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August 30, 1909

HADLEY WILL OPEN
INDEPENDENCE FAIR.

OLD FASHIONED COUNTY SHOW
IS ON TODAY.

For a Week Products of Farm Will
Take Precedence Over Thrill-
ers -- Special Features
Are Attractive.

There was a bunch of tired men in Independence last night who seemed happy in their fatigue. They were the directors of the Independence fair and everything was ready for the opening this morning. The fair this year is going to be just as it has always been, an old-fashioned county affair where the products of the farm take precedence over thrillers of summer park invention and where a prize hog looks a whole lot better than a motor car, for the time being.

And if exhibits are to be counted, the Independence fair is better off this year than ever before. It has been a good year on the farms of Jackson county, and for that reason the exhibits are going to be the largest in the history of the fair. The mountain of pumpkins, a yearly feature of the fair, is to be cooked into pies and distributed to visitors as edible souvenirs. That is to be done on the last day, Saturday.

HADLEY TO OPEN FAIR.

The fair is to have executive recognition and it will be opened at 10 o'clock this morning by Governor H. S. Hadley. The governor will make his speech at that time, after the salute of Battery B of Kansas City has been fired. After the speech of the governor, the battery will maneuver and the fair will be on in earnest. The gates will be open at 7 o'clock in the morning.

The directors have offered purses aggregating $10,000 for the race meeting, and there is a good list of entries. Independence is on three racing circuits and more than 200 horses will strive for the various purses. There will be from one to three races a day.

SERIES OF SPECIAL DAYS.

Admission to the grounds is to be free this year and as an added attraction, there is to be a fireworks display every night. A band will give a free concert every night. Zach Mulhall's Wild West show will be there.

There is to be a series of special days. Tomorrow is to be a special racing day and there will be an extra race for an extra prize. Thursday will be Kansas City day, when Kansas City exhibitors and Kansas City exhibits will have full sway. Friday will be Old Settler's day. Many of the old settlers of Jackson county and the counties surrounding will attend the fair on that day. Saturday is to be pumpkin day.

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August 19, 1909

PYROTECHNICS AT ELECTRIC.

"The Burning of Moscow" and Rus-
sian Dances Featured.

So successful has been "The Fall of Messina" at Electric park that the management has arranged for and prepared another immense and impressive pyrotechnical spectacle. This will be known as "The Burning of Moscow," and will represent the great conflagration which destroyed the Russian city incident to the invasion of Napoleon Bonaparte and his troops in 1812. The fireworks that will accompany "The Burning of Moscow" will be even more spectacular than those used in "The Fall of Messina."

The first performance of "The Burning of Moscow" will be given Sunday night, and the last performance of "The Fall of Messina" will be given Saturday night. Don Philippini's Band will play a programme tonight.

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July 12, 1909

3 DEAD AS RESULT
OF BOMB EXPLOSION.

FIREWORKS DISPLAY NEAR A
CHURCH ENDS FATALLY.

Italians of Holy Rosary Congrega-
tion Were Celebrating St. John's
Day -- Two Negroes Are
Instantly Killed.

The upright figure is sketched from a duplicate of the iron pipe which was also to have been fired. The upper figure is a sketch of the piece which killed the woman and the lower figure is a sketch of the piece which was hurled through the house at 511 Campbell street.


Amidst a throng of 700 persons who gathered at Fifth and Campbell streets last night to watch the celebration of St. John's day, a bomb exploded, instantly killing Clarance Harrington, a negro of 511 Lydia avenue, and Anna Fields, a negro woman of 568 Harrison street; and so seriously wounding Tony Grassiffe, an Italian living at 311 East Third street, that he died at 10:45 o'clock.

The bomb was one used in the pyrotechnical display being held under the direction of the Holy Order of St. John, an organization of the Holy Rosary Roman Catholic church, Fifth and Campbell streets. Tony Grassiffe, one of the victims, was the master of ceremonies and for almost an hour he had been lighting bombs, rockets and Roman candles, while the crowd gathered denser in the street.

