Find Kansas City Antiques and Collectibles at the Vintage Kansas City Marketplace ~ Own a Piece of Old KC

Vintage Kansas City.com

 

THE JOURNAL COMPANY, Publisher
EIGHTH, M'GEE AND OAK STREETS.

Old News
Headlines and Articles from The Kansas City Journal

BELL & HOME TELEPHONES
Business Office...4000 Main
City Editor.....4001 Main
Society Editor....4002 Main

Two cents. Subscription Rates:  By carrier, per week, 10 cents; per month, 45 cents.  By mail, daily and Sunday, one month, 40 cents; three months, $1.00; six months, $2.00; one year, $4.00.  Sunday only, six months, 75 cents; one year, $1.50.  Weekly Journal, 25 cents one year.

As We See 'Em ~ Caricatures of Prominent Kansas Cityans

The Isis Theatre ~ Kansas City, Missouri

The History of Fairmount Park

Claims of Cancer Cured by Dr. Bye in Vintage KC Missouri

Special Cut Prices ~ Always the Same

Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

February 9, 1910

PLANNED TO CHANGE
HIS WILL.

MRS. LOGAN O. SWOPE TEST-
IFIES IN INDEPENDENCE.

THOUGHT HE WAS DYING
FOR DECADES.

Artificial Cause of Death Suspected
by Pathologist.
Mrs. Maggie C. Swope, Sister-in-Law of the Colonel.
MRS. LOGAN O. SWOPE.

After the testimony of Dr. Hektoen yesterday in the coroner's inquiry into the death of Colonel Thomas Swope, Dr. Frank J. Hall, a patholigist, testified that he was requested by Mr. Paxton to get permission from Coroner Zwart to perform the post mortem examination of the colonel's body. He acted as an assistant to Dr. Hektoen, and dictated the report to Dr. Stewart. His report was a repetition of that of Dr. Hektoen, except that it was more explicit. It was filled with techincal terms and called for frequent explanations by Dr. Zwart to the jury.

After a recess, Dr. Hall was asked several questions suggested by Mr. Reed. He said that if strychnine had been taken in quantities sufficient to have caused death it would not have been noticeable in the post mortem. He also said that some artificial cause for death was suggested as a result of the examination.

After Dr Hall testified, Dr. Hoektoen was recalled, and was asked whether strychnine affected the old people more than it did the young, and he replied that he did not know. He also said that there was nothing in the post mortem examination to indicate the cause of death, and that a chemical analysis was indicated.

Overton H. Gentry, a pharmacist of Independence, testified as to the nature of the tonic mixture which Colonel Swope took. He said that it was made up of quinine, iron, pepsin and minor drugs and that each dose, a teaspoonful, contained one-hundred-and-eightieth grain of strychnine. He put the tonic up in six ounce bottles, which would give a little more than a quarter of a grain of strychnine to the bottle.

"EXTEMPORANEOUS MIXTURE."

"This tonic was an extemporaneous mixture," said Mr. Gentry. "It was put up for and sold to Mr. Hunton although I understood that Colonel Swope used it several times."

Mrs. Maggie C. Swope, widow of L. O. Swope, and a sister-in-law of Colonel Thomas Swope, at whose home he died, was the next witness. Mrs. Swope was dressed in mourning. A closely woven black veil with a heavy border dropped loosely from her hat to her chin. She spoke clearly.

"I have lived in Independence for fifty-four years," said Mrs. Swope. "Colonel Tom was my brother-in-law and he lived at my house for the last ten years or almost since the death of my husband. My husband was Colonel Tom's favorite brother. I have six children living and there were four at home during the last illness of Colonel Swope.

"Dr. and Mrs. Hyde came to the house Friday evening, October 1, the evening of Mr. Hunton's death. I sent for Dr. Hyde.

"Colonel Swope was very averse to taking medicines. 'Medicines don't do anyone any good,' he would say when it was suggested that he take something for his indigestion, or a tonic. He did take some medicines occasionally and took the tonic that Mr. Hunton got for him. He took two bottles of this tonic in a year. It was only at rare intervals that he would take the medicine. He also took charcoal tablets for his dyspepsia. He was only ill twice in the last two years. Both Drs. Twyman and Hyde prescribed for him then. Dr. Twyman prescribed a tonic for him a year ago and last summer Dr. Hyde prescribed some laxative pills.

WANTED TO STAY DOWN.

"Colonel Swope fell Sunday, September 4. He did not want to get up and we had some trouble getting him upstairs. We sent for Dr. Twyman, but he could not come and sent his son, Elmer. He put his shoulder in a sling and said that he did not need any medicines.

"The following Sunday Dr. Hyde and his wife come out for a visit and Dr. Hyde called on Colonel Swope. He was smiling when he came downstairs. 'I have solved the question,' he declared. "Colonel Swope has agreed to have a nurse.' We all agreed that this was an excellent thing, for it was hard to care for Colonel Swope. He did not want anyone around and we could not handle him as well as a nurse would. He did not take any medicine, and the only thing we know that he took was those pink pills. Monday Dr. Hyde brought Miss Kellar.

"When Mr. Hunton was taken ill we sent for Dr. Hyde. His wife came with him, and when she asked if I wanted them to remain at the house I told them that I did. I was glad to have her there. They remained until Monday after the Swope funeral. Saturday morning Dr. and Mrs. Hyde went to the cemetery to get a burial lot. I asked my daughter to do this for me.

"Sunday morning Miss Kellar and I were alone at the breakfast table. Miss Keller had told me that Colonel Swope had spent an unusually good night and then Dr. Hyde came in. Dr. Hyde asked if Colonel Swope had had his breakfast, and when told by Miss Kellar that he had, he remarked to her, 'Please come and give him this digestive tablet.' They were not gone long, and when they returned Miss Kellar said that Colonel Swope had refused to take the medicine.

"MATTER OF TIME," SAID HYDE.

"It was not long afterward when we received word that Colonel Swope had been stricken. I met Dr. Hyde in the hall afterward and he said: 'It is just a matter of time. He is going just like Mr. Hunton.' I stepped into Colonel Swope's room about 3 o'clock. He was unconscious then."

Mrs. Swope said that she had been told about the will which Colonel Swope had made but that she did not know its contents or any thing about any of the bequests until after his death. She said that she had been told that her children had been liberally provided for in the will. This was natural, she said, "as they were the children of his favorite brother.

"Mr. Swope was inclined to talk about his wealth to those whom he knew well. He frequently boasted to me that he was a millionaire. Dr. Hyde told me that Colonel Swope told him that he had a million and a half dollars that he intended to devote to charity. This was about the time he was taken sick.

"Dr. Hyde was aware that my children, one of whom is is wife, would be the biggest beneficiaries. They, however, did not know to what extent they had been provided for, although he told them that he had so arranged his estate that none should ever want for anything. He also talked of making a new will. He expected to do this when he got down town after he got well. Dr. Hyde understood that if Colonel Swope made a new will that the million and a half residuary estate would not go to the children.

"Dr. Hyde did not tell me that he wanted to be an executor of the estate of Colonel Swope but recently Miss Kellar told me that Dr. Hyde asked her to use her influence with Colonel Swope.

TOLD OF DEATH BY HYDE.

"I saw Dr. Hyde go into Colonel Swope's room when he was called by Miss Kellar and it was Dr. Hyde who told me that it was all over, referring to Colonel Swope's death. I only saw Colonel Swope once on the day he died. This was between 3 and 4 p. m.

"The children were all a little afraid of Colonel Swope. He did not like children and young folks seemed to bother him. That is the reason that the children did not go into his room during his last illness.

"I knew that his will was in his vest pocket. He told Moss that it was there the afternoon that he fill in the library. He told moss that if anything happened to him that he could find his will there."

Mrs. Swope was then questioned about the medicine which she threw away after the death of Colonel Swope and Mr. Hunton. She said that about a week after the funeral she cleared away a quantity of medicines which stood on an open shelf in Mr. Hunton's room. Some of these medicines, she said, were strychnine preparations or contained strychnine. Efforts were made by Coroner Zwart to get Mrs. Swope to tell just what all of the bottles and boxes contained and the colors of the boxes. Her testimony was apparently unsatisfactory in this respect. These medicines, she said, had accumulated for a couple of years.

"There was no possibility of Colonel Swope getting hold of these medicines, for he never entered Mr. Hunton's room," she said. "Colonel Swope had a well-beaten path from the library to his room and he never deviated.

"For the last twenty-five or thirty years Colonel Swope would tell me he did not expect to live much longer. He made the statement a couple of years ago while Dr. and Mrs. Hyde were here that 'You are talking to a dead man now. I am just walking around to save funeral expenses.'

