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January 31, 1910

HOW JUSTICE ROSS
MADE HIS FORTUNE.

DONOR OF MONEY TO MA-
HONEY CHILDREN WAS
ONCE A LAMPLIGHTER.

Formed Partnership With
John Mahoney Twenty-
Five Years Ago.

Justice Michael Ross, of Kansas City, who in the Wyandotte county, Kansas, probate court Saturday gave the children of his dead partner, John Maloney, $50,000, was born in Cincinnati, O., December 19, 1859. His father, Alexander Ross, came to Kansas City in 1866 to aid in the erection of the first gas plant the city had. In June a year later, the family followed him, coming from St. Louis by boat.

"The Missouri was full of boats in those days," said Justice Ross last night, "and was the principal means of navigation between here and St. Louis. Kansas City had a real wharf and it was a busy one."

Two brothers, William J. and James Ross, and a younger sister constituted the children at that time. James was drowned while swimming in the Missouri river in 1872.

"We attended a little frame public school down in the East Bottoms just opposite what was known as Mensing Island," said Justice Ross. "Later we went to Washington school which still stands at Independence avenue and Cherry street. A ward school education was as high as one could go in those days unless he went away, and that was all we received."

After the erection of the gas plant Justice Ross and his brother William secured positions as lamp lighters. It required them to get up at all hours of the night, according to the condition of the weather and the fullness of the moon, both to light and turn out the street lamps. After doing this work at night Justice Ross worked all day on an ice wagon for J. E. Sales. Later on he worked in the old Davis brick yard, which stood about where the Zenith mill now stands in the East Bottoms.

Justice Ross always had in view the day when he would go into business for himself -- be his own boss. With his savings and some help from his mother he started a little grocery and general store on the levee at First and Campbell streets in 1874. After a time his brother, William, was taken into partnership, but remained but a few years. The latter for several terms was a member of the city council.

BOUGHT OTHER STORES.

As the city began to grow away from the river, Justice Ross saw better opportunities and opened a grocery store at 1401-3 East Fifth street, at Lydia avenue, and later another at 1100-2 East Fifth street, at Troost avenue. These two stores were money makers and enabled him later to branch out along other lines.

In September, 1888, Justice Ross was married to Miss Bessie Egan. All of their children, seven boys and four girls, are living, the oldest daughter being away at school near Cincinnati, and the oldest boy at St. Mary's, Kas. Six of the nine children at home attend the Woodland school.

"I knew John Mahoney from the day he came here with the C. & A. railroad," Justice Ross said. "He was doing small jobs of grading in those days and his mother went with him over the country. They used to trade with us at the little store on the levee and when in town Mahoney and his mother stopped at our home."

It was almost twenty-five years ago that Mahoney and Ross went into partnership and the latter has been a silent partner ever since, Mahoney seeing to most of the details and looking after the work. Justice Ross also had other interests, such as tree planting, and planted the trees around the finest residences and along many of the prettiest boulevards. In speaking of some of the work done by himself and Mr. Mahoney, the justice said:

"We built all of the Southwest boulevard, also Fifteenth street, doing the grading work. Roanoke boulevard is another piece of our work, as was the ill-fated Cliff drive, where poor John and his wife met such a tragic fate. We did lots of work on the country roads in Jackson county and built almost all of the roads in Wyandotte county, besides many of the brick-paved streets.

LARGE CONTRACT WORK.

"We also did much work away from here, such as government work on the levee at New Orleans, county roads in Southern Indiana and railroad grading in Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Colorado. Mahoney was a man who made friends wherever he went. I just received a letter from Indiana asking if he and McGuire were the same men who were there asking for all particulars."

As Justice Ross's business ventures thrived he found it impossible to give the time required to his two grocery stores, and a few years ago he disposed of them. Previous to that, however, he had established the Missouri Carriage and Wagon works at 308-10 Broadway, which he still operates.

For many years he has been buying property and erecting modern flats thereon. He does not build flats to sell, but he keeps them for what they bring in. When Admiral boulevard was cut through at Virginia avenue, Justice Ross owned a big row of old flats immediately in the right of way. They are brick and their moving back was the biggest job of that kind ever done in this city. He made them modern and is erecting more flats near them.

The prettiest and most costly structure erected by Justice Ross is a flat building at Benton boulevard and St. John avenue, on a promontory overlooking the entire city. He owns forty or more pieces of improved property in the city.

In the fall of 1898 Michael Ross ran for justice of the peace on the Democratic ticket and was elected. Since then he has held the office for three terms, twelve years, winning each time with ease. He said last night, however, that he would not seek the office again. He intends to build a big home in the southern part of the city and he and Mrs. Ross will devote their time to their children. He now lives at 626 Troost avenue.

"John Mahoney almost decided to go to Jacksonville, Fla., with our party," said the Justice. "The ground was frozen and he could not work. But he was such a home-loving man he hated to leave his family, even for a day. I had a premonition when I left that something would happen. When I got the wire the first thing I thought of was his automobile. We did not get the particulars, however, until we got a paper at Memphis, and did not get full particulars and learn that McGuire was killed and the others hurt until we got The Journal at Paola, Kas.

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January 24, 1910

BOY ACCIDENTALLY
KILLS STEPSISTER.

Carries Dying Child Into House
and Runs Mile and a Half
for a Doctor.

Sobbing with grief and carrying in his arms the unconscious form of Elizabeth Baumgarten, his little sister, who was bleeding form a bullet hole in her forehead, Willam Mudder, 16 years old, staggered into the home of his stepfather, Marten Baumgarten, Kansas City, Kas., yesterday afternoon.

Baumgarten, a carpenter, sat by the side of his wife, who is confined to her bed with a 2-weeks-old baby by her side in the bedroom of their little home. A number of old acquaintances were also in the room. It was while they were talking and laughing the boy entered with his burden.

"I didn't mean to do it papa," he shrieked. He hurriedly explained that he had shot the little girl accidentally with a .22-caliber target rifle. Bolting from the room, the boy ran a mile and a half to the office of Dr. David W. Thompson at Nineteenth street and Quindaro boulevard.

"Doctor, I shot my little sister accidentally, and I want you to come to her quick," he shouted as he entered the doctor's office.

Dr. Thompson hurried with the boy to the home. The bullet had entered the middle of the child's forehead and lodged near the base of the brain. She died about twenty minutes after the doctor arrived. Dr. Thompson notified Dr. J. A. Davis, coroner of Wyandotte county, who decided that an autopsy would be unnecessary.

The Mudder lad works during the week for his aunt, Mrs. John Smith, who runs a grocery at Twenty-seventh street and Bell avenue in Kansas City, Mo. He went home yesterday and began a romp with his four brothers and three stepsisters. He took a little target rifle belonging to the step father and, calling the children, started out in the back yard to shoot at a mark. All seven of the children walked down the back stairs from the porch. Elizabeth, 4 years old, was the last. Just as she reached the bottom step, by some unknown means which the lad himself cannot explain, the gun was discharged, the bullet entering the little girl's forehead.

Mrs. Baumgarten was prostrated over the little girl's death. The father, too, was grief-stricken. The Mudder boy was affected more than either. He could not be comforted and paced the rooms of the house back and forth. Dr. Thompson said last night that the boy was nearly crazed when he came to his office.

Martin Baumgarten, the boy's stepfather, said last night that William was absolutely blameless. "I am confident that the shooting was purely accidental," he said. "The boy loved his little stepsister just the same as if she had been his own sister. It was just one of those unfortunate, unavoidable accidents.

Funeral services for the little girl will be held tomorrow morning at the Church of the Blessed Sacramet in Chelsea place. Burial will be in St. John's cemetery.

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January 4, 1910

BURGLARS LEAVE A NOTE.

Thank Proprietor of Store For Not
Disturbing Them.

The burglars who visited the grocery store of W. B. Mumford at 2901 Main street, Sunday night, left a note addressed to the proprietor, pinned to his rifled cash drawer. It was written on a piece of wrapping paper and read:

"Dear sir, thank you very much for not disturbing us as we robbed your store, yours truly, M. E."

"M. E." and his friend got away with $3 in small change and about $16 worth of cigars.

