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January 16, 1910

PHONE SERVICE VIA ROSEDALE.

New Cable Across Kaw, to Argen-
tine, Being Constructed.

The residents of Argentine, now the Seventh ward of Kansas City, Kas., whose communication over the Missouri and Kansas Telephone Company's lines to the rest of the city was cut off by the breaking of the company's trunk line across the Kaw river, when a pier and one span of the old Southern bridge went into the river Friday afternoon, are now getting service through the Rosedale exchange. The service was out only a few hours. Linemen are now at work stretching a new cable over the Kaw, and until that work is finished the operation of hte Argentine lines will be through the Rosedale exchange.

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December 31, 1909

SILVER CITY TO
BECOME A WARD.

ARGENTINE TO BE MERGED INTO
KANSAS CITY, KAS.,
TOMORROW.

Population 7,000; Its Debts Assumed
and Assets Absorbed -- Will Soon
Have Gas Supply.

At 12 o'clock, noon, tomorrow, Argentine, the Silver City, of which great things were expected in the early '80s, will merge its identity into that of Kansas City, Kas. This additional territory will be known as the Seventh ward and will be represented in the Kansas City, Kas., council by two councilmen to be appointed by Mayor U. S. Guyer. By the annexation of Argentine and the extension of its city limits Kansas City, Kas., will have graduated into the class of metropolitan cities. It is estimated that the additional territory will increase the total population of Kansas City, Kas., to something in excess of 135,000. Steps have already been taken by the city authorities to assume active charge of the former city's affairs. Two police sergeants and eight patrolmen will afford police protection for the new ward.

Argentine was organized as a city of the third class in 1881. The city covers an area of six square miles and has a population of 7,000. It is on the south of the Kaw river and just south and west of the Sixth ward of Kansas City, Kas. The majority of Argentine's residents are hard working, industrious home owners. The city has a bonded debt of about $126,000, in addition to special improvement bonds to the amount of $70,000 and school bonds for a like amount.

There is also $60,000 in outstanding warrants. The consolidated city assumes all these debts. While the new territory is in debt to no inconsiderable amount, there are many advantages to be gained by its annexation. Argentine has two miles of bitulithic pavements and also two miles of macadam paving. In addition to this there are about fifteen miles of paved sidewalks. A fire wagon and a team of good horses, also 3,000 feet of new hose, are among the assets.

HAS FINE SCHOOL EQUIPMENT.

Many commendable things can be said concerning the system of schools in the new ward. There is a high school recently completed and five ward schools averaging eight rooms each. The teachers in these schools will be continued in their respective positions by the Kansas City, Kas., board of education.

Among the industries in the newly acquired territory are the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroad shops, the Kansas City Structural Steel Works, the Santa Fe Car Iceing Company and the United Zinc and Chemical Company. Of these the Santa Fe employs the larger per cent of the people of the city. Two of the largest grain elevators in the state are located at the Argentine terminals of the Santa Fe, one with a capacity of 1,000,000 bushels and the other, one-half that size.

COULD NOT GET GAS.

One of the urgent reasons for annexation from the Argentine standpoint was the inability of the people of that city to obtain natural gas. This condition of affairs will be remedied by the merger. The Wyandotte Gas Company will extend its mains to the new ward.

C. W. Green, the last mayor of Argentine, during his four terms in office had much to do with the progressing of public improvements.

As to just what the effect of the Annexation will be on the complexion of politics is problematical. Persons in a position to know declare that the Democrats and Republicans are about evenly divided.

At a special meeting last night of the Kansas City, Kas., council the Democratic members refused to confirm the appointment of C. W. Green and J. W. Leidburg as councilmen for the new ward. Mr. Green is at the present time mayor of Argentine and Mr. Leidburg is a councilman in that city.

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December 10, 1909

HUNDREDS AT SCENE
OF ROSEDALE KILLING.

DEPUTY'S MURDERER HAD BEEN
DRINKING AND DANGEROUS.

Compelled Two Men at Point of Re-
volver to Imbibe, Then Carry
Suit Case of Ammunition --
No Funeral Arrangements.

Hundreds of persons yesterday afternoon in Rosedale went over the route of the running fight of Wednesday night which resulted in the murder of C. Q. Lukens, a Wyandotte county deputy sheriff, and the subsequent killing of Charles T. Galloway, the slayer. The home of M. E. Patterson, 3129 Bell street, Kansas City, Mo., where the besieged man was finally captured after a desperate battle with Missouri and Kansas officers, came in for a good share of attention.

In the investigation yesterday circumstances came to light which, had they been known at the time by Lukens, probably would have prevented the double killing. From many sources it was found that Galloway had been drinking heavily preceding the shooting, and was in a dangerous mood during the day. He had made numerous attempts to find his wife, Mrs. Anna Galloway, with the avowed intention of taking her life. At the point of a revolver he forced W. E. Tompkins and James Creason to drink with him and later to assist in carrying a suitcase full of ammunition.

ENTERED THE LAWYER'S HOME.

About 6 o'clock Wednesday morning he entered the home of Rush L. Fisette, the attorney who had brought divorce proceedings on behalf of Mrs. Galloway. the half crazed man insisted on searching every room in the house in the hopes of finding his wife. He left without causing any trouble, but with threats that he would kill his wife. It was Mr. Fisette who notified the sheriff's office in Kansas City, Kas.

Mrs. Galloway was prostrated yesterday by the events of the night before. The story of her fourteen years of married life included threats by her husband, who beat her and drove her from the house. Always following a hard drinking spell the man became half crazed and in this condition seized a gun or any weapon and attacked his wife. At other times he spoke in the most endearing terms to her. Mrs. Galloway remained yesterday at the home of her sister, Mrs. James L. Connor, 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale.

LUKENS WELL LIKED.

In Kansas City, Kas., and Argentine, where Lukens had been known for years, the man was respected and liked. At the home of his widowed mother in Argentine the aged woman refused to be comforted.

The body of Lukens had been removed to Simmons's undertaking rooms in Argentine. Funeral arrangements have not been completed. Charles Quincy Lukens was a member of the Brother hood of Railway Trainmen in Argentine and also was a member of Aerie No. 87, Fraternal Order of Eagles, in Kansas City, Kas.

POST-MORTEM EXAMINATION.

A post-mortem examination of the body of Galloway, conducted by Coroner Harry Czarlinsky yesterday morning at the Carroll-Davidson undertaking rooms, showed that the bullet entered his right side and taking a downward course pierced the liver and passed out the left side. A coroner's inquest will be held at 10 o'clock Monday morning.

In a letter received by Inspector of Detectives Edward P. Boyle yesterday afternoon from Chief of Police Wiley W. Cook of Kansas City, Kas., the chief said:

"Especially do I wish to express my highest commendation of Detectives Ralph Truman and J. W. Wilkens, who at the risk of their lives led the attack that effected Galloway's capture."

WANTED HIM TO DRINK.

W. E. Tompkins, employed at the Gates undertaking establishment in Rosedale and who lives at 505 Southwest boulevard, Rosedale, said he was passing in front of Galloway's home at 428 College avenue shortly after noon on the day of the double tragedy when he was accosted by Galloway and told to hold up his hands. At the same time Galloway pointed two large revolvers in the face of Tompkins and told him to follow him into the house. Tompkins followed.

When they reached the inside of the house James Creason, an electrician who helped Galloway on electrical work, was sitting there. Galloway insisted that Tompkins take a drink from a large quart bottle of whisky.

FEARED FOR HIS LIFE.

"I finally talked him out of that," Tompkins said, "but during the two hours he kept Creason and me imprisoned in the house Galloway drank at least three-fourths of the quart of whisky. He sowed us a Winchester shotgun and a Winchester rifle and a suitcase full of ammunition. He said to us: 'Do you know what I am going to do with these,' and when we answered negatively he said he was going to 'raise hell tonight.'

