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February 12, 1910

BANKS AGAINST NEW HOLIDAY.

Lincoln Anniversary Too Near Feb-
ruary 22, Month Short.

One hundred and one years ago today Abraham Lincoln was born, and in fifteen states the anniversary of that event is observed as a holiday. Missouri, however, is not included in that list, which comprises New York, new Jersey, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Illinois, Oklahoma, Colorado, North and South Dakota, Minnesota, Wyoming, Nevada and Washington. Ten of these states have made February 12 a holiday since 1906.

A number of bankers yesterday expressed themselves in opposition to any more holidays, although they agreed that to the memory of Lincoln was due all the honor a republic could pay.

"As the years pass," remarked the cashier of one bank yesterday, "the figure of Abraham Lincoln looms large in history. Any honor to his memory that we could pay would be inadequate, but with Washington's birthday coming February 22, in the shortest month of the year, it seems almost too much to add another holiday."

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January 28, 1910

HARD TOIL, MONEY
AND BANKER GONE.

"LITTLE ITALY" AROUSED OVER
THE DISAPPEARANCE OF
PETER ISNARDI.

Many Italians Deposited
Savings With Missing
Consular Agent.

Little Italy was never before stirred as it was yesterday, when the announcement was made that Peter Isnardi, consular agent of the United States government, had left for parts unknown. Several hundred Italians are worried about sums aggregating about $12,000, the savings of years, which they had deposited with him. Most of those who entrusted their money to Isnardi were railroad section hands and laborers, recent arrivals from Sunny Italy, and unable to speak the English language. Some had been saving to pay the passage of wives or sweethearts to the land of promise; others that they might some day return to their old homes in Italy and to pass the sunset of their lives among friends and amid familiar scenes and surroundings.

A subscription paper will be started today by J. P. Deo, publisher of an Italian newspaper at 210 East Fifth street, to raise money with which to hire lawyers and detectives to seek Isnardi. A committee of Italians will call upon the United States district attorney today to learn what can be done in the matter.

"We intend to secure an order tomorrow from the prosecuting attorney," said Deo last night, "to open Isnardi's safe. He kept all his books locked in it. Not until we can see the books will we know the facts in the case."

A telegram was sent to the minister of foreign affairs at Rome to find whether or not the money that Isnardi was to forward to the bank at Rome was ever received there.

The Italian consul-general at Chicago announced yesterday that the Kansas City office would be abolished. Roma Ladife, vice consul at Chicago, arrived here yesterday to close the office. He took possession of the Italian flag, which hung in front of the agency at 512 East Fifth street, also the seal of the Italian government and the coat-of-arms. Consul Guido Sabetta, in Chicago, that the Italian government funds were not involved.

OPERATED PRIVATE BANK.

In addition to occupying the office of consular agent, Isnardi operated a private bank. This was wholly outside of his official duties, and for any losses that might occur the Italian government is in no way responsible. The consular agent is supposed to have received nearly $8,000 in savings of Italians in the three and one-half years he has held the office. The remaining $4,000 is money he collected for steamship tickets and to be sent to Italy, to be deposited in the bank of Rome.

Local Italians were opposed to Isnardi from the day he was appointed. charges have been filed against him several times with the Chicago office. Though there were rumors among Italians in Kansas City regarding the consular agent, deposits continued to come from those who lived in the country or in railroad camps.

Ten per cent interest was offered by Isnardi on deposits. This was more than the Italian Central bank at Rome pays, which they had all known in Italy. The Italian bank pays 3 1/2 per cent on time deposits. Those who did not want to send their money to Rome could deposit it with their consular agent, Peter Isnardi, in his private bank.

The office of consular agent pays no salary. It is an honorary position. Isnardi had no other business here, and no apparent private income. The Italians say his sole income was from money he collected from his private bank.

APPOINTMENT WAS PROTESTED.

Isnardi succeeded G. G. Lanvereri as consular agent in Kansas City. Isnardi was appointed by Count A. L. Rozwadowski, who died shortly after the appointment. His office was in Chicago. Signor Sabetta succeeded him. A committee of Italians went to Chicago when the count died and asked for the removal of Isnardi. Charges of dishonesty were made against him, but Sabetta refused to act without first having an investigation.

Before his appointment as consular agent here, Isnardi was a traveling book agent. H represented an Italian publishing house and sold his books for $10 each. His home was then in Pueblo, Col. Isnardi was in Kansas City when the question of a vice consul arose.

Isnardi went immediately to Chicago. Count Rozwadowski and he had known each other in Italy. Against the protests of a committee of Kansas City Italians, who wanted a man from here appointed, Isnardi returned two weeks after the dismissal of Lancereri with the commission of consular agent. His appointment, though recommended by the consul at Chicago, was made directly by the foreign minister at Rome.

The consular agent is an American citizen. A consul general, however, must be a subject of the king. This being the case, as an American citizen, the Italians here think that Isnardi can be prosecuted under the laws of this state, in case the funds are not intact. The consul general, under the extra-territorial provision of international law, is immune from arrest and prosecution in the country where he represents his government.

PROSECUTOR WILL ACT.

"I will thoroughly investigate these charges," said Virgil Conkling, prosecuting attorney, last night. "If I find that consular agents are amenable to the laws of this state, Isnardi will probably be arrested and prosecuted."

A dozen complaints have been made the past two months at the prosecuting attorney's office against the consular agent. Isnardi was charged with taking money from Italians to send to the bank at Rome, and appropriating it to his own use. Two weeks ago today the consular agent was called to the prosecutor's office. There he was told that if he did not refund $800 to an Italian who gave him the money for deposit, that criminal action for embezzlement would be begun. He was given until March 1 to refund the money.

Isnardi left Kansas City January 16. His wife said yesterday he had gone to Chicago, but reports from that city say he has not been seen by the consul general. Mrs. Isnardi has been conducting the business since her husband left.

When the news that the office had been closed spread among the Italians in the North End a crowd of 200 m en and women, most of them depositors in the consular agent's private bank, gathered in front of Isnardi's office. At dark the crowd dispersed. when the door to the office would rattle a dog's bark could be heard. The dog had been turned loose in the office to prevent the angry foreigners from making a forcible entrance.

"What will you do if he does come back?" was asked one in the crowd.

"String him up," was the prompt answer of an Americanized Italian.

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December 23, 1909

FOR 27 YEARS A HOTEL MAID.

Death Ends Margaret Sullivan's
Long Service at Coates House.

Margaret Sullivan, 65 years old, maid in charge of the parlor floor of the Coates house for twenty-seven years, died at St. Joseph's hospital yesterday morning of pneumonia.

Among her effects in the room at the Coates house which she occupied almost continuously while employed there, were found some papers indicating that she left a considerable estate. It is known about the hotel that she lost a large sum of money in a bank failure ten or twelve years ago. At that time sh e told the housekeeper that she would not deposit another cent in a bank, but this resolve was forgotten, for it developed yesterday that she had a certificate of deposit in the National Bank of Commerce for several hundred dollars. Just what her estate amounts to will not be known until the arrival of her two sisters, Mrs. C. R. Helbing of Grand Crossing, near Chicago, and Miss M. Sullivan of Ogdensburg, N. Y. Mrs. Helbing wired the hotel people yesterday afternoon that she would arrive this morning.

Quiet and unassuming, Miss Sullivan worked steadily day after day, never allowing herself a vacation and making herself a veritable fixture in the first big hotel of Kansas City. She would not allow an y of the other maids to assist her and was on duty regularly.

"It is supposed that Miss Sullivan had some money when she came here," said Manager Firey of the Coates house yesterday afternoon. "She received $25 a month and her board, room and laundry. She was of simple tastes and I suppose saved much fore than her salary, for the parlor floor is supposed to be worth something in the shape of gratuities to the maids, as well as to the bellboys. Her death is regretted by everyone attached to the hotel who knew her."