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December 29, 1909

DIES IN GROCERY STORE.

Nebraska Visitor Had Just Pur-
chased Cigars When Stricken.

While handing the clerk a dollar to pay for some cigars he had just purchased, Isaac N. Mothershead, 57 years old, a farmer of Niponee, Neb., died of heart disease in Edward Kendall's grocery store, at Fourteenth and Harrison streets, yesterday morning. Mr. Mothershead and his wife had been spending the Christmas holidays at the home of their daughter, Mrs. O. P. Haslett, 1420 Tracy avenue.

The body was taken to the Stine undertaking rooms in the police ambulance. A widow and five daughters survive him.

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December 24, 1909

GAS COMPLETES RUIN
OF RIALTO BUILDING.

FLAMES UNDER CONTROL WHEN
MAIN BREAKS, EXPLODING.

Firemen Grope Way to Street as
Third Roar Is Heard and Fire
Raging for Hours, Leaves
Only Ice-Coated Walls.
Fire and Explosion Destroy the Rialto Building.
CHARRED WALLS OF THE RIALTO BUILDING, ALL THAT REMAINS OF A "FIRE TRAP."

Flames fed by a broken gas main destroyed the Rialto building at the southwest corner of Grand avenue and Ninth street at 3:30 o'clock yesterday morning. The building was erected in 1887 by Albert Marty, its present owner. The fire started in the basement and raged virtually unchecked for three hours until everything inflammable had been consumed. Nothing remains but the ruined and ice-coated walls. The loss is estimated at $300,000.

The building was one of the few remaining big Kansas City fire traps which are a terror to the fire department. Almost entirely of frame construction inside, it burned like tinder. In the language of Assistant Chief Alex Henderson, "not all the fire companies in Missouri could have stopped it."

The fire was noticed first by J. W. Johnson, a negro janitor, who had for many years been a fixture in the building. Johnson was sitting in one of the offices on the second floor at 3 o'clock in the morning, when he was startled by a rumbling sound like the report of a muffled cannon. He jumped from the chair in which he had been resting after several hours of hard work in policing the building, and bounded down the stairway.

He was confronted by dense smoke, and forgetting everything but that there were several person in the building who were in imminent danger of losing their lives, he bounded up the steps and shouted fire from each landing. In this manner he aroused Dr. J. W. Gaines, Dr. Robert O. Gross, Dr. Emil Thielman, Dr. Oliver F. Jones, Dr. A. Talbot, Dr. B. E. Jordan, Dr. J. B. Jones and Dr. Frank Jones. On the fifth floor Johnson came upon Charles R. Manley, senior physical examiner of the Y. M. C. A., in a semi-conscious condition, the result of striking his head against a post in his efforts to escape while groping his way through the dark, smoke-filled hallways. Johnson himself was beginning to feel the effects of the smoke, but not thinking of his own life in his efforts to save others half carried and dragged Mr. Manley down the stairway and out into the streets to safety. In the meantime, A. E. Perrine, night watchman in the building of McGowan, Small & Morgan, gas grantees, which is the first building south of the Rialto, discovered smoke and noticing the glare of flames which by that time had gained considerable headway in the trunk factory, hastened to a telephone and turned in the alarm.

FIRE FIGHT BEGINS.

The fire department soon was on the scene. The fire at first looked to be easy to extinguish. The firemen had the flames smothered, when a terrific explosion, caused by the breaking of a gas main, shot the flames up through the building to the top floors. At the time of this explosion Assistant Chief Alex Henderson and a squad of men were on the first floor of the building. The force of the explosion shook the entire building and as the flames were spreading to all parts of the structure, it was as much as a man's life was worth to stay inside, as another explosion could be expected at any time. While Chief Henderson and his men were extricating themselves from the trap, Captain Pelletier, with several men, were groping their way about in the basement of the Ninth street entrance. In what seemed to be hours, they emerged through the smoke and debris into the street. It was none too soon, as the third explosion occurred a few minutes later and had any of the firemen remained in the building they would have been buried beneath the floors and walls. By this time twenty companies had arrived and were throwing streams of water into the burning building from all sides, but it was of no use. The interior of the building was mostly wood and the outside wall kept the streams from getting to the center of the building, where the fire was worst.

The Rialto was the only old-time building of any consequence on Grand avenue. Albert Marty, the owner, is an active real estate and building man of Kansas City. He purchased the ground in 1886 and in 1887 constructed a five-story building on the corner. In 1889 he purchased forty-eight feet on the south side of the corner lot and the same year erected the south half of the building which burned yesterday morning.

The building was occupied by many prominent physicians and dentists, some of whom have been in the building twenty-five years.

"The number of occupants is in the neighborhood of 100," said Dr. H. D. McQuade, who had offices in the building for many years. "Many of us will be up against it for offices for some time, but I expect to contract for offices on the fifth floor of the Keith & Perry building tomorrow. Many of us received offers from other physicians to share their offices while looking for locations."

VALUED AT $125,000.

The building was valued at $125,000, although at the time of its erection it cost in the neighborhood of $200,000. That was more than twenty years ago. There was $81,500 insurance carried on the structure. The heaviest loser among the occupants was Hugo A. Brecklein, a druggist, occupying the first floor. Mr. Brecklein estimated his loss at $20,000, with $12,000 insurance.

J. H. Langan, son of John P. Langan, a grocer at 4601 Independence avenue, was walking north on Grand avenue yesterday morning when the fire started, and in attempting to awaken some of the men who were sleeping in the offices, he broke the glass in one of the doors, severely cutting his hand. But he saved the life of a man who was sleeping through all the disturbance, and succeeded in helping him to the street.

At least sixty physicians and twenty dentists lost their office furnishings and instruments in the Rialto building fire yesterday. The average loss for each tenant is said to have been about $700, and that only a small part of it was covered by insurance.

For years the Rialto has been the doctors' office building of Kansas City. Many of the most prominent physicians of the city were established there. Owing to the fact that in many buildings dentists and physicians are not allowed to rent offices, because the odors arising form the mixtures of medicines is objected to by other tenants, this building has long been recognized as the headquarters of men engaged in these two professions.

VALUABLE RELICS LOST.

About 1,000 specimens of prehistoric stone implements and two ancient violins were cherished treasures of Dr. A. H. Cordier, which were lost in the Rialto fire. Dr. Cordier occupied room 310, third floor.

A collector of prehistoric implements, Dr. Cordier, on trips to Mexico, Alaska, Ohio, Kentucky, Arkansas and through Missouri, got several thousand specimens, and he had about 1,000 of them on display in his offices. His is a collector of old violins and had two of these instruments, which he prized highly, in his rooms. Another relic which Dr. Cordier lost was the mounted head of a mountain sheep which he shot while on a hunting trip in British Columbia. Dr. Cordier's office had been in the Rialto building eighteen years.

DR. ANDERSON LUCKY.

A long distance survey of the Rialto ruins makes it appear that Dr. R. V. Anderson, a dentist, is the only tenant of the burned structure whose effects were not destroyed, and he recalls the fact that once before in a fire in the Rialto building he also was lucky.

Dr. Anderson's office has been in the building nearly eighteen years, ever since he began to practice, and some years ago ago fire broke out beneath his office, and his rooms, enveloped in smoke and flame, seemed doomed. The firemen, however, extinguished the blaze before his effects suffered any serious damage.

ORDINANCE NOT ENFORCED.

At the burning of the Rialto building yesterday morning the firemen were greatly handicapped by dangers from exploding gas, and they were in continual danger of being burned by flame of escaping gas. Had the building been equipped with a Siebens' shut-off gas valve it would have been possible for the firemen the moment they reached the fire to turn off the gas in the entire building and thereby lessen the danger occasioned by the escaping gas. The building code requires the installation of gas shut-off devices on all buildings, but for some reason the ordinance has never been enforced.

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November 30, 1909

HORSE OF MORE IMPORTANCE.

When Told Car Hit Employe,
Grocer Asks About the Rig.

At Tenth street and Troost avenue yesterday a man got in the way of a trolley car. He was saved by the motorman lowering the fender. The man fell into the basket. Although considerably shaken up he was not hurt seriously.

