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February 10, 1910

FAMOUS SINGER TO BE
HERE TOMORROW.

George Hamlin to Perform
at the Willis Wood.
George Hamlin, Famous Singer who will be Appearing at the Willis Wood.
GEO. HAMLIN.

The George Hamlin concert at the Willis Wood theater tomorrow afternoon at 4 o'clock will be the fifth regular attraction in the W. M. series. Mr. Hamlin is one of the famous concert singers in the country and is specially noted for his success as a lieder singer. He was the introducer of the songs of Richard Strauss to American music lovers and the programme he has arranged for tomorrow's concert is excellently chosen to illustrate his gifts as a concert recital and oratorio singer. Schubert and Schumann are represented with two numbers each; Liszt and Brahms and two Handel numbers represent the other masters. Of special local interest is Carl Busch's "The Last Tschastas," dedicated to Mr. Hamlin. Edward Schneider, the gifted accompanist, has two places on the programme and there are other interesting features.

The students' seats are placed on sale the morning of the concert. All inquiries should be addressed to Miss Myrtle Irene Mitchell at the Willis Wood theater.

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February 7, 1910

EVEN THE BABIES
HEAR THE BAND.

Battery B Musicians Please
Large Audience in Con-
vention Hall.

Yesterday afternoon's concert at Convention hall by Battery B band will not be the last, according to an announcement from the stage. There was no question of the success of the event, every number being vigorously applauded, "Lohengrin" proving fully as popular as the one ragtime selection of the afternoon.

The size of the audience was a surprise to the management, nearly 1,500 people being present. It was distictly a family gathering of fathers, mothers and the children. Mr. and Mrs. Newlywed and the baby were on hand and Papa Newlywed did a pedestrian "stunt" up in the balcony when the baby showed a disposition to rial the best efforts of the musicians.

Director Berry ha arranged an excellent programme, comprising seven instrumental and two vocal numbers, which was more than doubled by the insistent encores of the audience. Miss Mildred Langworthy was the soprano soloist and Ross Dale the tenor. Both pleased and were compelled to respond to encores.

The feature numbers by the band were a fantasie from Wagner's "Lohengrin," the overture from Offenbach's "Orpheus," and exquisite number beautifully rendered; a euphonium solo, "Evening Star" from "Tannhauser"' Nevin's dainty "Narcissus." The closing number was called the "Congress of Nations" and comprised the national airs of various countries. To give a spectacular touch, members of Battery B entered, one at a time, with the flag of the country as the band played the national air, closing with "The Star Spangled Banner" and Old Glory brought a storm of applause.

Yesterday's concert demonstrated that Kansas City has a large class of music lovers who do not require the stimulus of a great name to induce them to turn out. The classic selections on yesterday's programme were equally enjoyed with the lighter numbers. Director Berry had the courage to omit "ragtime" save in one single instance, and no one, apparently, felt very badly over it.

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January 28, 1910

DRUMMER RECOVERS OUTFIT.

Detectives Looking for "Good Fel-
lows" Who Pawned It.

The detective department is looking for four "good fellows" who appropriated the drummer's outfit of William G. Viquesney, a member of H. O. Wheeler's band, during the automobile show in Convention hall. The date on which the drums, tambourines, whistle, etc., were supposed to have been taken was January 19. It was on that night that four well dressed white men, half intoxicated, took the instruments to a pawn broker on Grand avenue and realized about $25 on them. The more valuable of the collections were recovered by Mr. Viquesney yesterday.

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January 24, 1910

BLESSES WATERS OF KAW.

Custom of Greek Catholics Carried
Out by Priest.

Clad in the rich silken robes of his office and surrounded by a number of vested altar boys, the Rev. John Markowitch, pastor of the Servian Greek Catholic church of St. George, at First street and Lyons in Kansas City, Kas., knelt before an improvised alter near the middle of the Central avenue bridge yesterday morning and invoked a blessing on the Kaw river. One thousand parishioners attended the ceremony. After blessing the river the priest sprinkled each one of the church members present with water drawn from the river and administered the sacrament to them.

The congregation met in the church yesterday morning and marched from there to the bridge. The procession was led by six vested altar boys, who carried candles. They were followed by the priest, who was dressed in rich robes and carried a crucifix. Following the priest was a brass band which led a column of about 600 men. After the ceremony, which lasted about one hour, the participants marched back to the church.

Later the priest visited the homes of each of his parishioners and sprinkled their door posts with the blessed water. The custom of blessing rivers, while comparatively new in Kansas City, is an old one in Servia. The rivers are blessed there once a year, and the water used for baptisms taken from them.

Father Markowitch, who conducted the ceremony yesterday, is 52 years old. He came to Kansas City, Kas., two years ago, and in January, 1908, performed a ceremony similar to that performed yesterday, which was the first of the kind in Kansas City. The parish has grown from 800 to more than 2,000 communicants since he took charge.

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January 23, 1910

A YIDDISH THEATER HERE.

First Playhouse of This Character
to Be Opened Here Tonight.

Kansas City's first Yiddish theater will be opened tonight in the Hippodrome annex, Twelfth and Charlotte streets. Manager Jacobs has fitted up a snug home for Yiddish drama here, the annex being cut off entirely from the Hippodrome proper by an outside entrance, though there is, of course, an entrance from the inside as well. M. B. Samuylow, who was seen here at the Shubert this season, will head a strong Yiddish company playing "Kol Nidre," a four-act opera with book by Charansky and music by Friedsel. Other Yiddish companies will be seen here from time to time and it is hoped to make the Hippodrome Annex theater the home of permanent Yiddish attractions, as there is a large clientele from which to draw.

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January 21, 1910

WHEN ELMAN WAS POOR.

Charles Grossman Was a Childhood
Playmate of the Violinist.
Charles Grossman, Kansas City Playwright.
CHARLES GROSSMAN.

There is one person in Kansas City who is awaiting with unusual interest the coming of Mischa Elman, the violinist who will be heard here in concert for the first time at the Willis Wood next Friday afternoon. He is Charles Grossman of 3212 Charlotte street, a young sketch writer, who was a childhood playmate of Elman and shared his clothes and even meals with the infant prodigy, destined to be one of the world's greatest violinists. Elman's father was a man of brilliant education but desperately poor and lived next door to the Grossmans. The younger Grossman is eagerly awaiting the violinist's coming to exchange reminiscences with him. They have not met for a dozen years and in the meantime the 7-year-old concertist of the parting has become at 19 one of the wonderful players of all time.

"I am two years older than Elman," said Mr. Grossman yesterday. "I well recall the time when I first heard little Mischa play his father's violin at the age of 4 years. In my childish way I thought to have him punished and I told his father he was playing the instrument, which was about the only thing of value in the Elman home. The father was at first angry, but soon recognized the hitherto unsuspected skill of his son. He had no means to educate him, however, but my father gave him his first start by placing him under teachers in our home town of Tolnoe. Later he was sent to Schapola where a Jewish millionaire named Bodsky became interested in him and sent him to Odessa, where Professor Auer of the St. Petersburg conservatory took him up. the story of his phenomenal rise is history, but I know that he will be glad to see his playmate of the old days. He was the guest of my brothers in New York, one of whom is a rabbi and the other an attorney. I hope to have Elman as my guest next week.

"Incidentally I do not see why Elman should be called the Russian violinist. He is a Jew and though the czar himself has given him a medal and other honors Russia is the prosecutor of this race, and Elman himself was not allowed by law to live in St. Petersburg until he had secured the august permission of the czar."

Young Grossman himself bids fair to attain a high degree of success in his chosen profession and may yet be a dramatist who will shed luster on the Jewish race, as he is already the author of many successful plays.