Grassiffe finally planted the huge cast iron pipe, loaded with dynamite and a bomb, in the center of a low corner lot. He had been warned to completely cover the bomb with dirt, and to plant it deep. Ignorance or carelessness caused him to leave the bomb in its two feet of iron pipe standing uncovered in the lot. He lighted the fuse and before he could gain his feet the explosion occurred.

NEGROES INSTANTLY KILLED.

Grassiffe's left leg at the knee was completely severed by the bursting projectile. A huge piece of the iron was hurled westward and struck the negro woman full on the right side of her face, tearing it away, and leaving only a small portion of the skull. Another, and smaller piece, struck Harrington in the center of his forehead, crushing his skull and tearing part of it away. The two negroes dropped in their tracks, dead. The woman lay across the sidewalk grasping a palm leaf fan in her hand. The man fell close by her side.

Sergeant D. J. Whalen was standing within three feet of the woman when she fell. He was struck in the chest by a piece of mortar, but was uninjured. Officer Lee Clarry was standing still closer to the negro, and escaped without a scratch.

PENETRATES HOUSE WALL.

One piece of the iron pipe was hurled northward with a force which caused it to penetrate the wall of a house, seventy-five feet distant, and continue its course within, plunging through a two-inch door and spending its force against the other wall of the building.

Seated at a window, not three feet from the point where the projectile entered the wall, was Tony Gafucci. He was thrown from his chair, and lay on the floor of his room, momentarily stunned. The house number is 511 Campbell street.

Instantly after the sound of the explosion, the great crowd surged forward to where the dead bodies were lying. The police officers held them back, and themselves ascertained the condition of the negroes. Seeing that both were dead, the officers hastened to aid Grassiffe, whom they heard groaning and crying for help. They picked the injured man up from the hollow and carried him into a nearby drug store.

The police ambulance was hastily called, and Dr. E. D. Twyman accompanied it to the scene of the explosion. As he alighted at the spot where the negroes were lying on the sidewalk, and stooped down to make examinations, the uncontrollable crowd of negroes and Italians surged forward closer still, knocking over the surgeon.

COULDN'T SAVE ITALIAN.

When Dr. Twyman reached Grassiffe he found the injured man to be in a dangerous condition. Nothing could be done to stop the terrible flow of blood from the severed limb. The surgeon ordered a record drive to the emergency hospital, where every effort was made to save the life of the injured man. He was kept alive until 10:45 o'clock, by means of artificial respiration and then died.

By some means Grassiffe's wife gained entrance to the hospital and, gazing upon the form of her husband, became hysterical. It was necessary for Dr. H. T. Morton to administer an opiate to quiet the woman, who was shrieking strange Italian chants at the top of her voice, pausing now and then to cross herself and mutter a hurried prayer.

The coroner was notified of the deaths and ordered the negroes bodies taken to Moore's undertaking establishment, 1033 Independence avenue.

The celebration last night was held in spite of the constant warnings given out by Father Charles Delbecchi, in charge of the Holy Rosary church. He had just left his church, where he had warned once more of the dangers of fireworks.

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July 9, 1909

ANOTHER VICTIM OF THE FOURTH.

Victor Whiteman, 8, Dies From
Burn of Firecrackers.

Another name was added to the list of Fourth of July victims yesterday, when death overtook Victor Whiteman, 8 years old, at the general hospital. He died from severe burns about the body.

Victor was burned last Monday while playing near the home of his widowed mother, Mrs. Alice Whiteman, 4315 East Fifteenth street. He was carrying a number of firecrackers in his trousers pockets, and in a manner not explained they were set off, severely burning his leg.

The boy, in a semi-conscious condition, was carried to the office of Dr. T. T. Sawyer at Fifteenth and Spruce streets, and later transferred to the general hospital. No funeral arrangements have been made.

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July 6, 1909

NOISE DIDN'T DISTURB THEM.

Deaf Mutes Enjoyed Their Outing
at Budd Park.

In one corner of Budd park yesterday were gathered about 125 men and women. Probably fifty or more children played about, shooting firecrackers and making the usual amount of noise that children make on the Fourth of July.

Not a mother said, "Be careful now," or "Don't go too close." Firecrackers, large and small, were exploded all about the grownups, but not one so much as turned a head or blinked an eye. The occasion was the Kansas City deaf mutes' picnic. Most of the children of deaf mutes have the power of speech, and those at the picnic yesterday were a happy, rollicking, talkative bunch of youngsters.

