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February 7, 1910

PORTERFIELD KNEW
SWOPE CLAIMANT.

CIRCUIT JUDGE SAYS ELMER C.
WAS PROSPEROUS BUSINESS
MAN OF MARTINSBURG.

DOUBTS STORY'S TRUTH

Must Prove His Allegations,
Which Legal Records
Alone Could.

The claim of Elmer C. Swope of Martinsburg, W. Va., that he is the son of the late Colonel Thomas Swope was the general topic of conversation yesterday among old friends of Colonel Swope, by whom it was ridiculed. They declared that Colonel Swope came here before the war, and that therefore the Eastern claimant was in error. They also insist that Colonel Swope was a bachelor, and that had he been married someone here surely would have known of it.

"I think that Elmer C. Swope is laboring under an hallucination," said Judge E. E. Porterfield, who was born and raised in Martinsburg. "I knew Elmer C. Swope when he came to our town a quarter of a century ago and went to live with his uncle, Hugh A. Frazier. Mr. Frazier was in the implement business and young Swope was then just out of age and took an active hand in the business. He was well liked and the business prospered.

"I left there over a score of years ago but have returned frequently for short visits. On these trips I have seen Elmer Swope, and have talked with him. In recent years he suffered business reverses, and lost much of his money. My brother, Joseph L. Porterfield, is in the real estate business in Martinsburg and I make sure that I would have heard something about Elmer C. Swope's claim before this were there anything to it."

SHIFTS TO INDEPENDENCE.

The center of interest in the Swope case shifts this morning to a little room in the court house at Independence, where Coroner B. H. Zwart, assisted by Deputy Coroner Trugdon, will begin the inquest into the cause of death of the late Colonel Thomas H. Swope.

Here the witnesses on the several sides will be asked to tell the coroner's jury all they know about the last illness and death of Colonel Swope. The attorneys for the interested parties will be present. The coroner, his deputy and the members of the jury will ask questions of the witnesses. Whether Prosecuting Attorney Conkling will question the witnesses will be determined this morning. It is presumed by the attorneys for the Swope heirs that the prosecutor's office will ask some of the questions, either directly or through the deputy coroner.

Yesterday was a day of rest of those engaged in the case. The attorneys attended to private affairs and several of them took long motor rides in the afternoon.

Independence had many visitors yesterday. They began coming into the town early in the morning and most of them walked about the old court house and visited with those shopkeepers whose places were open. The people in Independence are surprised that the outside outside world should take so much interest in the Swope case. In fact, there are many of the residents who are not aware of the fact that an inquest is to be held this week. The persons who will attend the inquiry promise to come largely from Kansas City.

The testimony which will be heard today will be from the undertaker and his assistants who removed the body from the cemetery to the undertaking rooms at Independence, the sexton at the cemetery and possibly the doctors who performed the autopsy and removed the viscera. Other witnesses will be placed on the stand to prove the identity of the body.

On Tuesday it is probable that the members of the Swope family, the nurses and possibly the doctors will be heard. The experts from Chicago, it is thought likely, will not be heard until Wednesday. They are expected to arrive here Tuesday, however, and will confer with Mr. Paxton, the executor of the estate.

In the meantime the attorneys in the Dr. Hyde libel suit will rest. It is not expected that they will endeavor to take any depositions until after the inquest. One of the principal reasons for a delay is that they expect to attend the inquest and therefore will not have the time to give to examining witnesses.

It is understood that Detectives Harry Arthur and Joe Morris have been detailed by the police department to attend the Swope inquest. They will be there to assist the prosecutor.

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January 28, 1910

DRUMMER RECOVERS OUTFIT.

Detectives Looking for "Good Fel-
lows" Who Pawned It.

The detective department is looking for four "good fellows" who appropriated the drummer's outfit of William G. Viquesney, a member of H. O. Wheeler's band, during the automobile show in Convention hall. The date on which the drums, tambourines, whistle, etc., were supposed to have been taken was January 19. It was on that night that four well dressed white men, half intoxicated, took the instruments to a pawn broker on Grand avenue and realized about $25 on them. The more valuable of the collections were recovered by Mr. Viquesney yesterday.

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January 27, 1910

FATHER'S FEARS UNFOUNDED.

Italian's Effort to See Girl Starts
Black Hand Story.

Fearing that he was about to become a victim of a Black Hand plot, Petro Marsala, a wealthy Italian living at 410 Oak street, appealed to the police for protection yesterday. Detectives immediately investigated the case and reoprted that Marsala's apprehensions were for the most part unfounded.

Petro has a 13-year-old daughter whose name is Dora. She recently had an ardent suitor, Sam Valenta, who proposed marriage to her. The father promptly interposed an objection and ordered Sam to desist his attentions. Volenta's feelings were hurt and it is said that he wrote imploring letters to Dora and finally formed the habit of frequenting the Marsala premises in an effort to see the girl.

Then Marsala seemed to take alarm. He had heard that Valenta had relatives who were said to be members of the Black Hand society. Neighbors told him they had heard rumors to the effect that Sam and some accomplices plotted to kidnap Dora. No arrests have been made.

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January 22, 1910

BRIDE LOYAL TO PRISONER.

Says They Have Plenty of Money
and Charge is Absurd.

Clyde Houk, a prisoner at police headquarters awaiting the arrival of officers who will take him back to his home at Memphis, Tenn., on suspicion of having passed worthless paper, still retains the unshaken confidence of his bride of two weeks.

All day yesterday Mrs. Houk, a fragile little woman of about 25 years, sat in the matron's room holding her husband's hand and consoling him as best she could. They were visiting Kansas City on their honeymoon when Houk was arrested by Detectives Andrew O'Hare and D. D. Mitchell Thursday night.

"Of course Clyde is innocent," Mrs. Houk said yesterday. "The whole affair is a terrible mistake. Clyde is well known in Memphis, where he was engaged in the implement business. We have plenty of money, and it is absurd to connect my husband with anything dishonest. He merely overdrew his bank account a few dollars, that's all. Why, he did not even know that he had done so. I don't see the need of having policemen come to get Clyde, as we were going back to Memphis anyhow. I shall go with him and see the matter through."

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January 15, 1910

INDEPENDENCE "HOUSE OF
DEATH" CLOSED TO VISITORS.

Swope Home in Independence
Guarded Day and Night by
Special Officer.
The Home in Independence Where Occurred the Deaths of Several Members of the Swope Family.
The Swope Home in Independence.

The Swope home, a magnificent three-story brick structure on South Pleasant avenue in Independence, is regarded as the abode of death by nearly every resident of that rural city.

The sudden death of J. Moss Hunton, closely followed by that of Thomas H. Swope, the millionaire benefactor and that of his nephew, Chrisman Swope, awoke suspicion that all was not well and that the Swopes were a marked family among even the most easy-going of the inhabitants. Men and women passing to or from their homes during church hours of a Sunday evening gazed fearfully up at the now tomb-like building with its darkened windows and barred doors. If they ahd been asked ubruptly why they did this they would have stammered out the answer that they did not know. It was all so mysterious that one after another of the same family should be stricken with a fatal illness of different kinds, but uniformly ending in convulsions.

Where there are suspicions there are those to invent tales of various sorts or to uncover significant incidents from the charmed house of the past. Some of the stories were undoubtedly founded on fact. Many were as wild and incredible as any ever bandied about the boar's-head dinners of King Arthur's court or the tales taken as evidence in the days of Salem witchcraft.

Some of the followers of Joseph Smith, the Independence seer and prophet, it is said, believed that sometime in the life of the philanthropist he had offended his God and that a curse was now being visited on his household. There would be no end, they said, until the last vestige of the family was swept away.

Another rumor that always had credence was that someone skilled in the use of subtle poisons was profiting by his knowledge.

WATER FREE OF GERMS?

Soon after the death of Chrisman Swope, it was announced by physicians of the family, that a city chemist of Kansas City had been summoned and that he had declared the presence of typhoid germs in the water used by the Swopes. In the same statement was added that the well formerly used by the family had "played out" and that another long out of commission was furnishing the supply. The water, it was said last night, was analyzed and said to be free from typhiod bacilli, notwithstanding the report.

