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February 9, 1910

NEW PLAN TO OUTWIT THIEVES.

Traveler Tears Ticket to Bits and
Scatters Them Over His Person.

Joe Lamford, who claims Seattle, Wash., as his residence, spent several hours yesterday trying to pass through the Union depot gates on a tattered ticket. He explained that on his arrival here last Friday he had torn his ticket for Oklahoma City into small pieces and placed them in different pockets to prevent "lifting." Then according to his story he took in Union avenue. After a few days in the workhouse, he tried to get his ticket together. When he presented the various portions in an envelope yesterday, he was given the option of buying another ticket or counting the ties to Oklahoma City.

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January 13, 1910

SOLDIER DICK AND
GIRL ARE PARTED.

"WAIT 'TIL I'M 21" HE SAYS,
"I'LL BE TRUE," GIVES
CHESSIE.

"Mooning" Around Third
and Main When Arrested
by Policeman.
Parted Sweethearts Chessie Nave and Richard Wiliford.
CHESSIE NAVE AND RICHARD WILIFORD.

Chessie Nave is 16, and Richard Wiliford is 20, but they each felt a great deal older and more responsible than when they arrived in Kansas City yesterday morning on an early train, with a wish and a determination to get married. they didn't feel so old nor so responsible last night. This is the way of it:

Last Tuesday the young people ran away together from Lexington, Mo., where the young man is a student in Wentworth Military academy. The girl is just a girl. they were accompanied on their matrimonial excursion by two friends, Grace Nave, a cousin of Miss Chessie, and Calvin Cook of Bartlesville, also a student in the military academy. The plan of the eloping kittens was to get a marriage license in Kansas City, Kas., where officials dealing in Cupid's paper are generally supposed to be gentle and kind. They missed the direction and went "mooning around the vicinity of Third and Main streets at an early hour yesterday morning. There a policeman found them.

The police had been notified that the young people were headed toward Kansas City with some kind of a prank in veiw, and the policeman saw them and happened to remember. He nailed them.
HIS FATHER ARRIVES.

Joel Wiliford, Woodford, Ok., father of Richard, had also been notified of his son's unceremonious leave in company with a little girl in skirts. The old gentleman hopped a train and got to Kansas City about as soon as the elopers. He dropped into central police station about the time that Richard and Chessie, Grace and Calvin were making a botch of trying to argue the police into the belief that while the resemblance was probably great, it was not absolute.

Papa Wiliford tried moral persuasion on his son. Nothing doing. Son was obdurate. What's the use of trying to make a soldier of a fellow, anyway, if you expect him to give up his girl at a mere parental command Richard said a soldier should never surrender. And he further declared he wouldn't. So into the dungeon cell went he, like any real, spicy, belted and buckled Don Juan of old. His good friend Calvin went along with him, but not from choice.

As for the girls, they saw life as it is from the matron's room Thus stood the matter all day. Richard would not desert the principles of academic soldiering, and Chessie vowed she would be as true as "Beautiful Bessie, the Banana Girl, or, "He Kissed Me Once and I Can't Forget." Then came Nash Ruby, brother-in-law of Chessie. He came From Lexington. He looked real fierce.

HERDED BEFORE CAPTAIN.

Forth from the dungeon cell marched Soldier Richard, and friend Calvin. Down from the matron's melancholy boudoir minced Chessie and Grace. They were herded into the office of Captain Walter Whitsett, where more moral suasion was rubbed on.

Richard, during the afternoon, had agreed with his father upon a compromise, bu which he was to return to school and finish his education. Later he took it all back. And w hen he saw Chessie he said:

"I'm going to marry you, Chessie, even if I never become a great general."

"That's where you're wrong," mildly said Papa Wiliford.

Then Chessie put in her word. But it didn't move anybody at all. Unless it was Nash Ruby, Brother-in-Law Nash. "You'll come along home with me, miss," said he. Chessie subsided. But when it came to parting, Richard uttered his defiance. "I'll be 21 before long," said he, "and then we can marry."

"I'll be true to you," sobbed Chessie.

Brother-in-law Nash led her away to catch a train for Lexington. this morning Richard will go to Woodford, Ok., with pa. Friend Calvin went home last night. That's all, except it is said Chessie made a face at her future father-in-law.

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January 6, 1910

TRAINED "DAN" AND "JOE."

Mark Kesler, Former Kansas City
Fireman, Passes Through City.

Mark Kelser, formerly of the Kansas City fire department, who trained "Dan" and Joe," the famous team of fire horses which won honors at London in the international exhibit in 1893, was in Kansas City yesterday afternoon, stopping off a few minutes on his way to Excelsior Springs.

Kesler is now with the Oklahoma City fire department, where he is engaged in training eight fire horses. He was here a short time ago, having been sent with three other firemen to make a study of the departments of large cities with a view of strengthening the Oklahoma City department.

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December 30, 1909

WHITE GIRL TO WED INDIAN.

Miss Albertson of Richmond, Mo.,
to Become Bride of Educated Creek.

A license was secured yesterday by John A. Phillips, a full-blooded Creek Indian of Okemaha, Ok., to marry Miss Lulu B. Albertson, a white woman living at Richmond, Mo. The groom is a well-to-do real estate dealer.

Phillips is an educated Indian. He is a graduate of McComb college of Muskogee. He is a widower of a few years. His first wife was a white woman. Mr. Phillips and Miss Albertson met last summer when the latter was visiting friends in Okemaha.

The bride will return to her home in Richmond, to join her husband later in Oklahoma.

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December 28, 1909

MOTHER LECTURED BY JUDGE.

She Admits False Age of Son Was
Given Factory Inspector.

Mrs. E. L. Folsom, 707 East Eighteenth street, weeping bitterly, was lectured by Judge E. E. Porterfield in the juvenile court yesterday for making a false affidavit regarding the age of her son, Lyle H. Wilcox, in the office of W. H. Morgan, state factory inspector, recently when the boy went to work. She swore that he was born April 7, 1895, but yesterday admitted that he was born a year later. While under oath, as the court learned from private conversation with the woman's daughter, other misstatements were made.

"You ought to be punished," said Judge Porterfield, "for making the false affidavit about your son's age and for other statements made here under oath, but I cannot do it in this court. It could be done in the criminal court, however. This habit people have gotten into of making false affidavits of their children's ages before the factory inspector has got to be broken up. Somebody is going to be punished, too, if it does not cease."

The boy, Lyle, was given into the custody of his sister, Mrs. Iva Hubbard, 1405 Spruce avenue. Mrs. Folson said she had born ten children, seven of whom are living. She said she was divorced from Joseph Wilcox in Oklahoma City, Ok., and that seven years ago in January she was married to Folson.

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December 19, 1909

HURRIES FROM GRAVE
TO LAUGH ON STAGE.

GIRL WIFE SINGS SCOTTISH DIT-
TIES, CHOKING SOBS.

As Orchestra Plays "Hearts and
Flowers" for Next Sketch the
"Two Macks" Mourn Death of
"Danny," Their First Born.

Unknown to the audience of the Gayety theater yesterday afternoon, while the orchestra playing the gladsome tunes suggestive of love and happiness, a drama was being enacted in the dressing rooms behind the scenes. In her room sat a wife of one year, her head buried in her arms and tears streaming down her face. Between sobs she could be heard to say: "My baby, my little boy."

Beside this woman sat a young man, barely out of his teens, trying in his way to console the heartbroken girl. Tears glistened in his eyes. His face was contorted with pain and anguish. He was the picture of despair.

The young man was Douglas McKenzie, 20 years old, of Dundee, Scotland. The girl was Mabel McKenzie, 18 years of age, his wife. The two are known to the stage world as the "Two Macks," and they have been playing a comic sketch in Scotch the last week at the Gayety. The two sat in the dressing room in their plaids and kilts, the same that they had appeared in a few minutes before on the stage.

The orchestra suddenly ceased its playing. The lights were turned low. The next sketch was a love scene and the orchestra in a low key softly began, "Hearts and Flowers." The young wife raised her head and listened. With her sleeve she brushed away the tears.

"I wonder if Danny is in heaven -- I know he is," she said, smiling. "I suppose the angels are now playing the same tune."