"We pleaded with him to let us go, as I was afraid every minute that he would get wild and kill both of us. He finally agreed to let us go if we would carry the guns and ammunition down to Creason's home on Bell street. Creason led two bird dogs and carried the guns, and I carried a heavy coil wire belonging to Galloway, and the suit case fu ll of ammunition. My load got heavy, though, and I left all of the stuff at Young's store at College avenue and Oak street. Creason, I suppose, took his stuff on down to his place, and then Galloway came back up and got what I had left."

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December 9, 1909

TWO KILLED AND
ONE WOUNDED IN
RUNNING BATTLE.

Charles Lukens, Wyandotte County
Deputy Sheriff, Shot Through
Heart by Charles Galloway, Drink
Crazed Rosedale Electrician, He
Tried to Serve With Injunction.

SLAYER HAD THREATENED
WIFE WHO SOUGHT DIVORCE.

After Killing Lukens, Galloway
Carried on a Retreating Fight
With Other Officers Until
Brought to Bay at 3129
Bell Street.

SHOT BY DETECTIVES, DIES
IN EMERGENCY HOSPITAL.

Double Tragedy Direct Result of
Domestic Difficulties of the Gal-
loways -- Wife, Who Sued for Di-
vorce, Feared for Her Life, Which
Husband Had Threatened -- Re-
straining Order Was to Keep Him
From Further Terrorizing Her.
Murderer of Peace Officer, Who Was Slain as He Fled From Posse.
CHARLES T. GALLOWAY.

Two men are dead and another wounded as the result of an attempt by Charles Quincy Lukens, a deputy sheriff of Wyandotte county, Kas., to serve a restraining order upon Charles T. Galloway, a drink crazed electrician of 428 College avenue, Rosedale, Kas., late yesterday evening.

Lukens was shot above the heart and instantly killed during a running fight with Galloway.

Galloway was later brought to bay in a house at 3129 Bell street, and after a desperate resistance was mortally wounded, dying at 11:30 o'clock last night as he was being placed upon the operating table at Emergency hospital.

JUST BACK FROM OKLAHOMA.

Deputy Sheriff Lukens left the Wyandotte county court house yesterday afternoon about 4 o'clock with an order from the district court restraining Galloway from annoying or in any way interfering with his wife, Mrs. Anna Galloway. The Galloways had been having trouble for several months, and November 23 Mrs. Galloway, through her attorney, Rush L. Fizette, 1255 Kansas City avenue, Rosedale, filed a suit for divorce, alleging cruelty, drunkenness and ill-treatment.

Since the filing of the divorce petition Galloway had beaten his wife and threatened her life. She then applied for an order restraining him from bothering her. The order was granted several weeks ago, but Galloway had been in Oklahoma during that time. Yesterday word was received at the sheriff's office that he was in town, and Lukens was sent to serve papers on him.

QUARTER-MILE RUNNING FIGHT.

Mrs. Galloway has been staying for the past few days at the home of her sister, Mrs. J. L. Connor, at 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale. The deputy sheriff and Marshal Drew thought perhaps they might find Galloway hanging around there, as he had visited the Connor home earlier in the day and made demands to see his wife and children.

The officers reached Kansas City avenue and Washington street about 5:30 o'clock, and met Galloway shortly after they stepped off the car. Marshal Drew spoke to Galloway and shook hand with him. Lukens then shook hands with Galloway, and told him that he had some papers to serve.

Almost instantly Galloway drew a revolver and opened fire on the officers, who, unprepared for such an emergency, had to unbutton their overcoats before they could get at their weapons. They at last got hold of their revolvers and opened fire on Galloway. A running fight was kept up for more than a quarter of a mile.

The fleeing man turned into alleys, turning back every few steps to fire upon the pursuing officers. He finally reached Rosedale avenue, and turning south ran toward the tracks of the Frisco railroad. When the officers reached the tracks he turned and fired at Lukens, hitting him directly over the heart.

LUKENS FALLS DEAD.

Lukens staggered, and after grasping a telegraph pole with both hands fell to the ground dead. Galloway then ran south, and after a vain attempt to make his escape on a horse, abandoned the horse, and fled to the woods on the hills around Gray's park.

Officer Drew ran to Lukens's assistance, but finding him dead, started to pursue Galloway. He fired the last shell from his gun, and then finding himself without ammunition sent a boy after some. A large crowd of persons had been attracted by the firing, and a number of them assisted in taking the body of Lukens to a barber shop at Kansas City and Rosedale avenues. The coroner was notified, and he ordered the body taken to the Gates undertaking rooms in Rosedale, where he performed a post mortem. It was found that the bullet had pierced the heart and lungs, and had gone entirely through the body, coming out near the middle of the back.

GALLOWAY BROUGHT TO BAY.

The sheriff's office was notified in Kansas City, Kas., and Under Sheriff Joseph Brady, deputies William McMullen, Clyde Sartin and George Westfall jumped into an automobile, driven by George E. Porter, an undertaker at 1007 North Seventh street and rode at break neck speed to Rosedale. The Kansas City, Kas., police were also notified and Chief W. W. Cook led a large force of uniformed men and detectives to the scene of the murder. The citizens of Rosedale also turned out in large numbers and the hills around Rosedale glittered with the lights as these posses scoured the woods in an effort to find the murderer.

At 9 o'clock last night Galloway was cornered in the home of M. E. Patterson, 3129 Bell street, Kansas City, Mo., which he took possession of forcibly.

Barricading himself in a closet upstairs he held his pursuers at bay for over two hours. A posse consisting of nearly 100 men guarded the house on all sides. the air was tense with tragedy, and the bitter cold of the winter night added to the unpleasantness of the whole affair. Every man knew that a desperate fight was inevitable and that Galloway would have to be taken either dead or helplessly wounded.

MISSOURIAN LEADS CHARGE.

A delay was occasioned by the fact that the Kansas officers were outside of their jurisdiction, and did not feel that they had a right to enter the house, which is built on Missouri soil. Missouri officers were summoned and arrived at about 10 o'clock. The plans were laid and great precaution was taken in every step taken, for the officers realized that they were at a great disadvantage in forcing their way into the house, which they knew held a man who had already killed one officer and who would not hesitate to kill others should they press him too hard.

Finally the attack was planned and at 11:30 o'clock a squad of detectives consisting of Joe Downs, Billy McMullin, Harry Anderson and J. W. Wilkens, the latter a Missouri officer, leading, forced their way into the house, and after cautiously searching all the downstairs rooms without finding Galloway, rushed up the narrow stairs to the second floor.

When the officers reached the second floor a volley of shots rang out. Another volley followed. Breaking glass and a great commotion could be heard in the street below.

LAST WORD FOR HIS WIFE.

Then a husky voice was heard to shout:

"We got him."

In entering a dining room the officers were reminded of the presence of Galloway by three shots fired in rapid succession. The officers responded with a dozen shots and bullets went whizzing in every direction, embedding themselves in the walls. One bullet passed through the sleeve of Detective Wilkens's overcoat and lodged in the thumb on the left hand of Harry Anderson, a Kansas City, Kas., detective.

Within a twinkling a bullet entered the abdomen of Galloway and he fell to the floor, rolling into a dark kitchen adjoining the dining room. Writhing in his great pain, the man rolled frantically about the floor.

"Oh my dear wife, my own wife, my darling wife," he moaned time and again. Then he pleaded for ice water, clutching his parched throat madly.

An ambulance was called and Galloway was taken to emergency hospital, where he died just as they were lifting him to the operating table.

ANOTHER WOMAN'S LETTER.

Drs. Harry T. Morton and C. A. Pond, who were in attendance, pronounced death due to a wound from several buckshot that had entered the left side of the abdomen and after penetrating the intestines came out of the right side.

His pockets were searched while on the operating table. The contents consisted of a pocket-book containing $55 in cash, a gold watch and chain, a pack of business cards, several boxes of revolver cartridges, a bank book on the Fort Worth, Tex., State bank, and a letter.

The letter, which was written in lead pencil, was so blood soaked that it was barely legible. As far as it could be deciphered it ran as follows:

"Dear Friend -- I hear that you are getting a divorce from Mrs. G. ----- she is selling all your things and ---- I don't see where Mrs. G. or the boys is at. They act disgraceful, never coming home. --- Good luck, your loving Nan."