"There is evidence that Mrs. Logan O. Swope believed the house unsanitary. About the time the well story was given out, she sent word to John Welch, a plumber, to come to the place and overhaul everything. This was done. Not a pipe but was inspected, not a hydrant or sewer outlet but was dested and disinfected. They were, according to the plumber, in ship-shape. No trace of disease laden decomposed matter was found.

HOUSEHOLD TERRORIZED.

All this time solicious neighbors were making inquiries of Mrs. Swope and others closely conneted with the family, touching the cause of the unusual spread of typhoid in the home. They seemed at their wits end to account for the disease.

Thus it was given out that the milk used in the kitchen was tainted; that the water was stagnant; that there was a quantity of decaying sewage in the pipes and that a servant girl, recently hired, who had had typhoid, had thrown her infected clothing in the milk house adjacent to the kitchen. No one knew what to believe.

Just when Mrs. Swope or her lawyers awoke to the real peril is not known definitely It is supposed to have been less than a month ago, when the doors of the palatial home were shut finally upon all visitors and a private detective employed to watch that no one should step within.

This detective is William C. Rice, former chief of police at Fairmount Park. A reporter who knockked at the big outer folding doors last night was met by him and warned off the place.

"I am here to see that no one shall see Mrs. Swope," said he. "There is no hope of getting an interview. She is indisposed and would not talk for publication. It is impossible."

The bland officer said this with a degree of finality. Without another word he stepped backward into the lobby. the heavy doors swung to. A bolt dropped in place. While the disappointed interrogator was yet on the porch a distant click like that made by an electric switch, was heard. The great house was as dark as a tomb.

SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES.

The story of several deaths in the Swope family, as told by some of their intimate friends last night, points to many susicious circumstances.

The family from the oldest member to the youngest was described as about of one disposition, kind, generous and impulsive. Thomas H. Swope would travel many a mile to help a friend.

Logan O. Swope, brother of Thomas H., died about ten years ago leaving a large inheritance in property around Independence. Naturally the burden of hte care of htis estate would devolve on the shoulders of Thomas, who already was loaded with business cares of his own. the year following Logan's death, Thomas sent for a cousin, J. Moss Hunton, then in Kentucky.

Hunton was a good manager anda man of high social standing in St. Louis, where his father, Judge James Hunton, is conisdered an authority on corporation law. Hunton came to Independence nine years ago and assumed the management of Mrs. Logan O. Swope's estate. He was acting as her major domo at the time of his death.

BECAME CONFIDANTS.

The Swopes, with the exception of Thomas Swope, a son of Logan, who owns a farm three miles northeast of the city, resided in the home on South Pleasant avenue. Hunton also lived there and as time went on Thomas H. Swope and he became inseparable companions and confidantes. Not a charity did the philanhopist indulge in but was previously laid before Hunton and met with his approval. The people of Independence came to love one as the other and Hunton acquired the unique reputation of being the only man in the city who would give a cigar or a box of candy to collectors presenting him with his month's end bills.

"I am Colonel Swope's bodyguard," Hunton told a friend on one occasion. "there is no danger of his ocming to grief when I am about. I guess things would go different if I shou ld die."

On the evening of Friday, October 1, the night of Hunton's death, he came home from a trip to the business district in good humor.

Suddenly, a few minutes after supper, he complained of feeling mortally sick and threw himself on a lounge in the sitting room, calling Mrs. Swope to his side. they had always been the greatest of friends.

"Maggie," said Hunton, "I believe this is the end." He then closed his eyes and the fatal convulsions came. Two hours later he was dead.

The death of Homas H. Swope came quite as suddenly two days from that of his confidant and friend, at about 8 o'clock the following Sunday morning. The abrupt taking away of all that was dear to Mrs. Logan O. Swope, except her children, was a great strain on her nerves and for several weeks she was on the point of a break down. She was advised to go to Chicago to recuperate. She followed the instructions and went in company with two of her personal friends, Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Thomas.

HURRIES TO DEATH BED.

While she was in Chicago word was sent to her that her eldest son, Chrisma, 31 years old, and a daughter, Margaret, were very sick of typhoid fever. She hurried back and arrived at the home four days before the death of Chrisman.

The home to which Mrs. Swope returned wsa one of hte blackest sorrow and apprehension. Margaret and Chrisman were both at death's door. One of hte servants was sick and MIss Cora Dickson, Margaret's governess who had thrown over her position as teacher of the third and fourth grades in the Columbian ward school to attend to her mistress, was down with the fatal malady.

In mortal dread of impending trouble as deep and poignant as any that had occurred heretofre, the widow cabled at once another daughter, Stella Swope, taking music lessons in Paris, to come home as quickly as steamship and train could carry her. Before she arrived in America, however, Chrisman was dead from a convulsion which turned the trend of his sickness to the worse at the climax.

Perhaps Mrs. Swope at this time believed as did some of her neighbors, that there was something supernatural in the calamities which had come to her in such close succession. anyway she sent a distant relative by marriage to meet Stella at New York and escort her home. Stella contracted typhoid fever on the train or home, it is alleged, and when she arrived was ready for the sick bed.
ADDED TO MYSTERY.

When the body of Thomas H. Swope was taken from its resting place in the vault in Forest Hill cemetery to the morgue of the H. J. Ott undertaking establishment in Independence it was about as much of a mystery as the more important details of this remarkable case. The physicians who examined the body, the lawyers at whose insistance the body was exhumed and the undertaker and coroner would not talk yesterday.

It is known that the body was at the Independence morgue, however, at 4 o'clock Wednesday afternoon, for it was at this time that a special coroner's jury was called to the Ott undertaking rooms to formally identify the body.

After they had been filed through the rooms and gazed at the face of the dead benefactor they were dismissed on call. The jurors were T. J. Walker, A. J. Bundschu, S. T. Pendleton, S. H. Woodson, Bernard Zick, Jr., and William Martin.

"We were asked merely to identify the body and our opinion as to how Colonel Swope came by his death was not asked," said T. J. Walker, one of the jurors, afterwrds. "We probably will not be called again until the contents of the stomach have been examined by the Chicago specialists.

Henry Ott of the undertaking firm would not give out a statement last night. He said he has been instructed to tell nothing and he intended to do as he was told.

Dr. B. H. Zwart, county coroner, said that Dr. Frank Hall asked his permission of the autopsy on the body of Colonel Swope, which was granted. the autopsy, he said, was performed by Dr. Heptoek of Chicago and Dr. Hall. A jury ws provisionally impaneled and viewed the body. This jury will be reimpaneled, according to Dr. Zward, providing an inquest is held.

"If there is a request for an inquest, I will order one," he said. "If after a reasonable time nothing further is done in the matter, I will then have to investigate and find why no request is being made for an inquest. It will be my duty to learn why the autopsy was made."

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January 12, 1910

ADAMS IDENTIFIED AS
K. C. MURDERER.

LOCAL MAN PICKS YOUTH AT
OMAHA AS SLAYER OF M.
A. SPANGLER.

Victims of Holdups Insist on
Identity -- Lads Will Be
Brought Here.

OMAHA, NEB., -- Jan. 11. -- John Adams and Earl Brown, two youthful alleged desperadoes who were arrested by Detective Mitchell and others on December 10 for alleged connection with a series of holdups and one shooting affair, are wanted at Kansas City on murder and robbery charges.

They were identified this morning by several victims who came here from Kansas City.

This morning three victims of recent holdups in Kansas City arrived. They were S. W. Spanglerr, Al Ackerman and Joe Shannon. With them were Detective Wilson, Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Norman Woodson and Cash Welch, proprietor of a Kansas City messenger service.

Ackerman identified Adams as the youth who killed Spangler's father November 23 while attempting to hold up the latter's saloon. they said Brown resembled the companion of Adams on that occasion.

SHOT OMAHA MAN.

On December 7, E. S. Ashcroft, of 1811 Chicago street, Omaha, was held up at Seventeenth and Chicago streets by two young men, who ordered him to throw up his hands. He refused, and started to run. they fired two shots at him, one taking affect in his right arm. Two nights later Marvin Kohn, a young business man, was held up by the same two youngsters, it is alleged, at Twenty-fifth avenue and Douglas streets, and robbed of $5. Next Day Detective Mitchell located Adams and Brown in a lodging house at Fifteenth and Capitol avenue and arrested them on suspicion. Kohn positively identified them and they were held to the district court on a charge of robbery under $500 bonds. They are now in the county jail.