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December 19, 1909

TRAIN IS RUSHED TO
LEE'S SUMMIT FIRE.

AID FROM KANSAS CITY STOPS
FLAMES IN BUSINESS SECTION.

Town Helpless as Conflagration
Gets Beyond Control, Following
Pump of Volunteer Firemen
Breaking -- Damage $65,000.

Lee's Summit, twenty-five miles southeast of Kansas City, unable to cope with a fire which threatened the business section last night, appealed to Kansas City for aid and a special train, carrying a fire engine and hose reel, went out over the Missouri Pacific at 11:45 o'clock, nearly two hours later.

The fire started from a stove, which was located over the M. A. Kinney grocery store. In a few minutes the entire business section of the town seemed doomed. By midnight three business buildings were badly burned and two others were damaged.

T. M. George, a real estate dealer, was overcome by the heat, but was rescued and revived. No other injuries were reported.

The Lee's Summit fire department was badly handicapped. The company had only a gasoline pump with which to work. Water was pumped from a public well. Two streams of water were being directed on the fire when the pump broke and the volunteers were rendered helpless. The Kansas City's aid was sought.

NINE FIREMEN TAKEN.

A special train was made up of two flat cars and one caboose. The fire engine and reel was from No. 1 station. Nine men were taken along from Company 16 with Assistant Chief Alex Henderson in charge.

The special train reached Lee's Summit at 1 o'clock this morning. when the Kansas Cityans arrived the entire population of Lee's Summit, numbering 2,000, out fighting the fire in their helpless way, cheered wildly. The engine and reel were unloaded at once on skids and in fifteen minutes a big stream was being played on the fire. the water from the old mill pond was used.

The flames were checked rapidly by the Kansas City firemen, and the impending complete destruction of the business district was prevented.

The entire stock and goods of the M. A. Kinney company, in whose building the fire started, were completely destroyed. The flames spread to the building belonging to J. D. Ocker, which was occupied by his stock of furniture and hardware.

BUILDINGS DESTROYED.

The entire building was destroyed, including Mr. Ocker's complete stock of goods, and also the offices and fixtures of Dr. J. C. Hall, who occupied the floor above.

The fire next caught at the Citizens' National bank and the building and all the fixtures and property were consumed except the fire-proof vaults.

The J. P. McKisson building located east of the burned block was saved by the valiant work of the volunteer fire department, under the command of H. Lewis. The volunteers had played their streams on this building until the breaking of the apparatus.

One business block was practically saved. In this was the W. B. Howard Clothing store occupying the ground floor and the Bell telephone company on the floor above.

The loss of the Bell telephone company exceeds $3,000 although the local office was but slightly damaged. Only a week ago the company had rewired the town.

All connections and cables were burned and the service completely destroyed. W. B. Howard, cashier of the Citizens State bank declared that his business was the only one affected entirely covered by insurance.

CITY RECORDS LOST.

In the Citizen's Bank building, where the Kansas City firemen finally checked the fire, were located the offices of Keupp & Kimball, a real estate firm, and also the rooms of the city council. All the records and papers of the city were stored in the city rooms, and were a complete loss.

The Kansas City firemen directed two streams of hose on this building and within twenty minutes had the fire put out. There was plenty of pressure and 1,200 feet of hose were used.

The loss will aggregate $65,000. The damage to the buildings was estimated at $15,000, while conservative estimates place the damage to the goods at $50,000. M. A. Kinney carried $1,000 insurance on both his stock and his building.

J. R. Leinweber, president of the bank at Lee's Summit, announced immediately after the fire that plans would be taken for an early re-building of the bank building. The bank is capitalized at $26,000 and has a surplus of $15,000. Its deposits at the last quarterly statement were $108,00. All the valuable papers and bonds held by the bank were deposited in the fire-proof safety vaults, which were uninjured by the fire.

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November 12, 1909

JAPANESE COMMISSIONERS
COME TO TOWN TODAY.

COMMERCIAL CLUB ROOMS DEC-
ORATED FOR RECEPTION.

Five Women Members of Party Will
Be Guests of Honor at Country
Club Luncheon -- Omaha
the Next Stop.

Kansas City will be the host today to the Honorary Commissioners of Japan, consisting of forty-three of the leading business men and educators of the Oriental empire, who, together with five Japanese women, are touring the United States. No efforts will be spared to entertain the foreign guests during their stay here, which will be from 9 o'clock in the morning until 11 o'clock at night.

Following the arrival here the party will breakfast in their special train. At 9:30 the men of the party will be met in automobiles by the members of the Commercial Club and the next hour and a half will be spent in a reception in the club rooms. The club rooms have been decorated with palms and ferns, the stars and stripes, the Japanese national flag, the mikado's coat of arms, and the Japanese man-of-war emblem. Judge W. T. Bland, president of the club, will head the receiving line, and in it will be the forty-three Japanese commissioners, the officers off the Commercial Club and all former presidents of the club.

WILL VISIT HIGH SCHOOL.

At 11 o'clock the party will be taken to the Westport high school, where Baron Kanda, head of the school of the nobility in Tokio, will make a short speech. Baron Kanda speaks English fluently and is a graduate of Amherst college. The address will be followed by a drive through Swope park and a stop at the Evanston Golf Club for a buffet luncheon.

After the luncheon the party will be driven through the city, up and down the principal streets, over the boulevards and through the leading parks.

The first place of interest to be visited will be the Bank of Commerce. This will be followed by an inspection of the Burnham-Munger overall factory. A drive to Kansas City, Kas., is next in order, where the party will be shown through the plant of the Kingman-Moore Implement Company. These will be the only places visited during the day.

While the men are being entertained by the members of the Commercial Club the five women in the party, Baroness Shibusawa, Baroness Kanda, Madame Midzuno, Madame Horikoshi and Madame Toki will not be forgotten. A committee composed of the wives of the Commercial Club directors and Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Clendening will entertain them. A visit to the Westport high school, a noon lunch at the Country Club and a tea at the home of Mrs. W. R. Nelson will be the events of the day which have been mapped out for the women.

DINNER AT THE BALTIMORE.

At 6:30 o'clock in the evening a dinner will be served to the men in the banquet room at the Baltimore hotel. At the same time a dinner will be given for the women in the Japanese room of the hotel. At the conclusion of their dinner the women will repair to the banquet room, where the entire party will listen to the addresses by David R. Frances, Senator William Warner, Baron Shibusawa and Baron Kanda. Judge Bland will act as toastmaster.

This will conclude the events of the day. The visitors will be taken back to their train, and will leave for Omaha, from where they will work west to San Francisco, from which port they will sail for Japan, November 30.

LEADING FINANCIER.

The Japanese arrived in Seattle from Japan September 1, and when they leave will have spent eighty-eight days in America, visited fifty-two cities, and traveled more than 11,000 miles. During this time they have visited plants and institutions representing nearly every American industry. Many of Kansas City's leading industries will not be visited, as the party has been to similar ones in other cities.

Baron Elighi Shibusawa, who is the head of the commission, is one of the leading men of Japan, being both a statesman and a financier. His individual efforts have raised the status of business men in this country. In 1873, Baron Shibusawa organized the first national bank in Japan under the capital stock system, and has been connected since with all leading banking institutions in Japan.

One Pullman dynamo car, a baggage car, a Pullman dining car, four ten-compartment sleepers, one twelve-section drawing room car and a six-compartment observation car comprise the equipment of the special train that will bring the Japanese to Kansas City over the Burlington railroad. The train will be in charge of W. A. Lalor, assistant general passenger agent for the Burlington at St. Louis.

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October 18, 1909

FAMOUS SONS UNITE
CHILDHOOD CHUMS.