Danny was the name of their little boy, only a few weeks old, whom they had buried but two hours before. One year ago Mr. and Mrs. McKenzie were married in Scotland. They came to this country on their honeymoon trip and got a place on the vaudeville stage. They made a tour of Texas and Oklahoma. Two months ago they reached Kansas City.

A baby was born, Danny, they called him. There were doctor bills to pay and room rent. Last Thursday the little boy died. They had no money to pay for its burial. for two days the little body was kept in their rooms at the Wyandotte hotel, the undertakers refusing to take it until the burial expenses were advanced.

Yesterday morning Mr. McKenzie told Tom Hodgeman, manager of the Gayety, of his plight. Mr. Hodgeman immediately went to all the playhouses in the city. He told the young man's story to the actors. When he returned from his trip Mr. Hodgeman had $80, enough to pay the funeral expenses.

HURRY TO THEATER.

Yesterday afternoon the little body was buried. From the cemetery where they had laid to rest their first born the young pair hurried to the theater. They arrived barely in time to dress in Scotch costume for their sketch. The "Two Macks" came out on the stage. They danced the Scotch dances and sang the light and frivolous Scotch ditties. They smiled, they laughed and they joked. Little did the audience realize that behind the mask of happiness were two bleeding hearts, a man and wife who had just come from the cemetery after burying their baby boy.

The curtain was rung down and the two went to their rooms. Mrs. McKenzie broke down in tears. During the long minutes she had been on the stage playing the part of a Scotch lassie the minutes had been torture. "Danny" was dead. He was her first born.

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December 9, 1909

TWO KILLED AND
ONE WOUNDED IN
RUNNING BATTLE.

Charles Lukens, Wyandotte County
Deputy Sheriff, Shot Through
Heart by Charles Galloway, Drink
Crazed Rosedale Electrician, He
Tried to Serve With Injunction.

SLAYER HAD THREATENED
WIFE WHO SOUGHT DIVORCE.

After Killing Lukens, Galloway
Carried on a Retreating Fight
With Other Officers Until
Brought to Bay at 3129
Bell Street.

SHOT BY DETECTIVES, DIES
IN EMERGENCY HOSPITAL.

Double Tragedy Direct Result of
Domestic Difficulties of the Gal-
loways -- Wife, Who Sued for Di-
vorce, Feared for Her Life, Which
Husband Had Threatened -- Re-
straining Order Was to Keep Him
From Further Terrorizing Her.
Murderer of Peace Officer, Who Was Slain as He Fled From Posse.
CHARLES T. GALLOWAY.

Two men are dead and another wounded as the result of an attempt by Charles Quincy Lukens, a deputy sheriff of Wyandotte county, Kas., to serve a restraining order upon Charles T. Galloway, a drink crazed electrician of 428 College avenue, Rosedale, Kas., late yesterday evening.

Lukens was shot above the heart and instantly killed during a running fight with Galloway.

Galloway was later brought to bay in a house at 3129 Bell street, and after a desperate resistance was mortally wounded, dying at 11:30 o'clock last night as he was being placed upon the operating table at Emergency hospital.

JUST BACK FROM OKLAHOMA.

Deputy Sheriff Lukens left the Wyandotte county court house yesterday afternoon about 4 o'clock with an order from the district court restraining Galloway from annoying or in any way interfering with his wife, Mrs. Anna Galloway. The Galloways had been having trouble for several months, and November 23 Mrs. Galloway, through her attorney, Rush L. Fizette, 1255 Kansas City avenue, Rosedale, filed a suit for divorce, alleging cruelty, drunkenness and ill-treatment.

Since the filing of the divorce petition Galloway had beaten his wife and threatened her life. She then applied for an order restraining him from bothering her. The order was granted several weeks ago, but Galloway had been in Oklahoma during that time. Yesterday word was received at the sheriff's office that he was in town, and Lukens was sent to serve papers on him.

QUARTER-MILE RUNNING FIGHT.

Mrs. Galloway has been staying for the past few days at the home of her sister, Mrs. J. L. Connor, at 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale. The deputy sheriff and Marshal Drew thought perhaps they might find Galloway hanging around there, as he had visited the Connor home earlier in the day and made demands to see his wife and children.

The officers reached Kansas City avenue and Washington street about 5:30 o'clock, and met Galloway shortly after they stepped off the car. Marshal Drew spoke to Galloway and shook hand with him. Lukens then shook hands with Galloway, and told him that he had some papers to serve.

Almost instantly Galloway drew a revolver and opened fire on the officers, who, unprepared for such an emergency, had to unbutton their overcoats before they could get at their weapons. They at last got hold of their revolvers and opened fire on Galloway. A running fight was kept up for more than a quarter of a mile.

The fleeing man turned into alleys, turning back every few steps to fire upon the pursuing officers. He finally reached Rosedale avenue, and turning south ran toward the tracks of the Frisco railroad. When the officers reached the tracks he turned and fired at Lukens, hitting him directly over the heart.

LUKENS FALLS DEAD.

Lukens staggered, and after grasping a telegraph pole with both hands fell to the ground dead. Galloway then ran south, and after a vain attempt to make his escape on a horse, abandoned the horse, and fled to the woods on the hills around Gray's park.

Officer Drew ran to Lukens's assistance, but finding him dead, started to pursue Galloway. He fired the last shell from his gun, and then finding himself without ammunition sent a boy after some. A large crowd of persons had been attracted by the firing, and a number of them assisted in taking the body of Lukens to a barber shop at Kansas City and Rosedale avenues. The coroner was notified, and he ordered the body taken to the Gates undertaking rooms in Rosedale, where he performed a post mortem. It was found that the bullet had pierced the heart and lungs, and had gone entirely through the body, coming out near the middle of the back.

GALLOWAY BROUGHT TO BAY.

The sheriff's office was notified in Kansas City, Kas., and Under Sheriff Joseph Brady, deputies William McMullen, Clyde Sartin and George Westfall jumped into an automobile, driven by George E. Porter, an undertaker at 1007 North Seventh street and rode at break neck speed to Rosedale. The Kansas City, Kas., police were also notified and Chief W. W. Cook led a large force of uniformed men and detectives to the scene of the murder. The citizens of Rosedale also turned out in large numbers and the hills around Rosedale glittered with the lights as these posses scoured the woods in an effort to find the murderer.

At 9 o'clock last night Galloway was cornered in the home of M. E. Patterson, 3129 Bell street, Kansas City, Mo., which he took possession of forcibly.

Barricading himself in a closet upstairs he held his pursuers at bay for over two hours. A posse consisting of nearly 100 men guarded the house on all sides. the air was tense with tragedy, and the bitter cold of the winter night added to the unpleasantness of the whole affair. Every man knew that a desperate fight was inevitable and that Galloway would have to be taken either dead or helplessly wounded.

MISSOURIAN LEADS CHARGE.

A delay was occasioned by the fact that the Kansas officers were outside of their jurisdiction, and did not feel that they had a right to enter the house, which is built on Missouri soil. Missouri officers were summoned and arrived at about 10 o'clock. The plans were laid and great precaution was taken in every step taken, for the officers realized that they were at a great disadvantage in forcing their way into the house, which they knew held a man who had already killed one officer and who would not hesitate to kill others should they press him too hard.

Finally the attack was planned and at 11:30 o'clock a squad of detectives consisting of Joe Downs, Billy McMullin, Harry Anderson and J. W. Wilkens, the latter a Missouri officer, leading, forced their way into the house, and after cautiously searching all the downstairs rooms without finding Galloway, rushed up the narrow stairs to the second floor.

When the officers reached the second floor a volley of shots rang out. Another volley followed. Breaking glass and a great commotion could be heard in the street below.

LAST WORD FOR HIS WIFE.

Then a husky voice was heard to shout:

"We got him."

In entering a dining room the officers were reminded of the presence of Galloway by three shots fired in rapid succession. The officers responded with a dozen shots and bullets went whizzing in every direction, embedding themselves in the walls. One bullet passed through the sleeve of Detective Wilkens's overcoat and lodged in the thumb on the left hand of Harry Anderson, a Kansas City, Kas., detective.

Within a twinkling a bullet entered the abdomen of Galloway and he fell to the floor, rolling into a dark kitchen adjoining the dining room. Writhing in his great pain, the man rolled frantically about the floor.