When arrested the two young men were in bed, although it was then noon. In the sole of one of their shoes was secreted considerable money and a revolver was found wrapped in a shirt and hidden in a dresser drawer.

The murder in Kansas City with which Adams is charged occurred shortly after midnight November 23. M. A. Spangler was killed and his son, Samuel, had both arms broken. Ackerman was present at the time.

TO BE BROUGHT HERE.

Young Spangler and Ackerman were confronted at the city hall this morning by a group of ten prisoners, among whom were Adams and Brown. Ackerman immediately picked out Adams as the man who killed the elder Spangler. They also said that Brown looked like the other holdup.

Joe Shannon, a Kansas City politician, who was held up and robbed of his watch and $48 shortly before the murder, positively identified Brown as one of the desperadoes. He says the second man looked like Adams.

George H. McCray, a Kansas City business man, identified Adams and Brown as the two robbers who held him up and robbed him of $2. He says that Brown's mask dropped from his face and that he therefore got a good look at him.

Cash Welch, the messenger service man, identified the two young men as having worked for him during the robberies.

It is thought that Adams will be sent to Kansas City to answer a murder charge. Brown will probably be also sent there on a robbery charge, since the Missouri cases are even stronger than the Omaha ones.

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January 12, 1910

De JANON SUSPECTS FREE.

Girl's Love for Joke Caused Arrest
-- Reed and Miss Horton Leave
for Salt Lake City.

Harry J. Reed and Marie Horton, arrested Monday afternoon on suspicion of being the eloping Philadelphia heiress, Roberta de Janon, and Ferdinand Cohen, her waiter-sweetheart, were released from police headquarters yesterday afternoon.

The couple ordered their trunks and other baggage, which had been stored in the office of Captain Walter Whitsett, taken to the Union depot and checked to Salt Lake City. They left by an afternoon train.

Although from the time of his arrest to that of his release Reed absolutely refused to make any sort of a statement, either to Pinkertons or the police, Marie Horton was more communicative.

"It was really my own fault that we got into this trouble," she stated. "I knew that because I have a slight foreign accent, and I am dark-haired and young looking, people thought we were the eloping couple. Everywhere we excited curiosity. At first I thought it was a good joke, and used to call Mr. Reed Ferdinand, and ask him if he did not think it a shame to run away with a 17-year-old girl. I don't think it is a joke now. I was mighty glad to read in the papers this morning and find that things were straightened out. Our experiences in Kansas City have not been very pleasant, and we are going away to escape the notoriety. Where? Well, just say further West."

Answers received from the police departments of Seattle, Detroit and Chicago in regard to the antecedents of the couple were declared satisfactory by Frank F. Snow, chief of police. Chief Henry Ward of Seattle, Wash., stated that Reed had been for several years connected with a gambling establishment there, but that his record was first-class.

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January 11, 1910

HELD AS SUSPECTS
IN HEIRESS CASE.

KANSAS CITY POLICE THOUGHT
THEY HAD FOUND MISS-
ING COUPLE.

Arrested as They Disem-
barked From Train From
Excelsior Springs.
Marie  Horton, Suspected of Being Henrietta Von Etten.
MARIE HORTON, ALIAS HENRIETTA VON ETTEN.
Reed's Companion and for a While Believed to Be Roberta De Janon.

While the Kansas City police were arresting a man and a woman suspected of being Ferdinand Cohen and Roberta De Janon, respectively waiter and heiress, ho eloped from Philadelphia more than one week ago, the real Cohen and De Janon were being taken into custody in Chicago.

The Kansas City suspects were arrested by plain clothes officers from Central station as they alighted from a train from Excelsior Springs at the Union depot yesterday afternoon. Information leading to the arrest was given to Captain Walter Whitsett of the Central police district by R. E. Mackey of the Pickwick apartments at Excelsior Springs by long distance telephone. Patrtolmen John Torpey and T. H. Gillespie were awaiting them at the depot.

They were taken to police headquarters and examined by Captain Walter Whitsett. The man gave his name as H. J. Reed, and address as Chicago. He said he had been for some time in the gas fixture business with offices in the Holland building in that city. On his person was found $1,200 in currency, and letters addressed to H. J. Reed and H. J. Ross. He said he was not married to the woman in whose company he was arrested. He said he had known her for eight years. He refused to make any other statement.

H. J. Reed, of Chicago or Salt Lake City.
H. J. REED.
Arrested Under Suspicion That He Might Be Ferdinand Cohen.

Men from the Pinkerton detective agency who have been working on the De Janon elopement case declare that Reed resembles the missing waiter, Ferdinand Cohen, in almost every respect, and asked that he be held until information could be secured from their Philadelphia office.

WOMAN TALKED FREELY.

Reed's companion, although visibly worried over the fact that she was detained, was willing to talk. She said she was Marie Horton of Detroit, Mick., but after cross-questioning declared taht her real name is Henriette von Etten. According to her story she was born in Vienna, Austria, and was married in that country to a man who was at one time connected with the foreign embassy at Washington, D. C. She left her husband and went to the Pacific coast eight years ago, where she met Reed, who, she stated, was at that time conducting a place in Seattle, Wash. She says Reed is suing his Seattle wife for divorce. In March, 1909, she went to Detroit, where she conducted a rooming house. She came to Kansas City two weeks ago and met Reed. They lived in a hotel on Baltimore avenue until they went to Excelsior Springs. They intended going on to Salt Lake City.

Two big trunks, a dress suit case, a valise and a handbag were brought from the baggage room at the Union depot by the police officers. The contents were emptied and examined, but no further indenifying evidence was obtained.

Pinkerton men and the police were soon convinced the woman is not Roberta De Janon. The eloping girl is only 17 years old, while the woman at present in custody appears to be 25. Marie Horton has several false teeth, while Miss De Janon has none.

SHORT STAY IN EXCELSIOR.

The man and woman had spent Thursday night at the Elms hotel. They registered as H. J. Reed and wife of Chicago, and rented rooms Friday in the Pickwick apartments, saying they would remain a month. They kept close to their room during their stay. Considerable wine was delivered to the rooms. The woman was in Kansas City Saturday.

They gave no reason for leaving here hurriedly. When asked by another guests of the apartments to show credentials as to who he was the man exhibted papers from Salt Lake City and Tacoma, Wash., but had nothing to show he was from Chicago.

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January 3, 1910

DID NUDE VISITOR
BECOME SENATOR?

KANSAS CITY DETECTIVE TELLS
OF EDITOR-POLITICIAN'S
HUNT FOR CRIME.

Covered With Mud, He Broke
Into Station, but Later
Showed Big Roll.
Detective Joe Halvey Narrates a Tale.
HALVEY SMOKES UP.

Murder was in the air in the detective bureau rooms of Central police station -- murder, along with other things, particularly tobacco smoke. This is said to be the atmosphere of a police secret service department the world over.

It is stronger when there is a story telling contest on and the sweating of a murder suspect in an adjoining room. Detective Joe Halvey had elected to while away the time until the end of the secret conference. His audience consisted of newspaper men, Inspector of Detectives Edward Boyle and Detectives Robert Truman and Dave Oldham.

"It was a late spring night three years ago," said Detective Halvey. "One of those chilly early mornings when reporters love to sit about the 'phone in the lobby and call up instead of going out after their stories," he added, with a ponderous wink.

A SCRIPTURAL WIND.

"It was a very cold night and a wind like the one spoken of in the scriptures was blowing down Missouri avenue."

"What kind of a thing was that scriptural wind?" inquired the reporter.

"I don't see why you intellectual cubs never seem to have had a religious bringing up," scornfully broke in Inspector Boyle, who prides himself in having maintained a Bible in his home since his marriage twenty years ago. "I think it is in Psalms where a March wind is spoken of that blows the straw hat wherever it listeth while many a good man and strong sweareth thereat."

The silence which followed the inspector's quotation was profound. The narrator took advantage of the lull.