Joseph Collingwood, a canvasser for the election commissioners, aided the man to a drug store. There the man requested that his employers, grocers, be told of the accident.

Collingwood called up the firm over a 'phone.

"Your delivery clerk has been hurt by a trolley car," he explained.

"How about the horse? Was it damaged?" Collingwood was asked.

The employers were told that the horse and wagon were not in the wreck. The man at the other end said, "That's good."

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October 31, 1909

RAZING A LANDMARK
MADE FAMOUS BY
WASHINGTON IRVING.

Oldest Building on Fifth Street
Meets Its End.
The Old Brevoort Hotel, West Fifth Street, Kansas City.
THE OLD BREVOORT HOTEL IN WEST FIFTH STREET.

With the razing of the old Breevort hotel at 118 West Fifth street, to make way for a modern building which will be erected shortly, the oldest structure on Fifth street will have been a memory. Long before the '60s the hotel was known as an old building, and no one seems to know the exact date of its erection or its builder.

Standing on an eminence directly opposite Kansas City's first Methodist church, the "Cannon house" as it was called then, was one of Kansas City's most elite boarding houses. The owners of the building rarely rented the rooms to transients, but were content with making it a fashionable boarding house. The rates after the war were $1 and up. In the '70s the building became known as the "Morgan house" and fifteen years ago it was christened the "Breevort."

When Fifth street was graded in the '60s to its present level, the cellar of the Breevort house was on a level with the street. The proprietor immediately arched up the windows, painted the cellar walls and had a three-story building. A week ago, before the structure was being torn down, the old cellar walls were clearly discernible and indicated that at one time Kansas City's hills were much steeper than at present.

"The hotel was an old building when I was a boy," said Dr. W. L. Campbell of 504 Olive street, one of the recognized authorities on early Kansas City history. "I don't think there is anyone living who knows the exact time that it was built or the builder. There used to be a report that Washington Irving stayed there when he made a visit to Kansas City, but I think that the report is generally discredited."

Fred Seewald, who runs a grocery store at 317 West Fifth street, is confident that the building must have been about 60 years old.

"It was by far the oldest building on Fifth street," he said.

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August 15, 1909

ESTATE VALUED AT $250,000.

All of the Property of the Late P.
D. Ridenour Goes to Family.

By the will of the late P. D. Ridenour, pioneer merchant, the entire estate of $250,000 is left to his family. The will was filed yesterday for probate.

To Mrs. Sarah L. Ridenour, the widow, who is named as executrix, is given the home at Eighth street and the Paseo, all of the personal property and one-third of the realty. The remainder of the estate is to be divided equally between the children, who are as follows: Mrs. Kate R. Lester, Edward M. Ridenour, Mrs. Alice R. Raymond and Ethel B. Ridenour. Mr. Ridenour was president of the wholesale grocery firm bearing his name.

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July 31, 1909

DEATH CAME SUDDENLY
TO P. D. RIDENOUR.

HEART DISEASE CLAIMED PIO-
NEER WHOLESALE GROCER.

Had Been Ill at Home About Ten
Days, but Fatal Termination
Was Not Expected by
Physicians.
P. D. Ridenour, Pioneer Kansas City Grocer.
THE LATE PETER D. RIDENOUR.

Peter D. Ridenour, pioneer wholesale grocer of Kansas City, died suddenly of heart disease at 11:00 last night at his home, 1416 East Eighth street. He was 78 years old, and as the result of complications due to old age has been kept home from the store at 933 Mulberry street, in the West Bottoms, for over a week. His fatal illness is believed to have begun ten days ago when he first complained of shooting pains in the vicinity of his heart.

At his bedside when he died were his wife, Mrs. Sarah L. Ridenour and his son, Edward M. Ridenour. The family physician, Dr. Lester Hall, and Dr. R. T. Sloane, who had been called in, were in attendance, but neither believed death would result from the indisposition.

BORN ON OHIO FARM.

Besides the widow and the son, Mr. Ridenour is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Catherine Lester, Mrs. Alice Raymond and Miss Ethel Ridenour, all of this city, the last named living at home. Four brothers are living, T. M. Ridenour in Colorado, Irving W. in Richmond, Ind.; Elisha at Liberal, Mo., and Samuel Ridenour, who through the death of his brother will become president of the Ridenour Baker Grocery Company, lives at the Washington hotel.

Funeral arrangements have not been made.

Peter D. Ridenour was born May 5, 1831, on a farm of one half mile south of the village of College Corner, O. His parents were of Dutch extraction and pioneers of the state. The town received its name form its location in the northwest corner of the land donated to the Miami university. In 1837 his father bought a store in the town and in it for the next seven or eight years young Ridenour gleaned the knowledge of the grocery business so useful to him in after years.

At the age of 26, Mr. Ridenour married Miss Sarah Louise Beatty at Xenia, O., and moved to Lawrence, Kas. Part of the trip was made in boats because there was no railroad leading into Kansas City or in fact any other town in the vicinity of the Sunflower state.

BEGAN BUSINESS IN LAWRENCE.

With his brother, Samuel, who also had left the old home in Ohio to come West, Mr. Ridenour started a small grocery store at Lawrence taking as partners in the business Harlow W. Baker of that city and later his three brothers. This was in 1858.

By the death of Mr. Ridenour last night Samuel Ridenour became the sole survivor of the original Ridenour Baker Grocer Company. This firm was incorporated thirty-one years ago when having grown to dignified proportions it was moved from Lawrence to its present ho me on Mulberry street. Such has been its progress in Kansas City that it has been able to establish branch stores at several points. Both Peter and Samuel Ridenour grew wealthy. P. D. Ridenour's estate probably amounts to about $300,000.

Mr. Ridenour was known as a public spirited citizen. Three years ago he was vice president of the Commercial Club and was offered the presidency but he refused because of his advanced age. He maintained a large farm near Dallas, twelve miles from Kansas City, where he had intended to spend the remainder of his life.

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June 25, 1909

KILLED BY A GUN HE
SAID WAS UNLOADED.

WILLIAM CLARK, 18, SHOT DEAD
IN DOORYARD.

Pistol in Hands of Younger Com-
paion, Whom He Told It Con-
tained No Cartridges, Just
Before Discharge.

William Clark, 18 years old of 2610 Lister avenue, was accidentally shot through the right eye by a playmate, and almost instantly killed, in the dooryard of Mrs. J. A. Avery at 2617 Lawn avenue at 8 o'clock last night.

"I did not know it was loaded," said Clem Burns, 14 years old, to his mother, Mrs. D. R. Webb, a moment later, as he threw the smoking revolver from him and burst into tears.

Clem lives with his mother and stepfather at 2625 Lawn, right next door to where the shooting occurred.

According to young Burns, the two boys, who were the best of friends, were sent by his mother to the grocery store of the Worries Bros. at Twenty-fourth street and Elmwood avenue for a box of matches. Before leaving the house Clark drew aside his coat and showed his companion that he had a cheap 38-caliber revolver in each hip pocket.

"He told me one of them was empty but that the other had one load in it," Clem told the police last night. "I asked him why he had the guns and he said he had been trying to kill a cat which had been killing chickens belonging to Mrs. Avery.

"As he turned to lead the way to the grocery I reached under his coat tails and got a revolver.

SAID WEAPON WASN'T LOADED.

" 'Oh, now I've got your revolver and I am as big a man as you are,' I said, but he laughed at me and replied:

" 'You're not so big as you think you are; that gun isn't loaded.'

"I began snapping the revolver at him at that. He didn't wince and I snapped three times. Suddenly there was an explosion from the weapon.

"William sank down on the lawn. I knew at once what I had done and called to my mother:

" 'Oh, mother,' I cried, 'I've killed Willie.' Then I threw away the gun. I don't know why I did this, but I wanted to get the nasty thing away and out of my hands as quick as I could."

The boy's cries and protestations of innocence of any intent to commit murder as he was taken to No. 6 police station after the accident brought tears of sympathy to the eyes of neighbors, many of whom had known both boys for several years.

Ray Hodgson of 2608 Lawn, who was the only person besides Clem who saw the shooting, says he saw the two boys playing about Mrs. Avery's yard.