The picnic was held to arrange ways and means for building a home for aged and infirm deaf mutes somewhere in Missouri. Cash donations already have been made and subscriptions pledged.

On August 26, 27 and 28 the Missouri State Association for the Deaf will hold a convention here. H. B. Waters, 2830 Michigan avenue, is chairman of a local committee to perfect arrangements for the convention.

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July 5, 1909

QUIET FOURTH, BUT
MANY ACCIDENTS.

TWO KANSAS CITYS HAVE LONG
LIST OF CASUALTIES.

Big Demand for Tetanus Anti-Toxin
at Emergency Hospital -- Four
Boys Hurt in One Explosion.

It was one of the quietest Fourths of July the two Kansas City's ever experienced. But the real test will come today. Many minor accidents were reported yesterday, and there were a number of applications to Dr. W. L. Gist of the emergency hospital for injections of tetanus anti-toxin to ward off the possibility of lockjaw from injuries.

Victim No. 1 to ask for aid at the dispensary was Willie Parrish, 9 years old, 1230 Drury avenue. Willie was playing with a friend named Clarence Cott, who was handling a pistol. It was accidentally discharged and a piece of the gun wad entered the palm of Willie's left hand.

A blank cartridge which S. Stern, 10 years old, 571 Campbell street, accidentally discharged, injured his right hand. He went to the emergency hospital and Dr. Gist cauterized the wound and gave him an injection of tetanus anti-toxin.

CHILD MAY LOSE EYE.

William Meyer, 14 years old, 2108 West Prospect avenue, was wounded yesterday afternoon while playing with a 22-caliber pistol. A wad struck him on the left hand, which was dressed in the emergency hospital. The surgeon made use of 1,5000 units of the anti-toxin which Dr. W. S. Wheeler secured to prevent tetanus infection.

Powder burns, suffered when his brother, John, snapped a toy pistol containing a blank cartridge, probably will cost Charles Grube, aged 6 years, 838 South Pyle street, Armourdale, the sight of his right eye.

Only a few boys and no grown-ups were arrested yesterday for noisy celebration of the Fourth. One boy was taken in at Central police station during the forenoon for exploding a cannon cracker on West Fifth street. His father appeared in a few minutes. Only $4 was necessary too get this juvenile lawbreaker from behind the bars. Police station Nos. 9, 5, 4 and 6 also made an arrest apiece, all the boys being released on minimum bonds.

Thomas Rogers, a negro 14 years old, applied at the emergency hospital last night for treatment, saying he feared he was suffering from lockjaw. Thomas shot himself in the hand with a toy pistol July 2. A piece of the cap was imbedded in the skin. One thousand five hundred units of anti-toxin was administered, and the boy sent home. He was instructed to keep his hand in hot water during the night.

Probably the most serious accident in Kansas City, Kas., was the injury sustained by S. A. Brophy, a street car conductor, living at 332 North Tenth street. The wadding from a blank cartridge entered his left thigh on the inside of the leg and caused a wound which Dr. W. R. Palmer, the attending physician, said last night might prove serious. Brophy was talking to a fellow street car conductor, L. J. Clark, when the latter pointed a gun at him and pulled the trigger.

BOY MAY LOSE HAND.

Roy Irvine, 5 years old, was injured by a piece of tin which flew from a torpedo and buried itself in the third finger of his left hand. He was treated at the home of his father, R. W. Irvine, 727 Central avenue.

Herman Fielder, 11 years old, was shot through the palm of his left hand by the wadding from a blank cartridge. He was attended by Dr. J. A. Davis, and removed to his home, 940 Ohio avenue. Charles Orr, 931 Tenney avenue, held a firecracker in his left hand while it exploded and may lose the index finger of his left hand as a result. He was attended by Dr. J. A. Davis. Mrs. M. Westerman, 318 North Tenth street, fell and dislocated her left shoulder while attempting to get away from a bunch of firecrackers which had been thrown near her. Mrs. Westerman is 62 years old, and was suffering great pain last night. She was attended by Dr. J. A. Davis.