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January 12, 1910

IRON BAR IN MIDDLE OF SONG.

Warrant Is Issued for Arrest of
Painter Who Used It.

Music hath charms, but not for Henry Ray. Ray is a house painter employed at 1212 East Forty-forth street. Complaint was issued by the prosecuting attorney yesterday, charging him with felonious assault. Jesse Helm was the prosecuting witness.

Helm was musically inclined. He broke the monotony occasionally with a few verses of popular song.

"I was singing this morning," he told Edward J. Curtin, an assistant prosecutor, "when Ray came down from the scaffolding and struck me in the back with an iron bar."

"What were you singing?"

"Oh, simply 'I Love My Wife, But Oh, You Painter,' " said Helm. "He told me I sang as though I had a busted reed in my organ. I can't imagine why it made him sore when I refused to stop."

"I can guess," said Mr. Curtin, and he issued the complaint.

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January 4, 1910

TETRAZZINI HERE FEB. 1.

Great Coloratura Will Sing in Con-
cert in Convention Hall.
Madame Luisa Tetrazzini, Appearing February 1 at Convention Hall.
MME. LUISA TETRAZZINI.
(Copyright, 1909, E. F. Foley, N. Y.)

Arrangements were completed yesterday by Manager Louis W. Shouse for the appearance at Convention hall on February 1 of Mme. Luisa Tetrazzini. It will be her only appearance outside of St. Louis and Chicago in this part of the West.

Mme Luisa Tetrazzini is today the recognised queen of colorature sopranos, both on the concert and operatic stages. She is the leading exponent of that now almost lost art -- the Art of Bel Canto. She is in the prime of her life and at the zenith of her career. Indeed, as a bravura singer, Mme Tetrazzini may be said to have no living rival. The characterizations applied to her by the London critics when she took the British capital by storm in the autumn of 1906 -- "The New Patti" and the "Florentine Nightingale" -- have been fully justified by the opinions of all the leading American critics who have heard her since Mr. Oscar Hammerstein brought her to this country as a member of his Manhattan opera company.

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December 24, 1909

MAYOR'S CHRISTMAS
TREE IS ALL READY.

CANDY AND TOYS FOR THOU-
SANDS OF CHILDREN.

Convention Hall Doors Will Swing
Open at 1 o'clock Today to
Admit the Eager
Youngsters.

Nimble fingers, hastened and made dexterous by kind hearts, effected a transformation in Convention hall yesterday, and today the great auditorium is a Santa Claus land for the poor children of Kansas City. At 1 o'clock this afternoon the doors of the hall will swing open for the mayor's Christmas tree, and at 2:30 they will close, while Santa Claus distributes Christmas presents to at least 7,000 little boys and girls who, by force of circumstances, might otherwise have had no Christmas.

Notwithstanding unceasing efforts, the committees of the Mayor's Christmas Tree Association have been unable to locate all the poor children in the city to give them the tickets which are necessary to entitle them to gifts, and these children who have been overlooked are asked to apply at Convention hall this morning from 8 o'clock until noon. Tickets will be supplied these children any time between those hours.

The Fraternal Order of Moose caught the Christmas spirit in earnest yesterday and notified the Mayor's Christmas Tree Association that it would have twenty-five wagon loads of coal at Convention hall at noon today for distribution among poor families. Each wagon will contain two tons of coal.

WORKED ALL DAY.

Poor families who need fuel are requested to notify the mayor's office by 'phone or in person up to 11 o'clock this morning. These cases will be investigated and if the applicants be found worthy the coal will be delivered at their homes at noon. The offer from the Order of Moose was made by W. A. McGowan, secretary of the local lodge.

That the Convention hall association is heart and soul in the Christmas tree project was shown when Manager Louis W. Shouse and the directors placed the whole Convention hall force at the disposal of the Christmas Tree Association. As soon as the railroad ball was over Wednesday night, Manager Shouse put a force of men to work taking up the dance floor and before 6 o'clock yesterday morning the building was ready for the decorating committees of the Christmas tree.

Steve Sedweek was the first of the association workers to appear on the scene. He arrived at 6 o'clock and within a short time a large force was at work, setting up the Christmas trees, decorating them and packing the gifts into sacks ready for distribution. The committees worked all day and this morning they will have the hall ready for the great event.

That the people of Kansas City may inspect the work of the "best fellows" a general invitation is extended to any who care to do so to stop into the hall during the morning hours, up to noon today.

THE GIFTS IN SACKS.

Among the busy people at the hall yesterday were Captain John F. Pelletier, A. E. Hutchings, Steve Sedweek, Captain W. A. O'Leary, Hank C. Mank, the Rev. Thomas Watts, Gus Zorn and a Mr. Bennett of Wichita, who is here to gain ideas for a similar event to be inaugurated in his city next year.

Among the most valued workers were the members of the committee of twenty. Their duties consisted of the packing and arranging of the gifts in sacks. They worked from early morning till late at night and ate luncheon and dinner in the hall. Mayor T. T. Crittenden was present at the luncheon and sat at the head of the table, commending the women for their work.

The workers were assisted by seven men from No. 6 hook and ladder company, Thirty-first and Holmes, detailed for the duty by Fire Chief John C. Egner. Chief Egner had intended detailing twenty men, but the fire in the Rialto building made it impossible for him to do so.

The giant Christmas trees, which will be among the objects of chief interest to the children, were decorated in magnificent fashion by the employes of the Kansas City Electric Light Company and the Webb-Freyschlag Mercantile Company.

The presents for the children will be arranged in sacks bearing the inscription, "Mayor's Christmas Tree, 1909." The sacks for the boys will be placed on the east side of the arena and those of the girls on the west side. The sacks for children up to 8 years of age are printed in blue and those of children from 8 to 12 are printed in red.

Each child will receive two suitable toys and candy, nuts and fruit, all arranged in Christmas style.

A CLOWN BAND, TOO.

The programme for the mayor's Christmas tree will be a simple one. The doors will open at 1 o'clock, when the children can come in to feast their eyes upon the great Christmas trees and enjoy a fine musical entertainment. The doors will close at 2:30, so that it will be necessary for the tots to be in the hall by that time.

Preceding the distribution of the presents, the Eagles' clown band will give a dress concert on the arena and a large electrical organ will also furnish music. Old Santa Claus, who, it is said, resembles very much in appearance Captain John F. Pelletier, will be present and he will have six assistants with him to mingle among the children. At 2:30 o'clock Santa will introduce Mayor T. T. Crittenden, who will make a short talk, and the presents will then be distributed.

"We have plenty of funds and plenty of gifts for all the city's poor children," said A. E. Hutchings, "and if they do not come and get their share it will not be the fault of the committees, which have labored incessantly to get in touch with every child entitled to the pleasures of the tree."

Although it was announced that no more funds were needed, and that no further cash donations would be received, the financial committee of the association was forced to decline donations yesterday to the amount of several hundred dollars.

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December 19, 1909

HURRIES FROM GRAVE
TO LAUGH ON STAGE.

GIRL WIFE SINGS SCOTTISH DIT-
TIES, CHOKING SOBS.

As Orchestra Plays "Hearts and
Flowers" for Next Sketch the
"Two Macks" Mourn Death of
"Danny," Their First Born.

Unknown to the audience of the Gayety theater yesterday afternoon, while the orchestra playing the gladsome tunes suggestive of love and happiness, a drama was being enacted in the dressing rooms behind the scenes. In her room sat a wife of one year, her head buried in her arms and tears streaming down her face. Between sobs she could be heard to say: "My baby, my little boy."