"Oh my dear wife, my own wife, my darling wife," he moaned time and again. Then he pleaded for ice water, clutching his parched throat madly.

An ambulance was called and Galloway was taken to emergency hospital, where he died just as they were lifting him to the operating table.

ANOTHER WOMAN'S LETTER.

Drs. Harry T. Morton and C. A. Pond, who were in attendance, pronounced death due to a wound from several buckshot that had entered the left side of the abdomen and after penetrating the intestines came out of the right side.

His pockets were searched while on the operating table. The contents consisted of a pocket-book containing $55 in cash, a gold watch and chain, a pack of business cards, several boxes of revolver cartridges, a bank book on the Fort Worth, Tex., State bank, and a letter.

The letter, which was written in lead pencil, was so blood soaked that it was barely legible. As far as it could be deciphered it ran as follows:

"Dear Friend -- I hear that you are getting a divorce from Mrs. G. ----- she is selling all your things and ---- I don't see where Mrs. G. or the boys is at. They act disgraceful, never coming home. --- Good luck, your loving Nan."

Lukens, whom Galloway shot down, was one of his best friends and so was Marshal Billy Drew, whom he fired at time and again in an effort to kill.

ASKS FOR FOOD.

The house where the shooting occurred is a two-story frame structure containing four apartments. The front apartment is occupied by Cecil Patterson and his family, and the rear apartment of four rooms by J. E. Creason, his wife and their little daughter.

"It was about 8 o'clock when Galloway came to the house," said Mr. Creason. "He was greatly excited and told me he had been in a shooting scrape and had shot a man. He said that they, meaning the officers, were after him and he did not know what to do. I told him that the best thing for him to do was surrender. He said: 'No, I'm not ready yet.'


Mr. and Mrs. Creason, Who Fed Galloway and Tried to Persuade Him to Surrender.
MR. AND MRS. J. E. CREASON,
In Whose Home Galloway Took Forcible Possession and Held Out Against a Posse Until Forced to Run for His Life When a Bullet Ended His Career

" 'Give me something to eat first and I will think about it,' he said. I have known Galloway for several years and worked for him at my trade as an electrician. He had always been a good friend and I saw no wrong in giving him something to eat and told my wife to fix him something. She fried some chops and potatoes and made some coffee for him. He tried to eat, but he was nervous and he could hardly swallow.

THE POSSE COMES.

"All this time my wife and I tried to find out just who he had shot and what the shooting was about, but he would put us off with the one answer, 'I will tell you when I am ready.' After supper he sat in a corner and seemed to be in a deep study. He paid no attention to our little girl, who seemed to annoy him by her childish prattle.

"I did not know what to do, so thought I would take a walk in the fresh air. I had hardly gotten 100 feet from the house when I met some people from Rosedale. They told me that Galloway had killed the undersheriff and that they were after him. I told them that he was in my house, but warned them not to go after him, as I feared he might use one of the weapons he had there. I told the crowd that I would endeavor to get him to surrender. I went back to the house. Galloway was still sitting in the corner, but jumped up w hen I came into the room.

" 'They know where you are,' I told him. 'Why don't you surrender?' 'I am not ready yet,' he said. I could get nothing more from him. Half an hour later some of the officers came into the ho use. I went downstairs and told them that Galloway was upstairs, but that he was armed and that it would be dangerous for them to go up there at that time. My family was up there, too, and I did not want my wife or daughter to be shot in case Galloway or the officers started shooting.

REFUSES TO SURRENDER.

This turned the posse back for a while and I made another effort to get Galloway to surrender. He still refused and I called to my wife and daughter and we went to the front of the house in Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Patterson's rooms. We left the gas burning in the dining room and the hall. The bedroom, in the closet in which Galloway took refuge, opened from the dining room by big folding doors as you see. The gas mantle on this lamp was broken and it was not lighted. We all remained in the front room until the posse called to us to come out of the house. As we went out I again told Galloway to surrender; that the house was surrounded and he could not get away, or if he did that he would have to jump to the house next door and climb down the side of the house.

" 'I am not ready yet,' were the last words he said to me. I felt as if the officers would not take Galloway alive and I feared that several might be killed. I was so nervous I did know what I was doing or saying. All I thought of was to prevent any more bloodshed.

"After we left the house we went into Griffin's home next door. We had hardly gotten inside when the shooting began. I put my fingers to my ears so that I would not hear the shots.

SURE HE WAS CRAZY.

"Galloway must have been out of his mind. He could have escaped from the house several times after he knew that the officers had him spotted and he could have held that staircase with his guns against 100 policemen. Why he refused to surrender and then retreated into the clothes closet where he was caught like a rat in a trap can only be explained by my opinion that he was crazy.

"Galloway brought the rifle and the shot gun over to the ho use this afternoon. He also brought a suitcase full of ammunition. This was before he did the shooting. He told us that he was going hunting and he wanted to leave his guns at our house. We had no objections to this as we had always been the best of friends. After we left the house he must have taken his rifle and gone into the closet. He left his shotgun in a corner in the kitchen."

THREATENED TO KILL WIFE FOR YEARS.

Mrs. Anna Galloway, wife of Charles Galloway, has been living with her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Connor, at their home, 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale, ever since she instituted divorce proceedings against her husband. For over forty-eight hours she has been a prisoner in that home, fearing even to step out, lest Galloway be near, ready to fire at her, as he had repeatedly threatened to do.

When seen last night after the killing of Deputy Sheriff Lukens, she was nearly in a state of nervous prostration. She had witnessed the start of the tragic escapade from a window in her room . She saw the officer attempt to serve papers on her husband. She heard the ensuing shots and then fell in a swoon.

"Oh, I knew it would come to this terrible end -- I knew it, I knew it," she moaned, as she paced nervously up and down the floor. "Charlie has had murder in his heart for thirteen years and I have always realized that it would only be a matter of time until the impulse would control him. He wasn't sane; he couldn't have been.

"Five times since Priests of Pallas week he has threatened to kill me, and from one day to another I never knew if I would see daylight again. Today some stranger 'phoned from a saloon to be extremely careful, as he had heard Charlie say that this would be the last day I could live. Marshal Drew remained with me to protect me and he has been in our house here all day.

"The first time Mr. Galloway ever threatened me was thirteen years ago. I should have left him then, but I thought he would get over his insane notions and I wanted to make a success of our married life if at all possible. He did reform and was better to me for some time, but when our two children, Harvey and Walter, were old enough to run around a great deal he began abusing me terribly and many times told me he would kill me. He became a harder drinker every year and would get in such a condition that no one could manage him at all.

"Many times as he choked me, and more than once has the end seemed so near that I could not possibly escape, but God has been with me for my children's sake I guess."

VICTIM WELL KNOWN IN WYANDOTTE.

Charles Quincy Lukens was 33 years old. He lived with his widowed mother, Mrs. Sarah Lukens, 336 Harrison street, Argentine. He was unmarried. He was appointed deputy sheriff by Sheriff Al Becker about one year ago. Before his appointment Lukens was constable and later marshal of Argentine for several terms. He had also served on the Argentine fire department. "Charley" Lukens was known by everyone in Argentine, both old and young, and also had a wide acquaintance thorugout the county. He was regarded as a very efficient officer, and had a reputation for fearlessness.

Besidses his mother he is survived by four sisters and four brothers. The sisters are: Mrs. Lydia Jones of Girard, Kas., Mrs. Beulah Robinson of 1108 East Twenty-fourth street, Kansas City, Mo., Mrs. C. A. Hare of Faircastle, O., Mrs. Leonard Eshnaur of Terminal Isle, Cal. The brothers are J. R. Lukens of Oklahoma City, Ok., and L. B, J. E., and F. D. Lukens of Argentine.

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December 4, 1909

INDIAN WIDOW WANTS AUTO.

Guardian Refuses to Buy One, So
She Used a Hired Machine.

"Just wait until my 'guardy' gets back to Pawhuska, and I will be willing to make a wager that he allows me the money to get a machine," said Mrs. Blanche Keeler, the pretty Indian widow who, though very wealthy, has been denied an automobile because Eugene Scott, trustee of her estate, thinks that it would be extravagance for her to have it.

"I could not have used one of my own any oftener than I have a hired one since last Saturday, when I arrived here," said Mrs. Keeler, "so I guess if I come up to Kansas City often enough I could do without one of my own.