"In the early part of his last illness he said that he was going to die. A week before he died he declared that he was going to get well and that he was going to change his will as soon as he got downtown. This was the first thing he said that he was going to do."

Subpoenas were served on Dr. Ludwig Hektoen yesterday in the libel suit of Dr. Hyde vs. the St. Louis Post-Dispatch an in the suit for libel by Dr. Hyde against Mr. Paxton.

Labels: , , ,

January 22, 1910

GETS WHAT HE ASKED
FOR WIFE'S AFFECTIONS.

Jury in Five Minutes Gives A. L.
Sherman $50,000 Verdict
Against J. C. Silverstone.

After less than five minutes' deliberation yesterday morning a jury in Judge Thomas J. Seehorn's division of the circuit court gave A. L. Sherman, a Kansas City lawyer, a verdict of $50,000 as a balm for a wound his feelings sustained when his wife lost her love for him in favor of another man three years ago. The suit, for $25,000 exemplary and $25,000 actual damages, was instituted by Attorneys L. C. Boyle and C. M. Howell.

The defendant was J. C. Silverstone, who for several years owned a drug store at Ninth and Wyandotte streets, but is now in Seattle, Was. Silverstone was not present at the opening of the case yesterday, but his lawyers were, and there was some interesting testimony. Mrs. Sherman obtained a divorce a year ago and is not in the city.

According to the testimony of Sherman he and Mrs. Sherman were married in September, 1898. Their life was happy until about January, 1907, when, he testified, Silverstone rose over the domestic horizon and began to shed compliments and other attentions on Mrs. Sherman.

One time Sherman said he asked his wife how it was she could buy millinery and fine dresses without approaching him for a loan. He had noticed for several months past that she was making purchases with out either consulting him or having the bills charged. She told conflicting stories of how she could perform the miracle, Sherman testified. He was not convinced and went to Silverstone's store to see him about it.

Sherman said he seized Silverstone by the throat and forced him back on a barrel in the rear of the drug store. Under threats of killing him, he said he obtained a partial confession and made the druggist beg for his life.

"After that my wife and I had frequent quarrels, and finally she left me, taking our child. The last I heard of her she was in Seattle."

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

December 24, 1909

GAS COMPLETES RUIN
OF RIALTO BUILDING.

FLAMES UNDER CONTROL WHEN
MAIN BREAKS, EXPLODING.

Firemen Grope Way to Street as
Third Roar Is Heard and Fire
Raging for Hours, Leaves
Only Ice-Coated Walls.
Fire and Explosion Destroy the Rialto Building.
CHARRED WALLS OF THE RIALTO BUILDING, ALL THAT REMAINS OF A "FIRE TRAP."

Flames fed by a broken gas main destroyed the Rialto building at the southwest corner of Grand avenue and Ninth street at 3:30 o'clock yesterday morning. The building was erected in 1887 by Albert Marty, its present owner. The fire started in the basement and raged virtually unchecked for three hours until everything inflammable had been consumed. Nothing remains but the ruined and ice-coated walls. The loss is estimated at $300,000.

The building was one of the few remaining big Kansas City fire traps which are a terror to the fire department. Almost entirely of frame construction inside, it burned like tinder. In the language of Assistant Chief Alex Henderson, "not all the fire companies in Missouri could have stopped it."

The fire was noticed first by J. W. Johnson, a negro janitor, who had for many years been a fixture in the building. Johnson was sitting in one of the offices on the second floor at 3 o'clock in the morning, when he was startled by a rumbling sound like the report of a muffled cannon. He jumped from the chair in which he had been resting after several hours of hard work in policing the building, and bounded down the stairway.

He was confronted by dense smoke, and forgetting everything but that there were several person in the building who were in imminent danger of losing their lives, he bounded up the steps and shouted fire from each landing. In this manner he aroused Dr. J. W. Gaines, Dr. Robert O. Gross, Dr. Emil Thielman, Dr. Oliver F. Jones, Dr. A. Talbot, Dr. B. E. Jordan, Dr. J. B. Jones and Dr. Frank Jones. On the fifth floor Johnson came upon Charles R. Manley, senior physical examiner of the Y. M. C. A., in a semi-conscious condition, the result of striking his head against a post in his efforts to escape while groping his way through the dark, smoke-filled hallways. Johnson himself was beginning to feel the effects of the smoke, but not thinking of his own life in his efforts to save others half carried and dragged Mr. Manley down the stairway and out into the streets to safety. In the meantime, A. E. Perrine, night watchman in the building of McGowan, Small & Morgan, gas grantees, which is the first building south of the Rialto, discovered smoke and noticing the glare of flames which by that time had gained considerable headway in the trunk factory, hastened to a telephone and turned in the alarm.

FIRE FIGHT BEGINS.

The fire department soon was on the scene. The fire at first looked to be easy to extinguish. The firemen had the flames smothered, when a terrific explosion, caused by the breaking of a gas main, shot the flames up through the building to the top floors. At the time of this explosion Assistant Chief Alex Henderson and a squad of men were on the first floor of the building. The force of the explosion shook the entire building and as the flames were spreading to all parts of the structure, it was as much as a man's life was worth to stay inside, as another explosion could be expected at any time. While Chief Henderson and his men were extricating themselves from the trap, Captain Pelletier, with several men, were groping their way about in the basement of the Ninth street entrance. In what seemed to be hours, they emerged through the smoke and debris into the street. It was none too soon, as the third explosion occurred a few minutes later and had any of the firemen remained in the building they would have been buried beneath the floors and walls. By this time twenty companies had arrived and were throwing streams of water into the burning building from all sides, but it was of no use. The interior of the building was mostly wood and the outside wall kept the streams from getting to the center of the building, where the fire was worst.

The Rialto was the only old-time building of any consequence on Grand avenue. Albert Marty, the owner, is an active real estate and building man of Kansas City. He purchased the ground in 1886 and in 1887 constructed a five-story building on the corner. In 1889 he purchased forty-eight feet on the south side of the corner lot and the same year erected the south half of the building which burned yesterday morning.

The building was occupied by many prominent physicians and dentists, some of whom have been in the building twenty-five years.

"The number of occupants is in the neighborhood of 100," said Dr. H. D. McQuade, who had offices in the building for many years. "Many of us will be up against it for offices for some time, but I expect to contract for offices on the fifth floor of the Keith & Perry building tomorrow. Many of us received offers from other physicians to share their offices while looking for locations."

VALUED AT $125,000.

The building was valued at $125,000, although at the time of its erection it cost in the neighborhood of $200,000. That was more than twenty years ago. There was $81,500 insurance carried on the structure. The heaviest loser among the occupants was Hugo A. Brecklein, a druggist, occupying the first floor. Mr. Brecklein estimated his loss at $20,000, with $12,000 insurance.

J. H. Langan, son of John P. Langan, a grocer at 4601 Independence avenue, was walking north on Grand avenue yesterday morning when the fire started, and in attempting to awaken some of the men who were sleeping in the offices, he broke the glass in one of the doors, severely cutting his hand. But he saved the life of a man who was sleeping through all the disturbance, and succeeded in helping him to the street.

At least sixty physicians and twenty dentists lost their office furnishings and instruments in the Rialto building fire yesterday. The average loss for each tenant is said to have been about $700, and that only a small part of it was covered by insurance.

For years the Rialto has been the doctors' office building of Kansas City. Many of the most prominent physicians of the city were established there. Owing to the fact that in many buildings dentists and physicians are not allowed to rent offices, because the odors arising form the mixtures of medicines is objected to by other tenants, this building has long been recognized as the headquarters of men engaged in these two professions.

VALUABLE RELICS LOST.

About 1,000 specimens of prehistoric stone implements and two ancient violins were cherished treasures of Dr. A. H. Cordier, which were lost in the Rialto fire. Dr. Cordier occupied room 310, third floor.

A collector of prehistoric implements, Dr. Cordier, on trips to Mexico, Alaska, Ohio, Kentucky, Arkansas and through Missouri, got several thousand specimens, and he had about 1,000 of them on display in his offices. His is a collector of old violins and had two of these instruments, which he prized highly, in his rooms. Another relic which Dr. Cordier lost was the mounted head of a mountain sheep which he shot while on a hunting trip in British Columbia. Dr. Cordier's office had been in the Rialto building eighteen years.

DR. ANDERSON LUCKY.

A long distance survey of the Rialto ruins makes it appear that Dr. R. V. Anderson, a dentist, is the only tenant of the burned structure whose effects were not destroyed, and he recalls the fact that once before in a fire in the Rialto building he also was lucky.