"Well, it was getting along toward the second owl car. Michael O'Brien had just brought in a 'drunk' and booked him under the charge of investigation and Pat O'Brien and I were toasting our shins by a warm fire in this same office. I remember every detail, you see, just as though it was yesterday.

YELL AND A SOB.

"Suddenly there came from somewhere on Fifth street near the Helping Hand institute, a blood curdling yell ending in a sort of a sob, as though some man was being choked.

"There were twelve good men in different parts of the station, wherever there was a heating stove, and all jumped at once. There had been a good many holdups during the winter months and of course the first thing we thought was that some villain had made a touch under the eaves of the station. We were not going to stand for that, no sir-e-e-e.

"I was about the first of the officers to reach the big folding doors in the north end of the station. My six shooter was in my hand and there was blood in my eye, I can tell you. If there was something going on I wasn't bound to let the blue uniformed mutts with the brass buttons do the pinch act to the discredit of the detective department.

"Just as I had reached the last step the doors flew open in my face. There was just enough time for action and no time for thought. A lean white streak had started to unwind itself up the stairway when I dropped on it like a thousand bricks.

NAKED, SHIVERING MAN.

" 'Look out below!' I yelled, grabbing it by the neck and bearing it to the linoleum. Then I made a careful analysis. what I was holding was a naked man shivering with the cold and dirtier than any tramp from having been dragged in the mud. 'Great thunder,' said I, 'this must be Adam returned to look after his Eden interests. Who are you, anyway?'


THOUGHT IT WAS ADAM.

"It didn't take much tugging and hauling after I got up off of him to get him in front of the desk sergeant and it took still less time for the entire force to see that he was in the last stages of destitution. He didn't have a finger ring left and his clothing was mud.

" 'What's your name?' the sergeant asked.

" 'You can put me down John Smith,' said 'Adam' with a groan. 'I ain't got any other name, for political reasons. Gentlemen, what I want is clothes, clothes, clothes.'

CLOTHES OBTAINED.

"The nude wonder somehow looked respectable and we could see that he was right about what he wanted. Half a dozen of us took him into the sink room and gave him a bath, while the rest of the shortstops went in search of clothes. He was not a very tall man and very slim, while the officers we had to draw from were all big, so when we got done with dressing him he looked like a Populist of the short grass country the year of the drought.

"I can't help but laugh when I think of him sitting there in the detectives' room with the waist band of the sergeant's extra trousers drawn up under his arm and his feet in shoes the size of four-dollar dictionaries.


LOOKED BETTER CLOTHED.

"But for all his togs he couldn't help but look respectable. Every time he opened his mouth he emitted an idea by the double handful, which was strange considering his appearance when we first saw him. He was no ordinary man, that was a cinch. He was a genius.

ASKS FOR REPORTERS.

"About the time we were settling back into the humdrum of waiting until morning the unknown quantity took a hitch on himself and asked: 'Where are the reporters? Seems like there ought to be one or more around. It isn't time for the second mail edition yet.'

"We told him there was a little reporter named Billings in the room allowed for the use of newspaper men and that he was probably at that moment writing a story of how a naked, insane man had broken into the police station with the intent to murder the captain.

" 'I'll risk it,' he said with a laugh, 'send him to me.'

"We sent for Billings and it was evident that the two would be kindred spirits. The very first thing the stranger said to the reporter was what he refused to tell the sergeant, and that was how he had come to be naked. We had set him down to be a sort of a crank with spells of lucidness who had undressed and run into the station on a bet, but now we knew better.

HELD UP AND ROBBED.

" 'I was held up and robbed because I got into bad company trying to have a good time when I ought to have been decent,' he told Billings. 'I am sure none of this I tell you will get into the papers because I am a fellow newspaper man.

" 'Now what I want is clothes. I haven't got a cent but plenty of credit. I can get $10,000 anywhere when the banks open. I want you to strike some second-hand clothing store where the proprietor sleeps in the rear and get me a complete suit. I'll pay you when pay day comes.'

"Billings did not answer at once, and we could see he was studying hard. He had the money, for it was Saturday, the day he got paid, but he appeared not to like the idea of lending so much on such a short acquaintance. Finally an idea seemed to come to him. He looked sharply at the stranger and asked rather quick: 'What's thirty?' Now 'thirty' is a newspaper term that few people understand, but this one answered in a second, grinning from ear to ear: 'It means to chuck work and go home,' he answered.

REPORTER BUYS SUIT.

"Well, sir, the reporter did just as he said and got a whole outfit for $14.50 and the stranger left at daybreak telling us all to stick around until he could get another and better rig and return.

"In three or four hours he was back. He had on a brand new suit of the best ready-made clothes in town, patent leather shoes and a plug hat. Also he had a roll of $100 bills so large that they wouldn't go into his inside coat pocket without a special effort. He was showing us that he had the credit he had boasted about.

"This time when we saw him he was feeling better toward the world and would talk more about himself, but he wouldn't tell his name, although I have since suspected the reporter knew it. He told us, though, that he was a prominent Missouri editor with aspirations to the United States senate.

"He had been in politics for years with his paper and never wanted anything so bad as that Senate plum. His platform from the start, he said, had been the cleaning up of the state morally.

WANTED TO FIND TRUTH.

" 'I have preached against immorality so much," he explained, 'that I just had to get out and find the truth about the other side. If my political enemies get hold of last night's caper it will be my undoing.'

"After he had gone the reporter looked at me and said: 'Well, we have promised never to mention this and it is safe, I guess. But my! what a story it would be for some newspapers I know.'

"The reporter is out of town now. By the way, Billings wasn't his name, either. I wonder which United States senatorial candidate that was?"

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December 20, 1909

ARREST A SACK OF SNAKES.

Police Also Take "Grave Robber"
and "Wild Man."

Detectives who do not object to tackling bad men draw the line when it comes to taking snakes into custody. There was a case of near insubordination in the detective bureau last night. It came about owing to the arrest of the proprietors of an animal show which held forth at 525 Bluff street.

The animals consisted of a choice selection of snakes, one fine specimen of Gilamonster and a weird and non-descript sort of animal which was advertised on the handbills as the "South American Grave Robber." There was also a "wild man of Borneo," but he was roped in, tusks, nose rings and all and deposited in the holdover at police headquarters. The detectives were willing to go up against the "grave robber" and even tackle the Gila monster, but they drew the line at a gunny sack full of lively reptiles.

S. H. Terry, S. D. Rose, L. Crossman and C. H. Hornsen, the alleged proprietors were taken to police headquarters and booked for investigation. The arrest was made on complaint of a man who declared that he had been defrauded of $30 while in the show room. The stock alive and kicking was left at 525 Bluff street.

"Suppose the animals should escape," said the inspector of detectives. "You men had better go back and bring them down here." With one accord the officers declared that they had no experience in animal training. The matter was finally compromised by letting one of the proprietors out on bond to care for the sackful of snakes.

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December 14, 1909

SLAYER WAS KILLED
AFTER HE SURRENDERED.

OFFICERS ALSO TESTIFY GAL-
LOWAY WAS DISARMED.

Coroner Could Not Learn Who Fired
Shot That Proved Fatal to
Murderer of Deputy Sheriff.

That Charles T. Galloway, who murdered Deputy Sheriff Charles Lukens of Wyandotte county, Kas., December 8, was shot and killed after he had surrendered and had been placed under arrest a few hours after the commission of his crime, was testified by witnesses at the coroner's inquest held yesterday morning. According to the testimony of several officers who participated in the spectacular attack which led to the killing of the cornered slayer, Galloway was unresisting and disarmed when the fatal bullet was fired into his abdomen.

"Detectives Wilkens, Downs and myself went upstairs to search for Galloway," testified Detective Ralph Truman. "We found him in a closet in the back part of the house. We called to him to give up. He answered with a valley of shots -- I don't know how many -- and we began shooting at him.

"After we fired a good many shots he called out to us and said: 'I'll surrender.' We told him to open the door and come out. He came out and we got him by the arms and led him into an adjoining room. There were then several shots fired, by whom I don't know, but at the last shot Galloway fell. Upon examination we found he had been shot through the body."

"Was Galloway disarmed when shot?" Trueman was asked.

