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February 11, 1910

DR. HYDE CHARGED
WITH MURDER IN
THE FIRST DEGREE.

Colonel Swope's Nephew by
Marriage Formally Accused
and Arrested.

OUT UNDER $50,000 BOND.

Special Grand Jury Convenes
Saturday to Investigate
Swope Deaths.

BIG LIBEL SUIT DROPPED.

By Dismissing Proceedings,
Dr. Hyde Avoids Giving
Deposition.

Dr. B. Clark Hyde, Charged with First Degree Murder.
DR. B. CLARK HYDE.

Dr. B. Clark Hyde, whose wife is a niece of the late Colonel Thomas H. Swope, was formally charged in a warrant issued yesterday afternoon by Justice of the Peace Loar at Independence, with having caused the death of Colonel Swope by poison.

Dr. Hyde was arrested in the office of Marshal Joel Mayes at 4 o'clock and an hour later gave bond in the sum of $50,000 before Justice Loar. The hearing is set for February 17.

The surties on the bond are M. D. Scruggs, vice president of the Kansas City Live Stock Commission Company; Fernando P. Neal, president of the Southwest National bank, and Herbert F. Hall, presiden tof the Hall-Baker Grain Company. Frank P. Walsh, John M. Cleary, John H. Lucas, attorneys for Dr. Hyde, and William McLaughlin joined in signing the bond, which was twice as large as was suggested by Prosecutor Conkling.

SPECIAL GRAND JURY CALLED.

Two hours prior to the issuance of the warrant, Judge Ralph S. Latshaw of the riminal court ordered that a special grand jury be convened to examine into the deaths of Colonel Thomas H. Swope, Chrisman Swope and other members of the Swope family who died of typhoid fever, including Moss Hunton, who died suddenly in the Swope home.

Marshal Joel Mayes was busy yesterday selecting a list of names of men who will be asked to serve on this grand jury. The jury will be convened Saturday morning when Judge Latshaw will instruct them in their duties.

The refusal of Dr. Hyde to appear at the Reed offices yesterday morning so that his deposition could be taken in his libel suits for $600,000 against the Pulitzer Publishing Company and the dismissal by the attorneys of the suit when they learned that an attachment had been issued for Dr. Hyde, precipitated the criminal proceedings.

The information was sworn to by John G. Paxton of Independence, the executor of the Swope estate. On the reverse of the warrant was a request by Prosecutor Conkling for an immediate arrest.

BIG LIBEL SUIT DROPPED.

The scenes of activity in the Swope case yesterday were kaleidoscopic. The legal sparring began in the morning when attemts to take depositions in the offices of Atwood, Reed, Yates, Mastin & Harvey on one hand and Frank P. Walsh on the other failed because the witnesses subpoenaed were not present.

Following the issuance of an attachment by the Reed forces came the dismissal of his suit for $600,000 damages.

The dismissal of the libel suit in which the Reed forces had obtained a prior right to taking depositions was not wholly a surprise, but it roused the attorneys for the Swope estate to activity. It was shortly after 10 o'clock a. m. when the attorneys and the women witnesses in the case gathered in the Reed offices. George H. Roberts, the notary, had failed to arrive and he was found in the court house. He had not expected the case to be called. Dr. Hyde had not arrived and it was determined to ask for an attachment. This was issued and a deputy sheriff began a search for Dr. Hyde.

JUDGE LATSHAW ACTS.

It did not take long for this news to reach the Walsh offices and John M. Cleary was dispatched to Independence. There the suit alleging libel against the Pulitzer Publishing Company, John G. Paxton, Dr. E. L. Stewart and Frank G. Hall was dismissed. The sheriff was notified and recalled the deputy who had been unable to find Dr. Hyde. the latter was ensconced in a private apartment of Mr. Walsh's offices. The news of the dismissal of the suit did not sit well with the attorneys for the Swope estate. There was a conference between Reed, Atwood, Maston and Paxton. It terminated at the office of Prosecutor Conknling.

It was at this juncture that Judge Ralph S. Latshaw entered the case. He went into conference with the attorneys and a quarter of an hour later declared that he would convene a special grand jury on Saturday monrning.

In the meantime Mr. Paxton had gone to Mr. Walsh's office. He said that he was sorry that he had caused the attorneys any embarrassment, but that he had a great deal of private business to attend to. He would greatly appreciate the favor of being excused until 2:30 p. m. Mr. Walsh conferred with Judge Johnson, and returning to the room, told Mr. Paxton that they would excuse him until 2:30 p. m.

Then Mr. Paxton got busy. Mr. Reed arranged for an interview with County Prosecutor Virgil Conkling. It did not take the attorneys long to arrive at a decision. This was that Mr. Paxton should swear to the information and that Prosecuting Attorney Conkling would recommend an issuance of a warrant charging Dr. Hyde with murder.

Before Prosecuting Attorney Conkling departed for Independence he called up Mr. Walsh on the telephone and asked him to have Dr. Hyde in the office of County Marshal Joel Mayes at 4 p. m. as he desired to serve a warrant on him at that time. Mr. Walsh promised to have his client there at the appointed time.

Dr. Hyde was not at the Walsh offices when this message came and caught his attorneys somewhat by surprise. They were getting ready to take the deposition of Mr. Paxton. Dr. Hyde was notifed over the telephone to come to the Walsh offices and then Mr. Cleary was given the job of finding bondsmen for Mr. Hyde. He was only a few minutes later than 4 p. m. in getting the signatures of the three businessmen to the bond which was made out in blank.

The warrant was issued at 3:30 o'clock on the application of J. G. Paxton in the office of Justice of the Peace Loar of Independence. Mr. Paxton was accompanied to the office of Justice Loar in the Jackson County Bank building by T. J. Mastin. Virgil Conkling indorsed the information. "I hereby approve of complaint and request that a warrant be issued," affixing his signature to the back of the document.

"I suggest that the bond be fixed at $25,000," said the prosecutor. "I believe that is sufficient in this case as there are certain contingencies which lead me to believe that a greater bond is not necessary." Justice Loar also was informed by the prosecutor that he could do as he pleased as to the amount of the bond, but that the state would be satisfied with that amount.

LEAVES WITH WARRANT.

Justice Loar upon the receipt of complaint at once was given another paper by Virgil Conkling which proved to be a warrant for the arrest of Dr. Hyde. In the body of the warrant the wording was identical with that in the complaint, and after being signed by the justice of the peace, who ordered it delivered to the marshal of Jackson county, the prosecutor and Attorneys Mastin and Paxton left in an automobile for Kansas City with the warrant.

Prosecutor Conkling stated that he had placed in the warrant that the preliminary examination would be held February 17.

Justice Loar stated that if the defendant waived preliminary examination he would commit him to jail, but if not he would accept the bond which it was expected Dr. Hyde would give.

Shortly before 4 p. m. Mr. Walsh and Mr. Lucas took their client to the criminal court building. Dr. Hyde was smiling. They hastened to Mr. Conkling's office where they remained until they were told that Mr. Conkling and Mr. Paxton had returned from Independence and were in the marshal's office.

Prosecutor Conkling handed the warrant to Marshal Mayes and told him Dr. Hyde would be in the office in a few minutes.

"Is your name B. Clark Hyde?" inquired Marshal Mayes of Dr. Hyde a few monents later when he was brought into the office by Attorneys Walsh and Lucas.

Dr. Hyde nodded his head in reply.

WAIVES READING WARRANT.

"I have a warrant which I am directed to serve on you. Shall I read it?" Marshal Mayes inquired.

"We waive the reading of the warrant," spoke up Attorney Walsh and the party including Dr. Hyde smiled.

Dr. Hyde and Marshal Mayes entered into a conversation on temporal subjects. The afternoon was delightful, remarked the marshal.

Prosecuting Attorney Conkling and Attorneys Walsh and Lucas drew to one side of the room.

"I have recommended that Justice Loar take a bond of $25,000 for the appearance of Dr. Hyde at the preliminary hearing which has been set for a week from today," said Mr. Conkling.