"I want an auto for my home in Pawhuska, and I am going to have it. Mr. Scott will come around to my way of thinking. I just know that he will, for it won't be a bit extravagant for me to own a machine, and it will be of much benefit to my health. The ponies and horses are all right, but I want action, something faster than horse-flesh."

With three big trunks packed to their capacity with pictures, new clothes, music and books, Mrs. Keeler departed early this morning for her home in Oklahoma.

"I did not get what I wanted, an auto, but I am taking back with me all the pretty things I fancied while here," said Mrs. Keeler at the Hotel Victoria last night.

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November 27, 1909

MANY CITIES ASK FOR
KANSAS CITY PRISONER.

Vagrant a Menace at Workhouse,
Board Member Says, Teaching the
Boys How to Work "Safe" Games.

The police of several cities are anxious to get possession of E. Burgess, now serving a year's sentence here on a technical charge of vagrancy, according to L. A. Halbert, secretary of the board of pardons and paroles.

Burgess was accused originally of inducing the matron of the Nettleton home to marry him, it being alleged that he had a wife in another city. He is said to have posed as a wealthy man. While awaiting "a large remittance," his new wife was supporting him, having paid for the marriage license and ceremony.

Mrs. Burgess heard that her husband proposed to other women after the marriage, and previously had proposed to a dozen or more. She caused his arrest. The first wife did not appear so he was arraigned in the municipal court as a vagrant and fined $500.

A letter from the chief of police at Hudson, Wis., told of a man supposed to be Burgess, who had a wife there. She supported him for a long time after marriage while he gambled and was engaged in a general confidence business.

The chief of police of Ottumwa, Ia., said Burgess is wanted there on a charge of passing worthless checks and "beating" hotels. He said the Cedar Rapids, Ia., police want Burgess on the same charge.

The police of Oklahoma City, Ok., and El Paso, Tex., tell of similar accusations there. The Hudson, Wis., chief says Burgess "is an all round crook and confidence man."

"He has been a menace to the younger prisoners here in the workhouse," said Jacob Billikopf, a member of the board, at the weekly meeting yesterday. "He frequently relates his experiences and tells how easy it is to separate people from their spare change and how to work the game so as to keep out of prison."

"I would be willing to turn Burgess over the the authorities of any city where it plainly could be shown that they had a case against him which would send him over the road," said President William Volker. "If any of these places has a direct charge against Burgess, I will be glad to turn him over, but I don't want to take any chances of turning loose a dangerous man on the public again. Let him remain here for the balance of his sentence, nine months, and notify the places where he is wanted when he is to be released."

An effort is to be made, through the Hudson, Wis., police, to induce the alleged original Mrs. Burgess to come here and prosecute the man for bigamy.

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September 25, 1909

CATTLEMAN KILLS
PARTER IN HOTEL.

SEXTON BAR TRAGEDY FOL-
LOWS QUARREL OVER RANCH.

Eugene Hayes of Elgin, Kas., Puts
Three Bullets Into Brain of
Edward Hayes of Paw-
huska, Ok.
Eugene Hayes, Kansas Cattleman Accused of Murder.
EUGENE HAYES.
Kansas Cattleman Who Killed Edward
Hayes, His Partner, in the Barroom
of the Sexton Hotel Last Night.

Following a quarrel concerning the affairs of their 40,000 acre ranch in Osage county, Oklahoma, Eugene Hayes of Elgin, Kas., a cattleman reputed to be worth half a million dollars, shot and killed his partner, Edward Hayes of Pawhuksa, Ok., in the bar of the Hotel Sexton at 7:45 o'clock last night.

Edward Hayes was shot three times, almost in the center of the forehead. He died instantly Eugene Hayes, who is held at police headquarters, says he shot in self defense.

The shooting was witnessed by Edward Lewis, and Lewis Weisenbacher, bartenders; Lee Russell, a millionaire cattleman from Ft. Worth and Lee Rogers, a Kansas City real estate dealer who is an ex-cowman.

L. C. Thompson, another Kansas City real estate man and former cattle raiser, was in the crowd, but says he did not see the shooting.

The five men entered the hotel together about 7:30 o'clock last night, and sat around a table in the front end of the saloon. About fifteen minutes later Eugene and Edward Hayes went to a table in the rear and against the wall opposite the bar.

THREE BULLETS INTO BRAIN.

Before dinner was served they began quarrelling about business affairs, but the conversation was not overheard by anyone unless it was Lee Russell, who is said to have been standing near the small table at which the partners were sitting.

Suddenly Eugene Hayes, who was facing north, leaped from his chair and running around the end of the table began firing. The first shot struck Edward Hayes in the forehead. Two more were effective, almost in the same spot.

Edward Hayes fell back in his chair, dead, and Eugene, taken in charge by a friend, walked towards the front door after placing his pistol, an automatic gun, in his hip pocket. As he rounded the glass screen at the end of the bar Patrolman Arthur Kennard arrested him.

Edward Lewis, the bartender who saw the shooting, said Edward Hayes reached towards his hip pocket first. As he did so, Lewis said, Eugene got up and pulled his pistol, and began firing as he stepped toward Edward. Edward Hayes did not succeed in getting his revolver out of his pocket. The coroner removed it, and took charge of it until an inquest is held. It was a Luger rapid fire gun, the magazine holding seven cartridges.

"I BEAT YOU TO IT."

"I beat you to it," the witness declared Eugene Hayes said as he put away his revolver.

Inspector E. P. Boyle sent Detectives Ralph Trueman and Denver D. Mitchell to the hotel as soon as he was informed of the killing. Detectives Keshlear and McGraw followed.

Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky was notified, and after viewing the body had it removed to Stewart's undertaking rooms, where he performed a post mortem.

Immediately after the shooting the hotel management called Dr. A. L. Porter, who lifted the dead man out of the chair and laid him on the floor.

Eugene Hayes was taken to police headquarters by Patrolman Kennard. He gave the patrolman his pistol while on the street car.

When taken before Lieutenant James Morris to be booked for investigation Hayes was recognized by Patrolman "Jack" McCauley, who asked him what he was arrested for.

"Just killed my partner, Ed Hayes, up at the Sexton hotel.

"What for?" asked Lieutenant Morris.

QUARREL OVER RANCH AFFAIRS.

"Well, he was going to kill me if I didn't. I had to do it. That's all."

To Captain Walter Whitsett, and Norman Woodson, assistant prosecuting attorney, Hayes made no attempt to conceal anything except details of the shooting. He refused to say anything more until he could see John Hayes, former chief of police.

"He's a relative of mine, you know," he kept saying during the conversation. "I'm a ranch owner in Oklahoma," began Hayes. "I'm a pretty well known man, and John Hayes, who was formerly chief of police, is a cousin of mine, and he comes down to the Territory and hunts on my place. This man Ed Hayes is no kin of mine. I simply took him into a partnership wit me and he owes me $5,000. He didn't pay anything into the place.

At police headquarters last night the police took off of Eugene Hayes a diamond ring which is valued at $1,000. Deputy Coroner Czarlinsky took possession of a gold watch, a gold pen, $5.50 in money, and a a revolver taken from Edward Hayes. He wore a Knights of Pythias watch charm.

Ex-Chief John Hayes denied last night that he was any relative of the prisoner. "He is not even distantly related," Hayes said. "I have known him for years and have hunted on his place down in Oklahoma. I don't know why he should claim to be some relative of mine."

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September 15, 1909

FORGOT HER DESTINATION.

Oklahoma Girl Bought Ticket for
Garnett Instead of Kansas City.

Through a mistake, for which she cannot account, Miss Emma Howe, 17 years old, bought a ticket and checked her trunk for Garnett, Kas., instead of to Kansas City, where her sister, Mrs. Hattie Fields, resides, before leaving Ola, Ok., Monday afternoon.

The trunk was put off at Garnett and Miss Howe would also have been detained there for lack of funds to proceed further, but several traveling men made up a purse to pay her fare here. When she arrived at Union depot over the Santa Fe last night it was to discover that her troubles had only just begun, for the paper on which her father had written her sister's address in Kansas City was in her trunk.

The girl was cared for overnight by Mrs. Ollie Everingham, the depot matron. The name of Mrs. Hattie Fields does not appear in the city directory.