"I believe he was," he replied.

"Was he unresisting at the time he was shot?"

"Yes, he had surrendered," responded the witness.

"What condition was Galloway in when you brought him out of the closet?"

"He was all right, as far as I know."

HIT DETECTIVE'S SLEEVE.

Detective J. W. Wilkens testified that he and Trueman led Galloway from the closet in which he had been hiding, and that he called to the crowd to quit shooting, but it seems that in the excitement of the moment, not all could realize that Galloway had surrendered. Wilkens said when the fugitive came out of the closet he assumed a crouching attitude and that he had his hands up in the air as a mute signal of surrender. Wilkins also said that the bullet which penetrated the sleeve of his own overcoat was the same one which killed the prisoner.

Detective David H. Oldham, in his testimony, said that earlier in the evening Inspector Boyle had been communicated with over the 'phone, and he had advised that a heavy guard be placed around the house in which Galloway had barricaded himself, and no attempt be made to capture the man until morning, when he would probably be in a less dangerous mood.

This course was decided upon, but at about 11 o'clock, some one, Oldham did not know whom, yelled out that he would go up and help get the fugitive, whereupon several officers announced they would take the lead. Within a moment, the witness said a squad of officers were inside the house. They searched the down stairs rooms first, and then proceeded with a rush upstairs and soon afterwards a fusillade of shots was heard.

Many other witnesses were examined, but no one knew who fired the shot which killed Galloway. The coroner's jury returned a verdict to the effect that Galloway met his death as a result of a gunshot wound inflicted by some unknown person.

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December 11, 1909

TO WORK UP SPANGLER CASE.

Detectives Will Hunt Evidence
Against Three Boys.

At the request of the prosecuting attorney, two detectives were detailed yesterday from the police department to work up the evidence against the three boys held at the county jail for the supposed murder of M. A. Spangler, the saloonkeeper.

"They will be held on the highway robbery charge until the evidence in the murder case can be worked up," said Virgil Conkling. "If an attempt is made to get them released on bond, the murder charge will be filed against them."

Mr. Conkling denied that the prisoners had been "sweated" Thursday afternoon. "We merely talked to them to get their story. Six men were present in the room," he said.

The boys who are being held are Louis M. Dye, Harry Shay and Ralph A. Clyne.

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December 9, 1909

TWO KILLED AND
ONE WOUNDED IN
RUNNING BATTLE.

Charles Lukens, Wyandotte County
Deputy Sheriff, Shot Through
Heart by Charles Galloway, Drink
Crazed Rosedale Electrician, He
Tried to Serve With Injunction.

SLAYER HAD THREATENED
WIFE WHO SOUGHT DIVORCE.

After Killing Lukens, Galloway
Carried on a Retreating Fight
With Other Officers Until
Brought to Bay at 3129
Bell Street.

SHOT BY DETECTIVES, DIES
IN EMERGENCY HOSPITAL.

Double Tragedy Direct Result of
Domestic Difficulties of the Gal-
loways -- Wife, Who Sued for Di-
vorce, Feared for Her Life, Which
Husband Had Threatened -- Re-
straining Order Was to Keep Him
From Further Terrorizing Her.
Murderer of Peace Officer, Who Was Slain as He Fled From Posse.
CHARLES T. GALLOWAY.

Two men are dead and another wounded as the result of an attempt by Charles Quincy Lukens, a deputy sheriff of Wyandotte county, Kas., to serve a restraining order upon Charles T. Galloway, a drink crazed electrician of 428 College avenue, Rosedale, Kas., late yesterday evening.

Lukens was shot above the heart and instantly killed during a running fight with Galloway.

Galloway was later brought to bay in a house at 3129 Bell street, and after a desperate resistance was mortally wounded, dying at 11:30 o'clock last night as he was being placed upon the operating table at Emergency hospital.

JUST BACK FROM OKLAHOMA.

Deputy Sheriff Lukens left the Wyandotte county court house yesterday afternoon about 4 o'clock with an order from the district court restraining Galloway from annoying or in any way interfering with his wife, Mrs. Anna Galloway. The Galloways had been having trouble for several months, and November 23 Mrs. Galloway, through her attorney, Rush L. Fizette, 1255 Kansas City avenue, Rosedale, filed a suit for divorce, alleging cruelty, drunkenness and ill-treatment.

Since the filing of the divorce petition Galloway had beaten his wife and threatened her life. She then applied for an order restraining him from bothering her. The order was granted several weeks ago, but Galloway had been in Oklahoma during that time. Yesterday word was received at the sheriff's office that he was in town, and Lukens was sent to serve papers on him.

QUARTER-MILE RUNNING FIGHT.

Mrs. Galloway has been staying for the past few days at the home of her sister, Mrs. J. L. Connor, at 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale. The deputy sheriff and Marshal Drew thought perhaps they might find Galloway hanging around there, as he had visited the Connor home earlier in the day and made demands to see his wife and children.

The officers reached Kansas City avenue and Washington street about 5:30 o'clock, and met Galloway shortly after they stepped off the car. Marshal Drew spoke to Galloway and shook hand with him. Lukens then shook hands with Galloway, and told him that he had some papers to serve.

Almost instantly Galloway drew a revolver and opened fire on the officers, who, unprepared for such an emergency, had to unbutton their overcoats before they could get at their weapons. They at last got hold of their revolvers and opened fire on Galloway. A running fight was kept up for more than a quarter of a mile.

The fleeing man turned into alleys, turning back every few steps to fire upon the pursuing officers. He finally reached Rosedale avenue, and turning south ran toward the tracks of the Frisco railroad. When the officers reached the tracks he turned and fired at Lukens, hitting him directly over the heart.

LUKENS FALLS DEAD.

Lukens staggered, and after grasping a telegraph pole with both hands fell to the ground dead. Galloway then ran south, and after a vain attempt to make his escape on a horse, abandoned the horse, and fled to the woods on the hills around Gray's park.

Officer Drew ran to Lukens's assistance, but finding him dead, started to pursue Galloway. He fired the last shell from his gun, and then finding himself without ammunition sent a boy after some. A large crowd of persons had been attracted by the firing, and a number of them assisted in taking the body of Lukens to a barber shop at Kansas City and Rosedale avenues. The coroner was notified, and he ordered the body taken to the Gates undertaking rooms in Rosedale, where he performed a post mortem. It was found that the bullet had pierced the heart and lungs, and had gone entirely through the body, coming out near the middle of the back.

GALLOWAY BROUGHT TO BAY.

The sheriff's office was notified in Kansas City, Kas., and Under Sheriff Joseph Brady, deputies William McMullen, Clyde Sartin and George Westfall jumped into an automobile, driven by George E. Porter, an undertaker at 1007 North Seventh street and rode at break neck speed to Rosedale. The Kansas City, Kas., police were also notified and Chief W. W. Cook led a large force of uniformed men and detectives to the scene of the murder. The citizens of Rosedale also turned out in large numbers and the hills around Rosedale glittered with the lights as these posses scoured the woods in an effort to find the murderer.

At 9 o'clock last night Galloway was cornered in the home of M. E. Patterson, 3129 Bell street, Kansas City, Mo., which he took possession of forcibly.

Barricading himself in a closet upstairs he held his pursuers at bay for over two hours. A posse consisting of nearly 100 men guarded the house on all sides. the air was tense with tragedy, and the bitter cold of the winter night added to the unpleasantness of the whole affair. Every man knew that a desperate fight was inevitable and that Galloway would have to be taken either dead or helplessly wounded.

MISSOURIAN LEADS CHARGE.

A delay was occasioned by the fact that the Kansas officers were outside of their jurisdiction, and did not feel that they had a right to enter the house, which is built on Missouri soil. Missouri officers were summoned and arrived at about 10 o'clock. The plans were laid and great precaution was taken in every step taken, for the officers realized that they were at a great disadvantage in forcing their way into the house, which they knew held a man who had already killed one officer and who would not hesitate to kill others should they press him too hard.

Finally the attack was planned and at 11:30 o'clock a squad of detectives consisting of Joe Downs, Billy McMullin, Harry Anderson and J. W. Wilkens, the latter a Missouri officer, leading, forced their way into the house, and after cautiously searching all the downstairs rooms without finding Galloway, rushed up the narrow stairs to the second floor.