COULD MAKE IT A MILLION.

"That is satisfactory to us," replied Mr. Walsh. "Mr. Cleary is out now and will be here very shortly with a bond that will be good for a million dollars if necessary.

"That is not necessary," replied Mr. Conkling. "I have suggested a bond which I deem sufficient."

Attorneys Conkling, Walsh and Lucas then withdrew to the outer office, leaving Dr. Hyde with Marshal Mayes.

"I am very much interested in knowing what they are going to do with me next," said Dr. Hyde to Marshal Mayes.

"Do we have to go to Independence, and will I have to stay there all night?" asked Dr. Hyde.

"If your attorneys are unable to get bond for you, you will remain with me tonight. If they do get bond, you will go to Independence with me and then go on home," said Marshal Mayes.

Dr. Hyde was inclined to be almost talkative while in the marshal's office. He talked on almost any subject not pertaining to the case, and his face, for the first time during the week, was wreathed in smiles.

About 4:30 p. m. Mr. Walsh suggested that the party depart for Independence, as he expected Mr. Cleary had already started there. Assistant Prosecutor Jost accompanied the party in the Walsh automobile, representing Mr. Conkling. A moment later they were on their way to Independence.

At 5:15 o'clock a large automobile glided up to the bank building at Independence. In it was the county marshal, having in custody Dr. Hyde. Accompanying the party were Frank P. Walsh, John Cleary and John H. Lucas. They immediately went to the office of Justice Loar.

Dr. Hyde followed his lawyers closely, and as soon as he entered stepped to one side, and motioning to a newsboy, bought an evening paper, scanning the headlines. Not once did he raise his eyes, but kept them riveted on the columns which contained the latest developments in his case. After reading the full account, he turned the paper over and reread it.

MAYES SIGNS RETURN.

County Marshal Joel Mayes drew up his chair to the desk and signed the return, turning it over to the justice.

Dr. Hyde, who was standing near, found room on a window sill where he kept reading his paper, only looking up sufficiently long to buy another, which he read with as much eagerness as the first.

Frank Walsh left the court room, stating that he would be back in a short time. Upon his return he placed the bond before the justice of the peace for $50,000 instead of the $25,000 expected.

"I expected bond for $25,0000, but this is better still," said Justice Loar.

Mr. Walsh signed the document, then handed a pen to Dr. Hyde. Dr. Hyde wrote in a plain, bold hand, without a tremor, and his signature was affixed with as much indifference as if writing a prescription for a patient. After Dr. Hyde, John M. Cleary and John H. Lucas signed the bond.

LAWYERS SIGN BOND.

After this preliminary Dr. Hyde, followed by his lawyers, went to their automobile and soon were out of sight.

"This is a good bond," said Justice Loar, after the crowd had left the office. "Mr. Neal is president of the Southwest National bank, and the others I am given to understand are stockyards men. I do not expet that there will be a preliminary examination here. I am confident that it will go to the criminal court at once.

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February 5, 1910

BLIND WOMAN WAITED
AT DEPOT IN VAIN.

Hostess Detained by Accident -- Mrs.
Aldrich Writes Literature
for the Blind.

Mrs. Clara Aldrich, totally blind and a stranger in Kansas City, arrived at the Union depot last night from Joliet, Ill. She was expecting friends to meet her at the station, but was disappointed. She told Mrs. Ollie Everingham, matron at the depot, that Mrs. O. P. Blatchley of 220 South Ash street, in Kansas City, Kas., had promised to meet her. The matron called the Blatchley home over the telephone and found that Mrs. Blatchley had fallen on the ice near her home yesterday morning and received injuries which confined her to bed. The matron sent Mrs. Aldrich to the Young Women's Christian Association boarding house for the night.

Dr. O. P. Blatchley said last night that his wife's parents were friends of the parents of Mrs. Aldrich, and that she had arranged to locate her in Kansas City, Kas. Dr. Blatchley said that Mrs. Aldrich for many years has been engaged in writing religious literature for students in the blind schools over the country.

Mrs. Blatchley suffered a dislocated left shoulder and a ruptured artery over her left eye in her fall yesterday.

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January 16, 1910

PHONE SERVICE VIA ROSEDALE.

New Cable Across Kaw, to Argen-
tine, Being Constructed.

The residents of Argentine, now the Seventh ward of Kansas City, Kas., whose communication over the Missouri and Kansas Telephone Company's lines to the rest of the city was cut off by the breaking of the company's trunk line across the Kaw river, when a pier and one span of the old Southern bridge went into the river Friday afternoon, are now getting service through the Rosedale exchange. The service was out only a few hours. Linemen are now at work stretching a new cable over the Kaw, and until that work is finished the operation of hte Argentine lines will be through the Rosedale exchange.

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January 7, 1910

CURED OF ILLS
OVER THE PHONE?

ABSENT TREATMENT PUT MRS.
MOSTOW UNDER SPELL,
WITNESSES SAY.

Spiritualist Seeks to Prevent
Heirs From Depriving
Him of Bequests.

That by giving her absent treatment over the telephone for rheumatism and in other ways, John H. Lee, said to be a spiritualist, won the confidence of wealthy Mrs. Victoria Mostow, 71 years old, and thus influenced her to bequeath him property worth $35,000, was the substance of testimony given yesterday in Judge J. G. Park's division of the circuit court.

The occasion was the trial of a suit by which Lee seeks to have set aside deeds transferring to James P. Richardson, principal of the Prosso school, and nephew of Mrs. Mostow, the property left to Lee by will. The heirs have a suit pending to set aside the will.

The story told by witnesses in substance follows:

Mrs. Mostow was the wife of the late Randolph Mostow, and a sister of the late Dr. De Estaing Dickerson. From the latter she inherited a large amount of property. Mr. Mostow died in the summer of 1908. During his last illness, he summoned Lee and was given treatment. In this way Mrs. Mostow became acquainted with the spiritualist.

TREATED BY PHONE.

After her husband's death, Mrs. Mostow became a believer in spiritualism. Through the medium of spirits and mesmeric powers Lee claimed that he could cure every known ill. Mrs. Mostow put in a telephone at her home, at Thirty-fourth and Wyandotte streets, and when she became troubled with rheumatism, Lee would give her absent treatment over the phone. At this time he lived near 4800 East Eighth street, several miles across the city from his patient.

In January, 1908, Mrs. Mostow made deeds to property at 817 Main street, and her home on Wyandotte, to her only surviving heir in Kansas City, James P. Richardson, owner of the Prosso Preparatory school. This was done to escape the payment of the collateral inheritance tax, and to prevent the heirs in Chicago from securing any of her property. The deeds were not to be recorded until after her death.

LIVED WITH HER.

In the summer of 1908, it is charged, Lee secured so great an influence over Mrs. Mostow that he secured permission to move himself and family into her home. Here they have lived since. The taxes are said to have been paid by the Mostow estate, and during her lifetime all the household expenses were met by Mrs. Mostow.

After Lee had been living in the Mostow home a few months, it is charged, it was seen that he gained an influence over the aged woman, and she began deeding small pieces of property to him.

Mr. Richardson, seeing the trend of affairs and fearing that he might lose the property that was to be his at the death of his aunt, immediately recorded the two deeds. When Mrs. Mostow died, it was found that she had bequeathed the same two pieces of property to Lee.

Suit was brought in the circuit court by Lee to set aside the deeds, charging undue influence. A similar suit was also brought by Richardson and the Chicago heirs to set aside the will.

The evidence was all submitted yesterday in Judge Park's court. The final arguments will be heard some time next week.

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December 25, 1909

TWO WREATHS OF HOLLY.

Outward Evidence of Christmas at
Union Depot.

Two wreaths of holly -- one over Matron Ollie Everingham's desk and the other in the sick room -- was the only evidence at the dingy Union depot last night of the fact that it was Christmas eve. The crowd, good natured and unusually large, packed bundles and and parcels and exchanged Christmas greetings. The exchange of presents by employes at the depot was accomplished under difficulties, made so by the unusually heavy travel this year. There were two places where the fact that it was Christmas eve was apparent. These were the Bell and Home telephone exchanges. The pretty girl operators were fairly loaded up with boxes of candy.