Lukens, whom Galloway shot down, was one of his best friends and so was Marshal Billy Drew, whom he fired at time and again in an effort to kill.

ASKS FOR FOOD.

The house where the shooting occurred is a two-story frame structure containing four apartments. The front apartment is occupied by Cecil Patterson and his family, and the rear apartment of four rooms by J. E. Creason, his wife and their little daughter.

"It was about 8 o'clock when Galloway came to the house," said Mr. Creason. "He was greatly excited and told me he had been in a shooting scrape and had shot a man. He said that they, meaning the officers, were after him and he did not know what to do. I told him that the best thing for him to do was surrender. He said: 'No, I'm not ready yet.'


Mr. and Mrs. Creason, Who Fed Galloway and Tried to Persuade Him to Surrender.
MR. AND MRS. J. E. CREASON,
In Whose Home Galloway Took Forcible Possession and Held Out Against a Posse Until Forced to Run for His Life When a Bullet Ended His Career

" 'Give me something to eat first and I will think about it,' he said. I have known Galloway for several years and worked for him at my trade as an electrician. He had always been a good friend and I saw no wrong in giving him something to eat and told my wife to fix him something. She fried some chops and potatoes and made some coffee for him. He tried to eat, but he was nervous and he could hardly swallow.

THE POSSE COMES.

"All this time my wife and I tried to find out just who he had shot and what the shooting was about, but he would put us off with the one answer, 'I will tell you when I am ready.' After supper he sat in a corner and seemed to be in a deep study. He paid no attention to our little girl, who seemed to annoy him by her childish prattle.

"I did not know what to do, so thought I would take a walk in the fresh air. I had hardly gotten 100 feet from the house when I met some people from Rosedale. They told me that Galloway had killed the undersheriff and that they were after him. I told them that he was in my house, but warned them not to go after him, as I feared he might use one of the weapons he had there. I told the crowd that I would endeavor to get him to surrender. I went back to the house. Galloway was still sitting in the corner, but jumped up w hen I came into the room.

" 'They know where you are,' I told him. 'Why don't you surrender?' 'I am not ready yet,' he said. I could get nothing more from him. Half an hour later some of the officers came into the ho use. I went downstairs and told them that Galloway was upstairs, but that he was armed and that it would be dangerous for them to go up there at that time. My family was up there, too, and I did not want my wife or daughter to be shot in case Galloway or the officers started shooting.

REFUSES TO SURRENDER.

This turned the posse back for a while and I made another effort to get Galloway to surrender. He still refused and I called to my wife and daughter and we went to the front of the house in Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Patterson's rooms. We left the gas burning in the dining room and the hall. The bedroom, in the closet in which Galloway took refuge, opened from the dining room by big folding doors as you see. The gas mantle on this lamp was broken and it was not lighted. We all remained in the front room until the posse called to us to come out of the house. As we went out I again told Galloway to surrender; that the house was surrounded and he could not get away, or if he did that he would have to jump to the house next door and climb down the side of the house.

" 'I am not ready yet,' were the last words he said to me. I felt as if the officers would not take Galloway alive and I feared that several might be killed. I was so nervous I did know what I was doing or saying. All I thought of was to prevent any more bloodshed.

"After we left the house we went into Griffin's home next door. We had hardly gotten inside when the shooting began. I put my fingers to my ears so that I would not hear the shots.

SURE HE WAS CRAZY.

"Galloway must have been out of his mind. He could have escaped from the house several times after he knew that the officers had him spotted and he could have held that staircase with his guns against 100 policemen. Why he refused to surrender and then retreated into the clothes closet where he was caught like a rat in a trap can only be explained by my opinion that he was crazy.

"Galloway brought the rifle and the shot gun over to the ho use this afternoon. He also brought a suitcase full of ammunition. This was before he did the shooting. He told us that he was going hunting and he wanted to leave his guns at our house. We had no objections to this as we had always been the best of friends. After we left the house he must have taken his rifle and gone into the closet. He left his shotgun in a corner in the kitchen."

THREATENED TO KILL WIFE FOR YEARS.

Mrs. Anna Galloway, wife of Charles Galloway, has been living with her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Connor, at their home, 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale, ever since she instituted divorce proceedings against her husband. For over forty-eight hours she has been a prisoner in that home, fearing even to step out, lest Galloway be near, ready to fire at her, as he had repeatedly threatened to do.

When seen last night after the killing of Deputy Sheriff Lukens, she was nearly in a state of nervous prostration. She had witnessed the start of the tragic escapade from a window in her room . She saw the officer attempt to serve papers on her husband. She heard the ensuing shots and then fell in a swoon.

"Oh, I knew it would come to this terrible end -- I knew it, I knew it," she moaned, as she paced nervously up and down the floor. "Charlie has had murder in his heart for thirteen years and I have always realized that it would only be a matter of time until the impulse would control him. He wasn't sane; he couldn't have been.

"Five times since Priests of Pallas week he has threatened to kill me, and from one day to another I never knew if I would see daylight again. Today some stranger 'phoned from a saloon to be extremely careful, as he had heard Charlie say that this would be the last day I could live. Marshal Drew remained with me to protect me and he has been in our house here all day.

"The first time Mr. Galloway ever threatened me was thirteen years ago. I should have left him then, but I thought he would get over his insane notions and I wanted to make a success of our married life if at all possible. He did reform and was better to me for some time, but when our two children, Harvey and Walter, were old enough to run around a great deal he began abusing me terribly and many times told me he would kill me. He became a harder drinker every year and would get in such a condition that no one could manage him at all.

"Many times as he choked me, and more than once has the end seemed so near that I could not possibly escape, but God has been with me for my children's sake I guess."

VICTIM WELL KNOWN IN WYANDOTTE.

Charles Quincy Lukens was 33 years old. He lived with his widowed mother, Mrs. Sarah Lukens, 336 Harrison street, Argentine. He was unmarried. He was appointed deputy sheriff by Sheriff Al Becker about one year ago. Before his appointment Lukens was constable and later marshal of Argentine for several terms. He had also served on the Argentine fire department. "Charley" Lukens was known by everyone in Argentine, both old and young, and also had a wide acquaintance thorugout the county. He was regarded as a very efficient officer, and had a reputation for fearlessness.

Besidses his mother he is survived by four sisters and four brothers. The sisters are: Mrs. Lydia Jones of Girard, Kas., Mrs. Beulah Robinson of 1108 East Twenty-fourth street, Kansas City, Mo., Mrs. C. A. Hare of Faircastle, O., Mrs. Leonard Eshnaur of Terminal Isle, Cal. The brothers are J. R. Lukens of Oklahoma City, Ok., and L. B, J. E., and F. D. Lukens of Argentine.

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September 27, 1909

BOY FLOATED SIX BLOCKS.

Miraculous Escape From Drowning
by Harry Palmer.

Harry Palmer, a nine year old Argentine boy, yesterday had almost a miraculous escape from death by drowning in the Kaw river near that city. while fishing with a number of companions near the foot of Olive street the boy dropped his pole into the water. In an effort to regain it he lost his balance and fell into the river. The current at this point is very swift and although the boy was unable to swim he was carried out into the middle of the river, while his frightened companions stood screaming on the bank. In his fall the boy had graspsed at his fishing pole and succeeded in catching the line. His struggles in the water wrapped this line again and again about his body.

The screams of the women and children who witnessed the accident, attracted the attention of Sam Taddler, a grocer's clerk, who lives at 230 Mulberry street, Argentine, and also George Brown, a laborer. These boys were standing near the river about two hundred yards below the Twelfth street bridge. As the boy was seen coming down the river, the rescuers threw off their clothes and sprang into the water. Taddler succeeded in reaching the boy, who was lying on his back and struggling with the current. He was carried to the bank and, almost unconscious, was removed to the home of his father, Dudley Palmer, an employe of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroad, who lives at 225 South Olive street, Argentine. A physician was summoned and at a late hour last night the boy had apparently recovered from the effects of the accident. When asked how he managed to stay above the water, he answered:

"I just shut my eyes and mouth and kicked my feet and worked my elbows."