"They were always good boys, but full of pranks," said Mr. Hodgson. "However, Clark had a mania for carrying guns. He was seldom seen without one or more. Ususally the weapons were the kind which policemen call 'pot metal.' "

The story of the shooting told by Mr. Hodgson agrees in every particular with that given by the boy himself.

Young Clark was an orphan and lived at the house on Lister avenue with G. M. and J. P. Farnswowrth, brothers, for four years past. As the Farnsworths are unmarried and have work to do in the daytime, and Clark was out of a job, he was allowed to keep up the home in the way of a general housekeeper.

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May 10, 1909

DOGS ARE HIS VICTIMS.

Budd Park Residents Looking for a
Vicious Miscreant.

Someone with an apparent grudge toward canines in general is operating close to Budd park. Fully a half dozen blooded and about a dozen non-descript dogs are dead from eating poisoned meat conveniently placed under the benches among the trees.

The poisoning began about a month ago when someone left a trail of "doctored" meat through the park. Strychnine was the drug used, according to a chemical test made at the instigation of Mrs. Mary Freeman, part owner of the Budd park greenhouses. The day following the appearance of the poisoned meat several dogs were found dead in the streets nearby and reports poured into central police station of valuable dogs that had died at the homes of people living in the vicinity of the park.

F. L. Snell, proprietor of the Snell grocery store, 5020 St. John avenue, lost a dog as did also Charles Horton of the Budd bakery. John Westmoreland, 115 Denver avenue, lost two Scotch collies. E. L. Kiley, manager of the Budd park greenhouses, lost a blooded bull terrier and a pedigreed Scotch terrier.

The work of the vandal created a good deal of excitement among the dog owners of that part of town and several men armed with revolvers voluntarily watched the park at night for over a week following the poisoning. Recently the vigilantes gave up their watch. The outrages began anew yesterday when a valuable Pomeranian Spitz belonging to Leonard Kinney of 4020 Morrell, and several common street curs were killed. It is probable a watch will be maintained at the park and vicinity tonight.

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April 10, 1909

CHARLES C. YOST DIES
AFTER BRIEF ILLNESS.

FUNERAL SERVICES WILL BE
HELD SUNDAY AFTERNOON.

Was Prominent Politician and Busi-
ness Man and Member of Many
Orders -- Had Lived in Kansas
City Thirty-Seven Years.
Charles C. Yost, Dead at 47.
CHARLES C. YOST.

Charles C. Yost, prominent Republican politician and partner in the Smith-Yost Pie Company, died last night at his home, 3032 Park avenue, after an illness of a week. His trouble was inflammation of the brain.

Mr. Yost was born 47 years ago in Rochester, Ind. Charles was only 10 years old when his parents brought him to Kansas City. He received a common school education and graduated from the Kansas City High school at the age of 16 years. He was only 19 years old when he became a clerk in a grocery store, a position which he held for two years and a half. At the end of that time he had accumulated enough money to go into the grocery business with L. M. Berkeley as a partner. Unfortunately, during the boom years of 1885-6-7 the firm invested heavily in real estate and went down with a large number of other business houses when the boom burst. The partnership made an assignment.

It wasn't long, however, before Mr. Yost was on his feet again. He organized the Yost Grocery Company and operated it for four years, selling out in 1894. After that he became the owner of a novel concern called Yost's Market. A short time later he went into the business of manufacturing pies, and rapidly built up his business. In 1902 he consolidated his interests with those of Howard Smith.

Mr. Yost was an ardent Republican all his life. He was appointed city assessor by Mayor Webster Davis in 1895, and reappointed for two terms by Mayor Jones. He was chairman of the Republican county committee for several years and a member of many republican clubs.

He was married to Miss Hattie M. Beedle of Johnson county, Kas., in 1883. Six children survive. They are Leroy, Charles, Joseph, Mrs. Pearl Yost Dietrich, Miss Nina and Miss Jeannette. All of them live in this city.

Mr. Yost was a mason, a member of the Knights of Pythias, Woodmen of the World, Order of American Mechanics and several other societies.

Funeral services will b e held from the home Sunday at 3:30 p. m. The Rev. E. C. Smith, pastor of the Linwood Methodist church, will officiate. Burial will be in Mount Washington.

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April 3, 1909

WOMEN FIGHT TO SEE
BOY CRUSHED BY CAR.

HYSTERICAL MOTHERS THINK
INJURED CHILD THEIR OWN.

Strong Men Weep as Jimmie
Palermo, Whose Father Saw
Him Hurt, Is Taken From
Under the Wheels.

While running across the street car tracks on Eighth street near Forest avenue about 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon, "Jimmie" Palermo, 5 years old, was run down by Independence avenue car 247, westbound, and injured to such an extent that both of his legs had to be amputated above the knee. The operation was performed at the general hospital immediately after the accident. Dr. J. Park Neal, who amputated the boy's legs, reported last night that he had survived the operation in a marvelous manner for one so young, and that he had a fighting chance for his life.

The boy is a son of Salvatore Palermo, an Italian grocer and butcher at 1103 East Eighth street, who lives on the second floor of 1103. The father, with Mack Carter, his butcher, saw the accident. The father ran to the scene, but became frantic when he saw his child pinned down by the front trucks of the car, and had to be taken away.

CROWD WEEPS AT SIGHT.

Two mothers, who thought that the child might be theirs, fought with tiger like ferocity with the crowd until they got to where they could get a look at the pale face of the little fellow.

The boy lay in such a position that he could not be moved until the car was "jacked up." The wrecking crew arrived in a few minutes, and with the aid of volunteers, the car tracks were elevated sufficiently. The boy's arm slipped to his side, and three marbles fell from his nerveless grasp.

"Take hold gently, men, and lift the boy out," said the foreman of the wrecking crew as the ambulance stretcher arrived.

"I just can't do it. I have seen enough to break my heart," said a big workman with sleeves rolled to the elbows, exposing a pair of muscular brown arms. He leaned against a trolley pole and wept bitterly.

As the ambulance was leaving another mother of the neighborhood arrived and battled with the dense crowd to get a look at the injured boy. Every woman in the crowd was crying, as were some of the men, and little brothers and sisters and playmates of the boy screamed with fright and grief.

FATHER SAW THE ACCIDENT.

"Mr. Palermo and I were standing in the door of his store when the accident happened," said Mack Carter, the butcher at the store. "We saw little Jimmie as he started to cross the street from the north to the south side about half way between the alley and Forest avenue. When he saw the car he made a motion as if to turn back. The motorman had slowed down at first, but put on speed again. It looked as if he calculated for the boy to cross the tracks before the car reached him, but Jimmie became confused and was struck by the fender and knocked across the track. It looked like an accident to me."

The grief in the Palermo home was tragic. Between sobs, prayers were said in Italian, and supplication made to Heaven to preserve the boy's life.

SNITCH LATE, BUT THERE.

While the family was in the midst of its grief a stranger appeared. Taking a card from his pocket he said, giving his name:

"Here is my card. I am a lawyer, but I got here a too late to see the accident. Send someone out into the street and get the boy's cap and those marbles. They are excellent evidence before a jury. Get the exact time of the accident , the number of the car and all the witnesses you can. I would like to handle this case for you."

Later in the evening Patrolmen William L. Cox and W. H. Schickhardt boarded car 247 and after riding to the end of the line arrested the conductor, H. E. Stoutz, 4100 East Ninth street, and the motorman, J. E. Warnike, 4600 Independence avenue. At police headquarters they made no statement and were ordered held for investigation, without bond, by Captain Walter Whitsett.

Representatives of the street car company insisted that a charge be placed against their men. Later in the evening an information was secured charging them with manslaughter in the fourth degree, a rather unusual charge while the boy was still living. They were taken to the home of Justice James H. Richardson, 2117 Prospect avenue, and arraigned on that charge. The men were then released on bond signed by representatives of their company. Their preliminary will be later. If the boy does not die, the charge will have to be changed.

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February 21, 1909

NEW WAY TO GRIND COFFEE.

A Mill, A Bicycle and a Pair of Feet
to Do the Trick.