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December 19, 1909

TRAIN IS RUSHED TO
LEE'S SUMMIT FIRE.

AID FROM KANSAS CITY STOPS
FLAMES IN BUSINESS SECTION.

Town Helpless as Conflagration
Gets Beyond Control, Following
Pump of Volunteer Firemen
Breaking -- Damage $65,000.

Lee's Summit, twenty-five miles southeast of Kansas City, unable to cope with a fire which threatened the business section last night, appealed to Kansas City for aid and a special train, carrying a fire engine and hose reel, went out over the Missouri Pacific at 11:45 o'clock, nearly two hours later.

The fire started from a stove, which was located over the M. A. Kinney grocery store. In a few minutes the entire business section of the town seemed doomed. By midnight three business buildings were badly burned and two others were damaged.

T. M. George, a real estate dealer, was overcome by the heat, but was rescued and revived. No other injuries were reported.

The Lee's Summit fire department was badly handicapped. The company had only a gasoline pump with which to work. Water was pumped from a public well. Two streams of water were being directed on the fire when the pump broke and the volunteers were rendered helpless. The Kansas City's aid was sought.

NINE FIREMEN TAKEN.

A special train was made up of two flat cars and one caboose. The fire engine and reel was from No. 1 station. Nine men were taken along from Company 16 with Assistant Chief Alex Henderson in charge.

The special train reached Lee's Summit at 1 o'clock this morning. when the Kansas Cityans arrived the entire population of Lee's Summit, numbering 2,000, out fighting the fire in their helpless way, cheered wildly. The engine and reel were unloaded at once on skids and in fifteen minutes a big stream was being played on the fire. the water from the old mill pond was used.

The flames were checked rapidly by the Kansas City firemen, and the impending complete destruction of the business district was prevented.

The entire stock and goods of the M. A. Kinney company, in whose building the fire started, were completely destroyed. The flames spread to the building belonging to J. D. Ocker, which was occupied by his stock of furniture and hardware.

BUILDINGS DESTROYED.

The entire building was destroyed, including Mr. Ocker's complete stock of goods, and also the offices and fixtures of Dr. J. C. Hall, who occupied the floor above.

The fire next caught at the Citizens' National bank and the building and all the fixtures and property were consumed except the fire-proof vaults.

The J. P. McKisson building located east of the burned block was saved by the valiant work of the volunteer fire department, under the command of H. Lewis. The volunteers had played their streams on this building until the breaking of the apparatus.

One business block was practically saved. In this was the W. B. Howard Clothing store occupying the ground floor and the Bell telephone company on the floor above.

The loss of the Bell telephone company exceeds $3,000 although the local office was but slightly damaged. Only a week ago the company had rewired the town.

All connections and cables were burned and the service completely destroyed. W. B. Howard, cashier of the Citizens State bank declared that his business was the only one affected entirely covered by insurance.

CITY RECORDS LOST.

In the Citizen's Bank building, where the Kansas City firemen finally checked the fire, were located the offices of Keupp & Kimball, a real estate firm, and also the rooms of the city council. All the records and papers of the city were stored in the city rooms, and were a complete loss.

The Kansas City firemen directed two streams of hose on this building and within twenty minutes had the fire put out. There was plenty of pressure and 1,200 feet of hose were used.

The loss will aggregate $65,000. The damage to the buildings was estimated at $15,000, while conservative estimates place the damage to the goods at $50,000. M. A. Kinney carried $1,000 insurance on both his stock and his building.

J. R. Leinweber, president of the bank at Lee's Summit, announced immediately after the fire that plans would be taken for an early re-building of the bank building. The bank is capitalized at $26,000 and has a surplus of $15,000. Its deposits at the last quarterly statement were $108,00. All the valuable papers and bonds held by the bank were deposited in the fire-proof safety vaults, which were uninjured by the fire.

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November 23, 1909

TERMINAL DIRECTORS
ACCEPT DEPOT PLAN.

KANSAS CITY'S UNION STATION
TO COST $5,750,000.

Great Structure Will Have Every
Facility for Handling Trains
and Travelers -- Dirt to Fly
in a Few Months.
New Union Passenger Station Faces on Twenty-Third Street and Has a Frontage of 512 Feet.
SOUTH ELEVATION OF NEW UNION PASSENGER STATION.

Five million, seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars will be the cost of Kansas City's new Union passenger station.

The plans prepared by Jarvis Hunt, a Chicago architect, were accepted yesterday by the board of directors of the Kansas City Terminal Railway Company. As soon as the stockholders of the several railroads that are to use the depot ratify the action of their representatives, work will begin on the structure. This consent is expected to be immediate. In a few months dirt will be flying and construction under way.

GENERAL PLAN OF STRUCTURE.

The main entrance to the station will face south. It's exact location will be twenty-five feet south of Twenty-third street, and 100 feet west of Main.

The frontage of the main building is to be 512 feet. The train sheds are to be 1,400 feet long, and are to be constructed so that trains east and west can run through.

The exterior will be of stone, concrete and steel. The roof will be rounding or barrel shape. The general lobby is to be 350 feet long and 160 feet wide, and the decorations and accommodations will be rich and elaborate.

Especial care has been taken in lighting and ventilation; the ceiling will be arched, and will be 115 feet high. The interior walls will be of marble, and massive columns will grace each side of the passageway into other parts of the building.

The center of the lobby will be the ticket office. Adjacent will be the baggage room, where passengers can check their baggage and not be annoyed with it again until they reach their destination.

ON THREE LEVELS.

In a space of 75x300 feet off the lobby will be the restaurants, lunch rooms, waiting rooms, men's smoking rooms, and other utilities. Telegraph and telephone stations, a subpostal station and other accessories will also find places within this space.

On the upper floors will be located the offices of several railroads using the depot together with rooms for railway employes.

Space has been set apart for dining and lounging, reading, and billiard rooms.

From the center of the lobby and above the track will extend the main waiting room, on either side of which there will be midways or passages leading to the elevators to carry passengers to the trains. Smoke and gases from the locomotives will be s hut out from the station by a steel and glass umbrella shed.

There will be three levels to the depot. These are to be known as the passenger level, the station proper; the train service level, from where passengers take the trains, and which is connected with the midways by eight big elevators on either side, and also, stairways; and the level on which are the baggage rooms, express and postal service.

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November 13, 1909

NOT CARL ORIN'S GHOST.

Des Moines Man Believed Killed in
Wreck, Is in Kansas City.

"Hello, Harry, is that you? This is Carl -- Carl Orin. Can't you understand -- C -A-R-L, O-R-I-N of Des Moines, Ia. Don't you know we came here together several years ago?"

"Not much you are not Carl Orin. He was killed in a wreck out in Wyoming nearly a year ago. Everybody knows that he's dead."

The foregoing telephone conversation took place about 6 o'clock last night between Harry Ensminger, foreman at the Gump truck factory, Ninth and Main streets, and Carl Orin, who just had arrived here from Oklahoma City.

"If you don't believe I am Carl Orin," said the first speaker, "I will just show you, so long as you are in Missouri. I am coming right over to see you."

"If you do you are Orin's ghost," insisted Ensminger, "for I tell you I know that he is dead. I know his mother is mourning him as dead."

"Quit your kidding," came back from the man at the telephone. "You must be trying to hand me something."

A few minutes later when Carl Orin, alive and well and unmistakably genuine, walked into the presence of Ensminger the latter was astounded. Orin was at once informed that his mother was at 211 Maple street, Des Moines, was at that very moment wearing black, believing him to be the victim of a disastrous railroad wreck which occurred out in Wyoming about ten months ago. One of the badly mangled victims of the wreck, from something on his person, was identified as Carl Orin of Des Moines and his people notified. Since that time, the live man was told his mother had spent a considerable sum of money sending representatives out into Wyoming to get the story of the wreck, and, if possible, make some kind of settlement with the railroad company.

