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January 24, 1910

DISLIKES TO HANDLE
BONES OF QUANTRELL.

Historical Society Clerks at Topeka
Not So Enthusiastic About
Grewsome Relic.

TOPEKA, Jan. 23. -- If some person, in some manner, could slip into the relic vault of the State Historical Society and steal the old, dry bones of Quantrell, the famous guerrilla, he would confer a great favor upon the clerks of the historical society, even though he riled the temper of George W. Martin, the boss of the shop.

"Oh, how I hate to rattle those old, dry bones," said one of the clerks, as he exhibited them for the nineteenth time today to visitors. "Why, I pull them out, shake them around and tell about them so much that I actually detest the things."

Everybody who goes to the historical rooms wants to see Quantrell's bones. Secretary Martin says they are a great drawing card, and that they are one of the chief relics of his department. But he doesn't have to handle them or exhibit them. The clerks must do that.

For fear they will be stolen, Mr. Martin keeps them in the vault, and a special trip must be made to see them, the medal which Victor Hugo, the Frenchman, gave Mrs. John Brown and the Ford theater program which contains some splotches of Lincoln's blood. Officials around the state house know how the clerks detest handling the bones and always tell visitors to be sure to ask to see them.

The clerks do not handle the bones as tenderly as Secretary Martin does. They yak them around, shake them together, hoping, no doubt, they will fall to pieces.

"I guess the only way to get rid of them is to wear them out," said a clerk, "and they don't seem to wear very fast. I believe they will be here when Gabriel blows his trumpet the last time unless someone should carry them off."

When the bones were first donated to the historical society a great howl went up from some of the old free state men. They declared that it was an insult to exhibit the bones of the old guerrilla who sacked Lawrence and killed so many people. But Secretary Martin held on to them with a strong grip and finally beat down public criticism. Still he can't subdue his own clerks. They are still in rebellion.

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August 21, 1909

FEW QUANTRELL'S MEN THERE.

Former Guerrillas Are More Inter-
ested in the Crop Prospects.

Only twenty-five men responded yesterday morning at the roll call of the Quantrell guerrillas, now in reunion in Independence. Cole Younger was not present, being on a lecture tour, the subject of his lecture being "Keep Straight." Frank James, another noted guerrilla, is down in Oklahoma in the Big Pasture, farming, and did not have time to attend. James has not attended any of the reunions since his noted speech made in the Independence court house yard, in which he declared that his friends were in the North and that he was never turned down except by those of the Southland.

The headquarters of the reunion were in the Brown building, North Main street. Here the scattered membership met and registered and it was here that it was noted that among the absent ones were John C. Hope, ex-sheriff of Jackson county, and Cyrus Flannery Wolf of Bates county, both having died within the past year. Captain Benjamin Morrow was present, Lieutenant Levi Potts of Grain Valley and Warren Welch were busy among the veteran guerrillas. Captain Gregg, who has been in about as many tight places as the next guerrilla who followed Quantrell, was present with his family. Also Dr. L. C. Miller of Knobnoster.

There was no formality about the reunion. "They just met and that was all there was to it," was the way one of them expressed himself. Some of those from Kansas City and nearby points brought well-filled dinner baskets, but the greater portion of those present had to go to restaurants. It was a day of reminiscent stories for the guerrillas and the oft repeated stories of the civil war were gone over and over again. Gabe Parr, who as a boy shot his way to freedom, yet lives, and others with equally hair raising stories were present and passed the day, telling of the yesterdays of their early manhood. The thing that interested these men most was the state of the crops.

The veterans will hold another session today and adjourn, in all probability to meet in Independence next year.

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August 15, 1908

WILL FORGET THE PAST.

Union Soldiers Will Attend Reunion
of Quantrell's Men.

The annual reunion of Quantrell's men will be August 21 and 22, at Blue Springs. There will be a basket dinner on the schoolhouse lawn the first day and on the second officers will be elected and reminiscent speeches made.

The Quantrell men have broken over the long established rule and have this year invited Union soldiers to meet with them and forget the animosities of a half century ago. The people of Blue Springs are preparing to give the blue and the gray a reception . Many of the soldiers who wore the blue expect to attend the reunion and show their friendliness to the men who fought on the other side fifty years ago.

