looked again Sharp was gone.

Preceding Mr. McAfee, there testified Job H. Lyon, a traveling evangelist. Just before the riot he had a talk in the Workingman's Mission with Pratt. Sharp and Creighton, the last named in charge of the place. Being warned against antagonizing the police, Lyon said Sharp waved his hand and said: "I am God. If any policeman attempts to interfere with me, I'll kill him."

The witness said Sharp made similar statements while brandishing his revolver in the direction of the city hall. Pratt and Sharp, said Lyon, pointed revolvers at Dalbow when he approached. Sharp, said the witness, fired the first shot.

After Sharp had been brought to jail here, Lyon, who often holds Sunday meetings for the prisoners, accused the fanatic of falsehood in regard to the story he told the Mulberry street barber. He asked Sharp to attend the jail services and Sharp said he himself was god, and, of course, would not come. Then Lyon told him that God did not prevaricate and Sharp refused to have anything more to do with the evangelist.

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February 1, 1909

RHYMES AS HE SHAVES.

Kansas Barber Who Talks in Poetry
to His Lathered Customers.

George McClelland, a Kansas City, Kas., negro barber, is of the musical kind, so instead of talking tariff revision, foreign wars and bits of local gossip with patrons, he entertains them with a continuous string of doggerel. McClelland seems to have a peculiar gift of adapting all kinds of small talk to rhyme. For instance, when the customer climbs into the chair he is greeted something like this:

Your face, kind friend, I'm about to scrape.
I'll get it in the finest shape;
And cut your hair and comb it, too;
You'll look much younger when I'm through.
Now, hold your chin up in the air,
Stretch out your legs and fill your chest
And close your eyes -- I'll do the rest.
The barber, who is a big man, recites this without apparent effort, changing the rhyme to suit the customer. Never is the doggerel twice alike. As the shave progresses he solicits a little additional business like this:

My friend, your hair is falling out.
A little bit of tonic stout
Will hold it in, or maybe you
Prefer a rub or egg shampoo.
I see your shoes require a shine,
Just hold them over next to mine
And note the difference and then
I'll call my boy, he'll shine for "ten."
McClelland says the verse appeals mightily to customers and draws trade to the shop.

"It's better than the old style, and it's original," he says.

"How about all great poets being insane?" he was once asked.

"Too true," replied the negro. "I find myself asking for things at the table in verse and sometimes I think that way. It's very humiliating to find yourself unconsciously saying to your wife when the baby falls out of bed:

Pick up the kid from off the floor.
I ask for this and nothing more.

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December 10, 1908

"ADAM GOD" HAS
NOT BEEN CAUGHT.

LEADER OF MANIACAL RELIG-
IONISTS STILL AT LARGE.

DETECTIVE BOYLE AFTER HIM.

BELIEVED TO BE HEADING FOR
BONNER SPRINGS.

Man Answering His Description Seen
in Armourdale -- Clark and Mul-
lane May Recover -- Selsor
Will Die.

Information was given the police about noon yesterday that a man answering the description of James Sharp, the "Adam God" of the murderous band of maniacal religionists which shot three members of the police force Tuesday, had been seen in Armourdale by a railroad man. Police were immediately dispatched to pick up the man's trail. At last midnight Sharp was still at large.

Every lodging house in the city and all the places were searched by the police Tuesday night and yesterday morning in an effort to catch the instigator of the riot of Tuesday afternoon in which Patrolman Albert O. Dublow was killed and two policeman and a citizen were seriously wounded. Many false clues were followed, as every policeman was anxious to find the man who had preached to his followers that it was right to kill.

Though the entire department was working on the case not a trace of Sharp could be found, and the information that he had passed through Armourdale was the first clue that looked good. The railroad man who telephoned to Chief Daniel Ahern that he had seen Sharp, said that the man had trimmed his whiskers and was bleeding. It was known that Sharp had been shot in the hand. When he laid a gun on the bar in John Blanchon's saloon, 400 Main street, while the shooting was going on in the street, the bartender saw that his right hand was bleeding.

NEGRO TRIMMED HIS BEARD.