Dr. Anderson's office has been in the building nearly eighteen years, ever since he began to practice, and some years ago ago fire broke out beneath his office, and his rooms, enveloped in smoke and flame, seemed doomed. The firemen, however, extinguished the blaze before his effects suffered any serious damage.

ORDINANCE NOT ENFORCED.

At the burning of the Rialto building yesterday morning the firemen were greatly handicapped by dangers from exploding gas, and they were in continual danger of being burned by flame of escaping gas. Had the building been equipped with a Siebens' shut-off gas valve it would have been possible for the firemen the moment they reached the fire to turn off the gas in the entire building and thereby lessen the danger occasioned by the escaping gas. The building code requires the installation of gas shut-off devices on all buildings, but for some reason the ordinance has never been enforced.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , ,

December 21, 1909

GAMBLED HIS MONEY AWAY.

Cecil Killey, 10 Years Old, Spent It
at Drug Store Raffles.

Money given him by his grandmother to buy schoolbooks Cecil Killey, age 10 years, of 4016 Central avenue, spent on drug store raffles. The boy was taken into juvenile court yesterday to explain.

"All the boys do it," explained the youngster. "Sometimes there are as many as thirty in a drug store at one time. It costs ten cents a chance. If you win you get a box of candy."

"You are too young to gamble this way," said Judge E. E. Porterfield. "The next time you are brought into this court you will be sent to the McCune Farm.

Labels: , , , , ,

December 10, 1909

HOUSEHOLD IS SAVED
BY UNWELCOME PUP.

HIS HOWLING CALLS MASTER'S
FATHER TO A FIRE.

Gas Left Burning, and Pressure Be-
coming Great Early in Morning
Scorches Woodwork, Making
the Pipes Red Hot.

Because of the vigilance of a four-months old pup belonging to E. L. Hayden, at Sixth and Central streets, the nine-room house and probably the lives of Mr. Hayden and his family were saved from destruction by fire early yesterday morning.

As the gas was so low during the early part of the evening Mr. Hayden left the furnace fire going so that the house would be warm the next morning, and turned the flow on to its full capacity.

At about 3 o'clock he was awakened by the continuous howling of his dog in the room below. He went downstairs to investigate the cause.

DOG IN A FRENZY.

The dog was jumping in a frenzy, throwing itself against the basement door. Upon opening the door Mr. Hayden hear gas hissing. He could hardly make his way down the stairs on account of the stifling fumes from scorching wood. Through the smoke he could see the glow of the furnace, which was red hot. The pipes were red with heat almost to where they were connected into the different rooms of the house.

The heat was so intense Mr. Hayden made his way to the gascock, only after he had thrown a blanket over his arm. He then used a poker to turn off the gas.

GAS PRESSURE STRONG.

The pressure after midnight is strong as most people turn the gas off entirely about that time. Mr. Hayden had not thought of this while shivering in the early evening.

The fox terrier pup belongs to Mr. Hayden's son, who is a pharmacist at the Owl Drug store. The dog has been kept in the household much against Mr. Hayden's wishes. Several times when he has been in the country he has tried to lose his son's pet, but "Romeo" has always "come back."

"Now," said Mr. Hayden yesterday, "you bet that dog stays just as long as he wants to. He probably saved our lives." There are three children in the family.

Labels: , , , ,

December 8, 1909

BOYS IDENTIFIED AS
SPANGLER'S SLAYERS.

ROBBERS' VICTIMS RECOGNIZE
TRIO, ONE A BRIDEGROOM.

Elevator Operators, Ages 17, 19 and
21, in Downtown Dry Goods
Store, Are Arrested -- Youngest
Weeps, Others Indifferent.
Louis Dye, Ralph Clyne and Harry Shay, Suspects in the Spangler Murder.
LOUIS M. DYE, RALPH A. CLYNE AND HARRY SHAY,
Three Suspects Held by Police for Spangler Murder and Recent Holdups.
(Sketched at Police Headquarters Last Night.)

Working on the "boy bandit" theory, the police yesterday evening arrested three youths, two of whom were identified as having shot and killed M. A. Spangler and wounded Sam Spangler, his son, in their saloon at Twentieth street and Grand avenue on the morning of November 23. Their names are Louis Dye, 21 years old; Ralph Clyne, 19, and Harry Shay, 17. All are employed as elevator operators in a down town dry goods store. Dye is a bridegroom.

The arrest was made at 5:30 o'clock by Captain Walter Whitsett and Plain Clothes Officers E. M. Smith and E. L. Maston.

VICTIMS VISIT STORE.

The officers visited the store in company with several recent victims of holdups and rode in the elevators with the boys as they were at work. They were arrested and taken to police headquarters. Albert Ackerman, 502 1/2 Wyandotte street, the man who was in the Spangler saloon at the time of the shooting, was summoned and in Captain Whitsett's office identified Dye and Clyne as the two who shot up the saloon.

"That's the fellow that had the gun," Ackerman stated, pointing at Dye. "The other fellow was with him. Of course they are dressed differently now, but there is no mistaking their faces."

Four others who have been robbed recently visited police headquarters in the evening and in every case identified the boys.

DRUGGIST IDENTIFIES.

W. S. McCann, a druggist, living at 1405 East Tenth street, identified Dye and Clyne as the two men who attempted to rob his store at Twenty-seventh street and Agnes avenue on the night of November 25. He said they went in the store, and that Clyne pointed a revolver at his head while Dye attempted to rob the cash register. When he showed fight they fired four shots at him and ran. He thinks that Harry Shay is the man that was left outside as a look out.

Miss Stella Sweet, 529 Brooklyn avenue, and Mrs. C. L. Flaugh, 629 Brooklyn avenue, who were held up Thanksgiving night on the steps of the Admiral Boulevard Congregational church, identified all three of the boys as the robbers.

Edward C. Smith of the Smith-McCord-Townsend Dry Goods Company declared that the three boys had robbed him on Thirty-sixth street, between Locust and Cherry streets, on the night of December 3. They took a pocket book containing a Country Club bond for $100. At that time they had handkerchiefs tied over their faces, but Smith was sure that he recognized them.

SPANGLER TO SEE TRIO.

Captain Whitsett made no attempt to cross-examine the boys last night, but ordered them locked up until this morning when they will be confronted by further witnesses, the chief of whom will be Sam Spangler, who was discharged from the general hospital yesterday. The prosecutor's office was notified and representatives will be on hand today to take their statements.

"I am sure that we have got the right men this time," stated Captain Whitsett. "They answer the description of the gang that have been doing all the robbing lately, and I am sure that it was they that held up Joseph B. Shannon last week."

None of the boys would make any statement except that they were strangers in town, only having been working for a week. During the identification process both Dye and Clyne showed indifference, while the younger boy, Shay, broke down and cried.

Dye lives at 1921 Oakland, Shay at 1242 Broadway and Clyne at 1710 East Thirteenth street. Dye was married three weeks ago, shortly before the Spangler murder.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

November 5, 1909

LAST OF WALLACE CRUSADE.

Nearly 4,000 Indictments Dismissed
by Prosecutor Conkling.

Nearly 4,000 indictments, returned by the grand jury last year during the Sunday closing crusade of William H. Wallace, then judge of the criminal court, were dismissed yesterday by Prosecuting Attorney Virgil Conkling. These are the last of 7,000 indictments by the Wallace grand jury.

When Judge Ralph S. Latshaw succeeded Judge Wallace on the criminal bench he instructed the prosecuting attorney, I. B. Kimbrell, to examine all the indictments and to file complaints where he thought he could secure a conviction. One dozen cases were tried, but all were acquitted, and about 2,000 dismissed.

When Prosecuting Attorney Virgil Conkling went into office the first of the year 1,500 more cases were dismissed.

The 7,000 true bills returned were against about 1,000 persons. Against some, principally theater managers, there were from 200 to 300 in each instance.

The Blue Law crusade started by Judge Wallace was directed largely against Sunday shows. At odd times his deputies would arrest cigar dealers, druggists and others who kept open on Sunday.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

September 22, 1909

BODIES OF VICTIMS
TO REST IN ATCHISON.

FUNERALS OF MRS. STOLL AND
WILLIAM JACOBIA TODAY.

Interment of Principals in Monday
Night's Murder and Suicide
to be Made at Former
Residence.

With the burial in Atchison, Kas., today of the victims of the tragedy enacted Monday night at the home of S. F. Stoll, 3617 Tracy avenue, in which Mrs. Sadie Stoll was murdered by William Jacobia, who later committed suicide at his wife's home, the last chapter of their story will have been concluded.