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November 12, 1909

NEW LOCAL WEATHER SERVICE.

Telephone Companies to Furnish
Free the Forecast Hereafter.

The Kansas City weather bureau in the Scarritt building will put out, beginning today, a new form of weather map and report. It will give the forecasts for thirty-six hours in advance.

A note on the bulletin states that through co-operation with the United States weather bureau, the Missouri and Kansas Telephone Company and the Kansas City Home Telephone Company and their connecting lines will furnish free, upon request, the weather forecasts and special warnings after 10:30 a. m. daily, except Sunday, to subscribers in Kansas and Missouri.

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October 27, 1909

TO LANSING FOR SAFE KEEPING.

M'MAHON BROTHERS, PATRICK LAMB
ESCORTED IN AUTOMOBILES.

Bum Tire Delays Journey; Mc-
Mahon "Guesses" He Is
Sorry.

Even before James McMahon's confession that he alone killed his two sisters and brother-in-law, Sheriff Al Becker had concluded that it would be best not to keep the prisoners, McMahon and his brother, Patrick, and Patrick Lamb, an employe at the McMahon farm, in Kansas City , Kas., over night and arrangements were made to take them to the penitentiary in Lansing. Telephone messages were coming into the sheriff's office informing him that there was much bitterness expressed in the vicinity of the McMahon and Van Royen homes and that a lynching was being planned.

Acting upon this advice the sheriff deemed it well to remove the prisoners at once, so that when Patrick McMahon had completed his confession to Taggart, the brothers and Patrick Lamb, together with officers and reporters, started for Lansing.

In an automobile with Patrick and James McMahon were Sheriff Becker, Under Sheriff Brady and Deputy Sheriff Brady. Patrick Lamb rode in another car with Deptuy Sheriffs Charles Lukens, U. S. G. Snyder, Harley Gunning, William McMullen and Clyde Sartin. In two other motor cars were newspaper reporters.

Never in all his life, probably, had James McMahon contemplated such a tour as he was then making. Every officer was well armed, and there was anxiety on the part of the sheriff, who did not know to what extent the movement to lynch the prisoners had progressed. The party drove out State street as far as Ninth street, then wheeled into Minnesota avenue and connected with the Reidy road.

The journey was continued on this road to a point where a cross-road offers an outlet to the Parallel road. If the junction of the Reidy road and the cross-road could be passed safely the officers felt confident that they would not meet violence.

PATRICK QUIET AND SULLEN.

Farmers in wagons and buggies lined the thoroughfare, and while the prisoners were peered at curiously, there was no demonstration. That everybody along the route knew of the apprehension of the McMahons was evident.

Riding with the sheriff and under sheriff, James McMahon appeared nervous during the first stages of the ride, but Patrick McMahon sat at his side, quiet and sullen, and seemingly totally oblivious to his surroundings.

At the junction there was not a person in sight when the motor car party arrived and, turning into the road, the machines were speeded rapidly to the main thoroughfare that led directly to Lansing. Near Bethel, Kas., the machine in which the McMahons were riding punctured a tire and the entire party got out and watched the chauffeur make the repairs.

During this interim, James McMahon, who was now feeling safe from a mob attack, appeared more cheerful and talked willingly to those about him. Again and again he said that he could give no reason for his crime and again and again he described it. He seemed unconcerned regarding his strange situation.

"GUESSES" HE IS SORRY.

"Guess you know this country pretty well, don't you, Jim?"

"I've walked over every foot of it," said the prisoner. "And I guess I won't walk over it any more."

"How do you feel by this time?"

"All right, all right, I'm glad I confessed."

"Sure that no one else was implicated in this affair?"

"No one else; Pat ain't guilty of anything," said Jim. "I did the whole thing."

"Are you sorry?

"I guess I am.

"Did you think they were going to catch you any time last week?"

"No, I didn't get afraid until this morning, then I knew the jig was up."

"How have you been at night? Did you sleep?"

"Yes, I slept all right; sometimes I got nervous."

"Didn't you get kind o' creepy when you walked about the Van Royen house?"

"No, not much."

"How about this man you said you saw talking to Van Royen on that Tuesday morning?"

"O, that was a lie."

"And about seeing Rosie when you were going to the pasture to milk the cows?"

"That was a lie, too," said James.

As he answered these questions the prisoner chewed tobacco at a furious pace. His lips were covered with the stains of the weed.

The repairs on the tire completed, the journey was resumed. At a point about fourteen miles from Leavenworth the same tire broke again, and there was another delay.

NEVER IN AN ASYLUM.

"We're outside Wyandotte county now, ain't we," said Jim, as he stepped to the ground the second time.

"Yes."

"Well, I feel safer now. There won't be any feeling over in this county."

"Were you ever in an insane asylum, Jim?" someone asked.

"No, but I guess I ought to have been."

"Ever have any insane fits or anything like that?"

"Not that I know of."

For a second time the obstreperous tire on Henry Zimmer's automobile was repaired and another start made, but in a few minutes the rim of the wheel rolled off. Then Zimmer tore off all the wheel fixings and the machine carrying the McMahons, rolled into Lansing limping on one side.

At the penitentiary Sheriff Becker and his prisoners were received by Warden J. K. Codding, who said that while the prison officials were willing to keep the men they would have to be willing.

"DON'T KNOW WHY I DID IT."

"We're willing," said Jim. "I'd rather be here than in Wyandotte."

"What do you think about it?" Patrick McMahon was asked.

"I guess this is the better place for tonight, anyhow," said Patrick.

Henry Zimmer offered to take Pat Lamb back with him, but the latter, at first willing, later decided that he would remain at the prison.

"I don't know what they're thinking down there," said Lamb, "so I'll just stay here for a few days."

The party remained in the warden's office fully a half hour, and during all that time Patrick McMahon spoke scarcely a word. When spoken to he answered, but his answers were brief. Jim McMahon, apparently not badly frightened, apparently not greatly concerned, sat in one of the warden's easy chairs and answered all questions put to him. The substance of all his answers were:

"I killed them, and I don't know why I did it."

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October 23, 1909

BOY-HUSBAND OF 19
CRUSHED BY A CAR.

Clyde Bailey, Married But Two
Months, Is Instantly Killed at
Eighteenth and Indiana.

Clyde Bailey, a carpenter, and a bridegroom of two months, who lived with his father-in-law, Andrew Curtis, 2811 Bales avenue, was killed by a southbound Indiana car between Eighteenth and Nineteenth streets at 6:18 o'clock last evening.

Young Bailey, who was only 19 years old, had been working all day with his father and brother on a building at Overland park, and at 5:30 in the evening left them at Thirty-ninth and State line with the words: "Well I'll see you in the morning, kid." He changed cars at that point and eventually transferred to the Indiana avenue car which would take him to his home and supper.

Charles L. Bowman, proprietor of a night lunch wagon at Eighteenth and Indiana, who was a passenger on the car with Bailey, said they got off at Eighteenth. Bailey walked south on Indiana to the center of the block, said Bowman, and seeing a northbound car coming, crossed the west track and tried to catch the car on the inside. He was thrown back on the west track in the path from the southbound car from which he had just stepped and which by that time was going very rapidly. the top of Bailey's head struck the inside rail of the west track and was crushed by the wheels, the motorman being unable to stop the car until it had entirely passed over the body.

Fifteen minutes after the accident Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky had the body removed to the Carrol-Davidson undertaking rooms, where it was identified by a book of Overland Park line tickets which he had purchased yesterday morning. His father, Nathan H. Bailey, 4435 Madison street, was notified, and his son, Cal W. Bailey, a brother of Clyde, was the first to arrive at the undertaking rooms.

The streetcar conductor, Jerome Moore, 835 Ann avenue, Kansas City, Kas., and the motorman, William Erickson of 1049 Ann avenue, were arrested by Officer Fields and taken to police headquarters where Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Norman Woodson released them on their personal recognizance for their appearance this morning.