It is estimated that the boy was carried at least six blocks down the river from where he entered it.

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August 26, 1909

FIGHT ON TOP OF FLYING TRAIN.

Man Thrown Under Car in Struggle,
Dies of Injuries.

While a westbound fast freight was running through the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe railroad yards at Argentine at 2 o'clock yesterday morning, switchmen in the yards saw two men struggling on top of one of the box cars of the train. One of the men was seen to fall between two cars. He caught at a brake beam as he fell, clung to it for a few seconds and then dropped to the track beneath the moving train.

The switchmen carried him to the Y. M. C. A. building, a short distance from the Santa Fe depot in Argentine. He was attended there by Dr. D. C. Clopper, a surgeon for the railroad company. A hole was found on the left side of his head, his left leg was severed below the knee and his left arm was badly mangled. He was taken to St. Margaret's hospital in Kansas City, Kas., where he died at 3:15 o'clock yesterday afternoon.

The injured man was unconscious when picked up, and nothing could be learned of the struggle on the car, or the identity of his companion. He wore a button of the United Mine Workers of America and letters found in his pockets identified him as Albert Winter of Roanoke, Ill. Daniels & Comfort, the undertakers who took charge of the body, telegraphed to the authorities of that city and received orders to hold the body until the arrival of his relatives from Roanoke. Winter was about 35 years old.

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December 29, 1908

THIEF ANSWERED TELEPHONE.

When Mrs. Anna Davis Called Up to
Say She Was Coming.

When Mrs. Anna Davis, a widow, living at 142 Ruby avenue, Argentine, returned home yesterday from spending Christmas with relatives at Minneapolis, Kas., the first thing she thought of was to call up and let the other members of the household know that she had reached the city and was about to take a street car for home. The voice that answered at the other end of the 'phone did not seem familiar, but she took it as being that of one of her nephews and announced that she would be there just as soon as a street car would carry her.

The street car did its duty all right, but the nephew was absent when she entered the house, and instead of finding everything as she had supposed, the place was turned topsy-turvy. Every bureau drawer in the house had been ransacked and a thorough search made for valuables. Mrs. Davis, after talking with her relatives, arrived at the conclusion that it was the robber she was conversing with over the telephone. The police authorities were notified.

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December 27, 1908

KIDS TRY TO REPEAT
AT THE GIFT GIVING.

More Presents From Mayor's
Christmas Tree.
It was announced in yesterday's Journal that about 700 children had failed to get a present at the mayor's Christmas tree in Convention hall on Christmas, and that tickets had been given them to return Saturday at 2 p. m., when sacks would be given them. About noon a telephone message was sent to police headquarters that over 2,500 boys were massed at the hall and police were asked for to keep order.

A great many of the policemen who were sent had been on duty there the day before and they recognized scores of boys whom they had seen get a package on Christmas day. When the kids were asked what they were doing there they answered, "We are after what we kin git that's what we're here fer." That class of repeaters were put out of line and only those who had tickets were admitted. With all of that care the little sharpers managed to get in on the second day's festivities.

After the packages fell short Christmas day -- on account of so many children from the outside which were not counted on -- Captain J. F. Pelletier, head of the purchasing committee,, went that evening and bought 1,000 more substantial toys and candy, nuts and fruit to go in the bags. Early yesterday morning, in response to a notice in The Journal, about twenty of the tired women who had worked so hard all week, reported at the hall and when the gifts arrived began work. All was in readiness at 3 p. m., but there was no crowding or jamming in the hall, as only those with tickets were admitted.

J. C. Chafin of the Franklin institute arrived at the hall soon after the long line of boys had been formed. As he walked up the line many of them ducked out, hid their faces and ran to the end of the line and got in again.

"Every child from my district was here yesterday," he said as he came in the hall. "They all got something, for I saw them. They are all outside again."

E. T. Bringham, superintendent of the Helping Hand institute, recognized many familiar faces from the North End which he had seen in the lines with sacks on Christmas day.

Many women came yesterday with one ticket and from two and a half dozen children. They wanted one ticket to admit them all. They swore that they had been overlooked, but when the little fellows were taken aside -- those little ones who know only the truth -- they would tell just what they had got when they were there the day before.

One woman with one little girl and one ticket was admitted. "I have four at home with the whooping cough. I want a bundle for them." She was given four extra bundles, appropriate for the sick ones and asked where she lived. "Over in Armourdale," she said, "and I want one of them whips for each one of them, and one of them tops that dance, and one of anything else you've got." She was given a street car ticket for her little girl and told to try and be satisfied with her five packages. She was mad and showed it by what she said in the most spiteful manner.

Two small boys who had succeeded in washing the stamp from their hands Christmas day in time to get back to the hall and get tickets of admission to yesterday's event, were heard to say after they examined their sacks, "Huh, dis is better'n we got yesterday, ain't it?"

Most of those who were admitted on tickets yesterday and who got sacks were of the very deserving kind. The were of the more timid ones who had been crowded out Christmas day and their joy was depicted in their faces as they marched happily away, bundles in arms. Between 500 and 700 packages were given out yesterday on tickets. The rest were put aside and will be sent out to the homes where there are sick children who could not get to the hall.

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December 26, 1908

GAVE PRESENTS
TO 5,700 CHILDREN.

MAYOR'S CHRISTMAS TREE WAS
A TREMENDOUS SUCCESS.

LATE COMERS
GOT NOTHING.

BUT THEY WILL GET THEIR
SHARE OF GIFTS TODAY.

Little Ones Came From Suburban
Places and Swelled the Throng
Beyond Expectation -- More
Toys Have Been Bought.


Was it a success, the first Mayor's Christmas tree in Kansas City? It was, even more than a success, and if the committee had counted on delegates from Kansas City, Kas., Armourdale, Argentine, Rosedale, Olathe, Kas., Independence, Holden and Pleasant Hill, Mo., and a few from Chicago, Ill., all would have gone off swimmingly. As it was there were more present than presents.

The women sacked and separated 5,000 bags for boys and girls, and 2,500 sacks lay on tables on each side of the hall. Besides those, about 700 Christmas bags had been prepared specially for children in hospitals and those who were ill at home and could not come to Convention hall. It was the intention to deliver them by wagons late yesterday afternoon.

In one short hour every sack was gone, including the ones prepared for the hospitals, and many children were still in line. Over 700 tickets were given to them to come to the hall at 2 o'clock this afternoon when an effort will be made to supply them. Captain J. F. Pelletier of the purchasing committee bought toys, candies and nuts last night and a committee of tired women will be at the hall at 8 o'clock this morning to prepare them. It is estimated that fully 1,000 children who were last in line failed to get a Christmas sack.


CAME HOURS TOO SOON.

It was stated that he doors to the main floor would be opened at 1 p. m. and that the distribution would begin at 2 o'clock. But the children began gathering at 10 o'clock, and as the wind was raw, they were admitted to the balconies of the hall.

Shortly after 1 o'clock some one gave the word "Ready" and the girls and boys rushed from the balconies and jammed into one living mass before the entrance to the arena. The wee ones were being smothered and, in order to save lives, the crowd had to be admitted to the floor.

On the right side was a big placard reading "BOYS" and on the left another reading "GIRLS." Instead of mingling about the hall and looking at the trees and watching the antics of the five Santa Clauses under the two great evergreens, the boys massed before the chute leading to their side and the girls did likewise on the other side.

Patrolmen William M. Meyers, Elvin Gray, T. L. Savidge, George H. Moseley and Thomas McNally, who were rigged in full regalia as the five Saints Nick did all they could to detract the attention of the children, but they had their eyes on those Christmas bags, and the lumbering antics didn't even win a grin.