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August 21, 1909

FEW QUANTRELL'S MEN THERE.

Former Guerrillas Are More Inter-
ested in the Crop Prospects.

Only twenty-five men responded yesterday morning at the roll call of the Quantrell guerrillas, now in reunion in Independence. Cole Younger was not present, being on a lecture tour, the subject of his lecture being "Keep Straight." Frank James, another noted guerrilla, is down in Oklahoma in the Big Pasture, farming, and did not have time to attend. James has not attended any of the reunions since his noted speech made in the Independence court house yard, in which he declared that his friends were in the North and that he was never turned down except by those of the Southland.

The headquarters of the reunion were in the Brown building, North Main street. Here the scattered membership met and registered and it was here that it was noted that among the absent ones were John C. Hope, ex-sheriff of Jackson county, and Cyrus Flannery Wolf of Bates county, both having died within the past year. Captain Benjamin Morrow was present, Lieutenant Levi Potts of Grain Valley and Warren Welch were busy among the veteran guerrillas. Captain Gregg, who has been in about as many tight places as the next guerrilla who followed Quantrell, was present with his family. Also Dr. L. C. Miller of Knobnoster.

There was no formality about the reunion. "They just met and that was all there was to it," was the way one of them expressed himself. Some of those from Kansas City and nearby points brought well-filled dinner baskets, but the greater portion of those present had to go to restaurants. It was a day of reminiscent stories for the guerrillas and the oft repeated stories of the civil war were gone over and over again. Gabe Parr, who as a boy shot his way to freedom, yet lives, and others with equally hair raising stories were present and passed the day, telling of the yesterdays of their early manhood. The thing that interested these men most was the state of the crops.

The veterans will hold another session today and adjourn, in all probability to meet in Independence next year.

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August 10, 1909

HAS APPENDICITIS IN DEPOT.

Unconscious Oklahoman Carried
$2,000 Currency in His Pocket.

With $2,000 in currency in his pockets, Gus Schneider, a cattle raiser of Enid, Ok., was attacked with appendicitis while waiting for a train in the Union depot last night, and was discovered unconscious by Mrs. Ollie Everingham, the depot matron. Mrs. Everingham gave him emergency treatment until a physician, Dr. R. O. Cross, was secured from among the waiting travelers.

Schneider brought his cattle to the stock yards Saturday night. They were sold yesterday, and after dinner he walked to the depot. He did not feel well, and selected a seat near a window. He was attacked by pains in the stomach and it is presumed he lost conscious shortly afterwards.

Several phone calls were put in for physicians, all of whom happened to be out. One of the callers then used a megaphone in the waiting room, and Dr. Cross responded. Dr. Cross lives at Lahoma, Ok., and was on his way home. He accompanied Schneider on the train.

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July 30, 1909

TOO HOT FOR HER HERE.

Visiting Oklahoma Woman Returns
to Her Home at Enid.

It was so hot in Kansas City yesterday afternoon and evening that Mrs. Anna Baker of Enid, Ok., cut short a stay which she intended to make here, and last night returned to her home..

She told officials at the Union depot that the farther north she came the hotter it got.

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July 10, 1909

CUT IN TWO ON CAR TRACK.

Body of Unidentified Man Discov-
ered at Walnut and Second.

While rounding the curve in the old Holmes street cut on Second street between Walnut street and Grand avenue at midnight last night, J. A. Franklin, the motorman of a Vine street car, noticed that his car bumped slightly at one particular place. He stopped the car, got off and went back to investigate.

In the middle of the track was the body of a man which had evidently been lying there for several hours. More than a dozen cars had passed over the body before any one noticed it. Dr. Harry Czarlinsky was notified and ordered it taken to an undertaker.

From papers found in the dead man's pockets it was presumed that his name is Walter A. Rosh of Enid, Ok.

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June 1, 1909

MARRIES A BALL PLAYER.

Miss Estella Greenwood of Kansas
City Weds Muskogeean.

MUSKOGEE, OK., May 31. -- E. Stanton Stofer, third baseman for the Muskogee team in the Western Association, and Miss Estella Greenwood of Kansas City, were married here this afternoon.

The players of the team made up a purse for the bridegroom, and President Shantz of the club will tomorrow night entertain the couple with a dinner and automobile ride.

The young woman came here from Kansas City. Stofer, who is also from Kansas City, is touted as the fastest kid infielder in the league. He is a personal friend and protege of Johnny Kling.

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May 27, 1909

BOY DUPE OF SHARP
BAND IS RELEASED.

WILLIAM ENGHNELL TELLS OF
FAITH IN ADAM GOD.

While on Stand, Prosecutor Dis-
misses Information Against Him.
Fanatic Continues to Inter-
rupt Court Proceedings.
William Enghnell, Member of the Band of Religious Fanatics.
WILLIAM ENGHNELL,
As He Appeared After His Arrest
Following the City Hall Riot.

Acrid exchanges of words between attorneys and the release of William Enghnell, a member of James Sharp's band, from the county jail, brought interest to the closing hour of the Adam God hearing for yesterday.

The day had been one of lagging testimony, largely by deposition, and court and spectators, as well as the jury, were weary when, at 4:30 o'clock, Enghnell, 20 years old, who does not appear bright, marched to the witness stand. He had been brought out of his cell on a former day of the trial, but taken back before he had a chance to testify.

On the stand Enghnell spoke with a pronounced Swedish dialect. He said he had lived in Kitchen county, Minn.

"Who is this?" asked A. E. Martin, counsel for the fanatic, Sharp, indicating the defendant.

"It's James Sharp."

"HE IS THE LORD," SAYS BOY.

"By what other name do you know him?"

"Adam."

"By what other name?"

"Adam."

"By what other name?"

"He is the Lord," said the boy, reverently.

"How long have you known Sharp?"

"I met him a year ago in Kitchen county, and hear him preach."

Judge Ralph S. Latshaw of the criminal court here turned to Enghnell and told him not to testify to anything that might tend to incriminate himself.

Immediately Virgil Conkling, prosecutor, was on his feet.

"If the court please," said he, "the state wishes to dismiss any information that may be pending against Enghnell. The state will not prosecute him for anything. He was not present at the shooting."

Mr. Martin resumed:

"Why are you in jail, Enghnell?"

"They had me arrested for believing the truth and Adam. I met him and God revealed to me that He was Adam, and I got the faith."

The witness started to tell what he saw of the shooting on the river, but was stopped by an objection by Mr. Conkling.

Sharp spoke up and said:

"I object. There you go stopping one of my best witnesses. Object, object," he continued, punching Martin in the back.

"Let him tell what he knows about that killing," shouted Sharp.

"That's the truth," called out the boy in the voice of a zealot.

On cross-examination Mr. Conkling asked:

GUNS TO KEEP OFF EVIL.

"Sharp believed in killing people, didn't he?"

"No," said the boy. "Letting all people alone was our doctrine."

"Why did you have guns?"

"I heard Adam say that all through the South, where he had been preaching, they had been putting him in jail, and he had the guns to keep the evil men off him."

"Now don't let him get more than twenty-five minutes from the shooting," called out Sharp. "They wouldn't let the others tell what happened twenty-five minutes afterward. Why should this boy tell what happened more than twenty-five minutes before the shooting?"

The interruption was too much for Martin, who jumped in and said, "For two or three days I've resisted putting this boy on the stand. I was forced to do so by the defendant."

"Mr. Martin is 21 years old, a member of the bar and ought to be able to conduct a criminal case or resign," said Mr. conkling frigidly. By this time the prosecutor was on his feet and continued: "I don't think you ought to take this position before the jury."

"Are there any other witnesses they are trying to force you to put on, Mr. Martin?" asked Judge Latshaw. "If there are, I will protect you."

"No," said Martin.

"If you object," said Mr. Conkling, "I shall not examine this witness further. I don't want to be unfair."

Martin had none, so the questioning about the guns was resumed by the prosecutor.

GAVE ADAM HIS MONEY.

"Sharp took the guns up town to protect him from the evil man," said the boy Enghnell.

"Did you give him some of the guns?"

"When I got into the faith I gave Adam my two pistols. I saw he was David, the father, and I gave everything I had to him."

"What else did you give him?"