It was at first thought Bailey was Roland Allshire, son of Roy B. Allshire, a contractor living at 2421 Indiana avenue, as Bailey had one of Allshire's cards in his pocket. A verdant young man immediately repaired to the Allshire home, where he threw the family into hysterics with the news. They telephoned to the Loose-Wiles factory, where young Allshire works nights, and he soon appeared on the scene to contradict the story.

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October 22, 1909

TRYING WIG AS POLICE CAME.

Intruder, on Stairs, in Possession of
Other Female Garments.

Mrs. Mabel Stone, 1335 Central street, heard a man roaming through the hallway of her residence yesterday evening and promptly telephoned the police.

Patrolman Rogers appeared on the scene and arrested Fred Coyle, who he found sitting at the foot of the stairs trying on a woman's wig. He had other female garments in his possession.

Coyle stated that he was a female impersonator and that he was merely seeking a boarding house. He was held for investigation.

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October 5, 1909

HEAR CONCERT BY 'PHONE.

Governor and Party at Mansion
Listen to Music at Sedalia.

Weil's concert band, assisted by the Sedalia Ladies' Musical Club, gave a sacred concert in the live stock pavilion at the Missouri state fair grounds, Sunday.

By special arrangement with the Bell telephone Company, the music was sent over the wires to the governor's mansion at Jefferson City where it was heard by the governor and Mrs. Hadley, and a large party assembled to hear it.

By the use of specially made megaphone receivers, the music was made plainly audible to the whole assemblage and was keenly enjoyed by them.

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September 24, 1909

GET DOGS TO CATCH THIEVES.

Police of K. C. K., Hope to Stop
Telephone Wire Stealing.

W. W. Cook, chief of police of Kansas City, Kan., has a new scheme which he will use in an effort to catch the wire thieves who have been making life miserable for persons in the outlying districts whose telephones are rendered useless by their depredations. From reports made to the office of the Missouri & Kansas Telephone company since last March, it is estimated that more than 1,000 pounds of copper ire has been stolen.

The chief recently secured the services of two English bloodhounds which he will use in an effort to trace the thieves who have been cutting the telephone wires and selling the copper. Every attempt to catch the wire cutters who operate in the early morning has been fruitless, but the chief hopes to stop the practice with the aid of the dogs.

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August 13, 1909

HE GREW RICH STAR GAZING.

Counted 17,000,000 Shooting Stars,
and 'Phoned John D.

At least one man saw shooting stars in the heavens last night. He had read a prophecy of the pyrotechnical display and early in the evening he started on his rounds star gazing. Occasional trips were made to the drinking emporiums and at the end of refreshments the man would dash madly out into the middle of the street and gaze longingly at the heavens. Passersby saw his lips move convulsively, and one who was possessed of more temerity and curiosity than his brothers approached near enough to hear him whisper:

"Money, Money, Money."

There was a pause until the deluded man saw another star flying from Venus to Jupiter or from Broadway to McGee streets and once more he would gasp convulsively:

"Money, Money, Money."

After some three hours of such behavior the saloons closed. Just before the doors of the saloon of his last choice were to close this strange man went to the telephone.

"Gi'me John D. Rock'feller," he demanded. The operator connected him with the emergency hospital.

"Hello," replied the surgeon in charge in answer to the telephone ring.

"Is that you J. D. R.? Well I just called you up to tell you that you are backed off the financial map. I saw 17,000,000 shooting starts tonight and said 'Money, Money, Money' after each one of them, three times apiece. Sure sign of money. What'll you sell out for?"

"Guess he really needed emergency treatment," said the amiable emergency surgeon. "Batty, clean batty."

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August 1, 1909

MISS HENRIETTA TILL WEDS.

Eloped to St. Joseph With Edmond
Kuenster Last Monday.

Last Monday morning Miss Henrietta Till, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Till, 4404 Campbell street, started for Lake Crystal, Minn., to spend the remainder of the summer. She was expected to arrive there Tuesday morning, and in due time there arrived in Kansas City the expected telegram from Lake Crystal:

"Arrived safely. -- Henrietta."

Yesterday afternoon there came a second telegram, this one to The Journal, dated St. Joseph, saying that Miss Till had been married by Father O'Donnell of the Holy Rosary church in St. Joseph Monday to Edmond Kuenster, a clerk in the Kansas City Bell telephone office. Kuenster had been paying attentions to Miss Till for a year, and it was understood there would be a wedding in the fall.

Asked if there had been opposition to his daughter marrying Kuenster, Mr. Till said there had been on his part, which probably accounted for the elopement.

The first the Till family knew of the marriage was Thursday afternoon when Kuenster called up the Till residence and said he was talking from St. Joseph, where relatives of his mother live. The new Mrs. Kuenster confirmed the report.

After that came news from another source that on Monday afternoon Kuenster and Miss Till, accompanied by a member of one of the Tootle firms in St. Joseph, went to the acting bishop of St. Joseph for a dispensation to allow the runaways to be married there. This was granted and the pastor of the Holy Rosary church performed the ceremony.

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July 29, 1909

A NEW TELEPHONE DIRECTORY.

Bell Company's New Booklet Is Re-
plete With Information.

The July issue of the Missouri & Kansas (Bell) Telephone Company's Kansas City directory is now being delivered to subscribers. The directory appears in an entirely new form, made necessary by the large increase in the number of subscribers. The old style cover which persisted in rolling up and breaking, has been replaced by a handsome, index bristol cover. The front section of the directory contains several pages of useful information, including a page write-up of Kansas City, compiled by E. M. Clendening, Secretary of the Commercial Club, postal information, office buildings, directory of both Kansas Cities, street directory of both Kansas Cities, libraries and reading rooms, theaters, table of weights and measures, information for taxpayers, street car routings, railroad time tables, carriage and automobile rates and a two year calendar. Subscribers' names are listed double column in new style type. The classified business directory is printed on yellow paper. The listing therein now includes business addresses. This section of the directory contains a goodly showing of classified advertising of a varied nature.

In speaking of the new directory, Homer Montfort, Advertising agent of the company, said: "The telephone directory of today has many uses aside form that for which it was originally intended. Its value as a social and business directory is beyond question. We have added the new features at considerable expense, with a view of making the directory more valuable to our patrons, and we will gladly receive suggestions as to other useful features that might be added. Our Kansas City directory is used for various purposes approximately 250,000 per day or 91,000,000 times per year."

The new directory is said by telephone men to be the handsomest ever issued for the purpose. There are 30,000 directories in this issue.

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May 15, 1909

CONNOR EXPLAINS STORM.

Due to Contact of Two High Baro-
metric Areas.

Last night's storm was due to a combination of two areas of high barometric pressure, one in the Northwest and the other in the Southeast sections of the country. The air currents, both revolving in a great arc from left to right, met in the vicinity of this city.

"The conflict of these air currents will produce tornadoes," said P. Connor, the local weather observer, yesterday afternoon, while the sky was yet serene.

About 5 o'clock his prediction was justified. Sheets of water descended that had filled the rain gauge 1.15 inches before 6 o'clock. While the rain fall was heavy there was very little high wind in the city, except in gusts.

Telegraph wires between the city and Independence, Pleasant Hill and Elden, Mo., were blown down.

At the south office of the Home Telephone company, Thirty-eighth street and Warwick boulevard, lightning was carried into the building on the wires and all the telephone girls stampeded.

Lightning struck a house at 1816 Summit street, and caused damage amounting to $200. No one was injured.

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May 3, 1909

WESTON NEARS KANSAS CITY.

At Marshall Tonight and Should
Reach Here Wednesday.

Edward Payson Weston, the famous pedestrian, who is expected to arrive in Kansas City next Wednesday morning on his tour from New York to San Francisco, left Mexico, Mo., at 12:05 o'clock this Monday morning, bound for Marshall, Mo. He expected to reach Marshall by midnight tonight.