Nathan Spicer, a merchant at 40 North James street, shot himself through the palm of the right hand while explaining the mechanism of a revolver to a prospective customer. He was attended by Dr. C. H. Brown, assistant police surgeon. James Whipple, 20 North James street, was struck by a flying particle during an explosion near his home and was burned on the left hand.

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July 4, 1909

WANTS A SANE FOURTH
IF BOYS ARE WILLING.

POLICE HAVE STRINGENT OR-
DERS FROM CHIEF SNOW.

Health Commissioner Wheeler Has
Placed Supply of Tetanus Anti-
Toxin With Hospitals --
Quiet in Most Districts.

This year there is to be an extraordinary effort made to have a same Fourth, and also Fifth of July in Kansas City. Chief of Police Frank F. Snow issued orders yesterday that he wanted as many men on duty during the "busy" parts of both days as possible. If the people do not want to act in a sane manner while celebrating a policeman may be on hand to make them. The chief called for the arrests of all parties caught putting explosives on the street car tracks, and wanted officers to take special care to see that "no fireworks of any kind are exploded near any hospital or near where there are sick people."

Dr. W. S. Wheeler, health commissioner, has taken steps to keep down, as far as possible, mortality resulting from gunshot or firecracker wounds. Tetanus often follows such wounds, especially in the hands, and death is frequently the result. At the general hospital, the emergency hospital and the Walnut street police station, Dr. Wheeler has placed a supply of tetanus anti-toxin with instructions to use it immediately in every case where it is suspected the injury may develop lockjaw.

"It has been shown," said Dr. Wheeler last night, "that where the anti-toxin is used promptly it acts as a preventive. It has also been used with good results in many cases where the disease had already begun to develop."

Dr. Isadore Anderson, in charge of the dispensary at the Post-Graduate hospital on Independence avenue, secured a supply of the anti-toxin from Dr. Wheeler and will use it in all cases where its use may be indicated. This dispensary being a free one, has many injured persons.

Chief of Police Frank F. Snow issued stringent orders recently indicating the class of firecrackers and fireworks which would be permitted. Firearms of any character, whether loaded with blank or bullet cartridges, are prohibited.

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June 29, 1909

WOMAN FIRST FOURTH VICTIM.

Mrs. Williams Sharp Injured While
Playing With a Toy Pistol.

Mrs. William Sharp, 26 years old, 1025 Harrison street, was last night distinguished by being the first person in Kansas City to be injured by the premature explosion of Fourth of July noisemakers. She was in her home and picked up a toy pistol loaded with a blank 22-caliber cartridge. In some manner the cartridge was exploded and the index finger on her right hand was badly lacerated. She was treated at the emergency hospital.

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May 31, 1909

MORE ROOM FOR VAUDEVILLE.

Bandshell at Fairmount to Be En-
larged to Accommodate Crowds.

The vaudeville show at Fairmount park for this week was well liked yesterday and last night. workmen will begin today to construct more tiers of seats in the bandshell amphitheater, so that the extra crowds will be accommodated. The bill this week includes Rand's dog circus, Meyers and Mason, comedians and kickers and Tachakira, a Japanese wire walker.

Although the weather was a bit cool, that didn't interfere with the opening of the beach yesterday and several hundred persons were in the water.

Special preparations have been made at the park for the crowds today. At 9 o'clock tonight a fireworks display will be shown on the side of the lake opposite the boathouse. The vaudeville show will be given twice in the afternoon and twice at night.

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May 30, 1909

SWIMMING AT FAIRMOUNT.

"Come On In, the Water's Fine,"
Says the Press Agent.

If the sun shines today -- and the weather department says it is sure to this afternoon -- it will bean the beginning of the swimming season at Fairmount park. The sunshine of the last few days has warmed the water to a very comfortable degree and with the improvements that have been put in on the beach, the water should be very enjoyable today.