LATEST METHOD OF GRINDING COFFEE
A combination exerciser and coffee grinder is the latest product of the inventive genius of Curtis F. Smith, a Kansas City, Kas., grocer. On the rear porch of the grocery store at 2063 North Thirteenth street, Kansas City, Kas., a large coffee mill is connected by a belt with a bicycle which is propped up so as to act upon the principle of a treadmill.

When the Saturday orders are in, a small boy takes his stand by the coffee mill prepared to pour the coffee into the hopper. Mr. Smith mounts the bicycle and beginning slowly as though climbing a steep hill, he gradually increases his speed and bends low over the handle bars until the wheels of the bicycle and the coffee mill fairly hum. The Saturday coffee is ground in a jiffy.

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January 28, 1909

WARNED BY THE BLACK HAND.

Grand Avenue Italian Grocer Gets
Threatening Letter Demanding
$300 on Pain of Death.

A letter signed "Black Hand Socialist" was received yesterday by Tony Jordan, an Italian, who has a grocery store at 507 Grand avenue. He took the letter to police headquarters at 8 o'clock last night and asked for protection. The letter is as follows:

"Mr. Tony: You better pay us $300 or we kill you. Be sure be Second and Grand avenue 12 o'clock a. m. (Signed) BLACK HAND SOCIALIST."

Lieutenant Ryan turned Jordan and the letter over to Benjamin Goode and John McCall, plain clothes men. They arranged to meet Jordan at Second and Grand a few minutes before midnight last night, but Jordan did not appear. He evidently was badly frightened, as he locked his grocery store and left the building.

Other Italians heard of the letter last night and there was a general alarm sent out by them. They gathered in groups in Little Italy last night to talk it over. The frequency of these letters and the efforts made to blow up one or two places has caused extreme nervousness in the Italian settlement.

No "Black Hand Socialist" appeared at Second and Grand avenue at 12 o'clock a. m. (midnight), so far as the officers were able to learn.

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December 24, 1908

NO COLOR LINE AT THE
MAYOR'S BIG PARTY.

BLACK AND WHITE WILL SHARE
CHRISTMAS GIFTS.

All the Children Need Do Tomorrow
Is Apply at Convention Hall.
There's Plenty for
Everybody.

Convention hall yesterday resembled many lines of business. In one section where all the bananas and oranges were being placed into sacks, it looked something like a fruit packing establishment. Another section resembled candy packers at work, while still another had to do with the sorting and arranging of toys. It had the appearance of one great combined establishment where every line of goods was handled and everybody was busy.

There was a rumor out yesterday that the gifts were to be only for white children. This is wrong, as the committee says the color line will not be drawn. Poor negro children are to be made happy, too, and they are all invited.

At the close of the evening the first 2,500 bags to be given out on Christmas day to the children who attend the mayor's Christmas tree, were well filled, sorted for boys and girls and placed in position. The other 2,500 will be packed today. Women from the different charitable organizations were doing most of the work.

It was discovered when it came to placing the trees in position that five would take up too much room and that the decorating of them would take up entirely too much time -- in fact that it would be an imposition on the Squires Electrical Company, which his donating the labor. Something had to be done on the spur of the moment, so the committee in charge decided that two large trees would be sufficient, as no presents are to be placed on the trees anyway. The two large evergreens were placed in position in the center of the hall about noon yesterday and by evening the men from the electrical company had finished stringing the colored lights. They were tested just after dark and found to be in perfect working order. Today the tinsel and other decorations will be strung under the supervision of the women who have the matter in charge.

COIN-DEVOURING BEASTS.

Some of the toys bought by the committee are really expensive and of fine workmanship. There will be enough to place a good and a cheap toy in each bag.

Among the toys are several mechanical banks where a coin is placed in the mouth of an animal, which immediately devours it. A carpenter connected with the hall tried one of them Tuesday night with a dime -- the last coin he had, too, by the way. It was swallowed and the carpenter walked home. Several others were caught on the same trick yesterday, and some poor child -- no one knows who it will be -- will find some news in his bank.

A large wagon load of toys and useful things such as baby carriages, bicycles, wagons, etc., arrived yesterday from Montgomery Wart & Co. They will be distributed in homes where they are most needed the day after Christmas.

The Long Bros. Grocery Company sent two dozen big dressed dolls. They will also be given out at the homes, as will 200 pairs of baby stockings donated by The Baby Shop, 202 Lillis building. The wholesale dry goods merchants, besides other donations, sent two large boxes of boys' and girls' socks, stockings, gloves and mittens to the hall yesterday, and the Faxon & Gallagher Drug Company sent three big boxes of toys.

LOTS OF GROCERIES.

Grocery stores are still responding liberally, and one room which has been set aside at the hall looks like a general store. Among the donations are bunches of fresh celery and a lot of onions. Several big jack rabbits were also received. The George B. Peck Dry Goods Company sent a lot of fancy toys and two caddies of assorted candy. The Loose-Wiles Candy and Cracker Company's wagon arrived with six caddies of assorted candies. The Coal Dealers' Association donated $150 in cash and many of its members said they stood ready to deliver coal to families where it was most needed.

Two women waited on the outside of the hall for a long while yesterday morning. They seemed to want something, but were afraid to go in and ask. Finally Steve Sedweek approached them and asked if they wanted anything.

"Yes, we do," said one of them. "We are poor and have nothing for Christmas. We read in The Journal where all poor children would be welcomed here. I have seven and this woman has five. We want to know how to get them in h ere, and if all can come."

"Just you bring all you have and all you can find in the neighborhood, or in any other neighborhood," instructed Mr. Sedweek. "Bring them right here to the hall and they will be given tickets and admitted."

"And I know of others, too," said the first woman who had spoken.

"That's what it is for," they were told, "bring fifty if you can find them, and each one will be made happy.

WON'T THE KIDS BE GLAD!

Many children flocked about the hall yesterday asking where they could get tickets that would admit them to the mayor's Christmas tree. They were told to be there Christmas afternoon -- with all their playmates -- and that tickets would be given them. Many of them stole timidly into the rotunda of the hall and took a peek through the cracks at what was going on. They would run away ever time any of the grown ups put in an appearance, afraid they would be corrected for it. But they had seen a little of the glories that are to come, anyway, and they left happy.

The work of distributing groceries, clothing and toys to the homes will take place Saturday, and even on Monday, if it is not completed. Letters asking aid are arriving fast.

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November 13, 1908

CLERK AND MONEY MISSING.

John Novak's Employer Believes He
Was Waylaid and Robbed
of $936.

John Novak, a Bohemian clerk in the employ of C. A. Eckerson, grocer, of 4 Kansas avenue, Kansas City, Kas., after having cashed $936 in checks belonging to his employer at the Stock Yards Bank of Commerce yesterday afternoon disappeared, and nothing has since been seen of him. He is thought to have been held up and robbed. The police of both cities are investigating.

The checks, which were on Swift & Co. and the Kansas City Packing Box Company, were tendered at the Eckerson store yesterday in payment for groceries. Later Novak took them all to the bank to have them cashed, as always had been his custom during the two years he had worked for the grocer. He was given the money and started on the return journey shortly after 4 o'clock, but at a late hour last night he had failed to put in an appearance.

Mr. Eckerson scoffs at the suggestion of the police that the man might have decamped with the money, he saying that Novak on one other occasion had cashed checks amounting to $5,000 and only yesterday morning he was sent to the bank with checks aggregating $2,000. On numerous other occasions Mr. Eckerson declares, Novak cashed large amounts at the bank and was well known to the officials.

Persons acquainted with the man's habits are thought to have waylaid him some place between the bank and the store, and, after relieving him of the money, made him prisoner until such time as they could make their escape, or to have so seriously injured him that he has been unable to notify any person of his predicament.

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October 27, 1908

CONFESS MURDER OF
SHOEMAKER'S SON

EDWARD CASSIDY AND THAD
DYER CAUGHT BY POLICE.

Went to Bassin's Shop to Rob Him
and Killed the Young Man When
He Interfered With
Their Plan.

When Edward Cassidy and Thad Dyer entered the little shoe shop of Elle Bassin and his son, Nathan, 1221 West Twenty-fourth street, at 10 o'clock Saturday night, they were bent on robbery. The confession of Cassidy to Captain Walter Whitsett late yesterday afternoon settled that question. They figured no interference, but when Nathan Bassin objected and grappled with Cassidy, the latter said he drew a revolver and shot him dead.