Beside this woman sat a young man, barely out of his teens, trying in his way to console the heartbroken girl. Tears glistened in his eyes. His face was contorted with pain and anguish. He was the picture of despair.

The young man was Douglas McKenzie, 20 years old, of Dundee, Scotland. The girl was Mabel McKenzie, 18 years of age, his wife. The two are known to the stage world as the "Two Macks," and they have been playing a comic sketch in Scotch the last week at the Gayety. The two sat in the dressing room in their plaids and kilts, the same that they had appeared in a few minutes before on the stage.

The orchestra suddenly ceased its playing. The lights were turned low. The next sketch was a love scene and the orchestra in a low key softly began, "Hearts and Flowers." The young wife raised her head and listened. With her sleeve she brushed away the tears.

"I wonder if Danny is in heaven -- I know he is," she said, smiling. "I suppose the angels are now playing the same tune."

Danny was the name of their little boy, only a few weeks old, whom they had buried but two hours before. One year ago Mr. and Mrs. McKenzie were married in Scotland. They came to this country on their honeymoon trip and got a place on the vaudeville stage. They made a tour of Texas and Oklahoma. Two months ago they reached Kansas City.

A baby was born, Danny, they called him. There were doctor bills to pay and room rent. Last Thursday the little boy died. They had no money to pay for its burial. for two days the little body was kept in their rooms at the Wyandotte hotel, the undertakers refusing to take it until the burial expenses were advanced.

Yesterday morning Mr. McKenzie told Tom Hodgeman, manager of the Gayety, of his plight. Mr. Hodgeman immediately went to all the playhouses in the city. He told the young man's story to the actors. When he returned from his trip Mr. Hodgeman had $80, enough to pay the funeral expenses.

HURRY TO THEATER.

Yesterday afternoon the little body was buried. From the cemetery where they had laid to rest their first born the young pair hurried to the theater. They arrived barely in time to dress in Scotch costume for their sketch. The "Two Macks" came out on the stage. They danced the Scotch dances and sang the light and frivolous Scotch ditties. They smiled, they laughed and they joked. Little did the audience realize that behind the mask of happiness were two bleeding hearts, a man and wife who had just come from the cemetery after burying their baby boy.

The curtain was rung down and the two went to their rooms. Mrs. McKenzie broke down in tears. During the long minutes she had been on the stage playing the part of a Scotch lassie the minutes had been torture. "Danny" was dead. He was her first born.

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December 18, 1909

CLOWN BAND AND
ORGAN FOR CHILDREN.

LOTS OF MUSIC AND FUN AT
MAYOR'S CHRISTMAS TREE.

A. Judah, Manager of the Grand,
Has a Surprise in Store and It
May Be City's Poor Good Boys
and Girls Will See Theater.

A mammoth organ is to be installed in Convention hall to furnish music for the thousands of little children who will be given presents from the mayor's Christmas tree. The Clown band of the Eagles also will furnish instrumental cheer. The musicians will be dressed in grotesque costumes. A. Judah, manager of the Grand, also has a surprise in the amusement line in store for the tots, and he might repeat this year his generosity of last year by inviting the children who seldom see the inside of a place of amusement to his theater for a performance and a liberal candy distribution.

"I'm always the happiest when I am doing something for girls and boys that the sun of plenty does not shine upon," said Mr. Judah at yesterday's meeting of the Mayor's Christmas Tree Association. Then he chipped in $25 to the fund, which has now reached the encouraging sum of $3,124.10.

"We'll double that amount when we hear from the people we have asked subscriptions from," declared A. E. Hutchings, who, with other warm-hearted and self-sacrificing men and women, are giving their time and means to provide Christmas cheer and joy for the thousands of poor children in Kansas City. And these faithful workers are going right ahead with their commendable work, regardless of envious and malicious ones who belittle the association by referring to it as the "Public Tree."

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December 9, 1909

FUNERAL OF CHRISMAN SWOPE.

Services Yesterday at Presbyterian
Church in Independence.

The funeral of Chrisman Swope, eldest son of Mrs. Logan O. Swope, took place yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the First Presbyterian church, Independence. Rev. C. C. McGinley, pastor of the church, conducted the service. Mis McGilveray of Kansas City rendered a solo, "Ye Shall Know." Burial was in Mount Washington cemetery.

Miss Lucy Lee Swope, who was in Paris, started home upon receipt of the news of the death of her brother and of the illness of other members of the family.

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November 26, 1909

15,000 SAW TIGERS
WALLOP KANSANS.

LARGEST CROWD IN HISTORY
OF BIG ANNUAL GAME.

Defeat Jayhawkers In a
Great Battle 12 to 6.
Missouri Tigers Wallop the Kansas Jayhawks.
IT'S BEEN A LONG TIME SINCE HE HAS TASTED ANYTHING AS GOOD AS THAT.

Bitterly, even heroically, contesting every inch of the Tigers' invasion the Kansas Jayhawkers went down to defeat before Missouri, by a score of 12 to 6. The biggest crowd that ever witnessed a football game in Kansas City passed through the gates yesterday at Association park. Long before the park opened at 12:30, large lines of rooters were headed for the different entrances and by 1 o'clock the 200 ushers were more than busy. Many persons who were unable to get seats took advantage of the buildings in the vicinity and trees, roofs and telegraph poles were crowded. The yelling was probably the best that was ever given by the rival universities.

Even when the Jayhawkers realized that they were beaten, their spirit was not broken. With the cheer leaders who were placed in the center of the field, 2,000 students echoed their famous war cry when they knew it was of no avail.

EVERY SEAT WAS TAKEN.

By 2 o'clock, a half hour before the game started, the seats were all taken .. It was one mass of color. On the south side the crimson and blue of Kansas flaunted saucily in the light breeze, while the somber yellow and black of Missouri floated in the north bleachers. Across the high board fence in the rear of the Missouri section, the Tiger enthusiasts had stretched a long canvas on which was painted "Missouri Tigers." It was unnecessary work, for any stranger in the city could have told from the yelling that the Missouri rooters were seated in that particular section.

The K. U. contingent was the first to open hostilities in the matter of yelling. The band, twenty-four in number, gayly dressed in crimson and blue suits, marched out on the field, and commenced to play the "Boola, Boola," which brought the Kansas rooters to their feet. For fully five minutes the Kansans had their inning. The cheer leaders with frantic gestures signalled for the famous "Rock Chalk," which echoed across the field for five more minutes.

BOTH TEAMS WERE CHEERED.

The Tigers a few minutes later had their chance. Out on the Belt Line tracks on the north side of the park a snorting engine pushed a Pullman and from the entrance twenty-two men in football uniform emerged and stealthily crept toward the park. The springy step told that ten weeks' training had not been for nothing. Before the roots were hardly aware of their presence they had filed into the park through the north entrance. A cheer that could have been heard for a mile greeted the Missouri players. The military band commenced on "Dixie" and for a moment the air was one mass of yellow and black. The cheering only stopped when the team lined up for a signal practice.

The Kansas team arrived on the field at 1:45. They came through the southwest entrance and their red blankets were more than conspicuous as they raced across the gridiron. A cheer that rivaled the Tigers' greeting arose from thousands of Kansas admirers, and lasted fully as long as that given their rivals. Until the game started, promptly at 2:30 o 'clock, the two sections vied with each other in giving the yells of their respective schools. The Missouri band, to demonstrate its ability to play, marched in front of the Kansan stands and played a funeral dirge.

With this great victory goes the championship of the Missouri valley conference for 1909 and the honor of having an undefeated team for the season, the first Missouri ever had. Not only this, but it shows how superior Roper is as a coach over Kennedy, winning with an eleven lighter, no faster, but so thoroughly trained in football that it outclassed the Kansas team, especially in kicking.