A long distance telephone message from Mexico brought the information that the pedestrian left there in fine condition, and confident of beating his schedule into Kansas City.

In his walk to Marshall Weston is using the Chicago & Alton railroad tracks.

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April 22, 1909

FINDS OLD LAND PATENT.

Among Effects of Late Mrs. Fergu-
son Was Washington's Signature.

Porter B. Godard, administrator of the estate of Mrs. Nona R. Ferguson, widow of Rodney Ferguson, once treasurer of the Bell Telephone Company, has discovered some curiosities among her effects.

Among them are photographs of scenes in Kansas City during the years of 1868, '69, and '70, forty-eight of them. They are river and levee scenes and are very rare. Also there was found a land patent bearing the date of 1796 and signed by George Washington.

Mrs. Ferguson's home was at 708 Garfield avenue. There is a contest in the courts over the disposition of the estate on account of two wills made by Mrs. Ferguson.

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April 21, 1909

TREATS BLACK HAND
LETTER AS A JOKE.

J. B. MARKEY HAS NO THOUGHT
OF GIVING UP $10,000.

Note Demanding Money Was Sent
to a Wealthy Farmer From Den-
ver -- Believed to Be the
Work of a Crank.

J. B. Markey, whose children live at 1303 West Thirty-ninth street, but who spends most of the time on his big farm in Harrison county, treats as a joke the "Black Hand" letter sent him from Denver, demanding $10,000 under pain of death.

It was last Friday when Mr. Markey received the letter, postmarked at Denver. At that time he was on his farm near Gilman City, Mo., and the missive had been forwarded to him from Kansas City. Laughingly he handed the letter to his friends and then forgot about it.

Being advised, however, to send the letter to Denver authorities, Mr. Markey did so, and since yesterday morning nothing more had been heard of it. Then it developed that the lives of his children were being weighed against the $10,000.

The letter was poorly written and demanded that the $10,000 be apportioned in designated bills, to be delivered at a certain address on Wellton avenue, in Denver, within thirty days of the date of the letter. No mention was made of the three children. Certain reports, however, have frightened the children, who are ignorant of the exact demands made upon their father.

Yesterday morning W. F. Farren, 3136 Central avenue, a nephew of Mr. Markey, read the letter in a morning paper, and hastened to the Markey home to break the news to the family. Some friends had preceded him and had talked with Miss Markey over the telephone. Though he assured the children that no harm whatever attended them, their fears were not fully dispelled. Last night Miss Markey refused to discuss the matter.

Speaking of the letter, Mr. Farren said:

"It is doubtless the work of some crank who knows that Mr. Markey has some money, and thinks that he can be bluffed into giving it up. Mr. Markey has not the slightest fear of harm resulting form the affair, and treats it only as a joke.

"Mr. Markey has no intention of complying with the demand. He pays less attention to the affair than do his friends."

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April 18, 1909

OLD SOLDIER SAVES
LIFE OF A WOMAN.

KNOCKED DOWN MAN WHO
STABBED MRS. ETHEL GRAY.

George Ripley, in Mad Fit, Was
Using Knife on Keeper of Room-
ing House When Charles
Hendrickson Interfered.

The strong right arm of Charles Hendrickson, 68 years old and a member of Fighting Joe Hooker's command during the civil war, saved the life of Mrs. Ethel Gray, 25 years old, last night at 9 o'clock. Hendrickson knocked down George Ripley, an admirer of Mrs. Gray's, after he had stabbed her in the back with a dirk.

Mrs. Gray, whose husband is out of town, bought a building at 215 East Fourteenth street last week and opened it as a rooming house for men only. Hendrickson, who is a carpenter, and W. T. Huddleston, a druggist, were among the roomers.

"I have known George Ripley only a week," she said at the general hospital last night. "He made my acquaintance in a restaurant and walked home with me. He called two or three times but never made love to me until last night. When he came into the room I saw that he had been drinking and it was not long before he began making love to me in the presence of Mr. Hendrickson. I am a married woman and, of course, I paid no attention to him. Then he got angry and struck me."

Hendrickson caught the man's arm after he had landed several blows on Mrs. Gray's face. Huddleston heard the noise and came to the old soldier's assistance. Between them they quieted the man and locked him in a rear room, while Mrs. Gray ran to the drug store of Adolph Lahme at Fourteenth street and Grand avenue and telephoned the Walnut street police station for an officer.

While she was away Ripley escaped from the house by opening a window, but Hendrickson and Huddleston almost immediately discovered his absence and went to the front door to prevent him from waylaying their landlady on her return. Ripley sprang out of the alley between Grand avenue and McGee streets and Huddleston attempted to prevent him from reaching Mrs. Gray.

"This isn't your butt-in," said Ripley. Huddleston gave way and Ripley ran after Mrs. Gray. At her own doorstep he caught her and stabbed her once in the back. Then the old soldier, who was standing on the steps, stepped down and struck the would-be assassin in the face. Ripley was knocked down, but arose and rushed at the woman again. Hendrickson struck again and knocked the knife out of his hand. Then Ripley fled.

The ambulance from the Walnut street police station was called and Dr. H. A. Hamilton dressed the cut, which was in the middle of the back. The knife penetrated to the vertebra. While the physician was at work the woman told the story to officers J. S. Scott and E. M. Wallace and furnished them with a description and a picture of her assailant. Later she was removed to the general hospital, where it was said that she would recover. Ripley has not been arrested. He is about 25 years old and rooms at 1322 Wyandotte street.

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April 8, 1909

ROUNDUP OF VAMPIRES
IN POLICE DISTRICT 4

TWENTY-SIX WELL DRESSED
VAGRANTS IN DRAGNET.

"Undesirables," Who for So Long
Have Defied Police, Find Their
Protectors Without Power
to Aid Them Longer.

Acting under express orders from the new board of police commissioners, Captain Thomas P. Flahive's men began yesterday to round up a gang of well dressed vagrants who for years have fattened in district No. 4 on the shame of 500 fallen women.

By midnight twenty-six male vampires were under arrest, and scores of other human vampires had fled from the scene of their long connection with the white slave traffic.

These hold degenerates, who aforetime flaunted their misdeeds in the faces of the patrolmen, and dared them to act, found yesterday that their pulls had vanished and that all crooks look alike to the police.

WOMEN GIVE BOND FOR MEN.

Also caught in the same net, which seined Kansas City from Twelfth to Nineteenth streets and from Locust to Wyandotte streets, were three of the women who supported these same well dressed vagrants.

So quickly did news of the crusade spread among the parasites that the officers who constituted the dragnet had to work quickly and silently. Four of those caught were found with suitcases packed, ready to leave the city. Captain Flahive believes that an exodus of vagrants has taken place. Twenty-four does not complete the count of those men known to the police, those men who live from the wages of unfortunate women. But in spite of the close search last night no more vagrants could be found.

Strangely enough the women seemed not to appreciate the work done by the police in delivering them from bondage, or perhaps it was fear. At any rate it was the woman, in most cases, who paid the $26 cash bond which liberated the arrested vagrant. All yesterday the telephone in the Walnut street police station was busy, and at the other end of the line was a woman who wanted to know if the particular vagrant whom she supported was arrested. Upon being in formed that such a person was under arrest, the woman, or her messenger, speedily appeared at the station with the necessary $26 in cash, and the vagrant was released on condition of his appearance in police court this morning.

Once liberated, all trace of the vagrant was lost and the district south of Twelfth street was as clean a district on the streets as any portion of the city.

IN THE RED LIGHT DISTRICT.

One other order given to the police captain by the board was to keep the scarlet woman off the streets at night. This order was obeyed to the letter last night, and the only three who fared forth were promptly arrested. Formerly it would have been impossible to have walked any block of that district after dark without being accosted. Usually he would have been met by groups of women, but it was different last night.

In No. 4 district, it is claimed, there are eighty-nine of the class of rooming houses referred to by the police commissioners in their orders to Captain Flahive yesterday and who are paying a monthly fine to the city. There are also hotels and rooming houses by the score which pay no fine and have been overlooked by the police entirely.