The murder took place in the shoe shop at 10 o'clock Saturday night, and when it was discovered it was a mystery. It remained so until Sunday morning, when Patrolmen Fred Nissen and W. J. Graham got a clue which led to the arrest of Dyer and Cassidy. A grocer, William Doarn, at the southwest corner of Twenty-fourth and Mercier streets, remembered that the two men had been in his place just before the killing and had said, "If you see anything happen around here tonight you haven't seen us."

Dyer was the first to confess yesterday morning after being questioned a long while. Then he laid the crime on Cassidy and said: "We went into the the shop with the intention of trying on a pair of shoes and wearing them out without paying for them . When we started out the young man grabbed Casssidy and he shot him . Then we both ran."

PURPOSE WAS ROBBERY.

This story didn't sound, as there were no shoes for sale in the shop. Dyer stuck to his story until Cassidy confessed; then he said the latter's version was correct. Casssidy told the following story to Captain Whitsett and afterwards made a statement to I. B. Kimbrell, county prosecutor.

"We were broke and wanted some money. We met in Water's saloon on Southwest boulevard about 8:30 p. m. Then we visited different places until about 9:45 o'clock, when we decided to hold up the old shoemaker. We went to Doarn's grocery store, across from the shoeshop, and saw Will Doarn in the door. We asked him not to say anything about seeing us in the neighborhood if anything happened.

"I'M AWFULLY SORRY."

"Then we went across the street," continued Cassidy. "Dyer stood in the door of the shop as I entered and ordered 'Hands up." The young man grabbed me, and I shot him. I wanted to get away. That's all. I'm sorry, awful sorry. I never went into the thing with the intention of killing anybody."

Cassidy and Dyer both ran from the place immediately after the shooting and separated. Cassidy remained about the Southwest boulevard until late and then went home with a friend. He lives at 908 West Thirty-first street, and Dyer at 703 Southwest boulevard. Dyer said he went home.

Dyer is the son of Edward Dyer, a member of the Kansas City fire department. The father was at police headquarters insisting upon his son's innocence yesterday just after he had confessed his part in the murder.

Both men are well known to the police. Cassidy was recently arraigned in the municipal court by Sergeant Thomas O'Donnell on a charge of vagrancy. They were taken before Justice Festus O. Miller late yesterday afternoon and arraigned on a charge of murder in the first degree. They waived preliminary examination and were committed to the county jail without bond to await trial in the criminal court.

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September 1, 1908

ODD FELLOWS CELEBRATE
SIXTIETH ANNIVERSARY.

Wyandotte Lodge No. 35 Was Organ-
ized by Faithful Few When Kan-
sas City Was a Village.

On September 1, 1848, when this city was better known as Westport Landing, a number of members of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows gathered in a small room over Shannon's grocery store at Second and Main streets and organized Wyandotte lodge No. 35. Last night nearly 200 members and friends of this same lodge gathered in the large hall at Missouri avenue and Main street to celebrate the sixtieth anniversary.

Judge E. E. Porterfield, who claims to be too young to have been a charter member of the lodge, presided, and made a short address. Judge Porterfield told of the early days when with but a few members the lodge started on its way. He read a few of the names of the early members and among those names mentioned are men who have helped to make Kansas City what it is today.

Among the early members were such men as L. P. Browne, Joseph S. Chick, W. H. Chick, Rev. John T. Peery, Daniel Dofflemeyer, John C. McCoy, Dr. I. M. Ridge, Nehemiah Holmes and James A. Gregory. In 1850 the records of the lodge were destroyed in a fire which burned the grocery store over which the lodge was located, and it is impossible to get the names of all the charter members.

Phillip Bentz, who joined the lodge in 1850 when it was but two years old, was present and gave a short talk on the early history. Mr. Bentz is the oldest living member of the lodge. An address was also made by M. S. Dowden, past grand master, and music was furnished by J. Bales, L. Bales, and Miss Maggie Martin. Misses Elsie Hite and Ruth Markward gave recitations. Refreshments were served at the conclusion of the programme.

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August 20, 1908

MEAT IS A LITTLE CHEAPER.

Retail Prices Have Declined as Much
as 3 Cents a Pound.

Retail meat prices are being quoted from 1/2 to 3 cents lower per pound than was the case a month ago. the reason for the slight decrease in price as given by the local retail butchers is that the wholesale markets have reduced their prices on meat stuffs, and that it is more profitable for them to reduce their own prices in proportion, inasmuch as more people will buy meat at cheaper prices.

The wholesalers give no particular reason for the decline in prices, saying that general circumstances make it possible to reduce the price of meat to the retailer a few cents a pound. The flood during the early part of the summer had a great deal to do with the large advance in the price of meats, which was maintained up until the last few days.

Steaks which cost the butcher 14 1/2 cents to 18 1/2 cents a pound are being sold by the retailers at 22 1/2 cents a pound. This is a decrease of from 4 1/2 to 7 1/2 cents per pound since last month. Rib roasts are selling from 15 to 17 cents a pound and cost the retailer anywhere from 14 to 17 cents a pound. Sugar-cured ham which costs the retailer 12 1/2 cents a pound is being sold for 17 cents, and pork, which ranges from 8 to 12 cents a pound at wholesale prices can be bought for 15 cents at many of the downtown markets.

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August 18, 1908

LOVESICK GIRL DRINKS IODINE.

Katie Thompson, 14, Wanted to Wed
a Grocer's Clerk.

Katie Thompson, 1326 St. Louis avenue, is only 14 years old, but that did not keep her from falling in love with Michael Griffin, an employe of the Kansas City Wholesale Grocery Company, Tenth and Mulberry streets. They wanted to get married.

Katie's mother and her stepfather, M. J. Chambers, objected on account of her age. Michael called at the Thompson home during the noon hour yesterday to press his suit. When he was told there would be nothing doing in the matrimonial line for at least four years, he became angry and cast a half brick at the stepfather, who promptly stopped it with his face. The brick was much harder than Chambers's face and a deep gash over the eye was the result.

It is said of Michael that he then made tracks toward the state line, while Chambers fled himself to No. 2 police station to have the brick-throwing lover arrested. All this excited little Katie to such an extent that she then and there consumed an ounce of iodine by way of showing her love for the grocery clerk. Dr. George P. Pipkin, with the ambulance from the emergency hospital, arrived after a hurry-up call and a strong emetic put Katie back on the eligible list again.

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June 9, 1908

TWENTY ESCAPE WHEN
BUILDINGS COLLAPSE.

NONE WAS INJURED IN GRAND
AVENUE WRECK.

Roof and Second Floor of Two Old
Structures at 1403-1405 Grand Ave-
nue Fell to Basement -- Were
Condemned Yesterday.

Twenty persons had a miraculous escape from being crushed to death at 11:45 o'clock yesterday morning when the front section of two buildings, located at 1403-1405 Grand avenue, collapsed and the walls fell inward carrying the roof and second floor to the basement. The buildings were condemned yesterday by the building inspector and ordered torn down. Adolph Dose conducts a saloon in the building at 1403 Grand avenue and there were ten men in his saloon when the collapse came. All escaped without injury. Henry Carter, a porter employed by Mr. Dose, was in the basement when he noticed a section of the sustaining wall on the south side of the building had fallen out. He went upstairs and reported the matter to Mr. Dose, who telephoned John E. Lach, a furniture dealer, the owner of the building. When Mr. Lach reached the saloon he and Mr. Dose went to the basement to examine the wall and had returned to the main floor when a rumbling noise was heard and the patrons in the saloon ran out.

The bartender, Charles Wedlick, was behind the bar at the time. He said he was walking towards the front end of the bar and noticed that as he got nearer the front end he was sinking below the bar. Wedlick ran from behind the bar and down into the basement, where he stood beneath a large girder in the center of the building. He was not struck by any of the flying bricks and timber, but the lime dust nearly suffocated him.

In the saloon at the time were Adolph Dose, Charles Wedlick, Peter Fielding, a contractor; Fred Hay, and insurance agent; John Baird, a constable; Henry Carter, the porter, and John E. Lach, the proprietor of the building, besides three strangers.