BOY SINGERS' MOTHERS LEARN
THEY ARE OLD FRIENDS.

Strange Coincidence Revealed at
Convention Hall Banquet Table.
Three Youths Earn Fame
With Remarkable Voices.
Frank Vrooman and Lawrence P. Smith, Boy Singers

Those persons who have followed closely the remarkable careers of Maxwell Kennedy, Frank Vrooman and Laurence Smith, boy singers, are pointing to a remarkable coincidence in the life history of the three boys.

Although reared in widely separated sections of the country, these boys have attained almost international reputations because of the remarkable qualities of their voices. Two of these singers, Laurence Powars Smith and Frank Ellsworth Vrooman, met for the first time at Convention hall in Kansas City, Mo., where they appeared on the programme and held spellbound the great assembly which had gathered to honor the postal clerks of the country.

MEET AT BANQUET.

Sitting opposite each other at the banquet table and sharing equally the congratulations of hundreds of persons who had been thrilled by the remarkable carrying power of their young voices were the boy singers and their parents. For a long time Mrs. Clarence J. Voorman, the mother of Frankie, gazed at the smiling countenance of Mrs. C. G. Smith, the mother of Laurence, seeing there something that carried her back in memory to her girlhood days in Junction City, Kas., when her dearest friend and playmate had been Laura Patterson, a girl her own age.

"I am sure you must be my old schoolmate, Laura Patterson," said Mrs. Vrooman, reaching her hand across the table. "Don't you remember me? Lottie Wood."

The two friends who had not met for thirty years quickly reverted to by-gone days and spoke with wonder of the coincidence that the mothers of the two greatest boy singers should have been playmates in their childhood days. The wonder of Mrs. Vrooman was increased, however, when Mrs. Smith spoke of little Frankie Kennedy, who "turned ropes," "spun tops" and did many other wonderful things for their edification while attending the public school in Junction City. Mrs. Vrooman then learned for the first time that this same little Frank Kennedy is the father of Maxwell Kennedy, the wonderful boy singer.

VOICES GAIN FAME.

Laurence Powars Smith is now 17 years old and was born in Ottawa, Kas. His former rich soprano voice combines a wonderful interpretation with great carrying power and has now developed into a tenor of the highest quality. He is the son of C. G. Smith, president of the People's National bank, Kansas City, Kas. His services are much in demand throughout the country, especially at Chautauquas. He is now engaged as soloist at the Linwood Boulevard Presbyterian church, Kansas City, Mo.

Frankie Vrooman is 13 years old. He is a son of Clarance J. Vrooman, 3114 Washington street, Kansas City, Mo. Frankie is a slight, manly little chap, unaffected; and a typical American school boy. His voice is a rich soprano, and every word is enunciated perfectly, so that the carrying power is remarkable. he has been singing in public three years and has met with much success. On June 13 he sung in the Westminster Presbyterian church of Minneapolis. He is a protege of Walton Holmes, and a brilliant future is predicted. At present he is soloist at St. Paul's Episcopal church, Fortieth and Main streets, Kansas City, Mo.

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October 17, 1909

PICKPOCKET SUSPECTS HELD.

Man and Woman Thought to Be No-
torious Professionals.

A man and a woman, suspected of being professional pickpockets wanted in many other cities of the country, were arrested yesterday afternoon in the corridor of the First National bank on a charge of attempting to rob B. T. Hawkins, a clerk at the Helping Hand institute, who had just drawn $144 from his savings account.

The two, it is said, have been noticed for several days in the bank building, where they generally loitered without any apparent object in view. Persons who drew their money from the bank, it is charged, were "crowded" by the couple who, if opportunity offered, picked the pockets of their victims. In the opinion of Edward Boyle, inspector of detectives, the two are among the best at their trade in the country. They will be tried in the municipal court on Monday.

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October 2, 1909

JAMES MOSS HUNTON DEAD.

Cousin of Thomas H. Swope Is
Stricken With Paralysis.

While sitting at the dinner table last night at the home of his cousin, Mrs. Logan O. Swope, South Seventh street, Independence, James Moss Hunton was stricken with paralysis and died a few minutes later. He was 62 years old and for many years had made his home with Mrs. Swope and his cousin, Thomas H. Swope.

Mr. Hunton was secretary and director of the Chrisman-Sawyer bank. He was well known in Jackson county and exceedingly popular. He was born in New Orleans and was the son of Judge Logan Hunton, who lived in St. Louis for many years. His mother was a Miss Mary Moss before her marriage.

For many years Mr. Hunton was engaged in the real estate business in St. Louis and for a time lived in Philadelphia. In 1896 he moved to Independence. Mrs. Elizabeth A. Moore, dean of Stephens college, Columbia, Mo., and Mrs. Mary McCune of St. Louis are sisters. The funeral arrangements will not be made until they reach the city.

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August 25, 1909

BANK'S 25TH ANNIVERSARY.

Reception Today from 10 to 3 at
German American.

Officers and directors of the German-American bank at Fourteenth street and Grand avenue will hold a reception today. The reception will mark the twenty-fifth anniversary of the founding of the bank. Special decorations have been arranged and visitors will be entertained from 10 o'clock until 3. The bank was instituted by Louis A. Lambert and his five sons, one of whom, Henry C. Lambert, is cashier.

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August 19, 1909

Y. W. C. A. GIRLS GUESTS
OF PROMINENT BANKER.

GIVEN A RIDE OVER BOULE-
VARDS IN HIS MOTOR CAR.

Regular Daily Programme Is Being
Carried Out by Devoted Father at
Daughter's Request -- Moth-
ers as Chaperones.

Three pretty young women, members of the Y. W. C. A., with one of their mothers as a chaperone, enjoyed a ride over the boulevards of Kansas City last evening in one of the most luxurious touring cars in the city. Their ride was through the generosity of a prominent banker of Kansas City who is greatly devoted to his daughter. She departed for a several weeks' visit North and when she left she asked that he arrange to take some of the Y. W. C. A. girls out in the machine.

Tonight another set of girls will be taken for a ride. This will continue each evening until the return of the daughter. The names and addresses of the young women to be taken on these rides will be furnished by Miss Ida Wilson, the desk secretary of the society.

That the idea will be a popular one and will be followed to a great extent by wealthy citizens who do not use their machines much while their families are away during the summer, developed last evening. Henry C. Lambert, cashier of the German American bank, said he thought that the idea should be taken up by the automobile club. "My machines can be placed at the disposal of such a cause at least once a week," said Mr. Lambert; " and I think there are probably a dozen other men in town who would loan their machines an evening or two a week."

"Some of our members have enjoyed the pleasure of auto rides while others have not," said Miss Ida Wilson yesterday afternoon. "Of course, to the majority of those who have not ridden in one of the big touring cars, such an invitation would hardly be refused. I believe that if other citizens hear about our banker friend they too will proffer their machines. If they do, I think we will have no trouble in furnishing the girls to ride. Our idea in this is, of course, to give the girl the full pleasure of the ride. The name and address of each girl and the chaperone will be given to the gentleman who drives the machine or his driver and the girls will be called for at their homes and returned there. In this way they will get the full pleasure of the auto ride.

"While we are not in any way soliciting automobiles for this purpose, I believe that as soon as this fact becomes known we will have several proffers of machines."

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August 16, 1909

HUGH C. WARD DIES
IN NEW YORK CITY.

APOPLEXY FOLLOWED HEAT
PROSTRATION A MONTH AGO.

Mrs. Ward and Judge PHilips at His
Bedside -- With Family Was
Spending Summer at Bass
Rooks Point, Mass.
The Late Hugh C. Ward, Prominent Kansas City Attorney.
HUGH C. WARD.

Hugh C. Ward, one of the most prominent attorneys of Kansas City, and a member of a pioneer family of Western Missouri, died from a stroke of apoplexy in New York yesterday morning.