Mrs. Stoll's body was taken to Atchison at 6:30 o'clock last night. It will be buried beside that of her father, who died several weeks ago.

Mrs. William Jacobia, 3235 Forest avenue, will this morning take the body of her husband to Atchison where he will be buried. The wife and child will be the beneficiaries of life insurance carried by Jacobia. The life insurance was partly placed in fraternal organizations. Jacobia carried about $5,000 insurance upon his life. The fact that he left no will gives his wife and son all of his personal property. The insurance is all he left.

That Jacobia formed the Linwood Investment company for the sole purpose of placing his property beyond the possibility of being taken from him in a suit for the alienation of the affections of Mr. Stoll's wife was denied yesterday by his attorney, W. F. Guthrie. Mr. Guthrie for a time acted as trustee of the property owned by Jacobia for the latter and his wife, and later assisted in the financial separation between them.

While Mrs. Stoll refused to give up Jacobia, and give all of her love to her husband, she is said to never have countenanced any idea of leaving her husband and children. While she informed a friend that she loved Jacobia, she said she w ould stay at home on account of her two boys. For a year she drifted along in this fashion, meeting Jacobia daily, and when suspected by her husband pacifying him.

Those persons intimate with the family relations of the Stolls said yesterday that Mr. Stoll never knew of the friendship that existed between his wife and Jacobia, though he became suspicious on many occasions. At such times he is said to have spoken to his wife regarding the rumors he heard, but she always talked him out of his suspicious mood, and it ended by Mr. Stoll apologizing for his mistake. The night of the murder and suicide Mr. Stoll told one of h is intimate friends that he had seen his wife with Jacobia on but two occasions.

The report that Mrs. Stoll's father, J. P. Brown, had assisted in meeting the expenses of the Stoll household was denied yesterday. It was admitted that he often made presents of various sums of money, but that he gave the money to his daughter because she was a favorite.

Albert Stoll, the 14-year-old son who was in the house at the time his mother was murdered, yesterday asserted that he did not know what subject was being discussed by his mother and Jacobia during the quarrel.

Albert did not inform his fatherr of the clandestine meetings because of the love for his mother. The older son, Sam, also failed to tell his father for fear he would kill either Mrs. Stoll or Jacobia and thus create a scandal that might otherwise be dept from the public.

Attorney W. F. Guthrie last night made a written statement in which he denied that Stoll had ever employed him to bring an alienation suit. Speaking for Mr. Stoll, the attorney said that the druggist had never hired detectives to shadow his wife or Jacobia. the attorney said that Mr. Stoll had accused a man of being too intimate with his wife while living in Atchison, and that it became public. The affair caused people to lose confidence in Mr. Stoll, and he was forced to seek another location.

A denial was made by the attorney, who was also attorney for Mrs. Stoll's father, that Mr. Stoll ever received or expected any sum of money from his father-in-law as the price of his continuing to live with his wife.

Labels: , , , , , ,

September 21, 1909

FRIENDSHIP ENDS IN
MURDER AND SUICIDE.

WILLIAM JACOBIA KILLS MRS.
SADIE STOLL AND HIMSELF.

Young Son of Woman Heard Quarrel
and Shooting -- Risks Life Try-
ing to Protect His
Mother.
Mrs. Sadie Brown Stoll, Murdered Woman.
MRS. SADIE BROWN STOLL.
Wife of Samuel F. Stoll of the Stoll-Moore Drug Company.

Murder and suicide ended a close friendship last night when William Jacobia, 600 East Ninth street, shot and killed Mrs. Sadie Brown Stoll, 3617 Tracy avenue, during a quarrel in the front hall of the Stoll home at 9 o'clock and a few minutes later committed suicide on the veranda of his wife's residence, 3217 Forest avenue.

Mrs. Stoll was shot through the heart and died at once. Jacobia shot himself in the head.

The only person in the house at the time Mrs. Stoll was murdered was her 14-year-old son Albert. What passed between the couple before the tragedy is not known definitely, but they were quarreling for nearly a half hour before Jacobia fired the shot. Albert Stoll heard part of the conversation between his mother and Jacobia, but was sent to his room by her just before the shooting.


BOY GETS A SHOTGUN.

That the young son expected serious trouble while Jacobia was there is shown by Jacobia's actions, which Albert Stoll graphically described to the police last night. Immediately after firing the shot which killed Mrs. Stoll, Jacobia started up the stairs, threatening to kill Albert, who had provided himself with a shotgun to protect his own life.

Either the shotgun frightened him or the desire to get away from the scene of his crime, Jacobia gave up the pursuit of the boy, and ran from the house, followed by Albert, who gave the alarm by crying for help.

But few minutes elapsed between the first and second shooting. It is only five blocks from the Stoll home at 3617 Tracy avenue to Mrs. Jacobia's suite in the Alabama apartment house, 3237 Forest avenue, and Jacobia ran all the way.


"I HAVE SHOT MRS. STOLL."

A balcony with no outside steps is front of her apartment, which is on the ground floor. Jacobia made his entrance by way of this balcony and in doing so had to climb over a stone balustrade which encloses it. As he entered with much agitation he said to his wife, who had come to let him in:

"Mamma, I had to come home."

She could see that he was greatly excited, and told him to sit down while she got him a glass of cold water.

"No, no!" he protested, excitedly, "I haven't time. I have just shot Mrs. Stoll. It is awful, it is awful."
William Jacobia; Killed His Friend and Then Himself.
WILLIAM JACOBIA.
Slayer of Mrs. Samuel F. Stoll, who committed suicide when the police traced him to his wife's home at 3217 Forest avenue.

Incoherently he was trying to tell her of the shooting when he heard the sound of steps outside.

"There are the officers coming for me," he said.

"Yes, but you will have to nerve yourself and be calm," she told him.

Mrs. Jacobia went to the door to let in Sergeant M. E. Cassidy and Patrolman Isaac Hull of No. 9 station, and as she did so her husband stepped out on the balcony.

"Where is he?" asked Sergeant Cassidy.


WIFE HEARS DEATH SHOT.

Just then they heard a single shot, and the three went hurriedly to the balcony door.

"There he lies," she answered, pointing to the dead body of her husband, prostrate on the stone floor of the porch. The husband of the murdered woman is S. F. Stoll of the Stoll-Moore Drug Company, formerly at Twelfth street and Grand avenue, and now located at 208 and 210 East Twelfth street. He was notified of the death of his wife by W. R. James, 3615 Tracy avenue. Sam Brown Stoll, 18 years old, the oldest son, was at a theater, and friends were unable to reach him by telephone.

According to the facts as told by Albert last night Jacobia telephoned yesterday afternoon about 3 o'clock and asked for Mrs. Stoll. Albert answered the telephone and upon recognizing Jacobia's voice hung up the receiver. About 8 o'clock last night he again called up and was answered by Mrs. Stoll, and a half hour later appeared at the house.

Mrs. Stoll fell dead in the hallway at the foot of the stairs. Her head was lying against the bottom step, while her feet pointed to the front door. Soon after Mr. Stoll reached home he asked neighbors and friends to inform the relatives of his wife of her death. J. H. Brown, a brother, who lives in Atchison, Kas., was informed of the tragedy.

"Tell all of them to come," said Albert, who was telling his father what should be done.

The account of the shooting as told by young Albert Stoll soon after the murder, while not full in all details, shows daring in a boy so young as far as his part was concerned. He said that he and his brother did not like Jacobia, and that a week ago Sam had purchased a shotgun with the intention of killing the man who was his mother's friend. The shotgun had been kept in their room until a day or so ago, when his mother removed it to the attic.

"Yesterday afternoon when Jacobia called up and asked for mamma, I hung up the receiver," said Albert. "Then about 8 tonight he called mother, and soon afterwards he came to the house. I was in my room at the time. When I heard mamma and Jacobia fussing I decided I would get the shotgun, which I did. I took a shell and after taking out the wad and shot I went down to the first landing and stood there.

HEARD HIS MOTHER SHOT.

"I told Jacobia to leave the house, that he did not have any business here anyway. At that he got mad at me and told me to keep still or he would beat me. Then to bluff him I picked up the shotgun and put a load into it. Mamma made me go to my room, saying she would get Jacobia awa.

"I'll not let that little pup talk to me that way," Jacobia is said to have repeated to Mrs. Stoll.

"Just as I reached the upper hall I heard the shot, and then mamma say, 'Albert, he shot me.' 'Yes, and I'll shoot him, too,' I heard Jacobia say as I was hurrying back downstairs. Jacobia was coming up the stairs, and knowing my shell was not good, I ran to my room and put a loaded shell in the gun and then came downstairs.