Above the saloon Kim Ying Woy conducts a chop suey restaurant. He was in the rear of his place with his cook. They were not hurt and walked down to the yard in the rear.

When the wall of the building at 1403 Grand avenue gave way the roof and second floor of the building at 1405 caved in. In the latter building Louis Lustig conducted a grocery store and the second floor was used as rooming house, occupied by Mrs. Edna Cooley. Persons in this place failed to get out when the first rumbling noise was heard. When the front wall fell to the sidewalk Mrs. Cooley and Flora Everest, a roomer, were in the front room and were dropped to the sidewalk with the falling walls. Mrs. Cooley was in bed at the time of the accident. Two men were also pitched out the front part of the building Charles Graham, a hack driver who was in the house, ran out the back way.

Only the clerk, J. B. Routh, was in the grocery store. He escaped through the rear door when he heard the crash. Mr. Lustig was standing in front of his store and his driver, Clinton Smith, was in the yard in the rear. The building at 1405 Grand Avenue is owned by A. P. Thurman.

Mr. Dose estimated his loss at about $3,000. He did not know whether his insurance covered accidents or not. He said his stock of goods was not damaged, but the bar fixtures are a total loss. He erected a small frame shed in the rear of his saloon and will continue in business there until he can secure a location. Mr. Lustig could not estimate what his loss would be.

Forty-five years ago two frame buildings collapsed in the same block in which the buildings fell yesterday. In one of the buildings was Josephine E. Vaughn, sister of the desperado Vaughn, who was caught among the falling timbers and killed. Those buildings were erected in 1857, and their collapse was occasioned in the same manner which ruined the buildings yesterday afternoon. At 1302 Grand avenue a frame building collapsed about eighteen years ago. No one was injured in the accident.

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March 18, 1908

MOURNER BREAKS NECK.

Robert W. Smyth Meets Death While
Returning From Wake.

Robert W. Smyth of 208 South Fourteenth street, Kansas City, Kas., brother of City License Inspector J. E. Smyth fell and broke his neck last night shortly before 10 o'clock while walking along South Eighteenth street. He had attended the wake of a friend in that neighborhood, and was on his way home when he met death.

The place where Mr. Smyth fell and received fatal injuries was within about twenty feet of where Isaac Malott, the Grandview grocer, was murdered by robbers about five months ago. He had been drinking, according to the statements of several persons who had been with him just a short time before he left for home. Dr. John A. Mitchell, who lives at 1803 Central avenue, only a short distance form where the accident occurred, was one of the first person s to reach the body. When he arrived Smyth was dying. Dr. Mitchell stated last night that there was no doubt that the man's neck was broken in the fall. Coroner Davis will hold a n autopsy this morning at Butler's undertaking rooms, where the body was removed.

Friends of Smyth believe that he was assaulted by highwaymen. There is a great gash on the dead man's forehead, and those who examined the ground where the body was found declare there are evidences of a struggle.

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February 29, 1908

WILL WALLACE STOP
THIS JEWISH PLAY?

SAYS HE HAS NOT GIVEN PER-
MISSION FOR IT.

But the Congregation Tefares Israel
Declares He Has Signified His
Willingness to Let Sunday
Performance Proceed.

Although the Jews of the Tefares Israel congregation, who are to present "De Boba Yochne," a dramatic opera in the Shubert theater Sunday evening, March 8, claim that they have a permit from Judge W. H. Wallace guaranteeing that they shall not be arrested or indicted. Judge Wallace says he has made no decision in the matter.

"First time I ever heard of Tefares Israel," the judge replied to a questioner. "Didn't know they were going to give a show in the Shubert theater on Sunday. I cannot say what I shall do, because I never cross bridges until I come to them."

When word of the judge's indecision was brought to a dozen Jews who were in M. Herowitz's meat market at 509 Independence avenue yesterday evening, there was a great shaking of heads. The men, all well along in years and heavily bearded, had been busy studying the lines they will have to speak in the play for it is to be a home talent performance. A man who was reading from a grayish book, grew silent and Herowitz, who was standing behind his chopping block humming the lines of a song he is to sing, snapped his jaws together. Not a word was spoken for two minutes. Then Herowitz filled and lighted his pipe and stepped from behind his counter. He took the pipe from his lips and spoke slowly through his beard:

"You bring us news. I do not understand. The judge has given us a permit, but we cannot be sure what he may yet do."

TO FURNISH A SYNAGOGUE.

"Yes, we will charge for tickets, but we will use the money to furnish a house of worship for our congregation. We are not rich people and we do not desire to beg. Why should we not give our time and our voices for this drama? We hurt no one, and we furnish our synagogue."

Everyone paid respectful silence for a full minute after Herowitz quit speaking, for he is assistant director of the proposed performance and his daughter is to be leading lady. At last another black-bearded man spoke:

"It is the last few weeks that we bought the church at Tracy and Seventh. It is small but a nice house. We want money to furnish it for a synagogue. We cannot give the opera on Saturday, for that is our Sabbath, and we take Sunday because many of us cannot open our shops on that day because of the court."

"DON'T PREJUDICE THE COURT"

As the reporter took his leave, five or six of the bearded men followed to the door.

"I beg of you, kindly," two or three of them said, "not to write anything to make the court go back on his word. We want the money for our synagogue."

The play, "De Boba Yochna," which the Tefares Israel Jews are rehearsing, and for which their wives and daughters are making many brightly colored gowns and robes, is a five-act drama. For fear, though, that those who attend may not receive their money's worth, half a dozen songs are to be sung by the sweetest voices of the congregation during the intermissions between the five acts.

Every word spoken will be in Hebrew. Even the judge, who closed sacred concerts in the Willis Wood theater and shut up A. Judah's playhouse on Sundays, should wish to indict the congregation of Tefares Israel, he would have to send interpreters with his deputy marshals in order to secure any evidence that a play, and not a son and prayer service, is in progress.

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February 21, 1908

WALLACE REFUSED
TO TOUCH THE WINE.

WOULD NOT DRINK FROM JEW-
ISH WEDDING CUP.

Was Guest of Honor at Marriage of
Rose Mandelcorn, bot Offended
Parents by Failing to
Drink Her Health.

Judge William H. Wallace was the guest of honor at a wedding feast last night, and a Jewish wedding feast at that. That is he was the guest of honor for a little while, until he refused to drink from the wedding cup. Then he rememered that he had an "important engagement" and unceremoniously departed.

It happened this way: Rose Mandelcorn, daughter of a grocer at 1029 Independence avenue, who lives at 510 Harrison street, was to be married to Dr. Adolph Miller of Nashville, Tenn. Much time had been spent in decorting the bride's home, many anxious hours had been passed by the bride's good mother in working out the details of what she had dreamed of since Rose was a tiny bud of feminity -- her daughter's wedding, the event of her life. Father Mandelcorn, too, had his concern in the affair. Besides the thousand dollars he had laid aside as his daughter's dowry, he had spent much on the feast, but it seemed to him that something lacked to raise it all above the sluggish swirl of lower Harrison street society.

Father Mandelcorn accordingly consulted Mother Mandelcorn. Their Rose was to be clipped from the parental stem. It was up to the Mandelcorn family to make it a noteworthy event.

"Judge Wallace!" said Father Mandelcorn.

"He is a hard and cruel man," said Mother Mandelcorn.

"He has had me indicted by his grand jury because I did not keep the Christian Sabbath, I know," admitted Father Mandelcorn, "but we shall now heap coals of fire upon his head. We shall invite him to the wedding of our daughter, to the marriage of our Rose."

So, he was invited; the guests were assembled, the feast was spread, the marriage cup was filled; he came. Rabbi S. J. Shapiro read the ceremony and the father gave away the bride. Then after she had been kissed by kinsmen and guests, the marriage cup was passed. It was brimming with wine, and when it reached Judge Wallace he refused to drink.

To refuse to drink form a Jewish wedding cup when offered is an insult to bride and parents and groom. If Judge Wallace didn't know it before he shortly found it out form the clouded countenances which hedged him like the threat of a storm. Then he made his plea of anohter engagement and departed.