An attack of heat prostration which he suffered in Chicago a month ago was one of the causes which led up to the death of Mr. Ward. He had never fully recovered from this attack, although his condition had improved sufficiently to permit him to continue his journey to New York, accompanied by his wife. With Mr. Ward at his death were Mrs. Ward, Judge John F. Philips and several relatives.


WESTERN TRIP FATAL.

Mr. Ward had taken a cottage for the summer at Bass Rocks Point, near Gloucester, Mass., and he left for that place in June with Mrs. Ward and their four children. Business matters required the presence of Mr. Ward in Kansas City and he came home for a few days in July. He left again for his summer home on July 13, but became ill as a result of becoming overheated in Chicago.

Mrs. Ward was called to his bedside by telegraph, and after a week his physician pronounced him able to travel. Mrs. Ward and her mother, Mrs. J. C. James, started for the East with Mr. Ward, but it was found necessary to make a stop in New York where Mr. Ward was taken to a hospital and given the attention of some of the best specialists of the city.


SUDDEN CHANGE FOR THE WORSE.

His improvement was slow, but a telegram from Mrs. Ward to her father, J. C. James, on Tuesday announced that he was much better. A sudden change occurred, however, and at 4 o'clock Saturday afternoon Mr. James received a message that Mr. Ward had grown much worse. Mr. James left at once for New York.

The announcement of the death of Mr. Ward came in a telegram from L. T. James, Mrs. Ward's uncle, who landed in New York yesterday morning from a European trip.

The funeral services and interment will occur in Kansas City, the details for these to be arranged as soon as Mr. James reaches New york.

In addition to his wife and the children, Hugh Campbell, Jr., James Crawford, Francis and John Harris, Mr. Ward is survived by his mother, the widow of Seth E. Ward, and his brother, John E. Ward.


LEGISLATION AND POLITICS.

Hugh C. Ward was born March 10, 1864 at Westport. His parents were Seth and Mary Frances Ward. Hugh was reared on the farm and received his elementary education at a private school in Westport and his collegiate education at William Jewell Collete, Liberty, Mo., and at Harvard University. He was graduated with honors from Harvard, a bachelor of arts, in 1886. He then entered the St. Louis Law School and in June, 1888, received his diploma. He then was admitted to the bar in Kansas City.

In recognition of his ability as a lawyer came in 1894 his appointment as receiver for the John J. Mastin & Co., banking business, on dissolution of partnership. The property involved consisted mostly of real estate, and amounted to more than $3,000,000.

Aside from his profession Mr. Ward was known in business circles as a director of the National Bank of Commerce, Commerce Trust Company, Kansas City Railway and Light Company, and of the Kansas City Home Telephone Company.

He was long influential in Democratic circles, and in 1892 was elected to the state legislature where he did much work in connection with constructive measures.

In case preparation Mr. Ward was known as thorough and exhaustive, and in presentation before a judge or jury clear and vigorous in expression, and intensely earnest.

As a politician he was equally successful and well known. In the legislature in 1892 besides being made vice chairman of the judiciary committee, he was appointed chairman of the committtee on conditional amendments.

In 1898 he was appoointed police commissioner by Governor Stephens, who also made Mr. Ward a member of his staff, and placed in his hands the organization of the Missouri National Guard. He resigned as police commissionier and retired from politics in 1902.

SOCIAL AND PERSONAL SIDE.

Mr. Ward was a member of the Society of Colonial Wars, deriving his eligibility through the lineal descent from Seth Ward, a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses. H e was also a member of the Elks lodge, the Country Club, the Commercial Club, the Harvard Club of the Southwest and the American Bar Association.

Mr. Ward was married October 26, 1898, to Miss Vassie James, a graduate of Vassar college and a daughter of J. Crawford James.

One of Mr. Ward's last acts was to give $25,000 to the Young Women's Christian Association of Kansas City.

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August 4, 1909

WIPING OUT A CAR LINE.

W. H. Winants Tells of Pioneer
Movement in Electric Railways.

Some idea of the complete way in which the street railway properties are wiped out may be gathered from the fate of the old Northeast electric line. It was only in an accidental way yesterday that the fact was developed that within the last twenty years there was built, operated and wiped out in this city an electric railway. The contractor who was speaking of the line could not recall particulars of it, but remembered that Colonel W. H. Winants, president of the Mercantile bank of this city, had been president of the old company. When Colonel Winants was asked about the road he told a story that was one of pioneering.

"Municipal transportation is a dangerous thing," said the Mercantile bank's president. "So many bright minds are bent upon perfecting the means of rapid transit that great discoveries are made, so great that they destroy all earlier methods. Eight men, including myself, found some twenty years ago that horse cars, dummy engines and cable railways would soon be obsolete and that electricity would be the moving power.

"We raised money for a line and took over the Northeast horse car line. That system ran from the Market square to Woodland avenue by way of Independence avenue. It took care of only that territory, and being a mule line, was not conducive to settlers going beyond. With electricity available we went further. We left Independence avenue and laid rails along the present route, though not so far east as the cars now go.

"When we went out there we went out alone. Our equipment was crude, being then newly invented, and the consequence was the service was not as good as it might be. It would not be accepted today. But we ran electric cars, the people saw how much faster they went than the old mules, and how much farther they could go without coming to a dead stop. Mules would go only so far.

"Poor as our service was, the line began to develop the country, and in an incredibly short space of time there were houses going up all along the route, and thus began the growth of the northeast part of Kansas City. The street cars did it."

Asked what became of the line, President Winants laughed and said that "modern inventions and other things made it necessary to get a bigger company, the Metropolitan, to take it over.

"I had the honor of being the president of the first electric line in Kansas City, and the only 'gravity system' we have had. One morning I arrived at the car line barns at Highland avenue, or near there, and found the trolley had got mixed up with the overhead rigging, and had been torn off the top of the car. It would not do to tie up the system. It was time for people to be getting down town. So I had the trolley pole laid at the curb, closed the doors, told the passengers there would be no stop made till we got to the end of the line, thus giving a chance to any who wanted to get off, and away we went.

"It was a downhill run all the way except past Shelley park, and we gathered enough momentum before reaching that level to carry us on to the next decline. We made the trip all right, and thus began and ended Kansas City's gravity line.

"Seriously speaking," resumed Colonel Winants, "there is a great risk in street car sureties. The lines have to spend vast sums of money pioneering. They do a tremendous amount of good to the city and a new invention may wipe them out."

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July 27, 1909

HELPED MAKE HISTORY
IN KANSAS CITY KAS.

BYRON JUDD, RESIDENT SINCE
1857, IS DEAD.

Held Many Positions of Trust and
equipped First Horse Car Line
in the City -- Was 85
Years Old.

In the death last night of Byron Judd, a pioneer resident of Kansas City, Kas., the city was deprived of perhaps its most widely known and lovable characters. He was a man of rare ability, and was noted for his keen, incisive mind. Every enterprise of worth which marked the early transition of a straggling Indian village into the metropolis of the state is closely interwoven with the name and personality of Byron Judd. Although his advanced age of late years prevented his active participation in the affairs of the city, his mind retained the vigor of youth and his counsel upon questions of moment was highly valued and eagerly sought.

ANCESTORS IN MAYFLOWER.

Byron Judd was born August 13, 1824, at Otis , Berkshire county, Mass. His parents were farmers and pointed with pride that their ancestry could be clearly traced to the landing of the Mayflower. He received his education at the state normal and at Southwick academy. As a young man in his ho me town he held many minor offices, among which were school commissioner, township assessor and selectman.

In 1855 he left his native state and journeyed westward to Iowa, being made deputy land recorder at Des Moines, a position he held until his removal in 1857 to Kansas City, Kas., or, as it was then known, Wyandotte. In 1869 he was elected a member of the board of aldermen of the city. In 1863 he was elected county treasurer of Wyandotte county. He was married in 1865 to Mrs. Mary Louise Bartlett.