Today a new weekly vaudeville bill begins at the park. Rand's dog circus is one of the principal acts, consisting of a troupe of thirty dogs that do nearly everything except talk. Of course, they bark as a substitute, but that isn't admitted as conversation. Among the dogs is "Marvelous Ted," a wire-walking dog. Meyers and Mason are comedians of the unusual kind. Tackahira is a Japanese wire-walker and does many things that are novel. There are to be two shows this afternoon and two at night. Between the shows Zimmerschied's orchestra will give a programme.

Tomorrow is Decoration day and that means a large crowd at Fairmount park. Because of this and because of the day, the park management has arranged a fireworks display which will be given at 9 o'clock at night. They pyrotechnics are to be fired from the balloon grounds, across the lake from the boathouse, and will include about everything in the fireworks line that can be exploded at night. Of course, there will be the usual pinwheels, skyrockets in bunches. Roman candles by the box and many novelties. Four vaudeville shows will also be given tomorrow.

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April 5, 1909

FIREWORKS ROUTED GREEKS.

Liberty Patriots Resented an In-
vasion of Foreign Labor.

LIBERTY, MO., April 4. -- A carload of Greek laborers, sent to Liberty for track work on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, started for Kansas City tonight after being subjected to a Fourth of July fireworks display that was not on the programme prepared by the railroad employment agent.

The Greeks did not come here with the cry of "Give me liberty or give me death" on their lips, but before they were allowed to emerge from the car they became convinced that there was absolutely no chance for liberty and almost certain death if they remained here.

The Greeks, although eager to earn and honest penny tamping ties and driving spikes, were glad to leave Liberty behind.

The home-grown laborers of Liberty do not want anything down here that looks or smells like Greeks. The information leaked out that about 100 Greeks had arrived last Saturday, were installed in a box car and were scheduled for work in these parts.

Armed with a full supply of spectacular skyrockets and Roman candles and noisy firecrackers, local anti-Greek enthusiasts surrounded the car and began what had all the earmarks of a patriotic demonstration. The Greeks looked at the affair from an entirely different viewpoint.

"Surely, this is not Liberty," said one of the Greeks.

"No, it is not liberty," said the captain of the gang. "This is hell."

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July 5, 1908

FOURTH REAPED
SMALLER CROP

NOT AS MANY ACCI-
DENTS AS USUAL.

ONE BOY NEARLY BLINDED.

MYRON KING INJURED BY IM-
PROVISED CANNON.

Toy Pistols, Cannon Cracker and
Gunpowder Claim a Number
of Victims -- Noisy across the Line.

As the result of an untimely explosion of an improvised cannon, Myron King, the 16-year-old son of A. J. King, 1705 Linwood boulvard, received painful and serious injuries about the face yesterday afternoon possibly blinding his right eye. Myron and about fifteen of the neighborhood boys and girls were gathered in the front yard of H. G. Brown's residence, 3219 Highland avenue, shooting off various kinds of fireworks. After all of the firecrackers had become exhausted, some of the boys decided to use a tomato can as a cannon. It was touching off this cannon that the King boy received his injuries.

The can was about half loaded with black powder and slugs, and then plugged with paper. A small priming hole was drilled through the top of the can and firecracker fuses sere used as a fuse. Myrom stooped over the can to light the fuse. As he struk the match the sulphur tip flew off, falling on the powder which had been placed about the priming hole. There was an explosion, and the powder and tin struck the lad full in the face.

Myron staggered back, grasping blindly at the air. His companions ran to him, and the little girls set up a scream which attracted the attention of the whole block. Mothers, whose boys were in the crowd, ran to the scene of the explosion.

Mrs. G. P. Kincade, 3220 Highland avenue, thinking it was her son who had been injured by the explosion, started to run to Mr. Brown's home. She got no further than the front steps of her own home when she fainted in her son's arms. He had come hurrying home to assure his mother that he was safe.

"DON'T SPOIL THEIR FUN"

None of the King family was at home at the time, so the wounded boy was taken into Mr. Brown's home and several physicians were summoned at once. Among them was Dr. J. W. McKee, an oculist. The boy's face was completely blackened by powder and was badly cut in several places. Immediately the physicians and the oculist began to pick out the grains of powder from the lad's face and eyes, and when they had done as much as was possible at one operation, he was taken to his home.