"A $5 bill."

"Because he told you he was Adam?"

"No. God revealed it to me."

"Revealed it to Sharp, too, didn't he?"

"Yes."

"When you offered him the $5, you had a hard time to get him to take it, didn't you?"

"No."

"What did he say about you not having nerve to use pistols?"

"He said I didn't."

As soon as this answer had been given, Mr. Conkling accused Martin of shaking his head at the witness and objected to such alleged acts. martin denied them, but Conkling persisted.

"Did Sharp tell you that if anybody stopped him from preaching there would be war? the prosecutor asked the witness.

"Yes."

"Did he say if they didn't let him do what he wanted he would shoot?"

"Yes, he said that."

"Did Sharp tell you that perhaps this was the town God wanted him to take?"

"Yes."

"Did he say he had to fire the first shot and then they all could shoot?"

ALL GOT REVELATIONS.

"Yes."

"Did he say he proposed never to be put in jail again?"

"Yes."

"Did he tell you he bought the guns to keep the police from arresting him?"

"Yes."

"Were you with Sharp w hen he stood off the Canadian police?"

"Yes."

"Stood them off with a rifle, didn't he?"

"Yes."

"And the next day he stood off several?"

"Yes."

"Then they sent fifty Canadian police after him and he stood them off with a rifle?"

"Yes."

"All of you who joined the band got revelations to give Sharp your money, didn't you?"

"Yes, we got revelations. God showed us."

"Did Sharp say he would do like David did to the Philistine with his knife?"

"Yes."

This concluded the examination of Enghnell, who was set at liberty. He was taken in charge by Mrs. Alice Stultz, a mission worker at 1418 Oak street, who said she would care for him. Court then adjourned for the day.

The reference Enghnell made in his testimony to Sharp taking the city had to do with a claim he made to his followers in connection with Joshua and Jericho.

SHARP NOT ON STAND.

Sharp himself did not take the stand yesterday, and it is possible that neither he nor his wife will be used as witnesses. The case may be finished today, as there remains little evidence to be put before the jury unless the Sharps go on the stand. Mr. Martin was unwilling last night to allow Sharp or his wife to testify, but added that they might override his wishes.

During the afternoon there were read by A. A. Bailey of Sharp's counsel depositions taken early this month in Oklahoma City. L. A. Sheldon, a real estate dealer who was a jailer there in February, 1905, said that the Sharps were in his charge for about sixty days that year. This was just after the naked parade.

"Sharp told me," said Sheldon, "that he came naked into the world and would go out that way. He preached and sang in the jail day and night so that one couldn't sleep in the jail office. He said also he was God and was generally 'nutty' on religion. His mental condition was 'mighty weak'.

"This naked parade was on Broadway in the afternoon. There were four of them in it."

James Bruce of Oklahoma City, who had the contract for feeding prisoners at the jail when Sharp was confined there, said he seemed to be rational on all subjects except religion. Sharp, so said Bruce, had a "very elegant beard," which reached almost to his waist.

"I told him," said Bruce, "that I wanted his whiskers and when I got back there he had cut them off with a pocket knife and had them in an envelope. 'Keep these and they will make you religious,' he said to me. I learned from neighbors that Pratt gave Sharp over $3,000, realized from the sale of Pratt's farm."

ASKED TOO MUCH FOR FARM.


John Tobin, a retired farmer of Oklahoma City, saw Sharp's band in their camp near Oklahoma City in the spring of 1905. He said he wanted to buy the farm (Pratt's), but that Sharp asked $6,000, or $1,000 more than it was worth.

John Ballard, a deputy sheriff, saw the naked parade.

John W. Hanson, assistant county attorney, who was police judge of Oklahoma City in 1905, gave it as his opinion that Sharp was sane.

"He told me," the witness said, "that the constitution of the United States guaranteed him the right to preach on the streets. This was after he had been arrested for blockading the streets."

When Mr. Conkling read this question from the deposition: "It's very common for religious fanatics to claim divine origin, isn't it?" Sharp remarked, loud enough to be heard all over the courtroom:

"No, it is not."

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April 8, 1909

PREPARE ADAM GOD TRIAL.

Prosecuting Attorney Conkling Is In
Oklahoma City to Get Evidence.

In preparation for the trial of James Sharp and Melissa Sharp, fanatic leaders of the city hall riot last December, Virgil Conkling, prosecuting attorney, has gone to Oklahoma City. A large part of the defense will be in the form of depositions from persons who do not care to come to Kansas City for the trial May 17. As only the defense may introduce depositions in evidence, Mr. Conkling has gone to cross-examine the witnesses.

The evidence to be gathered in Oklahoma bears largely on the conduct of the Sharps while they were leaders of a band in that state.

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May 2, 1909

TRACING MRS. YARBROUGH.

Woman Suicide, Implicated in Mur-
der Charge, Stopped Here.

The police are positive that Mrs. Helen Yarbrough, who committed suicide in the Manhattan hotel in Wichita Friday night, was in Kansas City several weeks ago. She was wanted at Claremore, Ok., on a charge of complicity in the murder of John Bullette, and rather than face the officers she took strychnine.

Detectives had been looking for Mrs. Yarbrough in Kansas City for several days. With the aid of a photograph she was traced to an East Side boarding house, where she had stopped during the month of March. She left ostensibly for Topeka April 7, but went to Claremore instead. The murder was one of the most brutal on record in Oklahoma. While in Kansas City Mrs. Yarbrough had no callers and made no friends.

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April 27, 1909

CONFESSED ROBBER
TURNED DOWN BY "PAL."

CONVICT SAYS HE DOESN'T
KNOW WILLIAM TURNER.

Man Who Told of Robbery at
Camden Point Is Confronted
With One Serving Sen-
tence for Crime.

The horror of spending several years in the Missouri penitentiary for robbery is not going to befall William Turner, the confessed safe blower of the Camden Point bank, who says that himself and three "pals" looted the place the night of December 27, 1907. Harry O'Neal, one of the robbers who was captured the day after the robbery and who was convicted, was brought from Jefferson City yesterday and after looking at Turner declared that he had never seen him before.

Turner's story was doubted when he "confessed" to the prosecuting attorney. The confession did not conform to the facts as the county attorney or Platte, who was called in, knew. The statement of O'Neal did not correspond. That Turner was not sincere in his confession was assured when he arrived in Platte City. Although he told the officers all about the robbery and wrote a description of the ways and manners of safe blowers, he refused to plead guilty.

O'NEAL DIDN'T KNOW HIM.

As Turner was the only witness who seemed to know anything about the matter and as he had refused to plead guilty, O'Neal was the only one who could tell whether Turner took part in the robbery. Governor H. S. Hadley and the warden of the penitentiary gave consent to O'Neal's removal to Kansas City to get a glimpse of his "pal."

Soon after his removal to Platte City, Turner was brought back to Kansas City and placed in the county jail. The authorities of Platte county were afraid the jail there was not safe. He was taken from the county jail to police headquarters Saturday and O'Neal was placed in the holdover.

Yesterday afternoon the "pals" met in Captain Whitsett's office. There was not a sign of recognition on O'Neal's part when he came into the room. He had not been told why he had been brought to Kansas City. Turner, who had been taken to the captain's office from the holdover when O'Neal was brought in, did not recognize his "pal" apparently.

"Do you know that man," Turner was asked.

"I don't remember his face," he replied.

TO OKLAHOMA FOR LARCENY.

The same questions were asked O'Neal, but he did not recall Turner as an acquaintance. When he was informed that the slightly built, well-dressed young man was his supposed partner in the bank raid, O'Neal took a second look.

"That feller a 'yeg?' Not much," he said.

As he is wanted in Sapulpa, Ok., on a charge of larceny, Turner will be held until the authorities from that state can be communicated with. The charge of bank robbery will not be dismissed against him until the Oklahoma authorities arrive.

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April 13, 1909

DUKE LEE QUITS THE FORCE.

Big Cop Returns to Old Love -- the
Wild West Show.
Duke Lee, Former Police Officer
DUKE LEE.

Duke Lee, after two years of faithful service as a Kansas City policeman, turned in his resignation to Secretary James Vincil of the board of police commissioners yesterday. Last night was Lee's final performance in the role of a bluecoat. Within a few days he will be at Ponca City, Ok., where he will join his old love -- a Wild West show.