During the early days of Wyandotte he engaged in the banking and land business which he carried on for many years, having been the first land agent in the city. He was president of the council in 1868 and was elected mayor in 1869. This administration was remarkable for the spirit of enterprise displayed and was in fact the beginning of that civic pride which has since characterized the city.

EQUIPPED FIRST HORSE CAR.

Mr. Judd was made United States commissioner in 1870. In 1871 he organized the First National bank of that city and served as president and cashier of the institution. He remained a director in the bank for many years. In connection with W. P. Overton and Luther Wood he went to St. Louis and purchased the material and equipment for the first horse car line in the city.

He was elected state senator in 1872 and served in that capacity until 1876. Although a staunch Democrat, he was not in sympathy with the border warfare and many of the outrages committed during that period were fearlessly denounced by him.

His is survived by his only daughter, Mrs. Sarah Judd Greenman, public librarian of Kansas City, Kas.

Funeral arrangements have not been made.

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June 22, 1909

MAJOR J. M. HADLEY IS DEAD.

Father of Missouri Governor Long
a Prominent Citizen of John-
son County, Kas.

DE SOTO, KAS., June 21. -- Major John M. Hadley, father of Governor H. S. Hadley of Missouri, died here at 2:35 o'clock this afternoon from the effects of a stroke of apoplexy which he suffered June 9. For several days he had lain in an unconscious condition, and the end came quietly. His son and daughter, Mrs. J. W. Lyman, came yesterday and were with their father to last night.

The funeral services, conducted by Rev. W. J. Mitchell, pastor of the M. E. church at this place, an old soldier and personal friend, will be held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Snyder at 1:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, after which the body will be taken to Olathe and interment made in the family lot.

The active pallbearers here will be Dr. W. M. Marcks, B. S. Taylor, C. S. Becroft, Zimri Gardner, C. K. Dow and B. F. Snyder. At Olathe they will be chosen from the Masonic lodge.

The G. A. R. and the Masonic orders, both of which Major Hadley was an active member, will have charge of the services at Olathe. The honorary pallbearers at Olathe will be Colonel Conover of Kansas City, Major I. O. Pickering, Colonel J. T. Burris, J. T. Little of Olathe, Frank R. Obb and William Pellet of Olathe, all of whom have been personal friends.

The governor reached Kansas City from the capital on a special train Sunday, after receiving word of the critical condition of his father. He was met at the station by a motor car, and made the remainder of the trip to De Soto overland, arriving at the bedside of his father at 1:30 Sunday afternoon.

The elder Hadley was one of the most prominent citizens of De Soto, president of the De Soto State Bank., and connected with many of the institutions of Johnson county, of which he was a pioneer resident.

Major Hadley located at Shawnee Mission in 1855. In October, 1861, he enlisted in the Eighth Kansas Infantry, being rapidly promoted to the rank of second lieutenant, in which capacity he served for fifteen months.

He was later made lieutenant and then captain of the Ninth Kansas Cavalry, and in May, 1865, was promoted to the rank of major, which title clung to him until death. At the close of the war Major Hadley was elected sheriff of Johnson county and served until 1870, when he was made clerk of the district court. He was also head of the extensive flouring mills at De Soto. In 1877 Major Hadley represented his district in the state assembly as senator, being re-elected in 1879.

He was one of the largest land owners in Johnson county. Mrs. Hadley died in 1875.

EXECUTIVE OFFICES CLOSED.

JEFFERSON CITY, MO., June 21. -- Acting Governor Humphreys said tonight that as a mark of respect to the governor whose father, Major John M. Hadley, died at De Soto, Kas., this afternoon, the governor's office and those departments in the state house grounds which come under the appointment of the governor would be closed tomorrow. This, he said, was as far as he would go, and that he was governed by the governor's wish in the matter, having talked with him by telephone.

No formal proclamation will be issued, however, as Major Hadley was not a resident of the state.

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May 18, 1909

SHAWNEE BANK ROBBED
WHILE PEOPLE LOOK ON.

Citizens Awed as Safe Is Blown at
Early Hour Monday Morning
and $1,300 Secured.

While the entire pupulation of Shawnee watched the performance, two yeggs marched out of the village early Monday morning with about $1,300 belonging to the Shawnee State Savings bank. The robbers were able to loot the bank after shattering the safe with three charges of nitro-glycerin. It is supposed that the men came to Kansas City.

When the first explosion shook the little town, everyone was awakened. According to those present, most of the inhabitants dressed and started toward the bank. Another explosion kept them at a respectful distance, and when the two men finally did emerge from the door, after firing another charge, no one had the nerve to molest them. The men carried the money away in a sack.

Shawnee is six miles southwest of Rosedale, in Johnson county, Kas.

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May 12, 1909

WYLIE W. COOK IN CHARGE.

New Head for Kansas City, Kas.,
Police Department.
Wylie W. Cook, Chief of Police of Kansas City, Kas.
WYLIE W. COOK.
Newly Appointed Chief of Police of Kansas City, Kas.


Wylie W. Cook, acting upon orders from Mayor U. S. Guyer, took charge of the police department of Kansas City, Kas., yesterday morning as chief. His name for this position will be submitted along with a list of other appointments to the council at tonight's meeting for confirmation.

Mr. Cook is 49 years old and has lived in the city since 1892. He was formerly connected with the Banking Trust Company and was an assistant state bank examiner during the administration of Governor E. N. Morrill. While he has not had any actual experience in police work he is considered fully competent to fill his new position. All of the men chosen for chief of police by the mayors for many years have been men of business experience rather than police work and in most cases the service rendered has been satisfactory.

Edward Strong, who has been made captain of police, is a man of many years' experience in the local department and with his help Chief Cook says he is confident that he will be able to soon improve the workings of the force. No changes in the assignment of them men will be made until the new executive becomes more familiar with the department.

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May 2, 1909

LINCOLN A GOLF ENTHUSIAST.

Son of Martyred President Won't Dis-
cuss Railroad Situation.

Robert T. Lincoln, son of the martyred president and called by the pet name "Tad" in all of the Liberator's correspondence, played golf yesterday at the Country Club links. The Scotch game takes the same place in the life of Mr. Lincoln, who is president of the Pullman Car Company, that rail-splitting did in the life of his father. All winter, when weather permitted, the son of the statesman, although 66 years old, chased the little white ball over the fields near his Chicago home. He is hale and hearty and is said to have played an excellent game yesterday, although none of the members of the party would say who had won.

Mr. Lincoln, with S. M. Felton, president of the Mexican Central railway, William V. Kelley, president of the American Steel foundries, and Joseph T. Talbert, vice president of the Chicago Commercial National bank, are the guests of E. F. Swinney of the First National bank. They will return to Chicago tonight. All of them are golf enthusiasts.

In personal appearance Mr. Lincoln is of average height. At first glance there seems to be nothing about him to remind one of the familiar face of his father. Closer inspection, however, shows that in at least two respects he is like him. The most noticeable feature is his mouth. Abraham Lincoln's mouth was not handsome but it was distinctive. The son's mouth, although almost hidden behind a grayish beard, is an exact counterpart of his father's. They eyes of Abraham Lincoln have been exploited in many chapters and Robert Lincoln has the advantage of having eyes that exactly tally with the description of his father's

"What do you think of Judge McPherson's decision in the rate case?" was a question sprung on the party, but they all grew mute at once. Mr. Lincoln disclaimed any knowledge of the railway situation in this state but expressed his willingness to talk on any phase of the golf game.

"I would like to say, though," he remarked, "that the beautiful roads of this city were a source of the greatest surprise and pleasure to me. I am delighted with my visit here if only because I have had a glimpse of what Kansas City is and seems destined to be."