At the time of the accident Myron requested that his parents not be notified until they returned home, saying: "There is no use to spoil their fun today. The accident has happened and it would do no good for them to come home right now." Nevertheless the physicians thought it best that they should be home to take care of the boy as soon as possible, and they were called from Elm Ridge, where they had gone to see the races.

Concerning the boy's condition, Dr. McKee said: "Myron will have a hard fight for the sight of his right eye. It was badly burned with powder and is in a precarious condition. It is impossible to say at this time just what may be the outcome There is still some powder left in the eye and it was not practicable to remove it this afternoon. His left eye is in good condition and it will not take much treatment to make it as good as it ever was."

MAY LOSE ONE EYE.

The physicians who attended the boy say that his condition is not serious. They fear only infection from the can and powder. Most of the particles were removed from Myron's face yesterday afternoon.

According to the physicians and occulist it will be some time before Myron can use his eyes to any extent. It was said that it would take at least three days to determine just the extent of the injuries done to the right eye, and if it can be restored it will take much treatment and a hard fight on the part of the oculist and boy.

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July 4, 1908

FOURTH BEGAN MORE
NOISY THAN EVER.

BEFORE MIDNIGHT, EVEN, THE
NOISE WAS UNBEARABLE.

No "Quiet Zone" Around Hospitals or
Anything Else -- Giant Crackers
and Torpedoes on the
Car Tracks.

"The racket and noise made by the Fourth of July eve celebrations is something awful, and we are going to call up the police to see if it can't be stopped," said one of the sisters at St. Joseph's hospital at 11 o'clock last night. "There has been loud and disturbing noises all the evening and just now one fanfare was finished up that was incessant for fifteen minutes. It is awfully trying on the patients."

"The annoyance from the discharge of nerve wrecking contrivances is becoming unbearable and our patients are complaining," was the report from Agnew hospital.

"Men and boys have been putting torpedoes on the tracks of the Holmes street car line all night long, and the whole neighborhood seems to be well supplied with dynamite fire crackers," reported the general hospital.

"We have one patient who has become hysterical from the din that is being created in the vicinity of the hospital building. Men and boys are putting something on the car tracks that, when it explodes, shakes the windows," was the report from the South Side hospital.

"The noise is awful and there seems to be no end to it. We wish the police would get around here and put a stop to it," was the complaint from University hospital.

Other hospitals reported like disturbing conditions, and the quiet zones which the police promised were not within the limits of Kansas City last night. Soon after sunset the booming of big and little fire crackers, the placing of the nerve-wrecking torpedoes on street car tracks were of common occurrence and there was not a section of the city that was free from the din and disturbance of the noise creators. Down town streets which in past years were as quiet on the eve of the national holiday as a Sunday, were particularly in a state of turmoil and deafening noises, and no apparent effort was made on part of the police to put a stop to it. From the river front to the limits south, east and west, the roar of all descriptions of fireworks was continuous, and in the residence districts sleep was out of the question.

Chief of Police Daniel Ahern had made promises that there was to be a sane 3rd and Fourth of July, and he issued orders to his command to arrest all persons that discharged or set off firecrackers, torpedoes or anything of the like within the vicinity of hospitals or interfered with the peace and quiet of any neighborhood. How well Chief Ahern's subordinates paid attention to instructions can be inferred by reports from the hospitals and the experiences of citizens all over the city.

The first to make history by celebrating too soon was Joseph Randazzo, and Italian boy 17 years old. He had reached a revolver with a barrel eighteen inches long. At Fifth street and Grand avenue Randazzo was having a good time chasing barefoot boys and shooting blank cartridges at their feet. After he had terrorized a whole neighborhood William Emmett, a probation officer, took him in tow and had him locked up. That was at 9:45 p. m. When he had a taste of the city bastile he was released on his promise to be good. But he has yet to appear before Judge Harry G. Kyle in police court.

Nearly an hour after this the police of No. 6 were called upon to get busy. A negro named L. W. Fitzpatrick, who lives near Fourteenth and Highland, moved his base of operations from near home and began to bombard Fifteenth and Montgall and vicinity with cannon crackers varying in length from twelve to eighteen inches. Just as he had set off one which caused a miniature earthquake he was swooped down upon by the police and he did not get home until $10 was left as a guarantee that he would appear in court and explain himself.