Lee has crowded an interesting and somewhat extraordinary career into a life of 32 years. He was a good horseman, a good shot and a good cowpuncher when he was 16 years old. He rode the plains of Wyoming and might have been there yet had it not been for a war with the sheep herders. This caused him to migrate to Texas, where he joined the Buffalo Bill Wild West show. When the Spanish war was declared in 1898 Lee joined Troop C of the Sixth cavalry, was sent to the Philippines and later went to China and participated in the siege of Peking.

Returning to America after the Boxer trouble, Lee rejoined the Buffalo Bill show and stuck to the sawdust for four years, but upon the suggestion of friends came here and landed a job on the force. Lee thought that he was to be given a place in the mounted squad, but he rode a horse only the first month. He has been walking a beat ever since.

While in Kansas City Lee got married and got fat. His wife was Miss Pansy Clark, whose dower amounted to several thousand dollars.

In the capacity of showman, Lee will soon be in Kansas City. He hopes to take off about twenty-five pounds of flesh before his return.

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April 4, 1909

OKLAHOMA COUPLE CAUGHT.

Nellie Wylie, 13, of Woodward, Ran
Away With Man of 30 -- Both
Arrested Here.

Three weeks ago Nellie May Wylie, 13 years old, disappeared from her country home near Woodward, Ok. At the same time George Lovett, 30 years old, who had been known to pay the girl some friendly attention, also disappeared.

No trace whatever could be found of the missing girl until recently, when a sister at Woodward got a letter from her postmarked at Broken Bow, Neb. To that she had signed the name of Mrs. Abraham Whistler." The girl's father, L. A. Wylie, placed the matter in the hands of the sheriff at home, and a wire sent to Broken Bow brought the information that the pair had left there and had directed that their mail be sent to Kansas City.

About 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon Patrolman J. R. Robeson of No. 6 station arrested the couple near the postoffice, Ninth street and Grand avenue. To her uncle, E. L. Wylie, who came on from Woodward, his niece is said to have confessed that she and Lovett had not married. She will be taken home this morning by the uncle. Lovett is locked up at police headquarters for investigation.

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March 19, 1909

MY! WHAT'S THIS? A BRIBE?

Woman Shopper Dropped Liquor
Purchases on Union Depot Floor.

Are fond husbands in Oklahoma and Kansas bribed to stay at home and care for the little ones while mother comes to Kansas City to shop and attend to the family's business affairs? And is the bribe in the form of liquor? Union depot employes believe that both questions could be truthfully answered in the affirmative for two sad accidents that occurred yesterday at the Union station tend to support their opinions in the matter.

The first mishap was when an attractive young matron hurrying to catch a train let a neatly wrapped package fall to the floor with crash. Following the crash there was a flow of real old Kentucky bourbon. A few minutes later another woman had a similar misfortune.

"My, John will be mad," the woman from Oklahoma murmured. "Fred will be awfully disappointed," said the woman from Kansas.

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March 14, 1909

CAME TO KANSAS CITY
SO HE WOULD BE SAFE.

CAMDEN POINT BANK ROBBER
KNEW WHERE TO LIGHT.

William Turner, Arrested at Station,
Makes Voluntary Confession That
Made Police Sit Up -- He's
Tired of Dodging.
William Turner, Confessed Bank Robber
WILLIAM TURNER,
Confessed Camden Point Bank Robber.

William Turner, one of the four men who robbed the Bank of Camden Point on December 27, 1907, and who has been in several bank robberies all over the country, has made a complete confession. Turner was arrested yesterday afternoon at Union depot under orders from the sheriff of Sapulpa, Ok., who wanted him for petty larceny. He confessed to the Camden Point bank robbery of his own accord.

The prisoner had been taken to the holdover late yesterday afternoon and as he was led through the corridor at police headquarters, he recognized W. P. Martin, a patrolman whom he had met in several occasions.

"I guess they are going to take me to Oklahoma," he said to Martin, who accompanied him to the holdover. "They want me down there for petty larceny, but if they knew what I had done here in Missouri, they wouldn't think of taking me back. Just tell the captain that I've got something to tell him."

DOESN'T LOOK LIKE CROOK.

Turner, who limps slightly, was led up stairs to Captain Walter Whitsett's private office. H is face had a determined look and though he is 28 years old and has associated with criminals ever since he was 14 years old, he does not look like a crook. He greeted the captain and in a matter of fact way informed him that he was a bank robber.

"I'm tired of beating around the country with the officers always on my trail and I'm willing to come through with all," he said. "You remember the bank at Camden Point? Well, I'm one of the four men that cracked the bank there over a year ago."

The robbery of the bank at that time had been a source of vexation to the police and though two of the men were captured, it was thought that the other members of the party came to Kansas City.

"Yes, Seranton Billie and I planned the robbery over in Zack's saloon at 307 Main street," Turner continued. "We went up to Leavenworth and then took a train to Camden Point the night before the robbery. Early the next morning, we went into the bank building and flowed the safe, but not until we had used most of our nitro-glycerine. The people of the town were roused and began to fire into the bank before we could get all the loot. The two men were captured the next day in a cornfield, but Billie and I got away. We first went to St. Joseph and there we separated. I came to Kansas City because I knew it would be pretty safe here. I had about $600 in bills but the police didn't get on to me at all.

STARTED OUT EARLY.

Turner's blue eyes grew reminiscent and he tilted back in his chair in a restful attitude. He told about his birth in Baltimore and said that he moved to Missouri with his parents in the latter part of the '80s,. At 15 he was stolen by tramps and learned the "yeg" business when in their company. They taught him to beg in small towns and on many occasions went around on crutches, pretending to be a cripple. He would carry the day's receipts to his pals late at night and they would then plan on some new disguise for the boy. He later became acquainted with the methods of manufacturing nitro-glycerin and the most approved method of cracking a safe. He has been all over the country, he says, and has known most of the "yegs" in the United States.

"But they all die in prison," he said, "and I've made up my mind to take my medicine. If there is any time left to me to be free I want to en joy it. I'm tired of this life. My shoulder hurts me where I was shot in one raid three years ago."

Turner put his confession in writing to W. S. Gabriel, an assistant prosecutor, and was taken to a cell in the matron's room. He asked permission of the captain to allow him a quantity of writing material.

"I want to write the story of my life," he said.

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February 14, 1909

POLITEO'S EX-WIFE
IN SPOTLIGHT AGAIN.

THIS TIME SHE HAS BEEN EN-
JOINED FROM SELLING LIQUOR.

Eva Springsteen Fair Caught in Of-
ficial Round-Up at Bartles-
ville, Ok. -- Her
Varied Career.

Eva Springsteen Fair, the woman who bewitched a Croatian priest of Kansas City, Kas., into marriage eight years ago, has again burst into the light of notoriety at Bartlesville, Ok., her present field. Among nine other holders of licenses she has been enjoined from selling liquor. She is now said to be the wife of a Bartlesville liveryman. Of the twenty-eight places where intoxicants are sold, twenty-two are listed for injunction.

Mrs. Fair, as she prefers to be known professionally, has left a wake of witchery wherever she has gone, but she served her piece de resistance when she inveigled Father Antony Politeo away from his priestly vows and his parish of simple Croatians to St. Joseph, where they were married November 19, 1901. Upon their return to Kansas City she is said to have left him at the Union depot and refused to live with him. Politeo, be it said, was straightway unfrocked and his wife obtained a divorce at Independence in the early part of 1907 on the grounds of abandonment and neglect. Soon after her divorce she went to Bartesville, where she has been living since.

MADE GOOD START, ANYHOW.

Many have been the vicissitudes of Mrs. Fair. As Eva Springsteen she was born in Manhattan, Kas., but later was taken by her parents to Atchison. There she was educated and received a diploma from the local high school. With other girl graduates, clad in commencement white, she sat demurely and listened with kindling ambition to the baccalaureate sermon, wherein the homilist shouted to them in his climax that "beyond the Alps lies Italy." Her intentions were no doubt good at first, but, figuratively, she tired of the irksome Alpine climb and strayed down into into the pleasant field of France an on to its gay capital, tarrying not far from the Moulin Rouge. After graduation she edited for a while the society page of an Atchison paper. She also waited behind a depot lunch counter in that city. On coming to Kansas city, she took the name of Mrs. Eva M. Fair. Here it was that she met Politeo on the street. She dropped her handkerchief. The priest picked it up and returned it to her with a bow. Smiles were exchanged and there was a stroll.