In order that Captain Flahive may make sure work of his cleaning up of the district, the commissioners have given him the pick of the men on the department, and have given him permission to use extra men. This morning the captain will confer with Chief Frank Snow and pick the men who are to fill the places in the cleanup.

At present the district over which Captain Flahive has control is lacking policemen. Several officers are forced to patrol more than one beat, which is a handicap when it comes to competent police protection.

Concerning the work, Captain Flahive said last night:

"I am going to clean this district. Within two weeks there will be no more well dressed vagrants loitering around the saloons and rooming houses. This order from the commissioners is one for which I have long waited."

"Why hasn't this cleanup taken place before?" the captain was asked. Surely other commissioners knew that these conditions existed here."

NOTORIOUS MEN CAUGHT.

"I have never been ordered to do so before," he replied. "But I do not wish to say anything about that. It is all dead, and I am going to carry out my orders now to the letter. This work is not a spurt, but it will be kept up, and this district will not know the well dressed vagrant after we have finished with them."

Among those vagrants who have been caught by the police are notorious men of the district, ringleaders in every kind of offense against decency. Many have been arrested before, but nothing ever came of the arrests. So bold did these vagrants become that they flaunted their misdeeds in the faces of the patrolmen, and then dared them to exercise the right of an officer.

The same tactics were tried yesterday, but without success. This time the patrolmen did not fear the loss of their stars for doing their duty.

The officers who made the arrests of vagrants yesterday are Sergeant Henry Goode and Patrolmen Mike Gleason and George Brooks.

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March 29, 1909

TELEPHONE AND TYPEWRITER.

Two Modern Inventions Not Com-
mon in England.

"The almost universal use of the telephone and typewriter throughout America puts England in the background," said F. E. Craig of London, Eng., at the Hotel Baltimore last night. Mr. Craig is an American whose business requires that he spend a greater part of his time in London.

"In some of the big manufacturing plants the typewriter is common, but you do not find it everywhere, as in the commercial centers of this country. Britishers seem to prefer to use the pen.

"The telephones here are better and the service in big cities superior to that even in London.

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March 25, 1909

KILLS HIS FRIEND
IN JEALOUS RAGE.

JOSEPH FLANAGAN TOO ATTEN-
TIVE TO MRS. LEON BRADY.

Husband, Returning From Office,
Finds Attentions Being Forced
on His Wife -- Fires
Three Shots.

Opening the door of his room to find his wife struggling to free herself from the grasp of another man, Leon Brady of 1014 East Fifteenth street, a mechanical draftsman in the employ of the board of education, shot and fatally wounded Josehp Flanagan, a land promoter of El Hito, N. M. The shooting occurred at 1:45 o'clock yesterday afternoon in the hallway of the boarding house at 1014 East Fifteenth streeet, where both Flanagan and the Brady family lived.

Upon arriving at his office at 1526 Campbell street shortly after lunch yesterday afternoon, Brady "felt that something was wrong at home." He went immediately to the East Fifteenth street boarding house and found the door of his room locked and his wife inside. His wife responded to his knock.

"After I had been in the room a few moments, my wife went out and down to the second floor. I shut the door and waited for her to return. In about five minutes I heard her cough. I listened and she coughed again. Then I went to the door and waited. I could not hear anything at first, but in a moment I heard someone whispering and it seemed excited. Then I heard my wife say: 'No! No! No!' in a half frightened, half sobbing tone.

RELOADED HIS REVOLVER.

"I cannot explain my action and I cannot tell how I feel about it now. I saw my wife struggle and I knew the man. I was white with rage and I could not control myself. It was that kind of a situation about which little is remembered and nothing is clear."

Brady rushed to the bureau and grabbed his revolver. Throwing the door open he saw Flanagan and his wife. Then he fired.

Flanagan fell at the first shot. Mrs. Brady uttered a cry and her husband fired twice again at his victim. Flanagan then arose and groped his way to his own room, while Brady went back and put two more cartridges in his revolver. Mrs. Brady, at her husband's request, went to the telephone and notified the police.

Flanagan was taken to the general hospital, where he died two hours later. In his statement to Assistant Prosecutor Garrett, he said he realized he was about to die and had given up all hope. He declared that his relations with Mrs. Brady had never been otherwise than friendly.

At the Walnut street police station where Brady surrendered he stated that Flanagan had persistently attempted to force his attention upon Mrs. Brady. "Flanagan was under the influence of liquor a week ago and he came to our room in that condition. He called my wife by her first name, Rose, and this impression of intimacy with my wife angered me," he said.

"Last Sunday I went out to my father's house at 3115 Benton boulevard, and took Billy, my year-old son, with me. While there someone called me on the telephone, and a woman's voice said, 'You had better come home and see what is doing.' I immediately returned to the boarding house.

BRADY CAN'T EXPLAIN.

"My wife told me when I arrived at the house that Flanagan had come to her room after I left and said to her, 'You are expecting someone.' She told me she was offended by his talk and manner, and asked him why he had taken advantage of my absence to come and see her. He told her that I need not know about it, and my wife told him that she would tell me. Flanagan was angry at that, and said to her, 'I'll fix you if you do. I'll do you dirt.' "

According to the statements of both men, they were out walking together the two evenings before the shooting took place. Both say that on no occasion had Mrs. Brady ever been mentioned by them.

Yesterday at noon when Brady came to lunch he found Flanagan already at the table and sat down with him. They talked during the meal and afterward Brady carried a lunch up to his wife, who is ill and confined to her room.

In an ante-mortem statement Flanagan said Mrs. Brady came out of the room in to the passageway, and following her, Brady appeared and shot him without saying a word. "I fell after the first shot," said he, "and then he fired twice more. I said, 'Oh Brady, Brady, Brady! Why have you done this?' His wife said nothing; simply stood there.

"We had always been good friends and he had never spoken to me about her. She told me to look out for him two days ago. I did not know anything was wrong or that he had anything against me until his wife told me. I ate lunch with him today and and boarded at the same house with them. I have known both of them about four months."

THE BRADY ROMANCE.

Brady is a graduate of the engineering department of Columbia university in New York and is the son of J. H. Brady, chief engineer of the board of education of Kansas City. He was yesterday elected president of the National Association of Heating and Sanitary Engineers in New York. Young Brady is said by his classmates to have been exceptionally bright and stood high with his teachers and others.

Leaving school he went to Mexico as a mining engineer. While riding on the cowcatcher of one of the small locomotives employed about the mines, the engine struck a burro standing in the tracks. The animal fell on Brady and the force of the impact broke his leg in two places. The injured man was taken to the house of the mine superintendent and nursed back to health by the daughter of the household. During the days when he lay helpless on his bed, he and the girl formed a friendship that gradually ripened into love and they were married three years ago. Since that time a son has been born. The son is a little more than a year old and at the boarding house on East Fifteenth street was the universal favorite.

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February 16, 1909

PEST HOUSE DETECTIVES
LAND TWO PRISONERS.

MAN WHO BROUGHT SMALLPOX
TO LIBERTY CONFESSES.

Student Who Dared Germs to Catch
Him Placed in Solitary Con-
finement -- Now for
Fumigation!

Smallpox is still raging at William Jewell college, and The Journal's correspondent, the only vaccinated newspaper man in Liberty, and the only correspondent woh is right at the seat of war, or, to be more exact, right in the pest house, got busy last night nad sent a startling story via fumigated long distance telephone, the only fumigated long distance telephone in the world.

Readers of The Journal need have no fear in reading this column, as all type is sterilized before going to the press room.

"Hello! Is this Liberty?" said the Kansas City Journal's smallpox expert at the Kansas City end.

"That's the name of the town," said The Journal's vaccinated staff correspondent, "but technically speaking, this is not Liberty, not Independence, either. This is the quarantine station."

"Good. How is everything at the pesthouse?

NEIGHBORS DOING WELL.

"Well, the neighbors are doing about as well as could be expected. The big news? Hold your ear close to the 'phone.