RAN AFTER JACOBIA.

"As I reached the head of the stairway Jacobia was going out the front door, and I ran down the steps and followed into the yard. He was then going up the street. I cried 'Help, help,' and someone across the street asked, 'What is the matter, Albert?' When I said mamma is shot nearly all of the people started to the house and I came back and called up papa, but he didn't answer. Then someone told the police.

"I wish I had shot him," Albert admitted.

"Oh, God, why didn't you shoot the scoundrel, boy?" Mr. Stoll asked of his son.

Albert insisted that he did not know what his mother and Jacobia were talking about. Whenever Albert endeavored to tell the police just what occurred, and how, Mr. Stoll, who was walking the floor of the lower rooms, would tell him to keep still. Mr. Stoll refused to answer any questions immediately after the murder.

HUSBAND STILL LOVED HER.

"I loved her with every drop of blood in my body," he said, "and I will not say anything against her. I would not say a word that would reflect upon her. Oh, God, why couldn't he have shot me?"

Not until Samuel Stoll, the elder son, came home after the performance at a theater, did he learn of the tragedy. As he hurried up the steps, he was met by J. A. Guthrie, a friend of the family.

"For God's sake, what's the matter?" he said with a perplexed face.

Then he saw the white shrouded figure in the parlor with the undertaker and his assistants standing near. Mr. Stoll, who saw him, threw his arms about the boy's neck and shouted:

"Your friend killed her, that's what he did. And you knew he was coming to see her all the time."

WHEN THE TWO FIRST MET.

Then both were hurried up the stairs by friends.

"I'll kill him myself," said the youth.

"He has done that to save you the trouble," said Mr. Guthrie. "He committed suicide just after he killed your mother."

Then the father upbraided the son for several minutes, but the youth declared he knew nothing about it. Then both began weeping hysterically, and were finally reconciled. But the father could not remain seated. He walked the floor in anguish.

"I knew the first day he saw my wife," he said. "One day when he was building those flats up on Forest avenue, he came in to use the telephone, and my wife met him at the door. He introduced himself, which was the beginning of their acquaintance. I began to get suspicious when I saw him at the house several times.

WAS TOLD TO WATCH WIFE.

"Somehow I had a suspicion that all was not right, and at times I felt sick. On one occasion I asked her about it, but she became angry and upbraided me so much that I felt almost humiliated. She went on occasional visits to Atchison, and I was suspicious every time that she left home.

"On one of the visits to Atchison, I found his picture in the close, and I was so angry when she came home that I could wait no longer. She flew into a rage, and I could do nothing but submit, not wishing to make the affair public.

"My feelings were again wrought to a high pitch when I received an anonymous letter, telling me I ought to watch my wife. I then determined to hire a detective agency to watch her, but after hiring two men I thought differently and canceled my contract with the firm.

"It has been that way for months until tonight when I was called to the telephone and was told that my wife had been shot. I won't harbor any ill will against her for my boys' sake. She was their mother.

Mrs. Stoll was a large woman with a rich mass of dark brown hair. Her face was full and her eyes were dark brown, which matched her olive complexion. She was considered one of the handsomest women in the neighborhood, and always attracted attention on the street by her dignified bearing. A dimple in her cheek was heightened by an engaging smile. She always dressed in clothes of the latest fashion, which while not always expensive, always were tasteful. She was 38 years old.

Mrs. Stoll was the daughter of J. P. Brown, a wealthy man who lived at Atchison, Kas., Her father died about three weeks ago. He was well known in and around Atchison being one of the most prominent men in that community. While the Stolls lived in Atchison Mr. Stoll conducted a drug store there.

JACOBIA 46 YEARS OLD.

William Jacobia, the dead man, was 46 years old and rather stout. Those who had known him in life said last night that he was apparently of a happy disposition, with rare conversational powers. He took uniformly with women and men, the former long remembering his bright wit and ready flow of small talk.

When Mr. and Mrs. Jacobia were married October 8, 1890, he was an engineer on a Kansas branch of the Missouri Pacific railway. Later he left the railroad in favor of the banking business and founded the Farmer's state bank, the stock of which was owned mostly by farmers at Corning, Kas., which was his birthplace. Seven years ago he sold out his interest in the Farmers' bank and came to Kansas City to enter the real estate business.

POLICE "DIDN'T KNOW."

The police notified Dr. B. H. Zwart, coroner, of the double crime and he in turn notified Deputy Coroner Dr. Harry Czarlinsky. The bodies of the murdered woman and suicide were sent to the Carroll - Davidson undertaking rooms by the deputy coroner.

The police who were stationed at the home of Mrs. Stoll and Mrs. Jacobia refused to give any information regarding the tragedy last night. Whenever any of them were asked who shot the woman or why he shot her or an y other question relative to the case the invariable answer was "I don't know."

One policeman was asked if the body lying in the front hall of the Stoll home was a man or woman, and he said, "I don't know."

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

July 22, 1909

DUMP THE UMPIRE
INTO BIG POND.

PLAYERS OBJECT TO SOX, SHIRT
AND DECISIONS.

No One Knows Result of Indepen-
dence Baseball Game Wherein
Henry McCoy Made Home
Run on a Bunt.

No one knows how the baseball game between the business men's and fair association nines resulted at Independence yesterday. It came to an untimely end when the business men's team tossed the umpire into the lake as a protest against his decisions.

The business men objected at the beginning of the game to the umpire, R. D. Mize, an Independence druggist, because he wore green socks and a red shirt. Mize, to quell criticism and enforce his rulings, carried two large horse pistols and a saber. Over his head he wore a tiny parasol.

Mize's decisions were questioned by the business men, and the game was all but lost when Allen Southern went to the bat. Southern, who prides himself on his batting, lined out a hot one over the head of the pitcher. The umpire called it a foul. That settled him for that game. The business men's team marched up in a body, and before the umpire could escape they carried him on their shoulders to the big pond and dropped him in.

Judge Allen Prewitt's uniform also had a tendency to queer the game. Several reefs had been taken in the costume, which was borrowed for the occasion, and the pearl buttons fore and aft fooled the players, who could not tell whether he was running to or from a base.

The most sensational play was made by Henry McCoy, a surveyor, who bunted the ball when he went to bat. The first baseman muffed the ball, and McCoy made second, where the baseman also dropped it. The runner went on to third. The baseman there let the ball slip through his fingers and McCoy made a home run.

R. W. McCurdy, the corpulent ex-mayor of Independence, didn't make a base.

Mayor Jones and members of the city council helped fill out the team. There were some good players on both sides, but the other kind of players went to bat first and the semi-professionals were shut out.

Labels: , ,

July 17, 1909

BOY DROWNS IN POND;
EFFORT TO SAVE VAIN.

BODY OF 9-YEAR-OLD STARR
ALLISON YET UNRECOVERED.

Playmate, in Swimming With the
Younger Lad, Makes Heroic
Struggle to Rescue Him, but
Becomes Exhausted.

Starr Allison, the 9-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Allison, 3532 Windsor avenue, was drowned about 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon in a slough immediately west of the entrance to the Milwaukee bridge on the Missouri river.

Clyde Perkins, 13 years old, made a most heroic effort to save his playmate. Twice he was dragged beneath the eddying waters, but becoming exhausted himself, he was forced to release his grasp on the drowning lad to save his own life. The drowned boy's body has not yet been found. Young Perkins is a stepson of K. L. Perkins, a druggist at 3600 St. John avenue.

W. H. Jackson, 3011 East Twenty-third street, was fishing about 100 yards south of where the boys were swimming. Hearing repeated cries for help he looked toward the slough and saw Perkins struggling in the eddy with his little friend. Perkins is said to be an excellent swimmer for a boy his age.

"The Perkins boy was holding to the Allison boy, and at the same time trying to master the swiftly rushing eddy and get his companion to a place of safety," said Jackson. "I believe it was he who made the outcry. While running along the steep embankment of the railroad to get near enough to go in I saw the boys sink twice. The next I saw, Perkins was alone swimming toward the bank just beneath the bridge."

The Perkins boy, after gallant fight to save a human life, was almost exhausted when he reached the bank. Johnson supported him until he was rested. He had swallowed a quantity of water. After a time the two secured little Starr's clothing, and, realizing what the shock would be to the mother, left them with a neighbor next door.

J. L. Allison, father of the drowned boy, is connected with the Allison-Richey Land Company at the Union depot.

"Star went down to Kanoky, as the boys call the place, with some other boys the other day and they all went bathing in the shallow pond," Mr. Allison said. "He was greatly delighted over the new venture, but his mother and I cautioned them.