POLITEO'S ROMANTIC CAREER.

Politeo was a man of undoubted intellectual attainments. He gave inconsistent accounts of himself, however, and among other distinctions claimed acquaintance with Gabriel d'Annunzio and Sienkiewicz, the author of "Quo Vadis." By reason of his heterodox opinions, political and religious, he was banished from Austria and the church and went to Italy. Later he became reconciled with the church and his political heresies were pardoned by Emperor Francis Joseph. Then he was sent to America to take religious charge of his people in the coal fields of Pennsylvania. After that he came West and organized the Croatians who worked in packingtown into a parish. Thus as shepherd of his trustful flock he administered to their spiritual wants until the fair charmer tripped his path. Then began his undoing.

SHE MARRIED FOR MONEY.

Mrs. Fair and her lawyer cheerfully admitted that she had married the priest for his money. She claimed, however, she did not know of his churchly office until after their marriage at St. Joseph and that he wanted her to live with him as his housekeeper. This, she said, she refused to do. Five years later she got a divorce.

In the meantime she formed a sort of partnership with one George W. Robinson and together they kept a rooming house at 312-314 East Thirteenth street, this city. Soon she claims her partner became delinquent. She sued for dissolution of the partnership and the payment of what money was due her. At any rate Robinson, who was said to be a grain broker, dropped out of her life, and she kept pretty well out of the limelight until she began suit for divorce from Politeo.

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February 11, 1909

PARTED COMPANY IN
FUSILLADE OF BULLETS.

FORMER DESPERADO AND MEM-
BER OF POSSE MEET.

"Hello, Jim," Said Emmet Dalton to
J. H. Knapp, "Glad I Didn't
Hit You That Time
at Vinita."

Two men who parted ten years ago with murder in their hearts after keeping up a running fire with Winchesters, met on the tanbark of the Rhoda Royal circus last night and one of them, Emmett Dalton, formerly one of the notorious Dalton gang of bank robbers, extended his hand to the other and said:

"Hello, Jim. Glad I didn't hit you that time down at Vinita."

The other man, dressed in the fez of a Shriner and evening clothes, turned and looked at the man who addressed him but did not recognize in the sombrero topped circus rider before him the fleeing desperado who had turned in his saddle ten years before on the Oklahoma plain and so nearly snuffed out his life with a bullet. Dalton introduced himself and the other, J. H. Knapp, president of Knapp Construction Company, grasped the hand of the brown skinned man in his own.

"And I'm glad I didn't hit you," he said.

For half an hour the men stood there talking, and parted friends.

Emmet Dalton is the youngest of the old Dalton gang. Knapp was at that time a special officer for the Wells-Fargo Express Company. While chasing the Dalton brothers the incident occurred which both remembered so clearly. They became separated from the others and Knapp took several shots at the fleeing outlaw, which the latter returned, but neither was hurt. Dalton's horse finally outstripped that of the officer and he got away.

Dalton is with the 101 Ranch Wild West show and is taking part in the Rhoda Royal exhibition to keep in training in the winter. He was released from Leavenworth prison three years ago, where he served seven years.

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February 5, 1909

DIVORCED TEN YEARS,
DECIDED TO REMARRY.

S. D. Hollis and Wife Couldn't Bear
To Be Apart, So the Second Wed-
ding Takes Place At Daugh-
ter's Home.

Ten years ago S. D. Hollis and his wife Mary, both of this city, quarreled and there was a legal separation. In the divorce court they had complained bitterly of each other, and when the hour of final parting came they declared with one accord that their marriage was a mistake, although they had lived together thirty years and reared ten children. It was a dry-eyed farewell. Hollis, glad of his freedom, went to Oklahoma, leaving Mrs. Hollis with her daughter, Mrs. Maude O'Flaherty, at 1606 Charlotte street.

Last night there was another chapter to the story in the Hollis household when at the house on Charlotte street a minister remarried the couple after they declared they were willing to remain together for the rest of their lives. Yesterday morning Mr. Hollis, who is now a night clerk at the Model hotel of El Reno, Ok., dropped in to the O'Flaherty home unexpectedly and asked for a reunion. And then it developed that he had come at the instigation of Mrs. Hollis, who had written him a letter from Omaha telling him she was lonely. The children as well as the parents were very happy last night.

"I admit that I was foolish and it all happened because of my ungovernable temper," said Mr. Hollis in explaining how it came about.

"We quarreled about a member of our family ten years ago. My wife took one course and I took another. We ended the argument in the divorce court.

"Three years ago I tried to take her back and she agreed, but we finally decided not to marry again. Last December I called here with the intention of bringing Mrs. Hollis back to Oklahoma as my wife. She had gone to Omaha, so after waiting six weeks I went home without her. This time I knew nothing could keep us apart, for we have both grown old and need each other's society."

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February 1, 1909

HUNGRY AMID PLENTY.

GUEST AT PROMINENT HOTEL BE-
WILDERED BY FOREIGN NAMES.

Unused to Metropolitan Hotels and
Cafes, Oklahoman Longs for
Plain Ham and Eggs of
Home Hostelry.

In the Hotel Baltimore for twenty-four hours, surrounded by all the luxuries and lavishly furnished cafes and dining rooms, with the most tempting good things to eat in store, and with plenty of money to satisfy his every want, a young Oklahoma business man meekly submitted to the gnawing pain of hunger because he thought it was necessary for him to speak at least one of six different foreign languages before he could order what he wanted to eat. The young man arrived at the hotel Friday evening, his friends say. He registered and was assigned to a nice room with bath. When he came down yesterday morning he asked a friend where was the best place to eat.

"In the automobile room," the friend told him.

"I have no automobile; what do I want to go into the automobile room for a meal for," the young man from Oklahoma soliloquized. He asked another guest of the hotel whom he saw walking through the lobby with a toothpick in his mouth, where he could be served with the best meal.

ON EUROPEAN TOUR.

"In the Egyptian room, of course," the guest told him. Again the young business man was stumped. He couldn't speak the old Egyptian language and he just knew he couldn't make the waiters in that Egyptian room understand what he wanted. He studied over the situation for an hour or so and asked another guest for information.

"The Italian room is the best if it is open," he was advised.

That was no better than the automobile and the Egyptian rooms. He couldn't speak Italian and hoped he never would.

"By heck, I must be dreaming," the young man said to himself. "Am I on a trip around the world." He felt his pockets and found he had spent none of his money for a trip of that duration. He pinched himself and found he was awake. He decided to make another break. He encountered a round-faced, good natured traveling man and asked to be directed into the best place around the hotel to get a meal.

BLOW ALMOST KILLED FATHER.

"The Pompeian room has just been opened and the German room is a good place if it hasn't been abandoned," was the information obtained.

"Dad bat it, if I was to go into either of those rooms and couldn't speak the languages they are just as liable to serve me with roast mummies or sauerkraut as anything else," remarked the exasperated young man, almost helpless with hunger and rage. He made one last desperate effort and asked one of the employes of the hotel where he could get a quiet dining room where plenty of plain eating would be served.

"The Japanese or the Chinese tea rooms are the best for private dinners, the employe informed him.

That was the severest blow yet administered. H e knew just about as much about Japanese and Chinese as an ordinary Oklahoma cow puncher knows about Broadway.

GRILL ROOM SAVED HIM.

He pulled himself over into one corner of the lobby and sank himself deep down into one of the upholstered leather chairs, pulled his hat over his face and dreamed over the juicy beef steaks, delicious coffee and the well cooked dishes served in a plain dining room in the Oklahoma hotels, where every one speaks English in the American style.

"I will go into the basement and kick myself," the young man said, as he picked himself up with some exertion and wandered down the stairway which leads to the grill room.

"Come this way," a negro waiter said, as the young man landed in the grill room, and was led to one of the tables, was seated and had placed before him a bill of fare printed in plain English.

"Saved," was the only sound he uttered until he began working on that meal as only a hungry man can work. It was then 6 o'clock in the afternoon and he hadn't had a thing to eat since the evening before.

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