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September 18, 1907

FRANK JAMES A FARMER.

WILL SETTLE ON 160 ACRES IN
OKLAHOMA.

During Visit in City Missouri's Form-
er Bandit Declares It Is Non-
sense to Say That Quan-
trell Still Lives.

Frank James, the former Missouri bandit, who has lived a reformed life since the bank raid at Northfield, Minn., which ended so disastrously for the James and Younger boys, has turned farmer. He spent yesterday in Kansas City with his nephew, Jesse James, Jr., an attorney, and talked of his plans.

For some time James, now 64 years old, has lived on the old homestead in Clay county, thirty miles from Kansas City. He hunted in winter and in summer was employed as a starter at race tracks. Recently he purchased a farm of 160 acres in Oklahoma and will go there October 1 to make his home. Frank is a well-preserved old man, but looked rather pale yesterday and the penalties of declining years appeared not far away in his future.

"Of course Quantrell is dead!" the brother and advisor of Jesse James and the Younger crowd during their years of border ravages exclaimed when the recently published rumor that the former Guerrilla chieftain is alive was mentioned.

"There is no question of his death. Why, I was at his side when he fell. In a pitched battle between the Quantrell command and Federal soldiers in Kentucky in the spring of '65, Quantrell was wounded. His command was hard pressed, but rallied around their leader. The boys wanted to take up Quantrell and make a dash for the hills, where, they told him, if escape were possible, they could nurse him back to health.

" 'No,' said Quantrell, 'I am as good as dead. Leave me and get to the hills yourselves. If I am dead, the next thing to do is save the living ones.'

"The last I saw of Quantrell he was paralyzed from the waist down and imploring his men to leave him alone. He died three hours later w here he had fallen and was left on the battlefield.

"The statement that he is still living is nonsense."

Frank James left last night for Kearney, Mo, at 5 o'clock.

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August 24, 1907

IT DIDN'T BOTHER THEM.

"QUANTRELL" MEN AND WOMEN
KEEP UP THE MERRY MAKING.

Attempt of One Man to Shoot An-
other, After a Three-Cornered
Struggle, Looked Upon as
a Sort of Joke.

It was scarcely an hour after David Edwards had shot at Jim Cummings yesterday noon, and "shot to kill" to use Edwards' own words, as he lay in jail, that Miss Feta Parmer, one of the hundred women at the Quantrell raiders' reunion at Wallace grove, who saw the shooting at close range, said:

"Oh, it's nothing! I turned around to see who was fighting and then went on about my business."
"It didn't amount to anything," another woman said. "The old men just had a quarrel."

The shooting truly did not terminate fatally, because Edwards missed Cummings and the stray bullet merely grazed the feet of two other men, but it would have broken up almost any other picnic. But the veterans of the Quantrell raids, their wives and daughters, forgot all about it in fifteen minutes and resumed their merrymaking. Even Cummings, the man shot at, treated the matter as a joke. Cummings was with the James brothers during their bloody days and has seen some real fighting. The only person who seemed excited was Jack Noland, a negro, who was Quantrell's hostler. When Edwards fired, Noland got behind a tree.

"I won't prosecute Edwards," Cummings said. "I understand that he has called me a thief and all that, but I'll let it pass. I'm not afraid of him. He was standing less than three feet from me when he pointed the revolver at my head and fired, and all he did was to hit the other men on the feet. He'll never have a better chance to kill me again, and if he couldn't succeed this time he can't do it later."

MARSHALL PREVENTS BLOODSHED

Joseph Stewart, deputy marshal and bailiff of the criminal court, helped prevent bloodshed. He was standing beside Cummings, talking over old times, when Edwards caame up and got into a quarrel with Cummings. Edwards pulled a revolver out of his pocket and fired a shot. Cummings stepped forward and grabbed his hand. Edwards jerked the imprisoned hand free and threw it around Cummings' neck, pointing the barrel of the pistol down Cummings' spine. Stewart grasped the pistol, sticking his thumb through the aperture back of the trigger to keep Edwards from shooting Cummings in the back, and tried to wrest the weapon from his hand. In the struggle the three men fell. Edwards still holding the weapon and pulling on the trigger, which wouldn't work with Stewart's thumb caught in it.