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April 21, 1909

BANK OF COMMERCE
UNDER NEW CONTROL.

J. WILSON PERRY OF ST. LOUIS
IS ITS PRESIDENT.

Dr. W. S. Woods, David T. Beals and
W. T. Kemper Retire From
Active Interest in the
Institution.

As the culmination of a deal by which St. Louis bankers gained control of the National Bank of Commerce, J. Wilson Perry, formerly vice president of the National Bank of Commerce in St. Louis, was elected yesterday to the presidency of the Kansas City institution to succeed David T. Beals, who retires from active business. Dr. W. S. Woods relinquished control of the bank to Mr. Perry yesterday morning, following which Mr. Perry's election immediately took place. Dr. Woods also retires from active business life.

With Mr. Perry, William L. Buechle of St. Louis, former national bank examiner for Missouri, was elected as vice president to succeed William T. Kemper, who has resigned, and George D. Ford, director, elected vice president, the position having been created for him. Mr. Kemper was elected president of the Commerce Trust Company yesterday afternoon to succeed Dr. Woods, and will devote his entire time to that institution. Dr. Woods will continue as chairman of the executive board of the trust company.

Mr. Perry commences his work with the Kansas City institution under the most favorable conditions. Forty years of persistent and competent effort on the part of his predecessors, recent reorganization and increased capital; a deposit account of more than $25,000,000, with a 42 per cent reserve, and an unusually strong and representative board of directors makes his success almost assured.

BECAUSE OF WIFE'S HEALTH.

Speaking of the change, Dr. Woods said yesterday:

"I took this step for several reasons, but principally on account of my wife's health. It is necessary for her to spend most of her time in the South and California. We will probably go to California to live. The trips I was obliged to take in order to be with her and attend to the bank's affairs at the same time taxed me more than I cared, so I simply made up my mind to retire from active business and devote my time to my family and personal affairs.

"After forty years of business, all of which time has been spent in banking, I believe I have earned a respite. My health is good, but I need rest and I feel it proper that I should now step aside and let a younger man fill my place.

"My years of association with the officers and directors of the National Bank of Commerce have been of the most pleasant character. I feel I have gained their confidence and esteem as they have mine, and it is with some regret that I sever these pleasant relations. I shall watch with great interest the growth of the Commerce with the new man at the helm. I have known Mr. Perry for years as a successful business man. He deserves the support of the people of Kansas City and I commend him to them."

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March 14, 1909

CAME TO KANSAS CITY
SO HE WOULD BE SAFE.

CAMDEN POINT BANK ROBBER
KNEW WHERE TO LIGHT.

William Turner, Arrested at Station,
Makes Voluntary Confession That
Made Police Sit Up -- He's
Tired of Dodging.
William Turner, Confessed Bank Robber
WILLIAM TURNER,
Confessed Camden Point Bank Robber.

William Turner, one of the four men who robbed the Bank of Camden Point on December 27, 1907, and who has been in several bank robberies all over the country, has made a complete confession. Turner was arrested yesterday afternoon at Union depot under orders from the sheriff of Sapulpa, Ok., who wanted him for petty larceny. He confessed to the Camden Point bank robbery of his own accord.

The prisoner had been taken to the holdover late yesterday afternoon and as he was led through the corridor at police headquarters, he recognized W. P. Martin, a patrolman whom he had met in several occasions.

"I guess they are going to take me to Oklahoma," he said to Martin, who accompanied him to the holdover. "They want me down there for petty larceny, but if they knew what I had done here in Missouri, they wouldn't think of taking me back. Just tell the captain that I've got something to tell him."

DOESN'T LOOK LIKE CROOK.

Turner, who limps slightly, was led up stairs to Captain Walter Whitsett's private office. H is face had a determined look and though he is 28 years old and has associated with criminals ever since he was 14 years old, he does not look like a crook. He greeted the captain and in a matter of fact way informed him that he was a bank robber.

"I'm tired of beating around the country with the officers always on my trail and I'm willing to come through with all," he said. "You remember the bank at Camden Point? Well, I'm one of the four men that cracked the bank there over a year ago."

The robbery of the bank at that time had been a source of vexation to the police and though two of the men were captured, it was thought that the other members of the party came to Kansas City.

"Yes, Seranton Billie and I planned the robbery over in Zack's saloon at 307 Main street," Turner continued. "We went up to Leavenworth and then took a train to Camden Point the night before the robbery. Early the next morning, we went into the bank building and flowed the safe, but not until we had used most of our nitro-glycerine. The people of the town were roused and began to fire into the bank before we could get all the loot. The two men were captured the next day in a cornfield, but Billie and I got away. We first went to St. Joseph and there we separated. I came to Kansas City because I knew it would be pretty safe here. I had about $600 in bills but the police didn't get on to me at all.

STARTED OUT EARLY.

Turner's blue eyes grew reminiscent and he tilted back in his chair in a restful attitude. He told about his birth in Baltimore and said that he moved to Missouri with his parents in the latter part of the '80s,. At 15 he was stolen by tramps and learned the "yeg" business when in their company. They taught him to beg in small towns and on many occasions went around on crutches, pretending to be a cripple. He would carry the day's receipts to his pals late at night and they would then plan on some new disguise for the boy. He later became acquainted with the methods of manufacturing nitro-glycerin and the most approved method of cracking a safe. He has been all over the country, he says, and has known most of the "yegs" in the United States.

"But they all die in prison," he said, "and I've made up my mind to take my medicine. If there is any time left to me to be free I want to en joy it. I'm tired of this life. My shoulder hurts me where I was shot in one raid three years ago."

Turner put his confession in writing to W. S. Gabriel, an assistant prosecutor, and was taken to a cell in the matron's room. He asked permission of the captain to allow him a quantity of writing material.

"I want to write the story of my life," he said.

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March 9, 1909

GYPSY SMITH'S COUSIN,
SAID WOMAN IN BLACK.

TALKED RELIGION TO VICTIM,
WHO IS SHORT $130.

Police Searching for Mysterious
Female, Who Used Hypnotism on
Domestic and Got All the
Money She Had.

A mysterious "woman in black," purporting to be a cousin of Gypsy Smith, has been reported to the police by one of her victims, Mary Anderson, 1836 Pendleton avenue, a domestic in the employ of J. L. DeLong, as having muleted her of $130 after advising her to draw the money out of the bank. The woman claimed to be a fortune teller, possessing the marvelous powers of foresight, and told Miss Anderson that unless she withdrew her deposit before March 5 it would be lost.

Friends of the girl believe the woman to have been a hypnotist, the girl's story of her experience with the "seeress" seeming to bear out this belief. The money is supposed to have been taken by the woman while she and Miss Anderson were in one of the waiting rooms at Emery, Bird, Thayer's store on Walnut street.

SHE'S A FORTUNE TELLER.

"The woman first came to the ho use on Monday afternoon a week ago and asked to be allowed to tell my sister's fortune," said the girl yesterday, "but, as my sister does not understand English well enough to carry on a conversation, I was approached. I told her I did not have time to talk to her and didn't want my fortune told, anyway.

"The next afternoon the woman appeared again and this time she insisted upon reading my hand. She told me that my people in the old country were having some trouble with their property and that all was not well with them. This was true and I began to put some credence in what she told me. Then she declared that the property would be lost and that there would much trouble come of it.

"After telling me this she looked right at me and said that I had money in the bank. 'You had better be careful of that, too,' she said, 'for I can see that you are going to have trouble with it. That institution will fail before March 5, and if your money is not out by that time you will lose it.' She then asked me how much I had and I told her I did not think it was any of her business. 'I know how much it is,' she declared, 'you have $130 or $150 in t he bank, but you had better take it out.' "

DREW MONEY FROM BANK.