This is the first battle the Missouri Tigers have won from Kansas since 1901. It is the first time Missouri has crossed the red and blue goal line since 1902. This is the fourth win for Missouri in the past nineteen years and so great was this victory that all Missouri is celebrating.

On straight football Kansas made 298 yards during the game while Missouri made but 190. On punting Missouri was the victor, making 780 yards in 21 attempts, for an average of over 37 yards to the punt, while Kansas made 465 yards in twelve attempts for an average of over 38 yards to the punt. Punting really won the game for Missouri.

STONG AND HILL MEET.

Chancellor Strong's visit to President Hill of Missouri in a neighboring box was watched with interest.

"It's too bad; you will lose," the tall Kansas chief executive greeted President Hill. Both smiled and shook hands.

"Just watch," was President Hill's rejoiner.

Mayor Crittenden occupied a box in the center of the field in front of the Missouri section. When the first score was made a few minutes after the game started the mayor threw his had in the air and yelled like a collegian. Frank Howe, who sat in the same box, was equally as demonstrative.

When the second band of rooters arrived in the city yesterday morning they maintained the same confidence that existed until the kickoff. At Thirteenth and Central streets the Missouri band started a procession which was several blocks long. Up the principal streets of the city the crowd wended its way, giving the Tiger yell. In front of the Coates, the headquarters of the Jayhawkers, the long line stopped and gave a serenade. Even the "Rock Chalk" yell wasn't able to drown out the "Tiger, Tiger, M. S. U."

TIGERS WANTED BETTING ODDS.

Though the Tigers were confident that they would win, the demanded odds and were generally successful in getting 2 to 1 money. It is thought that the boarding houses in Lawrence will have to wait for board for many weeks, for most of the K. U. students considered the proposition a joke that Missouri would win.

"Just putting your money out at good interest," was the way one K. U. man characterized it.

The crowd was especially well handled at the game. The twelve entrances provided enough room to admit ticket holders as fast as they applied for admission. After conclusion of the game there were jams at the gates, but no one was injured.

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November 25, 1909

FIREMEN REALIZE $5,000.

As Many as 1,500 Couples Dance at
Once at Ball.

Over $5,000 was raised for the Fireman's pension fund at the Firemen's annual ball in Convention hall last night, which was attended by nearly 6,000 people. The actual ticket sales amounted to over $5,600, and the checking stands furnished considerable additional revenue. This fund is in charge of a committee of firemen, and is disbursed under their direction to provide for the firemen's families in cases of sickness and death.

The grand march, led by Chief John Egner and Mrs. Egner, started at 9 o'clock. From then until the early morning the dancing continued, there being twenty-four numbers on the programme. As many as 1,500 couples were on the floor at one time. Deveny's orchestra of twenty pieces furnished the music.

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November 22, 1909

TWO SOUSA CONCERTS.

Convention Hall Filled With Music
Lovers Yesterday.

For two hours yesterday afternoon 10,000 people sat in Convention hall while that master of harmony and technique, John Philip Sousa, the most characteristic band conductor in the world, and his aggregation of musicians, probably the finest reed and brass artists in the country, rendered a programme, which for purity of melody has rarely been equalled in this or any other city.

The programme originally consisted of thirteen numbers and was what might be termed of the heavy order, but the spontaneous appreciation of the music by the vast gathering, was such that before the great conductor had made his final bow, his band and soloist had rendered fourteen encores and the popular dances and marches of the day had won an equal share of applause with the composition of the old masters.

It has been said that Sousa's control over his men is so great that were he to lose his hands he could still keep them in absolute time and accord by the flash of his eyes, a bat of an eyelid or the quiver of a muscle. And he uses all of these in addition to the baton, his arms and his fingers. In fact at times his entire body is in motion. Never once does the musician, no matter how far back he may be seated, lose sight of every movement of Sousa and his splendid control counts no little in the harmony.

Never is there a note that is just the fraction of a beat too long, never is there the roar of a drum or the jingle of a bell that vibrates for the fraction of a second longer than Sousa desires it, and when Sousa is through the entire band is through, or he knows the reason.

The band, every member of which is an artist, makes the music, it is true, but Sousa makes the band and so considerable honor should go to him, but the players deserve equally as much.

The programme yesterday afternoon opened with Liszt's Second Polonaise, and the applause continued until "El Capitan," one of Sousa's early compositions, was given. Again, an ovation greeted the music and continued until Mr. Clark made his bow for his coronet solo, "Sounds From the Hudson," one of his own compositions. As the first encore he gave the "Carnival of Venice," and as a second the "Sextet from Lucia Di Lammermoor," with three coronets and three trombones.

Liszt's "Fourteenth Rhapsody" brought the programme to a close, after the band master had been on the stage playing almost continuously for three hours, not including a ten-minute intermission. In fact, so constant was the applause that Sousa had hardly stepped from his platform before he had to step back again with an encore and this kept up the entire afternoon.

Another large audience and one equally as enthusiastic greeted the band last night.

It seems a pity that people will insist on taking children from two months to four years old to concerts, but they do it not only in Kansas City but everywhere else. Several of these were in attendance at Convention hall yesterday afternoon and Sousa, who is sensitive to disturbance, was visibly irritated by the cries of children while much of the low music was lost on the audience.

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November 6, 1909

SOUSA IN THE HALL NOV. 21.

The March King to Stop Here on
His Trip to the Coast.

After a strenuous six months John Philip Sousa, composer-conductor, has begun his thirty-fifth annual tour as director of the globe-famed band that bears his name. Sousa will not give the current season his customary extension, as "the march king" will be obliged to devote his attention to the production of his new opera, "The Glass Blowers," which production will be made about the first of the new year. For this reason the band season will comprise a quick trip to the Pacific coast and return, closing in New York just before Christmas time. Sousa and his band will give two popular price concerts at Convention hall on the afternoon and evening of Sunday, November 21.

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November 4, 1909

$1,000 FOR MISSOURI SONG.

Verses and Music, to Be Dedicated
to State, Will Be Decided Upon
by Governor and Committee.

JEFFERSON CITY, MO., Nov. 3. -- Governor Hadley wants a song dedicated to the state of Missouri that will be noted far and wide for its soul stirring melody, as well as its force of poetry descriptive of the past history of Missouri and the good things that are in store for the state.

During his trip down the Mississippi river with President Taft and party, he listened to songs dedicated to other states and became so impressed therewith that he induced Cyrus P. Walbridge, David R. Francis, Charles Huttig, James H. Smith and Harry B. Hawes, of St. Louis, to put up $50 each. The parties on the steamboat Alton, Gray Eagle and Wells each chipped in and raised $250.

This makes $1,000, which will be paid to the person or persons composing verses and music that will meet with the approval of the governor and a special committee composed of the following:

David R. Francis, Captain Henry King, managing editor of the St. Louis Globe-Democrat; Henry N. Cary, general manager of the St. Louis Republic, Walter S. Dickey, of Kansas City, and Hal Gaylord, of The Kansas City Journal.

Only Missourians who can compose a beautiful song melody, with words telling of the past glories of Missouri and her future prospects need apply. In a few days the governor will write to the members of the committee, telling them his ideas in general terms regarding the kind of song that should be dedicated to this state.

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October 18, 1909

FAMOUS SONS UNITE
CHILDHOOD CHUMS.

BOY SINGERS' MOTHERS LEARN
THEY ARE OLD FRIENDS.