There was nothing to do but start the ball, and start it they did. The first boy to get his goodies was George Cook, 11 years old, of 115 North Prospect avenue. A committeeman placed the imprint of a little Christmas tree on the back of George's left hand with a rubber stamp and indelible ink. He grabbed his sack, sailed through the chute and squatted immediately outside the door to see what he had. He was soon followed by a mob of other boys, just as curious, and soon the doorway had to be cleared by a policeman as there was a boy to every square foot.


SHE HAD A DOUBLE LOAD.

At the head of the girls' line stood Ester Cronkhite, 11 years old, 1700 Fremont avenue. In her arms she carried her 2-year-old sister, Alice. Both were given appropriate sacks and, heavily laden, little Ester labored on. The children were given street car tickets home. One ticket entitled tow to a ride.

Most attention was paid to the boys, as it was believed that they -- the little scamps --- would do some duplicating. Soon after it was seen that their hands were being stamped several boys appeared in line with gloves on. And so did some of the girls. When the jam on the boys' side got beyond control Detective Thomas Hayde mounted a box and, in stentorian tones commanded, "Here, you kids, quit that pushing. Don't you see you're smothering these kids here in the front? Stand back there. Quit that."

"Hully chee," said one boy, "dere's de chief. Skedoo back kids and beehave er we won't git nuttin."

From that announcement there was a line formed out of the boys and there was little crowding. "De chief's here," went down the line. "See 'im hollerin' on de box dere." That settled it with them.

SHOVED POLICE ASIDE.

On the girls side there was nothing short of chaos. About nine stalwart coppers -- out of thirty detailed at the hall -- under Captain John Branham, could no t keep them in line. They actually shoved the police to one side. "O'm demmed, eh? Oi aint timpted tuh give 'em the loight schlap," said one policeman, who had been shoved about ten feet by the little girls, "but 'twudn't do, all being gerrels, ye know."

While the bulk of the eagle eyes were on the boys to see that they played no tricks and did no repeating, the girls did a rushing business on that very line. At the head of the line were bags for little girls, and the big ones got theirs further on. Many of the "mediums," which could pass for both, got both. One was seen to get a sack, hold it under her cloaK with one hand, while with the other hand she gratefully received another.

Still others would get their sack and immediately pass it over the chute to a waiting companion on the outside while she passed on and got a second present from another woman. Many of the sharp boys whose hands had been stamped and who could not get back in line were seen to do this same thing.

"GIMME 'NOTHER, MISTER."

"Gimme 'nother for my little brother what's sick at home an' can't come. Gimme one fer my sister with th' mumps. Gimme one fer my little cousin what has fits an' can't come. Gimme 'nother one fer my half little brother what's visitin' an' won't be home 'till New Years. Gimme 'nother, please, fer a kid what lives by me an' sprained his leg so he can't git his shoes on any more this year."

The foregoing excuses were given by the boys and girls in line, and there were possibly a hundred others. No one could refuse them, as many cried to make the play strong.

Many little ones got lost from brothers and sisters, and the five Santa Clauses were kept busy carrying them about hunting for relatives and companions with whom they had come. All were crying. R. S. Crohn found a little fellow's brother for him three times, and when he got lost again turned him over to Santa Claus. Finally a room was set apart for the lost ones and by the time the festivities were over all lost children had been restored.


THE MAYOR WAS LATE.

Mayor Thomas T. Crtittenden, Jr. , mistaken in the time he should have been there, arrived at Convention hall with Franklin Hudson, just as the last of the bags had been given out to the children. There was to have been an entertainment, with a speech by the mayor, but that had to be left out. Devaney's orchestra furnished music while the children were waiting.

"It's the happiest day of my life," said the mayor. "I wouldn't have missed the little I have seen for anything. We will know better how to proceed next year, however, and will begin earlier. Another thing we will know is just how many children will be here and just what sort of presents to put up for them. Other cities may profit by our example next y ear and relieve us of such an unfortunate incident as took place today. We have more money, however, will buy more toys, more nuts, candy and fruit, and will be ready for the leftovers Saturday at 2 p. m."

"It was more than what we bargained for," said Franklin Hudson, chairman of the executive committee. "We were counting on our own children only -- but what's the difference, they are all children anyway."

"I don't care if they came here from Europe," said Captain J. F. Pelletier. "We were not looking for 1,500 outsiders, but as they weere here we are glad of it. I wish all the kids on earth had been here. At one time I thought at least half of them were here.

Another large bundle of Santa Claus letters were received at the hall yesterday, some of them being handed in by the children who came. They will be classified by districts and an effort made as far as possible to give each child just hwat it asked for. It may take several days yet, but the committee says: "We are not going to do this thing by halves."

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November 27, 1908

NOT A HUNGRY PERSON LEFT.

If There Was, It Wasn't the Fault
of Givers of Dinners.

Amid the general rejoicing and feeling of goodfellowship incident to a perfect Thanksgiving day, the less fortunate inhabitants of the city were not forgotten. At every charitable institution in the city a dinner was provided for the inmates. The Salvation Army, Franklin institute, Union mission and other organizations of like character fed hundreds of poor persons, and sent many baskets of provisions to deserving families who were unable to attend the dinners.

The Union mission, at Eighteenth and McGee streets, provided a dinner and fed over 400 persons. Special invitations had been sent out and persons from Rosedale, Argentine, Kansas City, Kas., and country districts attended the dinner. Everything in the way of eatables was provided, and if any person in Kansas City went without a Thanksgiving dinner yesterday it was not because of a lack of opportunity.

"It was certainly good to see those poor persons eat," said the Rev. Mrs. Rose Cockriel, the pastor of the mission. "Those who came to the dinner ranged in age from 7 weeks to 33 years, and they all appeared to enjoy themselves. Six little boys, the oldest one 10 years of age, walked in from beyond the Blue river. We gave them their dinner and a basket of provisions to take to their home."

At the Old Folks and Orphans' home the day was celebrated with an old-fashioned dinner, turkey, cranberry sauce, pumpkin pies and everything that should be eaten on that day. At the Perry Orphan Boys' home 130 boys partook of the good things that had been provided for them.

At the Working Girls' hotel there was really a day of thanksgiving, not alone because of the excellent dinner, for in addition to that some unknown friend donated a high grade piano to the institution. From the standpoint of charity and general cause for thankfulness, the day was very much a success.

At the county jail Marshal Al Heslip provided a dinner for the prisoners, of whom there now are fewer than 200. All the trimmings went with the spread. Eatables out of the ordinary also were served at the Detention home, where juvenile prisoners are confined.

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October 24, 1908

IT'S A SAD BLOW TO ARGENTINE.

Aileen D'Armond-Clemm Will Not
Vaudeville on Its Broadway.

If the D'Armond sisters, vaudevillians, attempt to sing in Argentine tonight, they will do so at their peril. At least this will be true in the case of Aileen D'Armond, or Aileen Clemm, 1515 East Twelfth, who is half of the vaudeville team. The first families of Argentine are doomed to disappointment.

The Argentine impresario who desired the services of the girls called up the Detention home again yesterday. He was told that Judge H. L. McCune had said, "nothing doing" in the case of Aileen. Grace Stafford, the other half of the team, being over age, may appear in Argentine, or Sugar Creek, if she pleases.

Incidentally, Judge McCune ordered Aileen brought into court again, to find out why her mother did not keep her agreement to move to Braymer, Mo., where the electric lights do not twinkle.

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October 9, 1908

RISKED LIFE FOR PLAYMATES.

Herbert Holden, 12 Years Old, Is In-
jured by Falling Stair.

Herbert Holden, 12 years old, is being boomed for a Carnegie medal by his many friends and acquaintances living near his father's residence, 230 South Seventh street, Argentine. If it were not for his nimble wits and prompt action yesterday morning a falling fire escape at the Emerson school house would have crushed two children playing marbles underneath.

According to bystanders the fire escape was hooked up out of the way of the children who might want to climb it, and sustained in place by means of a weight. In some manner the weight became loosened and the 250-pound stairway tumbled to the ground. Then it was that little Herbert sprang in the way, catching the escape squarely on his shoulder and diverting it from the children .