The victim of the plot, after this seeming marvelous revelation of "powers," made an excuse the next day and went down to the bank and drew out her $130, her saving of more than seven months, the money that was to bring relief and help to her family across the ocean, and help to bring another sister from Sweden to America. She had lost some of her savings once before when a bank failed three years ago.

At the office of the bank the "woman in black" was waiting, but Miss Anderson says she was not there when she came out with the money.

"I had my money tied up in a handkerchief and that inside a leather handbag I carried," she said. I walked into Emery, Bird, Thayer's and went up to the waiting room. Here I met the woman again and she came to me and said, 'What , you again? I am glad to see you.' "

Sitting down to a table by themselves, the two women, according to the girl's story, began to talk . The "woman in black" began by asking the girl if she had been to hear Gypsy Smith. A reply in the negative brought a torrent of upbraidings. The woman declared she would suffer the torments of hell and the fires of everlasting damnation if she did not change her ways, and live the right life, as set forth in the teachings of the revivalist. She urged the girl to go with her to Convention hall, but this she would not do.

SHE WANTED THE BANK ROLL.

"I experienced the queerest sensation all the time the woman talked," she said. "Her beady black eyes seemed to burn into mine, and I could not take my eyes away from hers. I kept saying to myself, 'You cannot get my money, you cannot get my money.' And then she asked me to give it to her, saying she would return it to me the next day. I asked her if she thought I was crazy, and she told me that she thought I was one of the brightest girls she had ever known.

"She left me saying 'God bless you, I'll see you tomorrow.' and went out of the room. I did not get up for a moment, and when I did try I could hardly stand on my feet. I felt dazed and sleepy, and thought I should not be able to get home. There was no one in the room during all the time we were in there together. It was not until after I was on the street car on my way home that I noticed the money was gone."

THE BEADY BLACK EYES.

The police were notified of the occurrence, but so far nothing definite has been learned. Several persons in the neighborhood of Pendleton avenue saw the "woman in black," and declared she had tried to gain entrance to a numnber of residences on the plea of telling fortunes. She is described as wearing a black hat with several large black plumes, a black skirt and a black cloak reaching about to the knee. Her expression is said to be unpleasant and forbidding, the beady black eyes which stare at you directly seem to fascinate against the will, make the face repellent.

The woman told Miss Anderson that she lived in a tent in Kansas City, Kas., in the old Electric park, and that she was gypsy and still kept to the traditions of her race.

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February 1, 1909

HOBOES ARE A MENACE.

They Retard Economic Development
of Country, Says C. B. Hoffman.

At the First Universalist church at Tenth and Park streets yesterday morning, C. B. Hoffman, president of the Bankers' Trust Company of Kansas city, Kas., spoke of the hobo as retarding the economic develpment of the country and said that he must furnish the solution of the problem of his own existence.

"There are more unemployed men in this country than its population and industry warrant," continued Mr. Hoffman. "This comes from the unequal distribution of work. The unemployed but willing laborers must form unions of a progressive and peaceable sort if they are to better their condition."

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January 23, 1909

LOAN MONEY TO THE POOR.

Jewish Organization That Does Not
Demand Pound of Flesh.

In order to aid the deserving poor who have to make occasional loans, the Society of Gemilus Chasodim, an organization composed of Jewish women, a scheme for lending money without security or interest has been evolved. The annual report made by the treasurer, L. J. Cohen, shows that the society has made loans aggregating $5,025, during the past year. The losses from non-payment by borrowers has amounted to less than 1 per cent of the whole. Under ordinary circumstances the loan is paid back in weekly installments of $1, but if the borrower is unable to meet the payment a longer time is given. The total funds for the organization during the past fiscal year were $5,772.60. A balance of $694.56 is left on deposit in the Fidelity Trust Company.

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January 22, 1909

FOR EARTHQUAKE VICTIMS.

$690 Collected and Turned Over to
Mayor Crittenden.

Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., A. Judah and Pietro Isnadi, Italian consul, who made personal appeals to the banks for aid for the earthquake sufferers of Italy, yesterday turned over $690 to the committee. Subscriptions, in addition to those already acknowledged, have been received by the mayor as follows:

Southwest National bank, $100; Corn Belt bank, $25; James L. Lombard, $25; German-American bank, $25; Central National bank, $10; Western Exchange bank, $5.

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December 24, 1908

CHANCE FOR A DETECTIVE.

Maybe He Can Find Out Who Bun-
coed the City Detective Force.

Consternation reigns among about ten detectives at police headquarters. They have work to do, detective work, and each one is keeping from the other his course of action. They are all searching for a clue to the wag who so kindly made them each a present of a substantial check -- all of which turned out to be bogus. Each of the detectives received a letter containing a check, worded as follows:

"Dear Blank: Inclosed please find my check for $10 which please accept for past favors. Merry Xmas, W. D. Blank.

One guardian of the peace immediately set out and paid his grocery bill with his check. Another indorsed his and banked it. Still another, in need of some ready cash, saw Captain Frank F. Snow, property clerk, who was accommodating enough to cash the paper for him.

It is not for everybody to know, but one of them is said to have paid a little saloon bill with his, while one did a very unusual thing -- he paid his doctor bill. This little detective wanted to surprise his physician, and he did, as the doctor indorsed the check to another, to whom he has not got to make good.

It was not until yesterday morning that the ten detectives, who had been so especially remembered "for past favors" this Christmas, began to get together and talk through their noses to one another about the matter. Then they began to take notes by way of comparing the letters. All are in the same handwriting, which is poor and the spelling bad. But the detectives never noticed that. All they saw were the checks.

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December 8, 1908

J. S. CHICK, PIONEER
MERCHANT, IS DEAD.

HE FOUNDED THE FIRST BANK
IN KANSAS CITY.

Widely Known for His Integrity and
Honor in Business Affairs.
Funeral Will Be Held
Tomorrow.

Joseph Smith Chick, founder of the first bank in this city and for fifty years a citizen here, died at his home, 1039 Brooklyn avenue, at 4:30 yesterday morning. He had been ill several months, although he went to his offices until last week.

Mr. Chick was born in Howard county, Mo., August 3, 1828. His parents were from Virginia and the family lived on a farm. In 1830 the family moved to the town of Westport. Mr. Chick's father, Colonel William M. Chick, was one of the early purchasers of the original site on which Kansas City was built. At the time the family moved to Westport there were not a half a dozen families in Kansas City, called then Westport Landing. Joseph Chick went to the Westport schools, but at the age of 18 years put away his books and went into business. He became a clerk in the general store of H. M. Northrup, the largest shop of its kind in the town of Westport Landing. He worked hard and faithfully and in 1852 was admitted to a partnership in the firm.

Soon afterwards he and his partner conceived the idea of operating a bank in Kansas City and established one under the name of H. M. Northrup & Co. The company also took some interest in the trade across the plains to Santa Fe and in the year 1861 Mr. Chick and Mr. Northrup, with their wives, made the trip over the Santa Fe trail to trade with the Indians.

BANKING IN NEW YORK.

The next year, on account of the unsettled conditions prevailing, the company gave up its business in Kansas City and removed to New York, where they established a bank under the name of Northrup & Chick, on Wall street. For eleven years they continued in that city but in 1874 Mr. Chick sold out his interest and removed to this city, where he associated himself with some of the wealthy business men of the city and organized the Bank of Kansas City. In 1888 this institution was merged with the National Bank of Kansas City and Mr. Chick was chosen president, a position he held until the dissolution of the firm in 1895. Since then he had been in the real estate business with his son.

Mr. Chick was also connected with the St. Louis and Missouri River Telegraph Company, built to Kansas City in 1851; the Missouri Pacific Railroad, the macadamized road from Westport to the city, the first telephone company, the Kansas City Electric Light Company and the National Loan & Trust Company. He was once president of the board of trade.