Strange Coincidence Revealed at
Convention Hall Banquet Table.
Three Youths Earn Fame
With Remarkable Voices.
Frank Vrooman and Lawrence P. Smith, Boy Singers

Those persons who have followed closely the remarkable careers of Maxwell Kennedy, Frank Vrooman and Laurence Smith, boy singers, are pointing to a remarkable coincidence in the life history of the three boys.

Although reared in widely separated sections of the country, these boys have attained almost international reputations because of the remarkable qualities of their voices. Two of these singers, Laurence Powars Smith and Frank Ellsworth Vrooman, met for the first time at Convention hall in Kansas City, Mo., where they appeared on the programme and held spellbound the great assembly which had gathered to honor the postal clerks of the country.

MEET AT BANQUET.

Sitting opposite each other at the banquet table and sharing equally the congratulations of hundreds of persons who had been thrilled by the remarkable carrying power of their young voices were the boy singers and their parents. For a long time Mrs. Clarence J. Voorman, the mother of Frankie, gazed at the smiling countenance of Mrs. C. G. Smith, the mother of Laurence, seeing there something that carried her back in memory to her girlhood days in Junction City, Kas., when her dearest friend and playmate had been Laura Patterson, a girl her own age.

"I am sure you must be my old schoolmate, Laura Patterson," said Mrs. Vrooman, reaching her hand across the table. "Don't you remember me? Lottie Wood."

The two friends who had not met for thirty years quickly reverted to by-gone days and spoke with wonder of the coincidence that the mothers of the two greatest boy singers should have been playmates in their childhood days. The wonder of Mrs. Vrooman was increased, however, when Mrs. Smith spoke of little Frankie Kennedy, who "turned ropes," "spun tops" and did many other wonderful things for their edification while attending the public school in Junction City. Mrs. Vrooman then learned for the first time that this same little Frank Kennedy is the father of Maxwell Kennedy, the wonderful boy singer.

VOICES GAIN FAME.

Laurence Powars Smith is now 17 years old and was born in Ottawa, Kas. His former rich soprano voice combines a wonderful interpretation with great carrying power and has now developed into a tenor of the highest quality. He is the son of C. G. Smith, president of the People's National bank, Kansas City, Kas. His services are much in demand throughout the country, especially at Chautauquas. He is now engaged as soloist at the Linwood Boulevard Presbyterian church, Kansas City, Mo.

Frankie Vrooman is 13 years old. He is a son of Clarance J. Vrooman, 3114 Washington street, Kansas City, Mo. Frankie is a slight, manly little chap, unaffected; and a typical American school boy. His voice is a rich soprano, and every word is enunciated perfectly, so that the carrying power is remarkable. he has been singing in public three years and has met with much success. On June 13 he sung in the Westminster Presbyterian church of Minneapolis. He is a protege of Walton Holmes, and a brilliant future is predicted. At present he is soloist at St. Paul's Episcopal church, Fortieth and Main streets, Kansas City, Mo.

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October 9, 1909

SWOPE LAID TO REST
WHILE CITY MOURNS.

THOUSANDS BRAVE RAIN TO
VIEW FUNERAL CORTEGE.

Procession Longest Ever Seen in
Kansas City -- Casket Temporari-
ly Placed in Vault at
Forest Hill.

Thomas Hunton Swope, for fifty-two years a resident of Kansas City, and its greatest benefactor, was laid to rest late yesterday afternoon in a vault in Forest Hill cemetery.

Following his request only the Episcopal service for the dead was said. It is the same service which has been said in that church for 500 years, and is used for the burial of both great and lowly, rich and poor.

There was no oratory, no eulogy. The service reminded many of the life of the man for whom it was said -- simple, quiet, impressive.

At Grace Episcopal church, Thirteenth and Washington streets, Bishop E. R. Atwill officiated, assisted by Rev. J. A. Schaad, the rector, and his assistant, Rev. E. B. Woodruff.

As the funeral cortege entered the edifice it was headed by the bishop, who repeated a portion of the service as he walked down the aisle. Chaplin Woodruff bore the staff. Following came the immediate family.

Stuart Fleming, a nephew from colonel Swope's old home in Kentucky, was with Mrs. Logan Swope, a sister-in-law of the dead philanthropist. Then came Dr. B. C. Hyde and wife, a niece of Colonel Swope's and all of the relatives from Independence.

The entire center of the church was reserved for the pallbearers, honorary pallbearers and civic bodies and commercial and fraternal organizations.


SERVICE IS SIMPLE.

Bishop Atwill read the service at the church, and the Rev. Mr. Schaad read the lesson. Mr. Frank B. Fisk presided at the organ and rendered a dirge as the body was carried into the church. Mrs. Darnell, contralto, sang "One Sweetly Solemn Thought." Then a hymn, "O Paradise, O Paradise," was sung by the choir, the audience assisting. At the close of the church service the choir rendered the anthem, "I'm a Pilgrim and a Stranger."

During the service at the church the creed was said, and the Lord's Prayer repeated.

It was 3:30 before the cortage reached the church and after 4 o'clock before it got under way, leaving. When it reached the vault in Forest Hill cemetery it was almost dark and raining hard. Here the services were just as simple as at the church. Bishop Atwill read the committal service and Rev. Mr. Schaad the lesson.

The casket was placed in a large vault, made especially for its reception, and sealed. There it will remain until some future date when it will be removed to its final resting place in Swope park, beneath a monument erected by the people of Kansas city.


AN HOUR IN PASSING.

The funeral cortege was the largest ever seen in Kansas City. Besides the military, civic, commercial and fraternal organizations in line, there were seventy-five carriages, not counting the private vehicles. It took over an hour to pass a given point.

It was nearly 2 o'clock before the mounted police, followed by the Third Regiment band at the head of the regiment, started south on Walnut street from the city hall. Then, in order, came police and firemen on foot, Battery B and band, Uniform Rank, K. of P., Modern Woodmen, Turner society, Elks lodge, park board employes, lodge of Eagles, United Confederate Veterans, labor organizations, Board of Trade and Commercial Club and city officials in carriages. The active and honorary pallbearers preceded the immediate family and citizens in carriages.

As the procession left the public library where Colonel Swope's body has been in state since Thursday morning it passed through a double line of school children, each a "part owner" in the beautiful park which he gave the city. They stood uncovered, their hats and caps over their hears, all the long time the cortege was passing. Children lined both sides of the street all the way down Ninth street to Grand avenue and to Tenth street on Grand.

After the procession had crossed Main street it passed through another double line of children formed on Eleventh street from Baltimore avenue to Broadway, and down Broadway to Thirteenth street. Here again every boy stood uncovered, at attention, while the cortege was passing.


THOUSANDS VIEW PROCESSION.

It has been estimated that between 10,000 and 15,000 school children were out. Besides the children, the streets were packed with people along thee entire line of march as far out as Twentieth street and Grand avenue. The windows in every building also were filled with people all the way through the main portion of the city and spectators filled the verandas and windows of every home passed by the cortege entirely to the cemetery. Possibly no fewer than 100,000 people saw the procession.

When Twentieth and Grand was reached all of those in the parade on foot dropped out, the distance to the cemetery being too far for them to walk. At this point the Third regiment, the Uniformed Rank, K. of P., the Modern Woodmen of America, police and firemen were formed in company front along the west side of Grand avenue. It made a solid line of uniformed men for two blocks.

It was intended from this point for the procession to make better time, but the rain had rendered Gillham road very slippery and the procession to make better time, but the rain had rendered Gillham road very slippery and the procession got beyond Thirty-first street on Gillham road before it left a walk.


FLORAL GIFTS BEAUTIFUL.