"This morning when he asked to go down there again with Clyde, his mother refused her consent until he had secured mine. He called me up at my office, but I was out. He begged his mother until she consented after he had promised not to go in the water. We understand the Perkins boy told Starr to stay out, and he certainly made an effort to save our boy."

"Star wanted to go in when we got there," said Clyde Perkins, "but I would not let him. After a short time he went behind some tall weeds and the next I saw he was in the water. Then I told him to stay close to the bank, where it was shallow. While swimming later I saw him wading out from the bank. There is a step off, made by the eddy, and he went down. Then I swam and caught hold of him.

"He was excited and struggled hard or I believe I could have gotten him to shore. After he had dragged me under twice I became so exhausted that I had to release him and make for the bank myself. It seemed to me that I barely made it, too."

W. H. Harrison, former license inspector, Herman Robrock, and Dr. C. O. Teach, neighbors of Mr. Allison, with three men from the latter's firm, went to the slough shortly after the drowning to make a search for the body. Most of the men are expert swimmers. Until 10 o'clock last night they took turns diving from different points in search of the dead boy. Grappling hooks were used and drags made. The men will return to the scene early this morning and renew their search.

Where the eddy swirls about, it has formed a whirlpool, and it is the opinion of some that the whirling waters may keep the body from floating out into the open river.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

July 5, 1909

ESCORTS RAN FROM
HOWARD'S REVOLVER.

BOTH LEFT THEIR COATS AT
THE AMBERSON HOME.

Alone, Clara Amberson and Her
Sister Fought a Losing Fight
With Murderer -- Girl Dies
After Four Hours.
Alfred Howard, Who Shot Miss Clara Amberson and Took His Own Life.
ALFRED HOWARD.

Miss Clara Amberson, who was shot in the right temple by Alfred Howard, a rejected suitor, in the dining room of her home, 735 Kensington avenue, just before midnight Saturday, died at 4:20 a. m. yesterday. She did not regain consciousness.

In an unlighted room, and deserted by the young men who escorted them home, and who fled when Howard appeared with his revolver, Miss Amberson, assisted by her sister, Mrs. Mamie Barringer, battled in vain with Howard for possession of the weapon. Finally throwing Miss Amberson to the floor, Howard jumped on her, and then, as Mrs. Barringer seized him about the neck, he pulled the trigger.

The bullet struck Miss Amberson just back of the right temple and she collapsed. Believing that he had killed her, Howard turned the weapon on himself and sent the second shot through his own brain, and fell lifeless beside her. Surrounded by her mother, sister and friends, sthe wounded girl passed away four hours later.

In the light of subsequent events, it is believed that Howard contemplated the murder and suicide Saturday afternoon. It is known that he saw the young women at Forest park in the evening in company with young men, when he had been denied the privilege of escorting them or even calling at their home, and it is believed that the sight of the girl who was all the world to him, encircled in the arms of another man on the dancing floor, maddened him.

Four years ago Alfred Howard, then 22 years old, came to Kansas City from Iola, Kas. He secured a position in a railroad freight office, and roomed and boarded with Mrs. Anna Amberson, mother of the girl he killed. Miss Amberson was then a child of 13.

WANTED TO MARRY HER.

They were together a great deal. Howard assisted her with her studies, and when she was graduated from high school last year he declared his love for her, and asked her to be his wife. This was objected to by her sister and her mother because of her youth.

Six months ago Howard left their house, and shortly afterward went to Hot Springs, Ark. In the meantime Miss Amberson entered a wholesale millinery establishment and was rapidly perfecting herself in that line when he returned three weeks ago.

Howard had been in poor health since his return, but this did not deter him from declaring his ardent love for the girl whom, he told his friends, no other could replace. Miss Amberson found many excuses for not making engagements. Thursday he called her on the telephone and to his several requests for an evening she replied that she had previous engagements.

Saturday evening he called at the Amberson home and asked Miss Amberson to accompany him to a park or that she spend the evening with him as she chose. Miss Amerson smilingly told him that she had an engagement for the evening and that she was sorry. During the conversation he showed the sisters the revolver which he later used. No thought of violence crossed the minds of either girl.

SHADOWED TO FOREST PARK.

Miss Amberson and Mrs. Barringer were unaccompanied when they walked to Forest park, a short distance from their home. There they met several friends, among them Orville Remmick of 5212 Independence avenue, and Ed Doerefull of 4621 East Seventh street.

It is believed that Howard shadowed the sisters to the park. H e arrived at the Ambrose home shortly before 10 o'clock in the evening. The noise he made when he withdrew a screen from a window in the kitchen of the Amberson home and clambered in was heard by Mr. and Mrs. Joe Wharton, roomers on the second floor, but they ascribed it to a parrot. For almost two hours Howard lay in wait. He chose as his hiding place the bedroom of the sisters, which opens from the dining room to the north.

On their way home, Deorfull, who escorted Miss Amberson, and Remmick, who escorted Mrs. Barringer, suggested that they eat some ice cream. They stopped at the Forest Park pharmacy and chatted for a few moments with O. Chaney, the druggist.

RAN FROM REVOLVER.

It was warm and the young men carried their coats over their arms. When they arrived at the Amberson home, they conversed for a few moments on the porch just outside the dining room, when the suggestion that they get a drink of water was made. the quartet entered the dining room. Miss Amberson and Doerfull going to one window seat while Mr. Remmick took a chair. Mrs. Barringer went into the kitchen for the water, when suddenly Howard sprang out of the bedroom.

Holding a revolver which he pointed at Miss Amberson, he cried:

"Throw up your hands and don't scream!"

"It's Alf! Help!" cried Miss Amberson.

Doerfull was first to see the revolver and the first to get out of the room. He was closely followed by Remmick. Both left their coats and hats. The cry for help brought Mrs. Barringer back to the room. By this time Miss Amberson had grappled with Howard and had clutched the revolver. Then began the battle for possession of the weapon and the shooting.

HAD PLANNED THE CRIME.

Screaming for help, Mrs. Barringer, after the shooting, fled to the sidewalk. Neighbors hastened to the scene. Doctors declared Miss Amberson fatally wounded, and said that Howard's self-inflicted wound had caused instant death.

The police who searched his clothing found the note which he had evidently written some time during the evening in which he declared that "Mamie" (Mrs. Barringer) was the cause of the anticipated double tragedy, and asked that Miss Clara and he be buried side by side.

ESCORTS DIDN'T WAIT.

Ed Doerfull, the escort of Miss Amberson, told a reporter for The Journal last evening that he had never been frightened as badly in his life as he was when he looked at that shiny steel barrel and heard the command to throw up his hands.

"I didn't wait to learn any more about who the fellow with the revolver was," said Mr. Doerfull. "Mr. Remmick and I had escorted the girls home and stepped inside the house to get a drink of water. I was close to the door and when I heard the command to throw up my hands and I saw that shiny steel barrel of the revolver, I concluded that I had better play checkers and move.

"I did not stop to grab my coat or hat, but ran. I don't know how I got home, for I was badly frightened. I lay awake all night and got up around 6 o'clock and went over to Remmick's house to see if he got home all right.

"I did not know until then that anyone had been shot, as I was too far away from the house when the shots were fired to hear the noise of the reports.

"I don't know why I ran away and did not notify the police about the man with the gun, but I guess most anybody would act the same as I did if they looked into the business end of a revolver and were ordered to throw up their hands.

GOT THEIR COATS SUNDAY.

"I got my coat and hat this morning at the same time Mr. Remmick got his. We saw Miss Amberson's body then and we will probably go to the funeral together.

"I did not know the young lady very well, having only met her a few times at the park. I did not go back to the house today, as I had an engagement to go to a picnic at Swope park, and it was too late when I got back this evening."

Orville Remmick, who was with Doerfull when Howard entered the room with the revolver in hand, told his parents that he was taken by surprise, and that when he heard the command to throw up his hands and he saw the revolver, his first thought was for his personal safety. He said that he ran for the door and ran home.

REMMICK HEARD REPORTS.

Half a block away he heard the muffled reports, and when he got home he telephoned to the Amberson home and learned of the double tragedy. He feared for a while, he said, that his companion, Doerfull, had been shot. Remmick left his coat and hat at the Amberson home and called for them yesterday morning. He spent yesterday afternoon at Forest park and yesterday evening at Electrick park.

Miss Amberson was 17 years old. She was the youngest of three children. Besides her sister, Mrs. Barringer, and her mother, she leaves a brother, Will, who is in the navy. An effort was being made yesterday to notify him by wire and hold the funeral until his arrival, if possible. The Ambersons came to Kansas City from Salida, Col., six years ago.