He, however, was knocked unconscious from a blow on the head and was taken home. Dr. H. A. Ware was called and found what looked like a fracture on the right temple. The boy's injuries were dressed and he will recover. His father, Herbert H. Holden, a railroad conductor, was notified at once.

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September 24, 1908

STRUCK BY STREET CAR.

Teddy Rush, 7 Years Old, Receives
Scalp Wound and Bruises.

Teddy Rush, a 7-year-old boy, was struck by an eastbound street car on the Argentine division of the Metropolitan street railway yesterday afternoon at 4 o'clock while crossing the tracks near Ninth street and Strong avenue. The lad started to cross behind one car and was struck by another going in the opposite direction. He was hit by the fender, which knocked him clear of the car. His injuries consist of a scalp wound and bruises about his body. Dr. D. E. Clopper treated the boy's injuries and he was taken to his home, 20 North King street.

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August 10, 1908

DEATH OF AN AUTHOR'S WIFE.

Mrs. Alta Trueblood Woodward Died
Yesterday at Family Home.

Alta Trueblood Woodward died yeserday morning at her home, 3215 Vine street Burial will be in Mount Washington cemetery at 3 o'clock this afternoon.

Mrs. Woodward was a very attractive woman, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Trueblood of Argentine, Kas., and married Robert Pritchard Woodward on July 17 last. The homeymoon was a trip to Europe. Yesterday, three weeks after the birth of their first child, the young wife died, leaving her soldier, author, journalist, globe-trotter and financier husband to face the world alone and broken hearted, without the prize which his impassioned verses, "A prayer to Alta," swore was the one object of his existence.

Mr. Woodward is a man with an adventurous career. The son of Judge B. W. Woodward of Brooklyn, N. Y., he was brought up in that city and went to West Point, being a member of the class of 1887. He did not enter the army, however, that prospect being too uninteresting in a time of peace. He was six years on the staff of the Brooklyn Eagle but abandoned newspaper work to become an author. To get material for a book he walked from New York to San Francisco, a burro for his only companion.

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July 26, 1908

DEATH GAVE LITTLE WARNING.

Miss Evalina Wolfsohn Suddenly
Stricken With Heart Disease.

Sitting on the porch of her home at 1206 Penn street at 10:15 o'clock last night, Miss Evalina Wolfsohn, 18 years old, suddenly jumped to her feet and fell to the ground, dead from heart disease. A young man, Horace A. Dickson, an employe of the Kansas Bitulithic Company, who lives at 111 East Ruby avenue, Argentine, was talking to Miss Wolfsohn's 12-year-old sister, Katie, who was in a hammock near the porch, then notified the members of the family who were home.

The dead girl's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Wolfsohn, were taking a car ride and did not return until some time after their daughter died. Mr. Wolfsohn is a watchmaker for the Meyer Jewelry Company.

Miss Wolfsohn had complained several times of pains in her heart. She had attended Manual Training high school two years and Spalding's Commercial college one year. She was a milliner's apprentice.

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July 19, 1908

IN MEMORY OF BENITO JUAREZ.

Mexican Laborers Rememer Date of
Peasant Liberator's Death.

Yesterday was an anniversary of the death of Benito Juarez, Mexican patriot and president, and was observed by several hundred Mexicans in Armourdale and Argentine. In the Santa Fe railway yards at 6 o'clock last evening fifty male voices recruited from the box car houses of the laborers sang the national anthem of the Southern republic and individual prayers asked peace and rest for the soul of the departed liberator.

"He was one of Mexico's greatest citizens as well as one of her most valiant soldiers," said Jose Perez, a foreman who was once a student in a military academy in Mexico, and led in the impromptu exercises in Argentine last night. "Diaz is the organizer, but Juarez made the organization possible by striking off the hand of the tyrant and freeing the people.

"They were born of full blooded Indian parents and symbolize the soil which was meant to be free, but Europe would gladly claimt them both," said Perez.

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June 9, 1908

ARGENTINE TERROR STRICKEN.

Three Hundred and Fifty Families
Moved Out of West End.

Argentine was in a state of terror because of the high water there last night. That section of the city known as the West End was well covered with murky water at 6 o'clock, and a great crowd of people stood about on the higher ground watching the progress of the overflow. The actual damage done up to a late hour last night was nominal.

At noon the whistles on the city water works in North Argentine blew a shrill, long blast, and thereafter for an hour people were without water in their hydrants, the encroaching water had found its way through basement windows to the fires under the boilers and the water works was without power.

At 1:10 o'clock, the hydrant began to work again, much to the delight of the housewife, who found herself without water to wash the dinner dishes. The supply came from the water works of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad Company's plant, and it was something of an improvement, it is said, on the product of the city pumps.

Along Strong avenue and in the West End the water was five feet deep at 10 o'clock last night and the buildings in that vicinity were almost without exception deserted. In the West End a number of men and boys took advantage of the rise and appeared on the streets early in the evening armed with pitchforks to spear the fish which could be plainly seen thrashing about in the shallow water.

The Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad Company employed all of its available help yesterday in loading scores of cars with lumber, machinery and implements of the shops onto flat cars, to be hauled to higher ground.

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April 20, 1908

BURNED BY ELECTRIC WIRE.

Carroll Freeman, Argentine, Was Un-
conscious From the Shock.

While twenty children were playing at the foot of Ash street at Argentine yesterday morning one of them, Carroll Freeman, caught hold of a guy wire, which extends across the tops of two telephone poles, and down to a stake in the ground, and before his comrades could pull him free of the wire, he was seriously burned. Clyde Foster was the first lad to rescue and his quickness probably saved Carroll's life.

Carroll's left hand was burned to the bone, and the toes on both his feet were scorched. His rescuer was slightly burned on the hands from taking hold of Carroll's garments and clinging while he pulled the helpless boy from the wire.

Walter Freeman, Carroll's father, who lives at 202 North Eleventh street, said last night that the boy would recover. After being brought home in the morning the lad remained unconscious until six o'clock in the evening, when he came to himself and rallied rapidly. The Foster boy lives on Ruby street, a block west from Ash. He is 13 and Carroll is of about the same age.

Walter Freeman explains the accident by saying that an electric light wire, carrying a heavy voltage, sagged and touched the guy wire, where it crossed from one telephone pole to the other. The end of the guy wire, which ran toward the ground, being attached to a dry post, had no opportunity to ground the electric wire current. When the lad took hold of the wire, the current grounded through his body, Freeman says. That explanation would account for the boy's toes being burned.

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April 3, 1908

MRS. MORASCH TELLS
HER STORY TO JURY.

DENIES SENDING POISONED CAN-
DY TO LITTLE GIRL.

Says She Fled Wyandotte Because
She Feared County Attorney
Would Prosecute Her
in Baby Case.

Mrs. Sarah Morasch testified yesterday in her own behalf before the district court jury in Kansas City, Kas. She was called by counsel for the defense to tell the jury of her whereabouts at the time of the murder of little Ruth Miller of Argentine.

On direct examination the story told by the defendant in many ways differed from that told by her daughter, Blanche, in connection with the doings of the Morasch family the night before and the night following the killing of the child. Some of her statements, according to court records, were diametrically opposed to statements made by both herself and Blanche at the preliminary trial in the South city court.

The testimony of the defendant was mostly a series of negatives. She positively denied having sent the box of candy to Ella Van Meter. She had never sent Ella any candy at all, had never in her life been the possessor of a grain of strychnine, and Ella had never written for her the address of the Millers at 634 Cheyenne avenue, she said. In regard to the baby alleged to have been adopted surreptitiously by Mrs. Morasch from the U. S. G. Hughes maternity hospital last January, the defendant likewise blocked all further inquiry about details from the prosecution and defense by an emphatic denial.

The baby had been in good health while in her hands, she said. She had not at any time claimed it as her own, as her neighbors unanimously testified, nor had she, at any time, said she was about to give birth to a child.