Kit Rose, a brother-in-law of Cole Younger, intervened. He searched Cummings to see if he, too, had a gun, and then Rose and Cummings jerked Edwards' revolver from his hand. Stewart's thumb was badly bruised in the struggle.

BULLET STRUCK BYSTANDER.

The bullet was afterwards found. It had struck the toe of W. H. Perkins' shoe, glanced hit the rung of a chair and athen stuck in the sole of Dr. Oliver C. Sheley's foot, but did not have force enough left to break the skin. Dr. Sheley lives in Independence. Mr. Perkins is from Oak Grove. Perkins has the bullet as a souvenir of the occasion.

Edwards was detained at the county jail last night, and slept in the deputy marshal's bedroom. He will be sent to the Confederate Veterans' home in Higginsville today.

There are four or five stories of how the trouble between him and Cummings arose. Edwards says Cummings had been threatening him ever since a year ago last Halloween night, when a pet raccoon was stolen from his room at the Confederate home. He accuesed Cummings of the theft and Cummings became sore.

They have had quarrels since. Both men are inmates of the Higginsville Confederate home. Edwards was with Quantrall a year, and assisted in the burning of Lawrence, Kas. He is 73 years old, while Cummings is but 56. Cummings was one of the followers of the James boys.

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March 17, 1907
CLAIMANTS APPEAR.

THREE AFTER THE ESTATE OF
ADOLPH HUNTEMANN.
ONE LIVES IN WISCONSIN.

WRITES TO CHIEF HAYES AND
ALLEGES RELATIONSHIP.
The second is Detective Huntsman, of
Kansas City, Who Says His Family
Name Was Modified --
The Third in Cincinnati.

An heir to the estate of Adolph Huntemann, who died at the General hospital here March 12, leaving an estate valued at $400,000, has turned up. Chief Hayes yesterday received a letter in which was an Associated Press clipping telling of the death of the aged German and stating he had no heirs so far as known here. The letter follows:

Allenville, Wis., March 14, 1907
Gentlemen find inclose a Duplick to refer to. My Father Conrad Eckstein Had a Sister Married to Huntemann in Germany & She was Born in 1819 in April, so if you Find the reckords of his mother berth corspond with this rite me the full dat
yourd Truly,
L. W. ECKSTEIN, Allenville, Wis.

"Mr. Eckstein is not quite clear," said Chief Hayes, "but I take his letter to mean this: Go back to Germany, and if you find that this man's father's sister, Miss Eckstein, and anybody named Huntemann were born about the same time, send the $400,000 to the man in Allenville, Wis."

Adolph Huntemann was born in Hanover, Germany. He came to America in 1843 with his parents and later emigrated to Lawrence, Kas. He and his family lived in Lawrence during the Quantrell raid. Huntemann later moved to Kansas City and bought real estate. He was a frugal man and watched his interests well. The property which he got for practically a song then has increased in value so that at the time of his death the old German was worth nearly half a million dollars. He had about $75,000 in cash in the bank.

It is possible that Huntemann has an heir in Kansas City. John Huntsman, a city detective, is now investigating the records back in Germany before he makes any formal claim. His granfather's name was Peter Huntemann and he was born in Hanover, the same town as was Adolph Huntemann.

Mr. Huntsman says that when his father came to this country he changed the name to Huntsmann and later on, within the last few years, kin fact, Mr. Huntsman himself dropped teh final letter "n" from his name. He did it, he said, because he thought the final letter superfluous and teh spelling of the name was unchanged materially by it. An attorney has the matter in charge for Mr. Huntsman.

CINCINATTI, O., March 16 -- (Special.) Herman Hunteman and his daughter are to lay claim to the estate left by Adolph Huntemann, who died in Kanas City leaving an estate valued at half a million dollars. According to the announcement of death received here Adolph Huntemann left no heirs, but it is claimed that Herman Hunteman is his cousin and that the two men came to this country together fifty years ago from Germany, Herman stopped in this city and Adolph went on west and accumulated a fortune. Herman Hunteman makes his home in Osgood, Ind., but he has a daughter who lives in Avondale, a fashionable suburb of this city. It is said to be their intention to bring action to gain a share of their relative's estate.

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