According to the story told by the railroad man, Sharp stopped him and asked the direction to Bonner Springs, and then hurried on. He told the chief that he noticed blood on the man's hand and clothes. While Sharp wore a long beard, partly gray, during the fight, when he stopped in the railroad yards in Armourdale the beard was clipped, and his hair had been trimmed. Two hours later the police at No. 2 station were told by Chester Ramsey, a negro barber for George W. Robinson, 956 Mulberry street, that he had cut a man's beard and trimmed his hair and that man might have been the leader of the Adamite fanatics.

Ramsey said that the man came from the east about 5 o'clock Tuesday evening and, when he left the shop went west. The man acted strangely while in the shop, refusing to take either of his hands out of his pockets.

"He got in a chair and ordered me to take his hat off," said the barber. "He kept his hands in his coat pockets while I cut his hair and trimmed his beard I had about half finished when he seemed to get very nervous and said, 'Hurry up. I have to meet a man.' When I got through with him he got out of the chair and had me put his hat on his head. Then he made me take the money out of his left trouser pocket. He explained that his hands had been frozen and he couldn't take them out of his pockets.

"I said, 'You must have been in a colder climate than this. He said, 'Yes, I was up north of here fishin'. That was all he said."

The police believe the man was Sharp. They say he evidently was hiding his right hand, which was shot, and kept the left hand on a revolver in his pocket. The description of the man given by Ramsey coincides with that of Sharp.

CITY HALL GUARDED.

The police took precaution to guard the city hall and police headquarters all day yesterday. They were of the opinion that Sharp might return to the scene of the crime on Tuesday, and for revenge enter the station unnoticed and shoot one or more of the officers.

The police are not sure that Sharp is alone. Two patrolmen stood on the sidewalk at the main entrance to the station and two were stationed in the areaway opening on the market. Inside the station two officers guarded the hallway leading to the chief's office and our or five patrolmen and detectives were held in reserve.

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October 26, 1908

LADY BARBER TOLD HIM.

Inquisitive Man Asked Her a Pert
Question.

The lady barber removed a steaming towel from his face and fanned it gently to and fro. The inquisitive man gazed deep into the blue orbs looking down upon him.

"Why is the average man prejudiced against the lady barber?" he asked.

The fair tonsorial artist paused in her methodical swinging of the towel, the well formed hands rested on her hips and a smile that held much pity in it, slowly wreathed her lips. For once the ever ready, "Massage today? Your face needs it," was forgotten.

"So, you are one of that almost forgotten number who firmly believe that when a woman invades a sphere hitherto occupied only by man, she necessarily leaves her womanliness behind her. Not that such men consider work for a woman degrading. Oh! dear no. Their wives, mothers or sisters might take in washing or sewing. They might scrub until their back ached and their eyes swam, that is only the nobility of labor. But just let a girl, compelled by force of circumstances, to earn her own living, step into a barber shop where she has an opportunity to earn an independent livelihood and she will at once become a target for the shafts of some super-sensitive representative of the masculine sex, who sets himself up as a judge."

At this juncture the inquisitive man uttered an inarticulate protest, but was immediately silenced by a storm of sarcasm.

"No, no, I understand exactly. Once in a great while, but only in a great while, thank goodness, some stranger will walk into the shop with that old mistaken idea about lady barbers. Such persons are quickly disillusionized. Understand me now, I am not vouching for all barbers, any more than you could vouch for a particular class of men. If you will take the trouble of investigating, however, you will find that lady barbers receive the same degree of respect, and enjoy the esteem of their customers to the same extent as in any other business or professional life. Massage today? Your face needs it."

The inquisitive man submitted meekly.

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August 2, 1908

BOY DROWNS IN A BATHTUB.

George Lemon, Subject to Fits, Per-
ishes Before Help Arrives.

George Lemon, 17 years old, entered the barber shop of Joseph Sarp and James S. Caldwell, 2605 East Eighteenth street, last night about 9 o'clock and said he wanted to take a bath. R. M. Dodson, the negro porter, prepared the bath for him, filling the tub half full of lukewarm water. Lemon entered and was heard splashing around. Fifteen minutes later his body was heard to fall in the tub and those who rushed into the room found him lying in the water, dead.

Dr. N. McVey was called and he tried to resuscitate him, but without avail. The body was taken to Eylar Bros., undertakers, where Coroner George B. Thompson examined it and found the death was due to drowning. Lemon was subject to epileptic attacks, one of which probably caused him to fall in the tub. No inquest will be held.