Between Thirtieth and Thirty-first streets one of the lead horses in the fourth section of Battery B, commanded by Sergeant Cloyse Jones, fell and was injured. The team was taken out and this portion of the battery proceeded with only one team. This caused but a slight delay. Just this side of the cemetery the battery dropped out and returned to the city. The mounted police, however, commanded by Chief Frank F. Snow, acted as convoy throughout the entire procession to the cemetery.

Following the hearse was the most beautiful floral piece ever seen here. It was a remembrance from the city, and represented a white column ten feet high. It was composed of 3,000 white carnations. At the top of the column was a white dove with spread wings. A wreath of American beauty roses and lilies of the valley wounded about the column of the base, which was embedded in autumn leaves. The leaves were gathered in Swope park. "Kansas City Mourns" was the inscription on the column.

Covering the foot of the casket was the Swope family piece, composed of roses and lilies of the valley. A basket of lilies of the valley was sent by the Yale alumni of Kansas City, of which Colonel Swope was a member. Flowers sent by local organizations and friends of the family completely covered the massive state casket.

The sky began to cloud just before the head of the line left city hall, and it passed through a slight shower before reaching the library. After that the sun came out and it appeared as if the rain had passed over. After the services at Grace church, however, the clouds again formed and while the procession was passing the uniformed bodies, standing in line on Grand avenue and Twentieth street, there came the first hard shower. this lasted but a few minutes, and there was a lull until the cemetery was reached, when a downpour started. This continued until the services at the vault were concluded.

PALLBEARERS.

Active pallbearers -- Mayor Crittenden, R. L. Gregory, president upper house; F. J. Shinnick, speaker lower house, A. J. Dean, president of the park board; W. P. Motley, president of the hospital and health board; Frank S. Groves, president fire and water board; William Volker, president pardon and parole board; John T. Harding, city counselor; John C. Paxton, S. W. Spangler.

Honorary pallbearers -- C. O. Tichenor, J.V. C. Karnes, William Warner, R. T. Van Horn, Adriance Van Brunt, Honorable Herbert S. Hadley, D. J. Haff, William Barton, J. C. James, Leon Smith, E. L. Scarritt, R. W. Hocker, R. E. O'Malley, J. C. Wirthman, James Pendergast, M. Cunningham, M. J. O'Hearn, E. E. Morris, R. A. Long, George M. Myers, F. C. Crowell, Wallace Love, W. S. Dickey, J. F. Downing, E. F. Swinney, H. C. Flower, Llewellyn Jones, George W. Fuller, Charles Campbell, W. S. Woods, Ralph Swofford, J. H. Slover, O. H. Dean, James A. Reed, Jay H. Neff, H. M. Beardsley, W. S. Cowherd, George M. Shelley, Lee J. Talbott, J. J. Davenport, R. J. Ingraham, J. W. Wagner, James Gibson,E. R. Crutcher, Cusil Lechtman, Bernard Corrigan, C. F. Morse, L. M. Jones, George H. Edwards, J. H. Hawthorne, J. C. Ford, Rev. Father W. J. Dalton, Homer Reed and John C. Gage.

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October 5, 1909

SAURIANS WELCOMED
THE BRIDE.

WEDDING MARCH BLARED BY
TWO BRASS BANDS.

Thousands of Strangers in Line to
Congratulate Mr. and Mrs. "Al-
ligator Joe," -- "She's My
Peaches Now," Said Groom.

It's an unusual privilege for guests at a wedding to be able to buy young alligators from the bride. It was not only possible last night at Electric park but was done. It was one of the many features of the wedding of "Alligator Joe," who figured in the marriage license as Warren B. Frazee, and Miss Cleopatra N. Croff. The ceremony was witnessed by many thousand persons. The wedding was perfect in every way. From the moment the bridal party entered the gates of the park until the finish there was but the main hitch. The wedding principals entered the gates in t his order:

Michael G. Heim, manager of Electric park.
J. A. Wilson, secretary of the Missouri valley fair.
Platoon of police.
Hiner's band.
Two flower girls.
The wedding party in an auto.
The Independence, Kas., band.

A complete circuit of the colonnade at the park was made with either of the bands tooting away on a wedding strain. Reaching the entrance to the alligator farm, the bands and autos deployed. The wedding party was marched up the center aisle. On either side of the aisle, crocodiles and alligators splashed in the water or spread their leathery lengths on the sand. But "Alligator Joe" ignored for once the presence of the saurians.

WEDDING BELL OF ALFALFA.

It was an exclusive affair, an admission being charged, but several thousand guests were in the enclosure while hundreds more hung by their elbows on the fence. Outside thousands of persons stood. The marriage was celebrated on a raised dais. Overhead there were rafters of wheat straw and grasses. A wedding bell built of alfalfa and crimson tissue paper was suspended over the couples' head. James A. Finley was best man and Miss Genevieve Johnson the bridesmaid. The Rev. Wallace M. Short performed the ceremony.

A slight inadvertence on the part of "Alligator Joe" marred the occasion somewhat. When it became necessary for "Alligator Joe" to produce the ring, he could not. Never before had eh ever tried to reach gloved fingers into his vest pocket and hold a brand new hat in the other hand. So he clapped his had on his head. Mr. Finlay removed it. "Alligator Joe" dug and dug until he got the ring. Some of the guests snickered, even those who had paid to get in joining in the laughter. The man with the searchlight took pity on "Alligator Joe" and switched off the intense gleam.

After the ceremony "Alligator Joe" reached over and smacked "Mrs. Alligator Joe" heartily. The crowd cheered. Then Mr. Finley essayed to kiss her. "Alligator Joe" gave him the throttle clutch with his four fingers spread under Mr. Finley's chin.

"Quit," "Alligator Joe" said. "This is my peaches now."

"Mrs. Alligator Joe" protested. Then "Alligator Joe" relented and Mr. Finley was allowed to kiss the bride. Afterwards 1,000 persons filed by to congratulate the couple.

ALLIGATORS FOR SOUVENIRS.

The bride was dressed in white and wore the conventional veil and orange blossoms. "Alligator Joe" was in black, his only ornament being a shark's tooth, worn pendant as a watch charm and an exquisite scarf pin fashioned of a fish fin.

"Lad--ies and gentle--men--n-n-n," "Alligator Joe" announced after the reception, through a megaphone, "we are about to give you one of the grandest exhibitions of alligator charming and hypnotism it ever will be your good fortune to see in the wide world. I have in my hand the crocodile Hiki-Kiki, which I will hypnotize before you all-l-l-l. It is simply a sample of the grand-est-t-t-t ex-hi-bi-tion within the park. Inside we will give the performance in a few minutes. All who wish to see it may buy their tickets now. The bride will give to each visitor-r-r-r who wishes them, a souvenir-r-r-r of the occasion."

Which she did, for a consideration. Arrayed in her white dress en train, the infant alligators were sold by the bride. "Alligator Joe," showman that he is, put in a stock of 800 of the tiny saurians.

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October 5, 1909

HEAR CONCERT BY 'PHONE.

Governor and Party at Mansion
Listen to Music at Sedalia.

Weil's concert band, assisted by the Sedalia Ladies' Musical Club, gave a sacred concert in the live stock pavilion at the Missouri state fair grounds, Sunday.

By special arrangement with the Bell telephone Company, the music was sent over the wires to the governor's mansion at Jefferson City where it was heard by the governor and Mrs. Hadley, and a large party assembled to hear it.

By the use of specially made megaphone receivers, the music was made plainly audible to the whole assemblage and was keenly enjoyed by them.

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September 27, 1909

NEW INSTRUMENT TO HER.

Fiddler's "Ma" Begged Him to
Learn to Play on "Comedy."