Probably the greatest surprise came to Otto Smith and Edward Meyers, 14 years old. Armed with 25-cent cap pistols they were having a jolly time near Nineteenth and Vine when a rude and heartless policeman took them to No. 6 station.

They were "armed," and it was against the law to go armed. On account of the extreme youth of the lads they were lectured and let go home.

Mrs. Mary Murphy, 65 years old, who lives at 2025 Charlotte street, was standing on the corner of Twenty-first and Charlotte streets last night when a groceryman who conducts a store on the corner offered her a large cannon cracker to fire off. Thinking it was a Roman candle, the old lady lighted the cracker and held it in her hand.

She was taken to the general hospital, where it was found that her hand had been badly burned. The hand was dressed and she was taken to her home.

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July 4, 1908

TRIPOLI TO BE DESTROYED.

Fireworks Will Represent Siege at
Fairmount Park Tonight.

"The Siege of Tripoli," a representation of the bombardment of the ancient city, is to be the special attraction at Fairmount park tonight. The "city," on the side of the lake opposite the boat house, is finished and all is in readiness for the display tonight.

H. O. Wheeler's band is to play a special programme this afternoon. Miss Pearl Warner, the band soloist, will sing.

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June 23, 1908

SAVE THEM FOR THE FOURTH.

Police Will Arrest Premature Shoot-
ers of Noisy Fireworks.

On account of so many complaints going to Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., about the discharge of firearms and the use of explosives and fireworks in the city previous to July 4, Daniel Ahern, chief of police, yesterday sent a special order to all commanding officers in the city, drawing their attention to city ordinance 24883, governing the use of firearms and explosives in the city limits.

The orders are to arrest all persons violating the order but boys. Where those are found the police are to give them a warning and tell their parents. Then if the same boys persist in celebrating prematurely, they are to be arrested and taken before the juvenile court. All those who are old enough to know better anyway, are to be arrested and arraigned in police court.

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September 30, 1907

2 BALLOONS COLLIDE.

IMPACT COMES 500 FEET ABOVE
THE EARTH.

AERONAUTS' NARROW ESCAPE.


WIRES PREVENT POSSIBLE FA-
TAL FALL TO GROUND.

Exciting Terminus of a Race Through
the Air That Was Watched
by Hundreds of People
at Electric Park.

A collision of balloons 500 feet above solid ground was viewed by hundreds of people at Electric park last night, when the race between five balloons, which is the feature of the Corn Carnival, had only well begun. A stiff breeze was blowing out of the east, and the balloons were carried rapidly away from the park.

When the balloons reached a point nearly above Forty-third and Main streets, it was seen to be inevitable that two of them would collide. Fireworks were being set off in the air, and the people at the park could watch the course of the aeronauts clearly.

A scream of fear arose from the spectators when it was seen that a collision was almost inevitable. Just when it seemed the balloons would surely dash against one another, the two aeronauts cut their parachutes loose, and started to descend.

The parachute of Lee Planet, of one of the balloons, for some reason refused to work, and Planet fell rapidly. It seemed that he must be dashed to death, and the crowd of watchers turned away their eyes when he had disappeared from sight, believing him dead.

But luck was with Planet, and he lit upon a row of telephone wires, and from there dropped to the ground. His right hip was fractured, and he was rendered unconscious. Dr. Carl Bates, of No. 4 police station, treated him, and had him taken to his home. Planet is 24 years old, and is living at 1639 Broadway. Warren Redwine, the other aeronaut, escaped uninjured.

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September 19, 1907

"THE FALL OF FRISCO."

Campbell's Earthquake and Fire-
works Spectacle Coming.

Kansas City will see something new in Campbell's earthquake and fireworks spectacle, "The Destruction of San Francisco." This production, which has never been presented here before, comes on Wednesday, the 25th, for ten nights. The exhibition will be on the circus lot at Fifteenth street and Kansas avenue. The exhibition consists of San Francisco as it was before the disaster, with 350 people on the busy streets, then the earthquake, followed by the fire, laying the city in ashes and ruins, while the people rush for the ferries in their attempt to escape from the city.