The boy was a teamster and lived at 1704 Agnes avenue with his parents and brother.

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December 25, 1907

SHOOTS FATHER IN THE LEG.

Too Much Hard Cider Is the Undoing
of Calvin Jackson.

Too much Christmas celebration out in Dallas, a little town about fourteen miles south of Kansas City, almost resulted in patricide last night. While Calvin Jackson and some of his friends were in the pool room of a combination barber shop and pool room drinking hard cider, George Jackson, Calvin's father, went into the barber shop to get a shave.

Soon the hard cider began to have its inevitable effect upon Calvin, and he drew a revolver and started to shoot out the kerosene lights in the building. The father jumped up from the chair where he was being shaved, with the lather still on his face, and tried to quiet his son. But Calvin did not comprehend, and turned the revolver upon his father, shooting him in the left leg.

Calvin was arrested by Constable O'Brien of Dallas and taken to Waldo, where he was met by Marshal Al Heslip and brought to the county jail.

Later he denied any knowledge of the affair, and said that he would not believe he had shot his father. Calvin is only 21 years old, and his father is about 45. Calvin was accompanied to Kansas City by his father It is not thought that the latter will prosecute the case.

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December 19, 1907

ROBBERS ATTACK A WOMAN.

Take Her Money and Leave Her Ly-
ing Unconscious in the Snow.

Alma Day, the 16-year-old daughter of W. L. Day, a barber who lives at Thirtieth street and Cleveland avenue, was assaulted and robbed last night at Thirtieth street and Askew avenue by two men who had followed her from Kansas City, Kas.

Miss Day is employed in the buttering department of Swift's packing house and receives a salary of $6.25 per week. Yesterday was her pay day and she thinks that the two men who assaulted her were aware of the fact. The men took her week's pay, less the 5 cents she had paid in car fair going home.

She says that they got on an Indiana avenue car at the same time she did when she was returning home from work. They sat across the aisle two seats behind her. They followed her from the car at Thirtieth street and Indiana avenue. She walked on down Thirtieth street to Askew, within one block of her home, when the two men grabbed her. She was strangled until she almost lost consciousness. One of the men struck her on the back of her head and in the face. She fell unconscious and lay in the roadside for almost an hour.

Her older sister, Effie, went out to the grocery store, and in doing so had to pass her sister lying in the snow. She did not know that the body was that of a person, but being somewhat frightened at it, walked to the other side of the road. She returned from the store and walked around her sister again in the same manner.

About fifteen minutes later one of the neighbor's boys made the same trip as did Effie Day. He did not notice the body until on his way back home. He immediately ran to the Day home and told Mrs. Day of her daughter's condition, and Alma was carried into her father's house, a block away.

From the tracks in the snow it was thought that the two men ran up Askew for about a quarter of a mile and then they crossed a field and went directly towards Jackson avenue.

The police were notified immediately, but were unable to trace the robbers further than Jackson avenue.

Miss Day's injuries, while not serious, are painful, and she will be unable to leave her bed for some time.

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December 1, 1907

BUT HER MONEY WAS BURNED.

Sick Woman Rescued With Diffi-
culty Wanted to Go for It.

Fire was discovered in a grocery store at the southeast corner of Fifth and Harrison streets this morning at 12:30 o'clock. An alarm was not turned in until the fire had gained considerable headway and the whole upper story, which was used as a residence, was in flames.

While the firemen were fighting the flames a report was spread about that Mrs. J. W. Taggart, who lived over the grocery store, was still in the building and too ill to save herself. Firemen were sent into the house and, after some difficulty, succeeded in rescuing the woman. After she was safely placed upon the ground she remembered that her husband had about $150 in the burning room. She made an attempt to go after the money, but was held back by firemen and the police. The money was in paper and gold and was not found.

The building was owned by William Hall. It was a large two-story frame and was used for stores and residences. The first floor was occupied by Salvato Trapino, who ran a grocery store, and a barber shop owned by Juan Laroso, who lives at Fifth street and Troost avenue.

The fire was supposed to have started from a gasoline tank which was kept in the rear of the grocery store. The loss is estimated at $5,000.