"Mother was an old-fashioned darkey with the ideas which prevailed before the war," said Harry Fiddler of the team of Fiddler and Shelton, negro entertainers at the Orphem last week.

"She was a devout Baptist of hard-shell kind and tried to bring me up in that belief, as well as in the ways with which had been taught her by the family of white folks to whom she once belonged. Moreover, it was her opinion that a good darkey could not be other than a barber, a porter or a groom.

"I was of a different opinion, however. I wanted to be an actor and go upon the stage. This inclination on my part got me many a good licking, my mother remarking: "Yo's the debbil's own; he shore g'wine get you yit.' The lickings didn't affect me a bit. I practiced all the time.

"When I wasn't doing that I was hanging around the stage door, importuning managers to give me a chance. One day it came. Billy Kersand's minstrel troupe came to town. He wanted a man to take the place of one who had quit the troupe. I heard him ask the house manager if he knew of anyone. I pleaded for a chance.

"The manager took me back on the stage, saw my work, and said I would do. I was to receive $25 per week. 'If you make good, I'll give you a contract for the season,' he said.

"Oh, I made good, all right," chuckled Fiddler. "I got my money Saturday night, and as we were not to leave until Sunday night, I went home and handed mother my salary. It was the first money I had ever earned.

" 'Whah you git dis money, chil'?' she asked.

" 'At the theater,' I replied.

" 'How you git it?'

" ' Danced for it.'

" 'Fifteen dollars for dancing?' incredulously, for this was more money than father earned each week.

" 'Yep,' I replied. But mother couldn't see it that way. Something was wrong. She picked up a hickory club lying in the corner, and, advancing toward me, once more asked:

" 'Look me in both eyes, chil'. Whah yuh git dis money?'

" 'Got it for dancing in Billy Kersands's minstrels. Why, that isn't anything, mother. Billy Kersands gets $250 a week for fifteen minutes' work each night,' said I.

" 'What he do?' she asked.

" 'He plays comedy parts,' I replied.

" 'An' he gits $250 a week fo' playin' dat?' she asked. Turning to my aunt, who was present during the conversation, mother exclaimed:

" 'Yah hear dat, M'riar? Didn't I tole you dat boy was de debbil's own. I dun beg him all his life to learn to play on dat instrument.' "

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September 26, 1909

PART OF BARNUM'S
FIRST FREAK SHOW.

PECULIARITIES OF THE LUCASIE
FAMILY, ALBINOS.

Burning of Museum in New York
Sent Joseph to Kansas City,
Where He Died of Dropsy.
Joseph Lucase, Famous Albino Violinist.
JOSEPH LUCASIE.

Joseph Lucasie, the Albino, who died of dropsy at the General hospital Friday morning, had in addition to an exceptional gift of harmony the distinction of having been one of the original exhibitions of P. T. Barnum, the pioneer showman.

It was in 1858 that Barnum heard of the strange family in Holland.

The fact that an Albino named Lucase had married an Albino wife and that both had abundant silken hair was in itself nothing remarkable. Barnum could have placed his hand on at least a dozen such couples in different quarters of the world.

It was the phenomena of two white-haired, pink-eyed children, a boy and a girl, born of this union, that made the Lucasie family worth having. The offspring of Albinos are almost without exception normal in every way, and the condition of being an Albino is said not to be hereditary.

HERALDED FROM MADAGASCAR.

When the Lucasie family was brought over from Holland, Joseph was 8 years old and his sister a few years younger. They were assigned to Barnum's New York city museum in 1859-60, where they were featured as having come from Madagascar and being the last of the great race of Albinos made famous by the writings of H. Rider Haggard. In this role they excited immense interest in the metropolis, attracting large crowds daily.

P. T. Barnum's Famous Albino Family.
FAMOUS ALBINO FAMILY THAT WAS SHOWN BY THE LATE P. T. BARNUM.

When the Barnum museum in New York burned the Lucasie family started out on its own resources and made money. They were picked up by the W. W. Cole circus and taken to Australia, where they were featured with success in a country popularly thought to be the home of the Albino.

After their return to America they hired out to the Lemen Bros.' circus, touring the West with it until 1898. Then, Joseph's father, mother and sister died in quick succession, leaving him practically alone in the world. The disruption of the family, which had been such a drawing card as a whole, left Joseph Lucasie in rather poor circumstances. He had, however, one recourse which stood him in good stead up to the time of his death.


EXPERT VIOLINIST.

During the years he spent with Barnum in the museum business he had learned to play the violin. Later he had improved his talent by constant practice, so that when his father died here ten years ago he was able to go into vaudeville and make good. It is said that there are few professional violinists in the west who are not personally acquainted with Joseph Lucasie.

Mr. Lucasie at his death was large and thick-chested. His luxuriant growth of white hair had been shorn a year previous because it made his head ache and there was little of the Albino distinctions left about him apparently, with the exception of his pink eyes. He was very sensitive and disliked to be alluded to as "the Albino" or have any name applied to him indicating that he was different from other men.

His memory of P. T. Barnum was very vague, owing to the great lapse of time and his extreme youth when he was in the great showman's museum, and he could tell few anecdotes about him. Since 1894 he has lived at 1117 Norton.

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September 25, 1909

JEWS OBSERVE YOM KIPPUR.

Period of Fasting and Prayer Began
at 6 O'clock Last Night.

The Jewish citizens of Kansas City have been fasting and praying since 6 o'clock last night. They are observing Yom Kippur, or the day of atonement, and their fast and prayers will continue until 6 o'clock tonight. Services appropriate to the event were held in all the Jewish churches last night.

The services at the church of Dr. Max Lieberman, 1415 Troost, were especially solemn and impressive and they will be resumed at 7 o'clock this morning and continue throughout the day. The male choir of twelve voices sang several selections at last night's services.

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September 21, 1909

BOGUSLAWSKI RECITAL.

Brilliant Pianist Who Has Made
Kansas City His Home.

An artist of the first rank played his first recital in Kansas City last night in the auditorium of Central high school. He is Moses Boguslawsky, the new head of the conservatory of music piano department and his formal introduction to local musical circles last night was more than auspicious. The impression which he made was instantaneously favorable and he was given a demonstrative welcome solely upon his merits as a player, for he came unheralded and unknown to Western music lovers. Kansas City is well equipped with good women players but there is ample room here for a man of Mr. Boguslawski's gifts. This young player, not yet 30, has unquestionably a brilliant future before him. He played a very musicianly programme last night with a verve, sureness, brilliancy and emotionality which stamped him a real artist. A man of slight physique, Boguslawski's repertoire is an extensive one and from it he selected last night a series of illustrative tone pictures which displayed the scope of his artistic acquirements.

Francois Boucher, violinist, assisted and his contributions were, as always, interesting musical features. He played several Weiniawsky numbers very effectively.

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September 12, 1909

NEGRO FAIR OPEN TODAY.

Sacred Concert by Band and Special
Services on Grounds.

The negro fair at Independence came to a close last evening. It was not a success financially owing to rain the first three days of last week. the management has decided to keep the fair grounds open today. There will be a sacred concert by the band, and special services also will be held on the grounds.

The fair was successful from an exhibition standpoint. The handiwork of the negro women attracted considerable attention, as did the cooking department and preserving section, which were excellent.

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September 7, 1909

DEATH ENTERS THEATER
AS ORCHESTRA PLAYS.

HEART DISEASE CLAIMS E. L.
DORSEY AT THE ORPHEUM.

Faints in Seat and Expires When
Carried Into Foyer -- Had Been
Having "Jolly" Day
With Daughter.