When in cross-examination the prosecutor parried with her answers and tried to pin her down to an acknowledgement that she wrote some of the letters exhibited, her voice rose shrill in reply:

"I wrote some of that letter, not all of it!" The damaging parts of the missives, she freely swore, had been inserted by someone else. As she leaned far over in her chair to designate the questioned sentences or paragraphs, the had with which she pointed shook perceptibly, and her voice frequently broke.

SAID TAGGART SCARED HER.

"Where was I February 11?" Why at home, of course. Where do you suppose I'd be?" the witness answered to one of the queries of the county attorney.

"I had just been let out of your office, Mr. Taggart, where you know you bluffed me and nearly frightened me to death, until I could jump into a river at the sound of your voice. I went straight home after quitting the court house. You told me there to go home and to pull down the blinds, lie on my back and think over all I knew of the Hughes home and then, if I remembered anything about it that I had not told you, to come back.

"I went straight to a rooming house across the line and hired a room and paid 25 cents down on it, leaving me with a nickel. I had started with only 35 cents."

"Did I knot tell you before you left my office," interposed County Attorney Taggart, "that you would never again be arrested on the charge of mistreatment of the Hughes baby?"

SHE WAS NERVOUS WRECK.

"Yes, you did, but I did not place much faith in it. You also told me that if I did not return to you with full information concerning the maternity home you would see to it I got a six months' jailing. You said I would be followed everywhere I went and that I could not escape you.

"I tell you, I went out of your office a nervous wreck compared with what I was when I went in."

As to the flight of herself and daughter, Blanche Morasch, form the temporary home at Eighth and Locust streets to Harrisonville, Mo., subsequent to the murder, defendant alleged it was inspired by a fear of the county attorney, who had bulldozed her, she said continually.

She said that on the evening of Wednesday, February 12, she had left the rooming house to buy bread for the children. Before she had gone far she turned a corner of a street and came face to face with Taggart standing on the opposite side of the street with his hat pulled well down over his eyes.

In great fear she had but then turned about without buying the bread, she swore, and had then fled to her room, there stating to her daughter, Blanche, that the two of them must at once leave the city and go to Wichita, Kas., or again face the juvenile court and Taggart on a charge of child abuse.

WROTE LETTER DURING FLIGHT.

County Attorney Taggart then showed the witness the letter purported to have been sent by Mrs. Morasch to her daughter, Mrs. May Gillin, while on the flight to Harrisonville. It is "No. 8" in the exhibit.

Witness stated that part of the letter was in her handwriting and part in that of a girl at the farm house, where the two were stopping for the night. She said she had asked this girl to finish her letter to her daughter.

"Mayme was her name," testified Mrs. Morasch, "and I don't know what she might have added to my letter. She also wrote my signature on it."

"Now, you say you wrote the forepart of this letter. Are you responsible for the line on page two of which says: 'Did the police inquire about Blanche?' "

"The line does not say Blanche," replied the witness, sharply.

"Well, it indicates it by the letters, B and L together, with a dash following."

Mrs. Morasch took the sheet referred to and satisfied the prosecutor that the two letters spell 'me' and are no abbreviation at all. The lines following practically repeat the question, using the name Blanche spelled out in full. Mrs. Morasch denied having written that part of the letter, ascribing it to "Mayme," whose last name she could not recall. The defendant will be called upon for further cross-examination this morning. Counsel for the defense, Daniel Maher, will today call upon his assistant, Attorney Wooley, in regard to the mysterious not introduced by the defense as a sample of Ella Van Meter's handwriting where on the experts disagreed.

The case may not go to the jury before Monday.

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December 11, 1907

SHOT DOWN IN BARROOM ROW

W. H. BARNES KILLS JAMES E.
WHITE, A MOTORMAN.

PISTOL AGAINST HIS HEART

"WHY DID I GET DRUNK? WAILS
DYING MAN.

Murderer Surrenders and Is Now in
Jail -- Holds Weapon Leveled at
His Victim Some Minutes
Before Firing.

In a barroom brawl yesterday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, W. H. Barnes of Argentine shot and killed James E. White, a motorman in the employment of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company, living at 816 Bank street. The fight, according to the story told by an eye witness, was begun by White. Barnes, or "Hank," as he was commonly known, was standing by the bar in Peter McDonnell's saloon, Twelfth and Charlotte streets, with a friend. White entered the room and, seeing some of his acquaintances, began to joke and jostle them in a familiar way. He had been drinking heavily.

Going down the line of men at the bar and speaking to each of them, he stepped up to the young man who seemed to be under the protection of Barnes, and spoke to him, lurching heavily against him as he did so.

The young man resented the drunken familiarity and demanded an explanation of White. But White did not choose to explain matters, and went on teasing the boy, who finally started to strike him. At this juncture Barnes interfered and began to make threatening gestures at White. They were standing within two feet of each other when White made a move towards his hip pocket with his right had as if attempting to draw a revolver. Barnes immediately drew a revolver himself and leveled it at White's heart.

Not believing that either man meant his move in any other manner than a joke, White threw off his coat and turned completely around, evidently to show that he was not the possessor of a revolver. Barnes did not lower the revolver, which was pointing at White. This made the drunken man angry, and he called Barnes many vile names.

FISTS AGAINST REVOLVER.

Mere words and threats did not lower the revolver which Barnes, with a steady hand, kept aimed at his heart for fully two minutes, so White started in bare-handed to disarm Barnes. He struck at him twice, neither blow reaching Barnes. Barnes said nothing, but stepped a little nearer White and pulled the trigger of the revolver. The cartridge did not explode, and Barnes waited another instant before pulling the trigger a second time.

This time the revolver did its work, the bullet striking White in the left breast slightly to the left of the heart. White did not stagger or fall, but kept to his feet and walked steadily to the rear of the saloon where several men had been playing cards. One man who had been standing in the inner doorway during the fight hastened forward to help the wounded man, who tried to throw him aside, saying: "I can whip him any time, but he got me like a coward just now."

He finally consented to sit down after considerable urging on the part of his friends. The minute that he sat down in the chair he became deathly sick and lost consciousness for a short time.

"I HAD TO DO IT."

After firing the last shot, Barnes walked out of the door leading into Charlotte street, remarking to a friend whom he passed, "Bob, I had to do it, didn't I?" He then jumped into his buggy, which was standing by the sidewalk, and drove rapidly south on Charlotte.

Hearing the shot, Officer Ed Doran ran into the saloon to investigate. By the time he arrived, Barnes had gone. The officer telephoned to the Walnut street police station for the ambulance. White was treated by Police Surgeon Dagg, who, seeing his critical condition, ordered him taken immediately to the general hospital.

On the way to the hospital White tried to talk and to answer questions, but the effect of the liquor and the mortal wound were too much for him, and he would only cry out hoarsely: "I know him. I know him. What is his name, I forget? He got me, yes, he got me. Oh, why did I get drunk!"

He died within two hours after he arrived at the hospital, from an internal hemorrhage caused by the bullet, it is thought that the bullet was one of the 38 caliber, as it pierced the body through.

THE MURDERER SURRENDERS.

Several hours after the shooting Barnes appeared at the county jail, where he surrendered. He is now in jail.

Barnes had owned the saloon in which the shooting occurred up to a little over a year ago, when he sold it to Rube Snyder, who sold it to its present owner, Peter McDonnell, a month ago.

White had been a motorman on the Metropolitan for about four years. He ran the Troost avenue owl car for some time, when he was transferred to a daylight run on the Broadway line.

White had been granted a divorce from his wife, Pearly White, by Judge Powell at Independence Monday afternoon. The divorce was granted on the grounds of desertion. His wife does not live in this city and her present address is unknown.

White was born in Caldwell county, near Breckenridge, Mo. He was about 35 years of age. He lived on his father's farm up until four years ago when he moved to Kansas City. His fellow workmen say that he was one of the best natured men in the service of the street car company.

SALT WATER IN HIS VEINS.