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November 3, 1907

GIVE BOND OR GO TO JAIL.

SUNDAY LAW VIOLATORS WERE HUR-
RIED TO THE CRIMINAL COURT.

Judge Wallace Wouldn't Allow Them to
Wait Until Tomorrow -- "You're
Next," He Said to Barbers--
A Tight Lid To-day.

No cigars to-day. No shaves. No haircuts. Last Sunday these luxuries were available. But not to-day.

The cigar dealers indicted yesterday for selling on Sunday were counting on one more day of immunity. Then to-morrow they were to flock to the criminal court and give bond. It had all been arranged by their attorney, T. A. Mastin and Albert Heslip, county marshal. Then Judge Wallace heard and--

"What, allow them to keep open another Sunday in defiance of the law?" he exclaimed. "Not at all. These cigar dealers must learn that I mean business. They must be brought in immediately. They'll give bond to-day or go to jail."

THEN FOR THE WARRANTS.

The judge sent for the marshal. The marshal had gone to Independence. The judge then sent for Herman Weisflog, chief deputy. When that officer emerged from the judge's chambers he looked worried and he was mopping perspiration from his face. He seized a bunch of warrants and the first on the pile was one of thirteen indictments for Dan Lucas, a negro proprietor of a barber shop on Main street between Eighth and Ninth streets. He handed it to another deputy telling him to serve it.

"I thought you were going to wait until Monday," the second deputy said. "That was the agreement."

"You are not to think," was the reply. "The judge is doing the thinking."

Then the chief deputy began distributing cigar store indictments among the other deputies for service. He telephoned the news to the attorney for the cigar dealers and asked him to help.

BUT HE THOUGHT WRONG.

"I thought we were to come down Monday," the attorney protested.

"That doesn't go with the court," the deputy replied. "You will have to bring your clients here and give bond to-night. The judge says he will be here until mid-night if necessary.

Then the attorney telephoned the judge. No use. It was only a short time until those who had been indicted began arriving at the courtroom. Judge Wallace accepted bonds until 6:30 o'clock. Then he went to dinner to return at 8:30 o'clock. He took bonds until 9:30 o'clock last night. He required a bond of $600 for the first indictment and $200 bond for each succeeding one. Each bondsman was interrogated closely and none was accepted accept owners of real estate.

The first to appear was J. W. Hearsch, a dealer at 514 Grand avenue.

"I am an Orthodox Jew," he said. I close on Saturday and open Sunday."

"This isn't your trial," the judge said. "If what you say is true you will not suffer. Your bond is $600."

The next were Dan Lucas and his eight barbers. A deputy marshal had arrested them all. This resulted in closing the shop for a while. The deputy allowed the barbers to finish shaving customers in the chairs and then took them to the criminal court.

LUCAS TRIED TO ARGUE.

"There's nothing in this Sunday law against barbers working on Sunday," Lucas said. "I made a test case of it once and beat it in the supreme court."

"That was a special law against barbers alone and unconstitutional because it was class legislation," the judge said. "You were indicted here under the general law against working on Sunday, which applies to all classes of labor and has been upheld by the supreme court. All the other barber shops have closed. My advice to you is to do likewise."

The eight negro barbers sat in a row waiting for their employer to give bond.

"You're next," the judge said, indicating the second after the first had given bond. "You're next here like you are in a barber shop."

As each one gave bond the judge called "next" until all had qualified.

"Now, Lucas, I'll say this to you," Judge Wallace said as the negro barber prepared to to: "I don't wish to be severe with you if you show a disposition to comply with and not defy the law. If you close I will let you off easy, but if you defy the law you will have to take the consequences of a prosecution on all these indictments."

The negro barber said he would close on Sunday. He returned to his shop with his eight barbers and hung a Sunday closing placard in the window.

Miss Agnes Miller, owner of the cigar stands in the Kupper and Densmore hotels, was among those who appeared.

"There's a young woman; have her come up here first," the judge said.

Miss Miller advanced to the clerk's desk and acknowledged her bond; then she left the courtroom.

THEN A CAPITULATION.

Meanwhile the attorneys had learned that the marshal had orders to arrest "on view" any cigar dealers transacting business to-day.