"The detective bureau got busy today and achieved two distinct victories. Landed the fellow who brought the malady back here after the holidays. Name, Sanford E. Tilton, residence, Allendale, Mo. Came back to college January 5. Showed symptoms on January 17 and on January 23 purchased a pair of eye-glasses."

"What's the significance of the eye-glasses? Wanted to see his finish?"

"No, sore eyes is one of hte earlier symptoms of smallpox. Investigation by our expert sleuths disclosed the fact that the suspect had purchased the eye-glasses after a few days' confinement. Doc, the family physician out here, rounded him up today and we wrung a complete confession out of him. He's not dangerous, but we have him with us. He likes it, too. No doubt that he's the fellow. He sat right next to one of the other fellows who was one of the smallpox pioneers.

LOOKED FOR TROUBLE, GOT IT.

"Yes, another one. Put down this name. Henry Weber, home, St. Louis, admitted to the bar, but still studying. Wanted to catch the smallpox. Came down here when Doc was taking his morning constitutional, crept inside and dared the pox to attack him. Made his getaway.

"What happened?"

"Hold your breath. Doc got indignant, went to the fellow's room, locked him in and announced that he is to be kept in solitary confinement for one week."

"What's that, feed? O, yes. They're feeding him through a crack."

"Had another recruit today. He plays first cornet and when he was brought in he was immediately assigned to the orchestral quarters. lays well and the band concert today showed great improvement. Don't wish anyone any bad luck, but we did need a first cornet.

ANTISEPTIC BATHS ARE ON.

"Basketball was cancelled today and the warmest exercise was the antiseptic bath. This is to be a daily feature until the official fumigation, which is to be inaugurated next Thursday.

"Feature of the band concert for Thursday morning will be 'Hot Time in Old Town Tonight' and 'Smoke Up Some More."

"School will positively reopen next Monday, and Doc (don't forget to mention Doc Hooser's name, he's a D. D. and an M. D. and a real fellow) thinks we'll all be at liberty, literally as well as geographically, by the end of the week. And, by the way, twenty students beat it out of town when the smallpox was first discovered and went home, but that's all been fixed. They're all in a little quarantine of their own at the instigation of the local college officials, who notified the police in the towns where these fellows live to keep 'em confined.

"The first band number is about on. So long."

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February 15, 1909

SMALLPOX VICTIMS
DISCUSS LIFE OF JOB.

SYMPATHY AT LIBERTY FOR
THE BIBLICAL CHARACTER.

William Jewell's Afflicted Students
Keep in Touch With the World
Via Telephone -- Love
Letter Relayed.

"Hello! Hello! Is this Liberty? The gymnasium of William Jewell college, I mean?"

"You mean the pest house, don't you?" said the man at the other end. "You do? I thought so."

"Well, how is everything at the pest house today?"

"Fine and dandy. Eight new patients brought in this morning, and they're doing fine. What's that? The Sunday dinner? Great, only Doc has put the lid on meat diet, and there was nothing doing in the chicken line. Smallpox patients, you know, are not allowed to eat flesh meat."

"Any excitement today?"

"Excitement? Surest thing you know. We had Sunday school at 9:30 this morning and preaching at 11."

"Who did the preaching?"

"Yours truly, the speaker, The Journal's regular correspondent at Liberty. Knew I was in the smallpox jug down here, too, didn't you?"

"Well, that is interesting; what did you preach on?"

" 'As He Thinketh in His Heart So is He.' "

"Anything else?"

JOB UP FOR DISCUSSION.

"Yes, young people's meeting this afternoon. The topic: 'What I Have Learned from the Life of Job.' Yes, and maybe we don't sympathize with that well known and popular character, too. Tee-hee."

The William Jewell college is still in quarantine, but the William Jewell pesthouse, so-called, is one of the jolliest spots in Liberty. For several days past the "gym" of William Jewell has been dedicated to Red Cross purposes, and some forty students, down with a mild attack of smallpox, have been having the best time they have experienced since the football season closed.

Information from the William Jewell "gym" must come by long distance telephone. The Journal's correspondent is among those present and vaccinated, and he is doing his little best under the difficulties.

In addition to the baseball teams, the handball flives, the quartet and band, the smallpox victims are seriously considering the advisability of establishing a detective bureau, with a view to ascertaining who is the guilty mark that brought the dread disease to Liberty.

WHO'S THE GUILTY ONE?

In times past William Jewell students, after their Christmas vacation, have brought back some funny things, but the student who brought back this fairly well developed case of smallpox probably was not trying to spring a joke. That some student did bring the malady back among his home products is nearly certain. But who did it?

The pesthouse band was not working yesterday, the day being given over mainly to religious exercises, but the strenuous and merry programme will be inaugurated again this morning.

Last Saturday night the pesthouse boys had a time that made the unafflicted on the outside world green with envy. One student delivered an oration on "The Romans in Carthage (Mo.)"; the pesthouse quartet sang several popular and classic songs and the pesthouse band made a melodic disturbance that could be heard as far east as Main street.

SHY ON FLOOR SPACE.

There have been so many beds added to the "gym" that they are shy on floor space and the basketball games will have to be abandoned. The weather may put a damper on the ball games, and as the college authorities put the ban on pinochle and seven-up, the students will be forced to chess and checkers for excitement unless the sun comes out and gets busy.

The several love-sick students in confinement are having the sorriest time of it all. They can write letters to their sweethearts afar, but as the nervous heroine has often said: "Now that I have written the note, who shall take it?"

It was Hocksaw himself who used to say: "I will take the note," but Hockshaw wasn't in quarantine.

DICTATES LETTER BY PHONE.

One young man who doesn't care particularly who knows his business dictated a letter over the telephone to a friend downtown, the friend copying the letter with violet ink and mailing it to the nerve-strained, restless maid who had been vainly waiting at the other end of the romance and wondering what had happened.

There are sixty cases of smallpox in William Jewell by actual count. It is the intention of the faculty to reopen the college a week from today and students in the "gym" have likewise been notified to get well. Reports indicate that they have been having entirely too good a time.

Dr. W. B. Hooser is in charge of the patients. "Doc," as he is affectionately addressed by every one of his patients, has had the smallpox, so that he is not in danger. He has also won the vote of every afflicted man by giving the positive assurance that there will be no pox marks on the face or body.

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January 22, 1909

SEEKING GIFTS FOR MERCY.

Hospital League Wants Food to Feed
the Hungry "Hoo-Hoos."

The Mercy Hospital League, a band of women who have organized for the purpose of aiding that institution, has hit upon a scheme by which it hopes to make a few more dollars for the hospital. During the "Hoo-Hoo," or lumbermen's convention next week, the league intends to supply the hungry "wood merchants" with dinner on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. The spreads will be made in Convention hall.

The league is asking donations of home-made cake and all kinds of home-canned fruits. It is asking the housewives of Kansas City to open their hearts and larders and assist. Mrs. L. Moreland, 1117 Troost avenue, has been made a committee of one to secure donations.

"It is an easy task," Mrs. Moreland said yesterday, "if the good housewives will just come forward with their donations. If convenient for donors to deliver their gifts, I will receive them at my home. My telephone number is 3806Y Grand on the Bell, and if any who wish to aid us will call me up, or drop me a note, we will see that the cake and fruits are collected."

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January 20, 1909

UNITED STATES IN THE LEAD.

"Other Nations Follow," Says T.
Takuhara of Japan.

"The Japanese government undoubtedly will adopt the same methods for creosoting timber to preserve it for use as railroad ties and telegraph and telephone poles as the United States government has so successfully established," T. Tukuhara, mechanical engineer in charge of public works in Japan, said yesterday. Mr. Tukuhara spent yesterday at the large creosoting plant in Kansas city, Kas., where he observed closely the methods used for preserving wood for railroad ties.

"Every nation where there are railroads and telegraph lines has the same problem to solve," he said. "The United States takes the lead in many of these experiments and other nations are only too glad to take advantage of the successful experiments."

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