It was believed from the first that White would die from the effects of the wound, but the doctors and nurses at the hospital did all in their power to save his life. Word was received from Captain Thomas Flahive of the Walnut street police station that he would be out to the hospital in order to take a dying statement, but when he arrived he found White too near dead for the police to gather much information from him.

While lying upon the operating table he called time and again for Gertrude Stevens, moaning desperately, "I want my girl. I want my girl." He gave her name and said that she worked at the Fern laundry. When she arrived it seemed to have a good effect upon him, for he no longer groaned and was willing to lie quietly, a thing he had refused to do before.

She stooped over and kissed him upon the forehead, talking soothingly to him. He asked to be moved over on his right side, that he might better see her and talk with her. "He shot me," was all that he would say, and then closed his eyes as if everything was satisfactory.

Three nurses and Miss Stevens stayed with during the hour he survived. His sweetheart stood over his body for several minutes after his death, and then left the hospital without a word. It is said that his recent divorce was procured so that he and Miss Stevens might be married.

SELF-DEFENSE, SAYS BARNES.

When seen at the jail last night, Barnes made the following statement in regard to the shooting: "There is not much left for me to say. I shot him in self-defense. He was a man about twice my size, and was ready to fight with me. I am much older than he and knew that I would stand now show with him when it came to a test of strength. For that reason, and to protect myself, I drew a revolver."

"If I had to go through it again, I would let him wipe up the earth with me rather than to even threaten him with a revolver. I did not try to evade the offense, but I just wanted to be the first to tell the unfortunate affair to my wife and family. I live on a farm about a mile and half from Argentine. It took me some time to drive out there and back again. As soon as I opened my front door I told my wife of the affair and told her that I had to go back to the city and surrender. I then drove directly to the jail.

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October 8, 1907

DON'T WANT ARGENTINE.

KANSAS CITY, KAS., COUNCIL
TURNS LITTLE CITY DOWN.

Is Told It must Wait Unitl Question
of Government by Commission
Is Settled -- Mayor Is
Disappointed.

Greater Kansas City, Kas., Skidoo!

The council of Kansas City, Kas., at a meeting held last night, defeated the annexation of Argentine by a vote of six to four, Alderman Schnaible and Clark being absent. Both of the missing councilmen, according to the statement made by Mayor C. W. Green of Argentine, signed an agreement to vote for annexation less than a week ago. Councilman West, before the meeting was called to order, telephoned Alderman Schnaible, who stated, so his colleague said, that his business at his store prevented him from attending the meeting. Alderman Morrow of the Third ward stated that his fellow alderman, Clark, instructed him to tell the mayor and council that he could not attend the meeting, but to register his vote against annexation. He gave as his reasons, voiced by Alderman Morrow, that he had discovered that the majority of his constituency were opposed to annexing the smaller city.

"I move you, Mr. Mayor, that the matter of annexation be postponed until the adoption of government by commission," said Alderman Sullivan.

"That's an indefinite proposition," replied Alderman West.

"I insist that the ordinance providing for annexation be read by section and placed on its final passage."

The ordinance was read, and when it came to a vote all eight of the Argentine councilmen voted for its passage. The vote of the Kansas City, Kas., council stood:

For annexation -- West, Renz, O'Connell, Powell, Lyons and Sullivan.

Against -- Burnett, Laughlin, Morrow and Patton.

Mayor Cornell arose and announced that the passage of the ordinance was defeated inasmuch as it required a two-thirds majority of the Kansas City, Kas., council to pass it.

Mayor Green of Argentine occupied a seat next to Mayor Cornell. The two mayors turned in their chairs, looked each other in the eye, and then shook hands. Mayor Cornell then stood erect and said: "Don't go away mad, gentlemen. The Mercantile Club is now holding a meeting just a block from us and is talking over the matter of government by commission, and I have been requested to extend an invitation to you all to attend this meeting."

The Argentine delegation left the city hall, but instead of visiting the Mercantile Club meeting boarded cars for Argentine, stating that it was "23" as far as it was concerned on the annexation proposition.

Mayor Green stated that he has an agreement signed by Alderman Clark, Schnaible, West, Renz, O'Connell, Powell, Lyons and Sullivan that they would vote for annexation, but could not explain the absence of Clark and Schnaible at last night's meeting. He says he, as mayor of Argentine, is through will all future negotiations for annexation.

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September 24, 1907

WILL TALK ANNEXATION.

Council to Confer with Argentine
Officals Thursday Night.

Shall Kansas City, Kas., annex Argentine? That is a question that is beign discussed by the people of this city at present. The sentiment expressed is favorable to it. The people of Argentine expressed their desire to be annexed to the larger city by their votes at a special election held several months ago. The mayor and council have made the formal application to Kansas City, Kas., council for annexation, and next Thursday night a joint session wil be held for the purpose of getting together on terms.

If the two councils agree upon an annexation ordinance, Mayor Cornell will probably call a mass meeting of the property owners in order taht the wishes of the people in general may be ascertained.

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Agusut 12, 1907

SAW HIS CHUM DROWN.

BUT KEPT FACT FROM PARENTS
OF VICTIM.

Finding of the Body of Martin
Cathro in the Kaw Discounted
the Story Told by Adel-
bert Lacer.

While John Hittle, L. McDonald and R. Retin, railroad laborers of Argentine, were strolling along the Kaw river bank in the vicinity of the Rex mills yesterday morning about 8 o'clock, they discovered the nude body of a boy caught in an eddy a few feet from the bank. The body was afterwards identified as that of Martin Cathro, aged 10 years, of 715 Metropolitan avenue, Argentine. Cathro's father is a foreman in the hair department of the Cudahy packing house. County Coroner Davis ordered the body removed to the Daniels Bros. undertaking establishment.

The drowned boy had been missing since early Saturday afternoon. He went to the river accompanied by Adelbert Lacer, a companion. The Lacer boy had reported to Mrs. Cathro that Martin had caught a meat wagon for Kansas City, Mo., when they had tired of fishing, about 4 o'clock. Chief of Police Frank James, of Argentine, took the Lacer boy into temporary custody. Lacer at first denied any knowledge whatever of the death of Martin Cathro, but finally admitted that he saw him drown while trying to untangle a snagged line several feet from the bank.

"We had been fishing about twenty minutes," said Lacer, "when Martin's line got caught on a snag. The water was pretty shallow where we were, at the deepest being not over one's chin. Martin took off all his clothes and waded in. I looked away a monent, and when I looked again, Martin had gone under. I never saw him again.

"I was awfully scared. I hated to return home without him, and tell people I saw him drown. Then I thought of his clothes. I took them to a clump of bushes near the river and hid them."

Lacer took the officer to the place where he had concealed the garments.

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August 8, 1907

MISS BOWDON IS INJURED.

Kansas City, Kas., Police Chief's
Daughter Hit by Car.

Bertha Bowden, 15 years old, daughter of Chief of Police D. E. Bowden, of Kansas City, Kas., was thrown from an Argentine car last night and injured internally. Miss Bowden is now being cared for by Dr. Millner at her father's home, 629 Osage avenue in Armourdale.

At 10:30 o'clock last night as Miss Bowden stepped from the car at Seventeenth and Osage avenue, the car started. The car was bound toward Argentine and the passengers said it appeared that the conductor started his car before the girl was safely upon the pavement.

Miss Bowden was not sufficiently recovered last night to make a statement regarding the accident.

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July 16, 1907

DIES IN DENTAL CHAIR.

Joseph Parker Had Three Teeth
Pulled, Then He Collapsed.

Joseph Parker, 45 years old, who lived outside the Argentine city limits, on South First street, died suddenly in the dental chair of Dr. E. W. House, No. 10 Spear avenue, Argentine, at 10 o'clock yesterday forenoon. Heart disease is said to have been the cause.

Parker had been ailing several weeks and was under the care of Dr. C. L. Zugg, his family physician. As he had been troubled with several bad teeth, he was advised to have them taken out.

Three of the teeth had been removed when suddenly Parker straightened out in the chair. Dr. House at first supposed the patient overcome by the cloroform, but it proved to be a fatal attack.

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