Howard had been rooming for the last two weeks at the home of Mrs. Ellen Harper, at No. 801 Cypress avenue, just a block from the Amberson home. That he planned the murder and suicide is believed by Mrs. Harper, as his trunk was locked and contained all of the small articles which he kept about his room.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

June 20, 1909

WHEN 'LUCKY NUMBER'
TOM DAVIS WAS BOSS.

WITH "ANDY" FOLEY WAS A
POWER IN POLITICS.

Old-Time Czar of Ninth Ward, Who
Helped Make Political His-
tory in Kansas City,
Is Dead.
The Late Tom Davis, Ninth Ward Political Boss.
THE LATE "TOM" DAVIS.

"Big Tom" Davis, for more than twenty years proprietor of the "Lucky Number" saloon, 1711 Grand avenue, and Democratic boss of the Ninth ward, died of liver complaint at his home, 517 East Seventeenth street, at 4:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon.

With the passing of "Andy" Foley of the Second ward, twelve years ago, the number of Kansas City's old-time Democratic ward bosses was limited to two, and now there are none worthy of the name left in the city. Davis's sway in the territory immediately surrounding his place, near Seventeenth and Grand avenue, was, however, just as strong at the time of his death as at any previous time, according to his admirers. Should he have bolted his party at any time in his career, they say, the Ninth ward would have become staunchly Republican.

Thomas Jefferson Davis was born in Alliance, O., fifty-five years ago. At 18 years of age he became a fireman on a locomotive and later an engineer. With Andrew Foley, now dead, former councilman from the Second ward, and Charles A. Millman, former member of the state legislature, he came to Kansas City about May 1, 1883. Millman alone survives.

YELLED COWHERD INTO OFFICE.

"Davis made his debut in ward politics in 1892 in rather a unique manner," said Mr. Millman last night.

"It was the time Henry J. Latshaw was running for nomination against William Cowherd, Thomas Corrigan, now dead, backing the former and Bernard Corrigan, president of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company, pulling private wires for the latter.

"The Ninth ward was in the hands of William Abel, a druggist, one time alderman, and had been for years, and it was understood that Abel was going to throw all his influence to Latshaw. On the night before the primaries the Cowherd faction was desperate and a hurried consultation was called among the leaders.

"Finally a deputation, comprised of Frank Rozzelle, after city counselor under Cowherd, and George Hale, chief of the fire department, visited his saloon.

"You are the last hope we have," explained Rozzelle. 'We have come to ask you if you can't help us lick Latshaw in the Ninth.'

" 'I can carry the nomination either way,' replied Davis. 'Only give me a short talk with "Andy" Foley.'

"Nominations were made by 'mob primaries' then, and the crowd that could holler the loudest won viva voce, and there was no appeal provided by the rules after the decision was made.

"At the time for the primaries the next day, a dozen or more moving vans came to the convention loaded with Foley's followers in the North End and Davis's particular crowd from the Ninth ward. The instructions were 'Yell like the devil.' Cowherd owed his nomination as well as his subsequent election to Davis. Likewise the power of William Abel was permanently wrested from him, and Joe Shannon became the czar of the Democrats in the Ninth ward."

Stories of Davis's zeal in advertising his saloon display has character in a different light than those relating to his political moves. It is said that every farmer boy in Jackson county knew of the big saloonkeeper twenty years ago, even though they never tasted his wares.

GANZHORN LOST WHISKERS.

One of his favorite pastimes was to purchase live rabbits, ground hogs, badgers and foxes from the farmer youths, and either put them on exhibition at his place or advertise a hunt and turn them loose in front of a pack of hounds on Grand avenue. For the latter amusement he invariably was arrested, but always paid his fine cheerfully and then seemingly forgot the incident.

Years ago when a former justice, now dead, grew tired of the single life he took his troubles to Tom Davis and was advised by "Tom" to have the vows proclaimed while standing with his bride on a table in the rear of his saloon. His idea in giving the judge this advice is not known, but his best friends say it was another advertising scheme brought to a successful conclusion by the overwhelming eloquence with which the saloonkeeper always presented his ideas.

Later when Davis learned that the bride had taken an aversion to the judge's long beard and mustache he sent for his client and advised him to have them cut and sold at auction at his saloon. This, too, was done, and a vast crowd witnessed the sale and shearing while ten bartenders hired for one day tried to take care of the enlivened trade.

Mr. Davis died after an illness of three months at his residence. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Emma Davis, four brothers and a sister, living in Ohio. He leaves an estate already converted for the most part into cash valued at about $30,000. No arrangements for the funeral have been made.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

June 10, 1909

BLOWN UP BY PRESCRIPTION.

Druggist High Loses Part of a
Thumb Through Explosion of
Chemicals, Which Starts Fire.

While preparing a prescription in his drug store at Fifteenth street and Troost avenue yesterday evening, Harley High was badly injured by an explosion of the chemicals which he was using in an evaporating dish. His right hand was badly hurt, and powdered chemicals were blown into his face.

The injured man was treated at the residence of Dr. W. T. Singleton, Jr., directly across the street. It was found necessary to amputate the right thumb at the first joint. The great mass of powder which had been blown into Mr. High's face was picked out. He was taken to his home, 3214 Chestnut street.

Fire which resulted from the explosion entailed a loss of $900 on the building and its contents.

Mr. High was suffering so greatly that he could not tell how the explosion occurred. No one else was near.

Labels: , , , , , ,

April 18, 1909

OLD SOLDIER SAVES
LIFE OF A WOMAN.

KNOCKED DOWN MAN WHO
STABBED MRS. ETHEL GRAY.

George Ripley, in Mad Fit, Was
Using Knife on Keeper of Room-
ing House When Charles
Hendrickson Interfered.

The strong right arm of Charles Hendrickson, 68 years old and a member of Fighting Joe Hooker's command during the civil war, saved the life of Mrs. Ethel Gray, 25 years old, last night at 9 o'clock. Hendrickson knocked down George Ripley, an admirer of Mrs. Gray's, after he had stabbed her in the back with a dirk.

Mrs. Gray, whose husband is out of town, bought a building at 215 East Fourteenth street last week and opened it as a rooming house for men only. Hendrickson, who is a carpenter, and W. T. Huddleston, a druggist, were among the roomers.

"I have known George Ripley only a week," she said at the general hospital last night. "He made my acquaintance in a restaurant and walked home with me. He called two or three times but never made love to me until last night. When he came into the room I saw that he had been drinking and it was not long before he began making love to me in the presence of Mr. Hendrickson. I am a married woman and, of course, I paid no attention to him. Then he got angry and struck me."

Hendrickson caught the man's arm after he had landed several blows on Mrs. Gray's face. Huddleston heard the noise and came to the old soldier's assistance. Between them they quieted the man and locked him in a rear room, while Mrs. Gray ran to the drug store of Adolph Lahme at Fourteenth street and Grand avenue and telephoned the Walnut street police station for an officer.

While she was away Ripley escaped from the house by opening a window, but Hendrickson and Huddleston almost immediately discovered his absence and went to the front door to prevent him from waylaying their landlady on her return. Ripley sprang out of the alley between Grand avenue and McGee streets and Huddleston attempted to prevent him from reaching Mrs. Gray.

"This isn't your butt-in," said Ripley. Huddleston gave way and Ripley ran after Mrs. Gray. At her own doorstep he caught her and stabbed her once in the back. Then the old soldier, who was standing on the steps, stepped down and struck the would-be assassin in the face. Ripley was knocked down, but arose and rushed at the woman again. Hendrickson struck again and knocked the knife out of his hand. Then Ripley fled.

The ambulance from the Walnut street police station was called and Dr. H. A. Hamilton dressed the cut, which was in the middle of the back. The knife penetrated to the vertebra. While the physician was at work the woman told the story to officers J. S. Scott and E. M. Wallace and furnished them with a description and a picture of her assailant. Later she was removed to the general hospital, where it was said that she would recover. Ripley has not been arrested. He is about 25 years old and rooms at 1322 Wyandotte street.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

April 11, 1909

DEATH OF A PIONEER.

Dr. Thomas W. Radford Came to
Missouri in 1858.

Dr. Thomas W. Radford, 80 years old and a resident of this city since 1880, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. George W. Matthews, 3112 Garner avenue, yesterday at noon.

Dr. Radford was born in Shelbyville, Ky. He graduated in medicine from a college in Louisville, and practiced there for several years. He was for a short time surgeon in a military school at Drenner Springs, Ky., where James G. Blaine was one of the teachers. Four years after his graduation, he decided to come West and visited Kansas City in the spring of 1858. The town didn't seem to be a good location to him then, so he moved to Fayette, Howard county, Mo., and settled there with his wife and slaves.