When the officers reached the second floor a volley of shots rang out. Another volley followed. Breaking glass and a great commotion could be heard in the street below.

LAST WORD FOR HIS WIFE.

Then a husky voice was heard to shout:

"We got him."

In entering a dining room the officers were reminded of the presence of Galloway by three shots fired in rapid succession. The officers responded with a dozen shots and bullets went whizzing in every direction, embedding themselves in the walls. One bullet passed through the sleeve of Detective Wilkens's overcoat and lodged in the thumb on the left hand of Harry Anderson, a Kansas City, Kas., detective.

Within a twinkling a bullet entered the abdomen of Galloway and he fell to the floor, rolling into a dark kitchen adjoining the dining room. Writhing in his great pain, the man rolled frantically about the floor.

"Oh my dear wife, my own wife, my darling wife," he moaned time and again. Then he pleaded for ice water, clutching his parched throat madly.

An ambulance was called and Galloway was taken to emergency hospital, where he died just as they were lifting him to the operating table.

ANOTHER WOMAN'S LETTER.

Drs. Harry T. Morton and C. A. Pond, who were in attendance, pronounced death due to a wound from several buckshot that had entered the left side of the abdomen and after penetrating the intestines came out of the right side.

His pockets were searched while on the operating table. The contents consisted of a pocket-book containing $55 in cash, a gold watch and chain, a pack of business cards, several boxes of revolver cartridges, a bank book on the Fort Worth, Tex., State bank, and a letter.

The letter, which was written in lead pencil, was so blood soaked that it was barely legible. As far as it could be deciphered it ran as follows:

"Dear Friend -- I hear that you are getting a divorce from Mrs. G. ----- she is selling all your things and ---- I don't see where Mrs. G. or the boys is at. They act disgraceful, never coming home. --- Good luck, your loving Nan."

Lukens, whom Galloway shot down, was one of his best friends and so was Marshal Billy Drew, whom he fired at time and again in an effort to kill.

ASKS FOR FOOD.

The house where the shooting occurred is a two-story frame structure containing four apartments. The front apartment is occupied by Cecil Patterson and his family, and the rear apartment of four rooms by J. E. Creason, his wife and their little daughter.

"It was about 8 o'clock when Galloway came to the house," said Mr. Creason. "He was greatly excited and told me he had been in a shooting scrape and had shot a man. He said that they, meaning the officers, were after him and he did not know what to do. I told him that the best thing for him to do was surrender. He said: 'No, I'm not ready yet.'


Mr. and Mrs. Creason, Who Fed Galloway and Tried to Persuade Him to Surrender.
MR. AND MRS. J. E. CREASON,
In Whose Home Galloway Took Forcible Possession and Held Out Against a Posse Until Forced to Run for His Life When a Bullet Ended His Career

" 'Give me something to eat first and I will think about it,' he said. I have known Galloway for several years and worked for him at my trade as an electrician. He had always been a good friend and I saw no wrong in giving him something to eat and told my wife to fix him something. She fried some chops and potatoes and made some coffee for him. He tried to eat, but he was nervous and he could hardly swallow.

THE POSSE COMES.

"All this time my wife and I tried to find out just who he had shot and what the shooting was about, but he would put us off with the one answer, 'I will tell you when I am ready.' After supper he sat in a corner and seemed to be in a deep study. He paid no attention to our little girl, who seemed to annoy him by her childish prattle.

"I did not know what to do, so thought I would take a walk in the fresh air. I had hardly gotten 100 feet from the house when I met some people from Rosedale. They told me that Galloway had killed the undersheriff and that they were after him. I told them that he was in my house, but warned them not to go after him, as I feared he might use one of the weapons he had there. I told the crowd that I would endeavor to get him to surrender. I went back to the house. Galloway was still sitting in the corner, but jumped up w hen I came into the room.

" 'They know where you are,' I told him. 'Why don't you surrender?' 'I am not ready yet,' he said. I could get nothing more from him. Half an hour later some of the officers came into the ho use. I went downstairs and told them that Galloway was upstairs, but that he was armed and that it would be dangerous for them to go up there at that time. My family was up there, too, and I did not want my wife or daughter to be shot in case Galloway or the officers started shooting.

REFUSES TO SURRENDER.

This turned the posse back for a while and I made another effort to get Galloway to surrender. He still refused and I called to my wife and daughter and we went to the front of the house in Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Patterson's rooms. We left the gas burning in the dining room and the hall. The bedroom, in the closet in which Galloway took refuge, opened from the dining room by big folding doors as you see. The gas mantle on this lamp was broken and it was not lighted. We all remained in the front room until the posse called to us to come out of the house. As we went out I again told Galloway to surrender; that the house was surrounded and he could not get away, or if he did that he would have to jump to the house next door and climb down the side of the house.

" 'I am not ready yet,' were the last words he said to me. I felt as if the officers would not take Galloway alive and I feared that several might be killed. I was so nervous I did know what I was doing or saying. All I thought of was to prevent any more bloodshed.

"After we left the house we went into Griffin's home next door. We had hardly gotten inside when the shooting began. I put my fingers to my ears so that I would not hear the shots.

SURE HE WAS CRAZY.

"Galloway must have been out of his mind. He could have escaped from the house several times after he knew that the officers had him spotted and he could have held that staircase with his guns against 100 policemen. Why he refused to surrender and then retreated into the clothes closet where he was caught like a rat in a trap can only be explained by my opinion that he was crazy.

"Galloway brought the rifle and the shot gun over to the ho use this afternoon. He also brought a suitcase full of ammunition. This was before he did the shooting. He told us that he was going hunting and he wanted to leave his guns at our house. We had no objections to this as we had always been the best of friends. After we left the house he must have taken his rifle and gone into the closet. He left his shotgun in a corner in the kitchen."

THREATENED TO KILL WIFE FOR YEARS.

Mrs. Anna Galloway, wife of Charles Galloway, has been living with her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Connor, at their home, 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale, ever since she instituted divorce proceedings against her husband. For over forty-eight hours she has been a prisoner in that home, fearing even to step out, lest Galloway be near, ready to fire at her, as he had repeatedly threatened to do.

When seen last night after the killing of Deputy Sheriff Lukens, she was nearly in a state of nervous prostration. She had witnessed the start of the tragic escapade from a window in her room . She saw the officer attempt to serve papers on her husband. She heard the ensuing shots and then fell in a swoon.

"Oh, I knew it would come to this terrible end -- I knew it, I knew it," she moaned, as she paced nervously up and down the floor. "Charlie has had murder in his heart for thirteen years and I have always realized that it would only be a matter of time until the impulse would control him. He wasn't sane; he couldn't have been.

"Five times since Priests of Pallas week he has threatened to kill me, and from one day to another I never knew if I would see daylight again. Today some stranger 'phoned from a saloon to be extremely careful, as he had heard Charlie say that this would be the last day I could live. Marshal Drew remained with me to protect me and he has been in our house here all day.

"The first time Mr. Galloway ever threatened me was thirteen years ago. I should have left him then, but I thought he would get over his insane notions and I wanted to make a success of our married life if at all possible. He did reform and was better to me for some time, but when our two children, Harvey and Walter, were old enough to run around a great deal he began abusing me terribly and many times told me he would kill me. He became a harder drinker every year and would get in such a condition that no one could manage him at all.

"Many times as he choked me, and more than once has the end seemed so near that I could not possibly escape, but God has been with me for my children's sake I guess."

VICTIM WELL KNOWN IN WYANDOTTE.

Charles Quincy Lukens was 33 years old. He lived with his widowed mother, Mrs. Sarah Lukens, 336 Harrison street, Argentine. He was unmarried. He was appointed deputy sheriff by Sheriff Al Becker about one year ago. Before his appointment Lukens was constable and later marshal of Argentine for several terms. He had also served on the Argentine fire department. "Charley" Lukens was known by everyone in Argentine, both old and young, and also had a wide acquaintance thorugout the county. He was regarded as a very efficient officer, and had a reputation for fearlessness.