As the orchestra of the Orpheum theater was closing the last strains of the overture from Mignon, E. L. Dorsey, a traveling salesman, leaned on the shoulder of his daughter, Miss Leonora, and with a single gasp lost consciousness. Doctors, who were summoned from the audience and reached his side by the time he was carried into the foyer, pronounced him dead.

His heart action had stopped, they declared, when he collapsed in his seat.

The collapse of Mr. Dorsey caused consternation among the occupants of the nearby seats, but ushers quickly carried him into the foyer and a request was made from the stage for a physician for a man who had fainted. This allayed the excitement and few in the audience realized that a death had occurred in their midst.

AT THEATER WITH DAUGHTER.

Mr. Dorsey was a salesman in the employ of the Burnham, Hana, Munger Dry Goods Company. He lived in Norborne, Mo., and traveled in the northern part of the state. He met his daughter Leonora, 18 years old, at the depot yesterday morning by appointment. They were to spend yesterday and today in Kansas City and then he was to have taken her to the Missouri Valley College at Marshall, Mo. A daughter of Virgil Conkling was to have accompanied them.

Mr. Dorsey secured seats close to the front at the Orpheum, and with his daughter reached the theater before the members of the orchestra took their places. It was while the last notes of the overture from Mignon were being played that Mr. Dorsey collapsed.

"I always like this selection," Mr. Dorsey told his daughter just a few moments before he fainted, "but it is seldom that I have the pleasure of listening to it."

EXPECTED A JOLLY TIME.

Attaches of the theater supported Miss Dorsey when she realized that her father was dead. She was taken to the Savoy hotel, where Miss Conkling and other friends were summoned to her side. Mr. Dorsey's body was removed to Stine's undertaking rooms.

"Father suffered from heart trouble occasionally, but he did not give it much thought, and none of us ever thought it was serious," said Miss Dorsey. "He was in fine spirits this morning and enjoyed a hearty lunch. We expected to have the jolliest sort of time here before Miss Conkling and I left for school."

Friends wired Mrs. Dorsey at Norborne, Mo. Besides the widow and daughter, Mr. Dorsey leaves a son, Edward, 10 years old.

Mrs. Dorsey and her son arrived last night and were taken to the Savoy hotel and later with Miss Leonora Dorsey to the home of friends. The body will be sent to Norborne, Mo., for burial today.

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August 30, 1909

JAPANESE CARNIVAL AT FOREST.

At Night Park Is Lighted With
10,000 Lanterns.

An elaborate display of Japanese lanterns is to be seen this week at Forest park. Nearly 10,000 of these vari-colored transparencies are distributed over the park, and when illuminated at night make an imposing sight.

Owing to the cool weather the ballroom was the objective point yesterday. There is an entire change in the vaudeville bill.

A pleasing and difficult act is that of the Kaichi Japanese troupe of acrobats. "The Climax" is performed by Mlle. Gertrude La Morrow, who not only dances but sings as well. Elliotte an d Le Roy, in a comedy sketch, are amusing.

Tonight is souvenir night for the women at the carnival.

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August 30, 1909

HADLEY WILL OPEN
INDEPENDENCE FAIR.

OLD FASHIONED COUNTY SHOW
IS ON TODAY.

For a Week Products of Farm Will
Take Precedence Over Thrill-
ers -- Special Features
Are Attractive.

There was a bunch of tired men in Independence last night who seemed happy in their fatigue. They were the directors of the Independence fair and everything was ready for the opening this morning. The fair this year is going to be just as it has always been, an old-fashioned county affair where the products of the farm take precedence over thrillers of summer park invention and where a prize hog looks a whole lot better than a motor car, for the time being.

And if exhibits are to be counted, the Independence fair is better off this year than ever before. It has been a good year on the farms of Jackson county, and for that reason the exhibits are going to be the largest in the history of the fair. The mountain of pumpkins, a yearly feature of the fair, is to be cooked into pies and distributed to visitors as edible souvenirs. That is to be done on the last day, Saturday.

HADLEY TO OPEN FAIR.

The fair is to have executive recognition and it will be opened at 10 o'clock this morning by Governor H. S. Hadley. The governor will make his speech at that time, after the salute of Battery B of Kansas City has been fired. After the speech of the governor, the battery will maneuver and the fair will be on in earnest. The gates will be open at 7 o'clock in the morning.

The directors have offered purses aggregating $10,000 for the race meeting, and there is a good list of entries. Independence is on three racing circuits and more than 200 horses will strive for the various purses. There will be from one to three races a day.

SERIES OF SPECIAL DAYS.

Admission to the grounds is to be free this year and as an added attraction, there is to be a fireworks display every night. A band will give a free concert every night. Zach Mulhall's Wild West show will be there.

There is to be a series of special days. Tomorrow is to be a special racing day and there will be an extra race for an extra prize. Thursday will be Kansas City day, when Kansas City exhibitors and Kansas City exhibits will have full sway. Friday will be Old Settler's day. Many of the old settlers of Jackson county and the counties surrounding will attend the fair on that day. Saturday is to be pumpkin day.

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August 26, 1909

DIES IN STATE HOSPITAL.

For Years Harry B. Taylor Was a
Well Known Band Man.

Harry B. Taylor, 32 years old, who was for years a drummer in Coleman's Military band in Kansas City, Kas., died yesterday morning in the state hospital for the insane at Osawatomie, Kas. The body will be brought to Fairweather & Baker's undertaking rooms in Kansas City, Kas., this morning. Burial will be in Leavenworth, Kas. He is survived by a sister, Esther, 15 years old.

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August 24, 1909

WITH 5,000 NEGRO DELEGATES.

SUPREME LODGE WILL OPEN
THIS MORNING.

Every State in Union Wil Be Rep-
resented on Roll Call -- Recep-
tion at Second Bap-
tist Church.

With a delegation of 5,000 negro men and women from every state in the Union, the supreme lodge of negro Knights of Pythias opens this morning in Ivanhoe hall, Nineteenth street and Tracy avenue, and continues until Friday night. It is the largest gathering of its kind ever held in Kansas City. Among the delegates are doctors, lawyers, bankers, merchants, clerks, porters, barbers, teachers, editors, farmers and every other profession, trade and business followed by negroes.

A reception was held last night at the Second Baptist church, Tenth and Charlotte streets. Grand Chancellor A. W. Lloyd of St. Louis presided and music was furnished by the choir of the Second Baptist church.

Nelson C. Crews, chairman of the local committee, made an address of welcome.

A solo by Miss Ennis Collins followed.

Welcome to the state was extended by Professor W. W. Yates, who represented Governor Hadley. His address was short and cordial. A selection by the Calanthian choir then followed.

S. W. Green of New Orleans, supreme chancellor, responded to this address.

S. C. Woodson represented Mayor Crittenden in an address of welcome.

There was a solo by Wiliam J. Tompkins and a selection by the choir, "The Heavens Are Telling." Other addresses were made by Prof. J. R. Jefferson of West Virginia; Dr. J. E. Perry, E. D. Green, of Chicago; Dr. W. P. Curtiss, St. Louis; Dr. J. A. Ward, Indianapolis; Mrs. Janie C. Combs and A. J. Hazelwood.

The Supreme Court of Calanthe will be presided over by John W. Strauther of Greenville, Miss. The session will be held at the Hodcarrier's hall. In this meeting every phase of the negro's home life will be discussed. Strauther is one of the most noted men of his race in the country.

At 2 o'clock this afternoon a band concert will be given at Cap Carrouthers by the Bixton, Ia., band, and dress parade at 5:30 p. m. by the entire uniform ranks.

Rev. B. Hillman of Terra Haute, Ind., made the opening prayer last night.

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