There was some gloom and considerable heat among the crowd which gathered around the festal board. J. R. Shapiro arose to make a speech, in which he scored Judge Wallace and his political ambitions.

Shapiro said that this reform wave of the judge's was merely a business move. He illustrated in this way: "When my business is run down and my shop becomes unattractive, I start out in a new way to boom the business and I paint my shop a new color and put out new signs. When Judge Wallace ran for congress some time ago, he lost the race. This time, he has come out with a new platform, one which he has built from this make-believe reforom of his. This is his way of booming business and painting his shop and putting out new signs."

Dr. Miller and wife left on an early train for a tour of the Southern states, after which the couple will go to Nashville, Tenn., which is to be their home. The bride was the recipient of many handsome gifts.

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December 5, 1907

SOLD BEER TO A FATHER.

Kansas City, Kas., Grocer Fined $200 and Sent
to Jail for Sixty Days.

Recently Joseph Snellin and his mother moved from their home in Kansas City, Mo., to 609 North Forth street, Kansas City, Kas., so that the father of the family might be free from the temptation offered by open saloons.

The son swore to a complaint Tuesday afternoon against George Zelzenok, a grocer, 608 North Fourth street, Kansas City, Kas., charging him with selling beer. The case came up yesterday morning in the Kansas City, Kas., police court.

"This man sold my father a case of beer," Joseph Snellin testified. "Mother and I have worked a long time to cure father of the drink hait. It made me angry when we learned that Zelzenok was selling to him."

Zelzenok denied the charge. He was fined $200 and sentenced to sixty days in jail.

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December 1, 1907

BUT HER MONEY WAS BURNED.

Sick Woman Rescued With Diffi-
culty Wanted to Go for It.

Fire was discovered in a grocery store at the southeast corner of Fifth and Harrison streets this morning at 12:30 o'clock. An alarm was not turned in until the fire had gained considerable headway and the whole upper story, which was used as a residence, was in flames.

While the firemen were fighting the flames a report was spread about that Mrs. J. W. Taggart, who lived over the grocery store, was still in the building and too ill to save herself. Firemen were sent into the house and, after some difficulty, succeeded in rescuing the woman. After she was safely placed upon the ground she remembered that her husband had about $150 in the burning room. She made an attempt to go after the money, but was held back by firemen and the police. The money was in paper and gold and was not found.

The building was owned by William Hall. It was a large two-story frame and was used for stores and residences. The first floor was occupied by Salvato Trapino, who ran a grocery store, and a barber shop owned by Juan Laroso, who lives at Fifth street and Troost avenue.

The fire was supposed to have started from a gasoline tank which was kept in the rear of the grocery store. The loss is estimated at $5,000.

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October 15, 1907

LEADER OF GANG IS FINED.

South Side Grocer Was Set Upon by
Rowdies.

As C. T. Baker, a grocer at 1321 West Twenty-fourth street, left a car at Nineteenth street and Grand avenue Saturday evening he was struck by a stone. Seeing a crowd of young men near at hand he approached and asked, "Do any of you know who threw that stone?"

"With that," Baker said in police court yesterday, "I was immediately set upon by half a dozen of them and had I not taken refuge in a grocery store I believe I would have been beaten to death."

Baker identified W. P. Peppinger as the one who led the rowdies. Peppinger said he "had some trouble" but that he "didn't start anything."

"Your fine is $15," said Judge Kyle. "I only wish I had the rest of that gang in here. You'd better tell the others to steer clear of that kind of business or there will be something doing in the $500 fine line."

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October 7, 1907

ALL OF THEM OPEN

THEATERS DO BUSINESS SAME
AS USUAL.
SOME ARE PACKED TO DOORS

POLICE PREPARE TO REPORT TO
GRAND JURY.

Penny Arcades Put on Passion Play
and Sacred Music -- Judah Says
There Are Sermons in His
Bill -- Cigars Sold
as Usual.

Kansas City theaters really give Sunday performances. Bold policemen, acting under orders which came directly from the police board, found this out last night. Such a rumor had reached police headquarters, but Chief of Police Ahern diplomatically sent out policemen to learn the truth after the police board pledged support to the criminal court in putting on the Sunday lid.

Regarding the rumor of Sunday performances -- the policemen found "It is even so." They will report to their superior officer today the evidence they collected in the playhouses. The supreme court decisions, shipped in from Arkansas, do not say it is a crime for an actor or an actorine to act, any day of the week. But with the managers it is different, and the police caught 'em red handed last night. The manager who includes Sunday performances in his contracts with the public "works" during the show.

Down at the Grand a policeman caught A. Judah working -- smoking numerous cigars and nodding "yes" or "no" to the doorman when a friend of the house applied for free admission. Judah is a long-headed manager. He saw the reform cloud on the theatrical horizon and send down East for a fitting show for the first tabooed performance. "Arizona" is the bill, and Mr. Judah's public flocked to the show like girls to a marked-down carnation sale. The house was sold out before 7 o'clock for the night performance, and half an hour before the curtain went up the "admissions" were exhausted, too.

SERMONS IN HIS SHOW.

"Did you ever see such a turn-a-way," said Harry S. Richards, manager of the show.

"No," answered Judah. "But it's the show which brings 'em out this Sunday night. There's a good sermon in 'Arizona' -- the kind that sends the public home with better thoughts to dwell upon through the week. For a show with a sermon coupon, 'Arizona' is a scream."

"But does Judah really own the Grand?" asked a uniformed policeman of the ticket seller early yesterday morning. He was getting the evidences for the police board. It was his first stop. He finally departed with the information that the place is managed by Mr. Judah.

Policemen did not visit many of the theaters until after the matinee hour in the early afternoon. They then called at each of the first class houses and later made the rounds of the penny arcades and moving picture shows, taking names of manager and locations of the places of amusement.

HE HEARD A HYMN.

At many of the arcades the policemen, who are to make a report also on the character of the performances, were astounded to find the "Passion Play" in progress. Down on Main street an officer put a penny in the slot, adjusted the tubes to his ears, and then turned pale when the phonograph struck up a hymn instead of the ballet medley he had expected. He did not want the proprietor to think he did not like the place, so he ground his teeth and heart it "clean" through.

The officer assigned to vaudeville houses got blind staggers before he caught the right tip and performed the duty assigned him. At the Orpheum he found that Martin Beck is a Chicagoan. He went over to the Shubert and found a vaudeville service in progress, but a kindly disposed man outside told the blue coated officer that Mr. Klaw isn't expected here for a fortnight at least. No, Mr. Erlanger wasn't in town, either.

"Well, who is manager of this house?"

"I'm trying to be," answered Walter Sanford, the local representative of the theatrical syndicate of Klaw & Erlanger.

INSIDE INFORMATION

Chief of Police Ahern at first assigned regular theater patrolmen to bring in the evidence wanted. The men had the information already, and did not bother the managers, but they did "peep in" to see that the show really went on. Others, drawn to the theaters by curiosity, questioned employes. A policeman in uniform stood in front of the Willis Wood last night with the negro attendant who looks after the carriages.

"Who does run this house?" asked the policeman.

"The manager is Mr. Buckley, sir," answered the employe.

"Well," said the policeman, I thought Frank Woodward runs the house."

"No, sir, Mister Frank is business manager, and Mr. Buckley is the manager, sir."

"What's the difference between a manager and a business manager," asked the bewildered policeman.

"That's easy. Mr. Buckley, he runs the business. The business manager signs checks."

"Where does O. D. Woodward come in?"

"Why! He's the governor. He runs the whole business."

HIST! SAID HE.

When two officers in plain clothes applied for admission last night at the Century, Manager Joe Donegan stepped to the door of his office. Then he turned and said:

"Hist! We're pinched." He had forgotten he had occupied the office alone and was only talking to an empty room. But the officers merely wanted to see if a show was in progress, and they soon departed to round up the arcades and outlying playhouses.

Cigar stands continued yesterday to sell newspapers, cigars and other stock. It's alright to sell newspapers, but it's considered Sunday labor to sell cigars, and the cigar stands which stay open to sell newspapers are preparing to put the lid on everything else if the grand jury so orders. But the police made no attempt to close either cigar stands or grocery stores.

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