Besidses his mother he is survived by four sisters and four brothers. The sisters are: Mrs. Lydia Jones of Girard, Kas., Mrs. Beulah Robinson of 1108 East Twenty-fourth street, Kansas City, Mo., Mrs. C. A. Hare of Faircastle, O., Mrs. Leonard Eshnaur of Terminal Isle, Cal. The brothers are J. R. Lukens of Oklahoma City, Ok., and L. B, J. E., and F. D. Lukens of Argentine.

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November 25, 1909

TO BE SHOWN WIFE'S DIARY.

Detective Joyce Goes After Earl
Deaton, Arrested in Omaha.

Detective Harry Joyce left yesterday morning for Omaha, with extradition papers for Earl Deaton, alias Earl Elbridge, charged with robbing Mrs. James W. Couch, 1711 1/2 Grand avenue, of $90 some weeks ago. Deaton left a diary in the Couch home that had been kept by his wife, Edna Deaton, in which it is alleged that he has been concerned in crimes all over the country. Deaton is expected to arrive in Kansas City tomorrow.

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October 27, 1909

HUNT MISSING MAILBAGS.

Carrier's Rig Disappears While His
Back Is Turned in Dark.

Raffles, who was reported dead some years by an English author named Hornung, reappeared in a rather clever role at 11 o'clock last night at Twenty-third street and Woodland avenue. The victim this time was the United States directly and Samuel E. Robinson, mail collector No. 59, indirectly, if a certain horse and wagon does not turn up tied to a water plug somewhere, as is confidently expected by the police.

Robinson had driven considerably past a mail box at the Twenty-third street corner. He did not like the idea of turning his wagon around to go back when it was only a few rods and his limbs were aching for the exercise, so he tied his faithful animal to a pole and did the trick on foot.

Coming back in a few minutes he found the wagon and horse had disappeared, as two bags of first class mail matter, one package of second class and one parcel which might have contained a sable overcoat went with the rig. The robbery was deemed of enough importance to stir up things at the postoffice last night.

Several government detectives and numerous police officers were detailed to hunt for the missing bags.

At an early hour this morning no trace of the resurrected Raffles and his booty had been discovered.

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October 24, 1909

EVERY HYMN BOOK GONE.

Hymnless Service Today Threaten-
ed Central Presbyterian Church.

The janitor of the Central Presbyterian church on Harrison street, between Ninth and Tenth streets, was sweeping out the church yesterday morning in preparation for today's services when he found there was not a hymn book in the building.

Thieves had taken them, he believed. He notified W. S. Canine, treasurer of the church. The police were notified. Detectives were assigned to the case. They found that the books had been borrowed by the Y. M. C. A. for the dedication of its new home.

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October 19, 1909

SLUGGER WALKS AWAY
AS CATTLE MAN DIES.

ONE BLOW KILLS MARK DUN-
LAP OF DALHART, TEX.

Only Identification Is Three-Car
Shipment Receipt Signed by
Commission Company -- No
Arrest is Made.

The identity of the mysterious slugger who struck a man supposed to be Mark Dunlap, a Dalhart, Tex., stockman, who came here from Maple Hill, Kas., at Sixth and Main streets, killing him instantly about 1 o'clock yesterday afternoon, is still a mystery. Though the incident was witnessed by a half dozen persons and a good description was furnished the police department, not a single arrest was made yesterday afternoon.

It is believed that the man escaped on one of the late trains last night.

The man who is supposed to have been Dunlap, from a receipt of a three-car cattle shipment in his pockets, signed by the Fowler-Todd Commission Company, first was noticed near Sixth and Delaware streets. Two men were talking with him at the time and as the three walked east, their conversation drifted into an argument. On the corner, the largest of the two men, who was dressed in gray trousers, dark coat and black slouch hat, reached in his trousers pocket and struck Dunlap a terrific blow.

SLUGGER WALKS AWAY.

He then turned away slowly with his companion, while the victim staggered and fell to the sidewalk.

A half dozen men lifted the injured man from the sidewalk and found that he was bleeding from the contact with the sidewalk or from a pair of "knuckles." The police are inclined to think it was the latter. None of the spectators paid any attention to the slugger and his companion who were soon lost in the crowd at Fifth street.

The ambulance arrived fifteen minutes later with Dr. George Ringle in charge. He pronounced the man dead and notified Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, county coroner, who directed the body be sent to a local undertaker's establishment.

BODY LEFT ON WALK.

The ambulance left before the arrival of the undertaker and the body was left on the sidewalk surrounded by a morbid crowd. It took several policemen to restrain the curious ones from trampling on the body.

The police rounded up the witnesses of the killing and attempted to get information on the whereabouts of the slugger. Van Stillwell, 23 West Missouri avenue; Clarence Brume, 1706 Bristol avenue; Alfred Freeman, 907 Forest avenue; William Single, 544 1/2 Main street; W. G. Smith, 511 1/2 Campbell street; Fred Murray, 517 Delaware street; Peter Stalzer, Sixth and Main streets, were all sent out with different detectives to help in the search.

Dunlap was about 50 years old. When searched by the coroner it was found that he had no money in his pockets.

WAS A COOK.

ALMA, KAS., Oct. 18. -- Mark Dunlap came from Dalhart, Tex., Saturday with cattle for W. J. Todd. He had been a cook at Dalhart and was not known at Maple Hill.

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September 28, 1909

A REMINDER OF HIS TRIP.

Mayor Crittenden Receives Framed
Picture of Montreal Scenes.

A pleasant reminder of his visit to Montreal was received yesterday by Mayor Crittenden -- framed pictures of several of the more important buildings of that city, and a separate frame containing the offical badge of the recent convention of American municipalities and a large, highly burnished key, supposed to indicate an invitation to again visit Montreal. The identity of the sender is not known, but the mayor believes it was from E. R. Carrington, manager of Thiels' Detective agency for the Dominion of Canada and the province of Quebec. Mr. Carrington some years ago was connected with the Kansas City police department, and was tireless in his efforts to make the visit of the Kansas City delegation to the convention enjoyable.

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September 25, 1909

CATTLEMAN KILLS
PARTER IN HOTEL.

SEXTON BAR TRAGEDY FOL-
LOWS QUARREL OVER RANCH.

Eugene Hayes of Elgin, Kas., Puts
Three Bullets Into Brain of
Edward Hayes of Paw-
huska, Ok.
Eugene Hayes, Kansas Cattleman Accused of Murder.
EUGENE HAYES.
Kansas Cattleman Who Killed Edward
Hayes, His Partner, in the Barroom
of the Sexton Hotel Last Night.

Following a quarrel concerning the affairs of their 40,000 acre ranch in Osage county, Oklahoma, Eugene Hayes of Elgin, Kas., a cattleman reputed to be worth half a million dollars, shot and killed his partner, Edward Hayes of Pawhuksa, Ok., in the bar of the Hotel Sexton at 7:45 o'clock last night.

Edward Hayes was shot three times, almost in the center of the forehead. He died instantly Eugene Hayes, who is held at police headquarters, says he shot in self defense.

The shooting was witnessed by Edward Lewis, and Lewis Weisenbacher, bartenders; Lee Russell, a millionaire cattleman from Ft. Worth and Lee Rogers, a Kansas City real estate dealer who is an ex-cowman.

L. C. Thompson, another Kansas City real estate man and former cattle raiser, was in the crowd, but says he did not see the shooting.

The five men entered the hotel together about 7:30 o'clock last night, and sat around a table in the front end of the saloon. About fifteen minutes later Eugene and Edward Hayes went to a table in the rear and against the wall opposite the bar.

THREE BULLETS INTO BRAIN.

Before dinner was served they began quarrelling about business affairs, but the conversation was not overheard by anyone unless it was Lee Russell, who is said to have been standing near the small table at which the partners were sitting.

Suddenly Eugene Hayes, who was facing north, leaped from his chair and running around the end of the table began firing. The first shot struck Edward Hayes in the forehead. Two more were effective, almost in the same spot.

Edward Hayes fell back in his chair, dead, and Eugene, taken in charge by a friend, walked towards the front door after placing his pistol, an automatic gun, in his hip pocket. As he rounded the glass screen at the end of the bar Patrolman Arthur Kennard arrested him.