The scenic picture is 400 feet in length and is an accurate reproduction of Market street, showing, among other buildings, the city hall, the Call building and and the memorable Ferry building as they were both before and after the earthquake and fire. There are fifteen carloads of scenery and fireworks, making up this production, and counting the mechanical staff, 450 people are required in the production.

A magnificent display of fireworks fills out an evening's entertainment.

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July 6, 1907

IN MEMORY OF THE FOURTH.

Police Court Windup of a "Safe and
Sane" Celebration.

When police court opened yesterday Judge Kyle asked that all persons who had spent the night in the holdover after being arrested for shooting big firecrackers or placing torpedoes on the car tracks, be brought out at once. Eight men and boys, who were unable to give bond, stepped forth. All were discharged.

"Now call all those up, arrested for the same offense," said the court, "but who were able to give bond."

Fifteen men, three boys and one negro woman crowded forward into the small space in front of the judge.

"I let all those other fellows go," Judge Kyle began, "because they had no money or friends to get them out. They had enough punishment by staying in that hot holdover all night. I think all of you deserve a light fine, however. How many are guilty?"

Every person but one raised a hand. That one, John Johnson, a negro, was made to stand aside while the court orated a little on the dangers of firearms, firecrackers and fighting. Then they were fined $2 each. Johnson, who had struck Patrolman C. E. McVay over the head with a baseball mask, was fined $3.

James Hederman, 19, a member of the "Fifth and Lydia" gang, thought he would have his Fourth celebration without expense when he frightened an East bottoms drug clerk into letting him have fireworks, but the good time cost him $5.

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July 2, 1907

A BOY ACTS AS 'JUDGE'

"KANGAROO" COURT WHILE
WAITING FOR REAL JURIST.


Juveniles Play "Big" Until Judge
McCune Comes, and Then Young-
ster in Chair Goes to
Reform School.

"This court will now behave!" said Joe Tint, and incorrigible 12-year-old of 1902 McGee street, as he called a kangaroo court to order in the witness room of the juvenile court yesterday morning. There was half an hour to spare before Judge H. L. McCune was to arrive, and the children, whose cases were set for yesterday, all got a sentence from Joe in that half hour.

"Who are these people?" Joe asked, pointing to three boys sitting disconsolately in a corner. "These people" were Ralph, Orpha and Leota Hill, waifs found recently alone in a house at 2101 Vine street.

"They are the Hillocks," suggested one.

"Naw, theys just foothills," said Joe. "Foothills, stand up! I sentence each of you to a square meal. Draw on 'Doc' Mathias for the grub."

"What are you in here for?" Joe asked of Joe Shaeffer.

"He stole $1.04 from a man," said Carl Robinson, who thereby appointed himself prosecuting attorney.

"Did the man have any more money? asked Joe.

"Yes, I guess so," the prisoner said.

"Ninety-nine years for you. Why didn't you get all of it?"

"What's that under that straw stack there in the corner?" the court inquired. Oh, it's a negro, is it? Well, take off your hat. You stole a dollar and spent it for fireworks, I believe. You ain't old enough to burn money. Four years for you."

Just then the real court convened and Kangaroo Judge Joe was called.

Joe has been in and out of juvenile court for four years and was sentenced to the reform school in May, 1903. He was paroled in April, 1904. he was before the court for quitting thirteen jobs which had been found for him.

"I'm sorry to have to sentence you, Joe," Judge McCune said to Joe, "but you'll have to back to the reform school for four years.

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June 28, 1907

FIRE UNDER FIREWORKS.

Boys Attempt to Burn Carload
Among Which Men Worked.

A carload of fireworks in the Southwestern News Company's warehouse at Third and Washington streets had a fire built under it yesterday noon by mischievous boys. The corrugated iron structure is built two feet above the ground and the boys splashed a quart of coal oil around on the under side of the floor and touched a match.

Their scampering away caused a teamster to investigate, and the fire was found. It was rapidly eating through the wooden floor before it could be extinguished. Once through the floor, the entire car of explosives would have gone in a flash. Four men were at work among the stuff, filling orders.

The house is on an isolated hill and was built for storing fireworks.

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