For many years Mr. Chick had lived in the house where he died. Immediately after his return from New York he bought a large plot of ground in that neighborhood, ten acres facing on the street that is now Brooklyn avenue. Mr. Chick gave the street its present name after the city that he made his home when a banker in New York.

Since his early youth Mr. Chick was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, South, and a faithful attendant at church services. For the last twenty-five years he had been the president of the board of stewards of the Central Methodist Episcopal church.

MRS. CHICK IS ILL.

Mr. Chick was married to Miss Julia Sexton of Howard county in 1855. Mrs. Chick is 76 years old. She is dangerously ill and may not survive her husband for long.

Two children survive, Joseph S. Chick, Jr., and Mrs. E. E. Porterfield, wife of Judge Porterfield, and three grandchildren, Mrs. Robert G. Caldwell, who lives in Indianapolis, Ind., E. E. Porterfield, Jr., and Miss Julia C. Porterfield.

The funeral services will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home. Burial will be in Mount Washington cemetery. The active pallbearers will be selected from Mr. Chick's nephews.

In both his public and his private life Mr. Chick bore the reputation for exemplary character. His business integrity was above reproach, and when the bank with which he was connected failed in 1895 on account of hard times, Mr. Chick assumed the task of paying off the debt. Five years ago the last dollar was paid, together with 8 per cent interest on the money. He was always benevolent in disposition and had given an efficient business training to many young men now scattered in many states. His bearing was erect and his address cheerful. He was beloved by many, and liked by all who knew him.

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November 23, 1908

COMSTOCK TO GO BALLOONING.

Kansas City Banker Will Try for
Record at Canton, O., Today.

CANTON, O., Nov. 22. -- (Special.) W. F. Comstock, secretary of the Fidelity Trust Company, Kansas City, and W. R. Timken, Canton manufacturer, will make a balloon trip from here tomorrow morning in an effort to smash records.

Comstock has come here solely for the purpose of going on the voyage. The men will go up in the training balloon, "All America," piloted by Leo Stevens. The "All America" has a displacement of 80,000 cubic feet and with only three in the basket will be able to carry plenty of ballast, so that with favorable weather conditions, the big gas bag should be able to stay in the air for many hours.

The start will be made form the grounds of the Canton Aero Club at 9 o'clock. Another ascension will be made in a smaller balloon, "Sky Pilot," after the "All America" goes off. A. H. Morgan and J. H. Wade, Jr., prominent Cleveland men, will be in the basket.

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November 21, 1908

NO PRESIDENT SELECTED YET.

Head of Commerce Will Be a "Good
Man," Says Dr. Woods.

Dr. W. S. Woods appeared yesterday in the managing director's room in the National Bank of Commerce, after an absence form it of nearly a year. J. J. Heim and William T. Kemper occupied the chairs of the vice presidents of the bank, the three old Commerce men succeeding W. B. Ridgely, George T. Cutts and Edward Ridgely. In the place of Cashier Edward Ridgely sat James T. Bradley, a United States bank examiner.

During the day Dr. Woods, Mr. Kemper and Mr. Heim had a conference with J. W. Perry of St. Louis National Bank of Commerce regarding the presidency of the Kansas City National Bank of Commerce, but just as he was leaving for his home in Excelsior Springs yesterday afternoon Dr. Woods said that neither Mr. Perry nor anyone else had been selected for president.

"On that point I can only say that I will not have the place. I want to spend more time in California than the duties of office would let me, and for that, if for no other reason, I cannot take the presidency."

"Who will likely get the place?" was asked.

"A good man," was the characteristic reply.

It is predicted that today will see important and most advantageous transactions in the bank, and that as chairman of the board of directors Dr. Woods will make an official announcement in detail. The presidency will go to one of two men, Mr. Perry being one of them. Mr. Bradley has forwarded to Washington his tender of resignation as bank examiner.

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November 20, 1908

WOODS WILL NOT
HEAD COMMERCE.

IS ELECTED TO THE PRESIDEN-
CY, BUT RESIGNS.

NEW CASHIER
J. T. BRADLEY.

W. T. KEMPER AND JOSEPH J.
HEIM VICE PRESIDENTS.

Committee Is Appointed to Recom-
mend a Man for Presidency -- Dr.
Woods is Chairman of
Board of Directors.

After a session which lasted two hours yesterday afternoon the board of directors of the National Bank of Commerce chose its new officers and filled the vacancies on the board with one exception. The following is a list of the newly elected officers:

President -- Dr. W. S. Woods, resigned and committee appointed to recommend man for president.
Vice presidents -- W. T. Kemper and Joseph J. Heim.
Cashier -- J. T. Bradley
Directors -- W. T. Kemper, John Kelly and J. T. Bradley

Immediately upon going into session yesterday afternoon the board listened to a personal reading of the resignation of William B. Ridgely, former president, George J. Cutts, former vice president and Edward Ridgely, former cashier. These resignations were accepted forthwith and the board set about to fill the vacancies at once. Dr. W. S. Woods was unanimously elected president, but, owing to the great responsibilities that were to be met by the incumbent of that office, Dr. Woods tendered his resignation, after having thanked the directors for the honor. Because of this fact the board did not discuss any other person for the office of president and placed the matter in the hands of a committee consisting of Dr. Woods, Mr. Kemper, Mr. Heim and J. Z. Miller, Jr. instructing the committee to recommend a man for the presidency as soon as possible.

The office of chairman of board of directors, which had not previously existed, was created yesterday afternoon. Since Dr. Woods, who controls the majority of stock in the institution, resigned the presidency of the bank he was chosen as chairman of the board. This office Dr. Woods accepted.


RIDGELYS TO STAY HERE.

William B. and Edward Ridgely will leave Kansas City for a short vacation and return here, where they will engage in business, the nature of which has not transpired. George S. Cutts, the ex-vice president will leave immediately for St. Louis, which is his home city. His family is there at the present time and he will join them for a short vacation.

Mr. Cutts does not relish the idea of being a victim of the official ax, and he doesn't hesitate to say so. "It was with the understanding that I was to come to Kansas City permanently that I gave up my former position and took the vice presidency of this bank. It was a loss as far as salary was concerned, but I had visions of helping to build a great banking institution here, so I left my home and good salary to come here. Anyhow, I am going to beat Mr. Ridgely out of town by three minutes."

Charles H. Moore, second vice-president of the bank will remain in hiS present position. Mr. Kemper, the new vice-president, will also remain vice president of the Commerce Trust company.

It is expected that the board of directors will hold another meeting before Sunday and the president will be chosen at that time. The newly chosen officers will take up their duties at once.

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November 18, 1908

BUYS RIDGELY'S INTERESTS.

Dr. W. S. Woods to Head Na-
tional Bank of Commerce.
Dr. William Stone Woods
Dr. W. S. Woods

Dr. W. S. Woods has purchased the Ridgely interests in the National Bank of Commerce. Several days ago Dr. Woods announced that he controlled a majority of the bank stock, and that he and his friends would again take active management of the bank's affairs. The change is expected to take place Saturday, when W. B. Ridgely, president; George T. Cutts, vice president, and Edward Ridgely, cashier, retire.

For some time Dr. Woods has been acquiring stock and recently secured 13,000 of the 20,000 shares. W. B. Ridgely and his friends sent out letters to the stockholders asking for proxies so they could control the annual election on January 12, and asking that the present management be continued. Yesterday it was announced that Mr. Ridgely and Dr. Woods had reached an agreement and that Mr. Ridgely would retire and Dr. Woods assume the presidency. Who will be the cashier has not been announced. It is said that a very few changes in the directorate of the bank will be made.

When Mr. Edward Ridgely was asked last night what plans he and his brother had in view after their retirement from the National Bank of Commerce, he said they had none.

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