Edward Lewis, the bartender who saw the shooting, said Edward Hayes reached towards his hip pocket first. As he did so, Lewis said, Eugene got up and pulled his pistol, and began firing as he stepped toward Edward. Edward Hayes did not succeed in getting his revolver out of his pocket. The coroner removed it, and took charge of it until an inquest is held. It was a Luger rapid fire gun, the magazine holding seven cartridges.

"I BEAT YOU TO IT."

"I beat you to it," the witness declared Eugene Hayes said as he put away his revolver.

Inspector E. P. Boyle sent Detectives Ralph Trueman and Denver D. Mitchell to the hotel as soon as he was informed of the killing. Detectives Keshlear and McGraw followed.

Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky was notified, and after viewing the body had it removed to Stewart's undertaking rooms, where he performed a post mortem.

Immediately after the shooting the hotel management called Dr. A. L. Porter, who lifted the dead man out of the chair and laid him on the floor.

Eugene Hayes was taken to police headquarters by Patrolman Kennard. He gave the patrolman his pistol while on the street car.

When taken before Lieutenant James Morris to be booked for investigation Hayes was recognized by Patrolman "Jack" McCauley, who asked him what he was arrested for.

"Just killed my partner, Ed Hayes, up at the Sexton hotel.

"What for?" asked Lieutenant Morris.

QUARREL OVER RANCH AFFAIRS.

"Well, he was going to kill me if I didn't. I had to do it. That's all."

To Captain Walter Whitsett, and Norman Woodson, assistant prosecuting attorney, Hayes made no attempt to conceal anything except details of the shooting. He refused to say anything more until he could see John Hayes, former chief of police.

"He's a relative of mine, you know," he kept saying during the conversation. "I'm a ranch owner in Oklahoma," began Hayes. "I'm a pretty well known man, and John Hayes, who was formerly chief of police, is a cousin of mine, and he comes down to the Territory and hunts on my place. This man Ed Hayes is no kin of mine. I simply took him into a partnership wit me and he owes me $5,000. He didn't pay anything into the place.

At police headquarters last night the police took off of Eugene Hayes a diamond ring which is valued at $1,000. Deputy Coroner Czarlinsky took possession of a gold watch, a gold pen, $5.50 in money, and a a revolver taken from Edward Hayes. He wore a Knights of Pythias watch charm.

Ex-Chief John Hayes denied last night that he was any relative of the prisoner. "He is not even distantly related," Hayes said. "I have known him for years and have hunted on his place down in Oklahoma. I don't know why he should claim to be some relative of mine."

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September 16, 1909

POLICE FORBIDDEN
TO TAKE PRESENTS.

TWO DETECTIVES SUSPENDED
FOR THIS REASON.

Board Rules in Case Where Woman
Gave $25 to Show Appreciation,
That a Postage Stamp
Is Graft.

The police board ruled at its meeting yesterday afternoon that it would consider any officer as grafting who accepted "even a postage stamp or a cigar as a present."

The ruling was made after Detectives J. F. Lyngar and Charles T. Lewis had been suspended for sixty days for accepting a present of $25 from Mrs. Rose Herman, 909 Lydia avenue. The money was given to Lewis on September 1 for recovery of a $125 locket. He gave his partner, Lyngar, half of it. The board ordered that if the $25 was not returned to Mrs. Herman within twenty-four hours the officers would be dropped.

Mrs. Herman was an unwilling witness and when she took the stand she said, with her eyes suffused with tears: "I would like to make a preliminary statement. I am not making these charges against these officers. A friend of mine virtually trapped me into doing it. If in telling the truth here I am going to cause trouble for either of them I want to say now that I am very, very sorry for it."

GAVE HIS PARTNER HALF.

The witness then went on to tell how previously she had lost $30 and how Detective Lewis had succeeded in recovering it for her. When the locket was stolen she sent for him. On August 30 it was located in a pawnshop at 812 Independence avenue, where sh paid the pawnbroker $10 to get it back.

"Both officers were there," she continued, "and advised me that I could replevin the locket, but lawyer's fees would have been more than $10, so I paid it. The man wanted $18.

"It was then I told Mr. Lewis to come to my house the next day. When he did I voluntarily gave him $25. I meant it as a present, as I felt very grateful to get my locket back. And I still want the men to have the money. I was dragged into this thing unwillingly."

Detective Lewis admitted all that Mrs. Herman said and added that he had worked on both cases alone, simply giving his partner half of the $25.

"It was my idea," he said, "that we were not allowed to accept of a published reward without permission of this board. I did not know it was a violation of the statute to accept a present. I have done it before, and so has every man on the force for that matter. Mrs. Herman will tell you that I told her she owed me nothing, but still she insisted and I took it."

POSTAGE STAMP IS GRAFT.

Commissioners Marks and Middlebrook discussed the case in low tones for a long time before rendering a verdict. Then Judge Middlebrook wheeled swiftly about in his chair and said:

"Were it not for the fact that Mrs. Herman was an unwilling witness, that the money appears to have been thrust upon the officer, both men would be dropped from the department here and now. That is the only mitigating circumstance in this case. You are suspended for sixty days and the money must be paid to the secretary tomorrow. He will return it. Hereafter men found accepting presents will be absolutely dismissed from the force.

"The mere fact that you see no wrong in what you have done is to say the least distressing. You are paid $115 a month and the acceptance of a postage stamp above that is regarded as graft."

"Rear in mind now," added Mr. Marks, "this means that you are to accept nothing form the public, not even a cigar, without the permission of this board."

"If that rule is enforced," said an officer who heard the order, "the board would be kept busy examining new men for the force, as every ma on the department would lose his job every day. I know a copper who has lost his eleven times today, as he has just that many good cigars in his inside pocket."

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September 8, 1909

FALLS IN LOVE WITH
ICE MAN AND ELOPES.

YOUNG GIRL CAUGHT BEFORE
KNOT CAN BE TIED.

Kitchen Romance of Ruth Risley
and Otis Pemberton Ruthlessly
Shattered by Father Send-
ing the Girl Away.

A romance that commenced in the visits of the ice man this summer to the home of G. M. Risley, a dentist at 2628 Myrtle avenue, ended yesterday when Ruth Risley, the 17-year-old daughter, eloped with Otis L. Pemberton, 23 years old. The young couple went to Kansas City, Kas., but on account of the youthful appearance of the girl, the marriage license was refused. When Dr. Risley heard the news and located his daughter, he promptly sent her to Butler, Mo., to join her mother.

"It won't do any good," the girl said firmly when she was placed aboard the train. "It won't be much more than six months until I'm 18 and then I can do as I please."

It wasn't exactly love at first sight, for the young man had tramped through the kitchen several times before the daughter of the household realized that he was good looking and that he was more cheerful than the average ice man who grumbled when he had to carry ice to the far end of the ho use. The ice man's visits were sometimes prolonged and in time the young folk began to converse in a friendly manner.

ELOPEMENT IS PLANNED.

Miss Risley discovered to her satisfaction that the young man talked in a pleasant manner, and was in no way inferior to her classmates at the Manual Training High School.

Evening calls followed and the family began to notice that the well dressed young man who was so attentive bore a striking resemblance to the ice man who came every morning. When the parental storm broke, plans for an elopement were made.

"We can get married in Kansas," was Pemberton's comforting assurance. "Just say that you are 18, and it will be all right."

It wasn't so easy when they faced the man in the recorder's office.

"Yes, I'm 18," said the girl, falteringly.

The man behind the desk grinned in a tantalizing manner and expressed his doubts. Then a lot of questions followed, and in the end Miss Risley admitted she was only near-18. There was nothing to do but return to the Missouri side, which the young couple did.

"Perhaps my mother will help us," said the young man, so they went to his home at 2717 East Fifteenth street. A strange man met them at the gate.

"I AM A DETECTIVE" -- FOILED!

"My name is L. D. Jennings, city detective," explained the stranger. "Sorry that I have to take you to the police station."

It didn't do any good to remonstrate and the would-be elopers accompanied the officer to police headquarters, where they were met by Dr. Risley, who wasn't in an altogether amiable frame of mind.

"You will join your mother at once," he said when he was told that they had not succeeded in tying the wedding knot. "No more of this foolishness."

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