"But," an attorney suggested, "we may not be able to get word to all the dealers of the agreement. Will they be arrested?"

"If the deputy marshals find any cigar dealer transacting business they will notify him to cease at once," the judge replied. "Should he comply he will not be molested. Otherwise he will be taken to jail, where he will be required to supply a bond or be locked up."

Then the judge began to make fine distinctions.

"The cigar stores," he continued, "may remain open to sell candy, news matter, soft drinks, fruits, nuts or any food that is cooked, so that it may be eaten on the spot.

"There's a distinction between food that may be eaten on the spot and food that must be cooked. One sort is a necessity, the other isn't.

THE NECESSITY OF CANDY.

"Now, why is candy a necessity, while cigars are not?" somebody asked.

"I have looked up the law carefully on this subject," the judge replied, "and I have determined that candy is a food necessity. Children must have it. That is my construction of the law.

The dealers who agreed to close to-day include the owners of practically all of the down town stores and of the hotel and drug store stands.

The theaters, however, under the protection of the federal court, will be open to-day as usual.

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October 20, 1907

ONCE, ANYWAY, THEY WORKED.

County Employes, at Varying Sal-
aries, Answered Telephones.

Inquiries from shopkeepers who wanted to know what they might do and what commodities they might sell today without laying themselves liable to arrest, flooding in over the telephones in the criminal court building yesterday, kept four employes of the county busy all day. Two men sat by the telephones in the county prosecutor's office and two in the city marshal's office answering or trying to answer questions. They are men who draw salaaries from the county of from $75 to $150 a month. Questions of all sorts were asked.

"I run a barber shop. I won't shave anybody tomorrow, but may I turn the water on in the bathtubs?" inquired one voice.

"I pass that," replied Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Kimbrell, who was on the telephone. "Cleanliness in next to Godliness, as I have heard, but I don't know what Judge Wallace will say about your selling a bath on Sunday."

"I am an undertaker and there is a man in my office now who wants me to furnish a hearse and carriages for his wife's funeral tomorrow. Will I be arrested if I do so?"

"When did the lady die?" replied Jimmy Moran, for this question floated into the county marshal's office.

"Friday, " replied the undertaker.

"That's a very unlucky day to die on," Jimmy said. "Especially since the lid is on. If you think the body won't keep until Monday, go ahead with the funeral Sunday."

The afternoon papers had not been on the street more than five minutes when the four county officers who served as telephone boys got into real trouble. The earlier instructions of Judge Wallace exempted the sellers of candies, bread, ice, milk, and other necessities of life from arrest. But the grand jury told police to report all kinds of business transacted excepting the sales of drugs and service of meals.

Candy store keepers, florists, and bakers, who thought they were exempt, began calling in to find out whether they should obey Judge Wallace or the grand jury. The men on the answer ends of the telephones were up against it and said so frankly.

"Judge Wallace last night wouldn't discuss the change which the grand jury made during his absence from the city, other than to say that he would look into the matter Monday morning. Men who know him, though, believe that promises which he made to bakers and others, many by personal word, will not be violated. If the jury should decide to go beyond the judge's instructions and close everything in the city excepting drug stores and restaurants, however, the judge will, perhaps, back it in enforcing the rules after today.

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September 16, 1907

AS GOOD AS THEY PRETEND.

That's What "Pat Flanagan" Thinks
of Men in General.

"I believe men are just as good as they pretend to be while wearing their 'company manners' in the presence of women. I had supposed that men always tried to be nicer when they knew a women were about. I have met a good many men who did not know a woman was near and they were just as nice as they could have been had they known."

That is what Viola Reed, alias "Pat Flanagan" said about "the men" in the police matron's room yesterday and she ought to know for she has been working with men, wearing men's clothes and passing as a man for several weeks.

She was wearing men's clothes yesterday, and while she talked of men she threw one leg over the other in the most approved manly manner possible.

"Pat" will leave the police station today. She will walk over the the Helping Hand like a little man, leave there like a little woman, and go to work in a private family as a domestic.

Girls do not often patronize barbers. "Pat" just learned yesterday that her inexperience cost her about $40. That was what she paid a barber in Vinita to cut her hair when she decided to be a man. She gave the barber her hair for cutting it. She learned yesterday she could have sold her hair for $40.

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