His practice grew, and soon he and his horse, "Physic," were well known all over the county. The war came on, but Dr. Radford did not enlist with either side, staying at home and attending to his patients, although frequently interferred with by guerillas. That Dr. Radford earned the esteem of his neighbors during these years is shown by the fact that immediately after the war he was elected three times to the office of county treasurer.

In 1880 he moved to Kansas City and opened a downtown office. He continued in practice here until fifteen years ago, when he retired. He was well known to many families in the city.

Dr. Radford attended the First Christian church for many years, but lately had been a regular communicant of the Independence Boulevard Christian church. A widow, seven children, nine grandchildren and two great-grandchildren survive. One son is T. J. Radford, a druggist at Ninth and Locust streets, and another, C. M. Radford of the Radford-Powell Shoe Company.

Funeral services will be held at 3 o'clock this afternoon from the home. Burial at Elmwood cemetery.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

March 13, 1909

DRUG CLERK PLEADS GUILTY.

Given Stay of Execution on $500 Fine
for Selling Cocaine.

Frank O'Brien, a drug clerk, fined $500 on each of two counts in the municipal court, where he was charged with selling cocaine, pleaded guilty yesterday and was given a stay of execution in the criminal court. The case came before Judge Ralph S. Latshaw on appeal. This has been the usual disposition of these cases, the druggists and clerks agreeing to quit selling the drug.

Labels: , , ,

January 22, 1909

WANT YEARLY REGISTRATION.

Retail Druggists Will Co-Operate
With State Board of Pharmacy.

Ratifying the resolution of the Missouri Pharmaceutical Association, the Kansas City Retail Druggists' Association yesterday appointed a committee to co-operate with the state association in its effort to require annual registration or re-registration of every pharmacist practicing in the state.

It is said that more than 35,000 certificates issued in this state in past years, under the present laws, are still in force. The revision asked will render these certificates void.

It is claimed that this legislation, if enacted, will do away with much that is injurious to the retail druggist in the matter of incompetent clerks and owners.

C. E. Zimm, Joseph C. Wirthman and R. S. Stevens were appointed a committee to co-operate with the state committee.

Labels:

December 19, 1908

SAW KEY AND MADE DUPLICATE.

R. L. Adams Put His Handicraft to
a Dishonest Use.

R. L. Adams, Baltimore, Md., expert key maker by trade and vagrant and thief by occupation, appeared in the municipal court yesterday charged with vagrancy. Thursday afternoon he was standing in front of the drug store of George Eysell on Union avenue looking at the window display.

The telephone operator unlocked the Bell telephone box and took the money out while Adams was watching him. The key used in the operation is a combination lock key, but the eagle eyes of Adams took in the various cuts and he reproduced the key. That evening he entered the drug store and unlocked the box and extracted 10 cents, all of the money it held.

While he was busy with the telephone box a clerk called in two policemen, who chased Adams through the rear door and caught him. He was sent to the workhouse under a fine of $50, which was imposed on him by Judge Kyle.

Labels: , , , , , ,

November 22, 1908

ARE HELD AS SUSPECTS.

Police Believe They Have Two of
Gang of Telephone Thieves.

John Barrett and Joseph Keller, well dressed young men who loaf about the saloon of "Kid" Rose at Fifteenth street and Grand avenue, were arrested yesterday by Detectives W. P. Walsh and James Fox, suspected of being implicated in the recent theft of pay telephones.

Charles W. Pool, druggist at 726 East Fifteenth street, whose telephone was stolen Thursday night, went to the Walnut street police station and positively identified the two men under arrest. There is still a third one suspected. The detectives say they will get him soon. He is known to frequent the "Kid" Rose saloon, with others of the same well dressed, never work character.

L. W. Clare, druggist, at 422 East Fifteenth street, whose telephone was stolen in the same night by two men, have not yet had a look at the prisoners.

There is an organized gang of telephone thieves in the city who work an entirely new trick. Two or three men enter a drug store. While one is buying 15 cents worth of goods one of them is apparently looking up a number in the telephone book. Presently he is gone. So are the others. So is the phone.

Labels: , , , , ,

November 21, 1908

BOLD TELEPHONE THIEVES.

Latest Plan Is to Walk in and Carry
Out the Pay Box.

Telephone thieves are growing bolder. It used to be the custom to enter a store after it had closed and steal the pay telephone. Now they walk in, and while one engages the attention of the clerk, cut the telphone off and walk out.

The latter game was worked by three men on Charles W. Pool, a druggist at Fifteenth and Charlotte streets, Thursday night, and later by two men on L. W. Clare, druggist, 422 East Fifteenth street. From the descriptions given by the druggists, it appears the same men figured in both robberies. The police believe that the telephone thieves loaf around a saloon at Fifteenth street and Grand avenue.

Labels: , , , , , ,

November 16, 1908

DRUNKEN MAN IS STRANGLED.

Henry Bernard Found Dead in an
Unfinished Building Near Thirty-
Third and Oak Streets.

Boys playing in a building in the course of construction at 3312 Oak street about 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon found the body of a man lying in a corner of the building, the head wedged against a wall and the neck pressed against a joist. Death had come apparently from strangulation induced by the position of the man's head. A crowd collected and the body was identified as that of Henry Bernard, 50 years old, a stonemason living at 3228 Summit street.

By the man's side was found a pint bottle with dregs of whisky in it. Bernard had been released from the Walnut street police station yesterday morning at 6 o'clock. The question arises, where did he get the whisky?

Bernard had been locked up for safekeeping. When he was released he had nothing of the sort about him. About noon he appeared at the house of William Gepford, a building contractor, his employer, and received from him $10 which was due him for work done last week. Several times in the next few hours he was seen loafing around the drug store of R. S. McCurdy, at Twenty-third and Oak streets, and was talking to Ray Wells, 3120 Campbell street, and others. About 2 o'clock he appeared to be in an unsettled state of mind and was seen to walk towards the new building of which only the side walls and part of the floors are finished. It is thought that he lay down in a stupor and was strangled by the beam pressing against his throat.

Nominally, the saloons were closed yesterday. Besides, there are no saloons in the neighborhood of Thirty-third and Oak streets. Bernard was not seen to leave the neighborhood from the time he received the money from his employer until the time he was found dead. R. S. McCurdy, the druggist who keeps the drug store at Thirty-third and Oak streets, and the only one in the vicinity, said last night that he had sold whisky to Bernard on prescription, but denied that he had sold any to him that day. He added that neither he nor either of his clerks, Louis Woods and D. Self, had seen Bernard in the store that day.

Bernard leaves a wife and nine children. The body was removed to Lindday's undertaking rooms in Westport and the coroner was notified. He will hold an autopsy this morning at 9 o'clock in the undertaking rooms.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

October 25, 1908

DESERTS HELPLESS CALF.

Humane Society Steps in and Cares
for a Freak.

During the American Royal stock sh ow two weeks ago a man had on exhibition a calf born without any fore legs. What became of the man is not known, but the helpless animal, all doubled up in a cracker box, was found beneath the viaduct at Eighth and Main streets yesterday morning. The owner evidently intended to place it on exhibition there, but he will have a hard time doing so now as W. H. Gibbens, field agent for the Humane Society, took charge of the calf and sent it to the veterinary college hospital on East Fifteenth street.

How long the little animal had been there without food or water is not known. The attention of Mr. Gibbens was drawn to it by business men in the vicinity. Mr. Gibbens tried to locate the owner of the beast but could not do so.

The attention of the Humane Society was called to another incident yesterday which Mr. Gibbens said he would put a stop to. It appears that a Vine street druggist is the possessor of two great boa constrictors. They are kept in his front window in full view of the public and frequently fed on live chickens and rabbits.

To witness the feeding of the snakes it is said many small children and women gather. Mr. Gibbens said the druggist would be requested not to feed the snakes in public.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

Google
 
Web vintagekansascity.com
Share on Facebook
Get the Book
Vintage Kansas City Stories ~ Early 20th Century Americana as Immortalized in The Kansas City Journal
Vintage
Kansas City Stories


More Books

SYNDICATE

Get this feed on your RSS reader

The History and Heritage of Vintage Kansas City in Books
Vintage Kansas
City Bookstore

Powered by Blogger

Vintage Kansas City.com

Vintage Antique Classics ~ Vintage Music, Software, and more Time Travel Accessories

In association with
KC Web Links.com ~ The Ultimate Kansas City Internet Directory