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February 11, 1910

DR. HYDE CHARGED
WITH MURDER IN
THE FIRST DEGREE.

Colonel Swope's Nephew by
Marriage Formally Accused
and Arrested.

OUT UNDER $50,000 BOND.

Special Grand Jury Convenes
Saturday to Investigate
Swope Deaths.

BIG LIBEL SUIT DROPPED.

By Dismissing Proceedings,
Dr. Hyde Avoids Giving
Deposition.

Dr. B. Clark Hyde, Charged with First Degree Murder.
DR. B. CLARK HYDE.

Dr. B. Clark Hyde, whose wife is a niece of the late Colonel Thomas H. Swope, was formally charged in a warrant issued yesterday afternoon by Justice of the Peace Loar at Independence, with having caused the death of Colonel Swope by poison.

Dr. Hyde was arrested in the office of Marshal Joel Mayes at 4 o'clock and an hour later gave bond in the sum of $50,000 before Justice Loar. The hearing is set for February 17.

The surties on the bond are M. D. Scruggs, vice president of the Kansas City Live Stock Commission Company; Fernando P. Neal, president of the Southwest National bank, and Herbert F. Hall, presiden tof the Hall-Baker Grain Company. Frank P. Walsh, John M. Cleary, John H. Lucas, attorneys for Dr. Hyde, and William McLaughlin joined in signing the bond, which was twice as large as was suggested by Prosecutor Conkling.

SPECIAL GRAND JURY CALLED.

Two hours prior to the issuance of the warrant, Judge Ralph S. Latshaw of the riminal court ordered that a special grand jury be convened to examine into the deaths of Colonel Thomas H. Swope, Chrisman Swope and other members of the Swope family who died of typhoid fever, including Moss Hunton, who died suddenly in the Swope home.

Marshal Joel Mayes was busy yesterday selecting a list of names of men who will be asked to serve on this grand jury. The jury will be convened Saturday morning when Judge Latshaw will instruct them in their duties.

The refusal of Dr. Hyde to appear at the Reed offices yesterday morning so that his deposition could be taken in his libel suits for $600,000 against the Pulitzer Publishing Company and the dismissal by the attorneys of the suit when they learned that an attachment had been issued for Dr. Hyde, precipitated the criminal proceedings.

The information was sworn to by John G. Paxton of Independence, the executor of the Swope estate. On the reverse of the warrant was a request by Prosecutor Conkling for an immediate arrest.

BIG LIBEL SUIT DROPPED.

The scenes of activity in the Swope case yesterday were kaleidoscopic. The legal sparring began in the morning when attemts to take depositions in the offices of Atwood, Reed, Yates, Mastin & Harvey on one hand and Frank P. Walsh on the other failed because the witnesses subpoenaed were not present.

Following the issuance of an attachment by the Reed forces came the dismissal of his suit for $600,000 damages.

The dismissal of the libel suit in which the Reed forces had obtained a prior right to taking depositions was not wholly a surprise, but it roused the attorneys for the Swope estate to activity. It was shortly after 10 o'clock a. m. when the attorneys and the women witnesses in the case gathered in the Reed offices. George H. Roberts, the notary, had failed to arrive and he was found in the court house. He had not expected the case to be called. Dr. Hyde had not arrived and it was determined to ask for an attachment. This was issued and a deputy sheriff began a search for Dr. Hyde.

JUDGE LATSHAW ACTS.

It did not take long for this news to reach the Walsh offices and John M. Cleary was dispatched to Independence. There the suit alleging libel against the Pulitzer Publishing Company, John G. Paxton, Dr. E. L. Stewart and Frank G. Hall was dismissed. The sheriff was notified and recalled the deputy who had been unable to find Dr. Hyde. the latter was ensconced in a private apartment of Mr. Walsh's offices. The news of the dismissal of the suit did not sit well with the attorneys for the Swope estate. There was a conference between Reed, Atwood, Maston and Paxton. It terminated at the office of Prosecutor Conknling.

It was at this juncture that Judge Ralph S. Latshaw entered the case. He went into conference with the attorneys and a quarter of an hour later declared that he would convene a special grand jury on Saturday monrning.

In the meantime Mr. Paxton had gone to Mr. Walsh's office. He said that he was sorry that he had caused the attorneys any embarrassment, but that he had a great deal of private business to attend to. He would greatly appreciate the favor of being excused until 2:30 p. m. Mr. Walsh conferred with Judge Johnson, and returning to the room, told Mr. Paxton that they would excuse him until 2:30 p. m.

Then Mr. Paxton got busy. Mr. Reed arranged for an interview with County Prosecutor Virgil Conkling. It did not take the attorneys long to arrive at a decision. This was that Mr. Paxton should swear to the information and that Prosecuting Attorney Conkling would recommend an issuance of a warrant charging Dr. Hyde with murder.

Before Prosecuting Attorney Conkling departed for Independence he called up Mr. Walsh on the telephone and asked him to have Dr. Hyde in the office of County Marshal Joel Mayes at 4 p. m. as he desired to serve a warrant on him at that time. Mr. Walsh promised to have his client there at the appointed time.

Dr. Hyde was not at the Walsh offices when this message came and caught his attorneys somewhat by surprise. They were getting ready to take the deposition of Mr. Paxton. Dr. Hyde was notifed over the telephone to come to the Walsh offices and then Mr. Cleary was given the job of finding bondsmen for Mr. Hyde. He was only a few minutes later than 4 p. m. in getting the signatures of the three businessmen to the bond which was made out in blank.

The warrant was issued at 3:30 o'clock on the application of J. G. Paxton in the office of Justice of the Peace Loar of Independence. Mr. Paxton was accompanied to the office of Justice Loar in the Jackson County Bank building by T. J. Mastin. Virgil Conkling indorsed the information. "I hereby approve of complaint and request that a warrant be issued," affixing his signature to the back of the document.

"I suggest that the bond be fixed at $25,000," said the prosecutor. "I believe that is sufficient in this case as there are certain contingencies which lead me to believe that a greater bond is not necessary." Justice Loar also was informed by the prosecutor that he could do as he pleased as to the amount of the bond, but that the state would be satisfied with that amount.

LEAVES WITH WARRANT.

Justice Loar upon the receipt of complaint at once was given another paper by Virgil Conkling which proved to be a warrant for the arrest of Dr. Hyde. In the body of the warrant the wording was identical with that in the complaint, and after being signed by the justice of the peace, who ordered it delivered to the marshal of Jackson county, the prosecutor and Attorneys Mastin and Paxton left in an automobile for Kansas City with the warrant.

Prosecutor Conkling stated that he had placed in the warrant that the preliminary examination would be held February 17.

Justice Loar stated that if the defendant waived preliminary examination he would commit him to jail, but if not he would accept the bond which it was expected Dr. Hyde would give.

Shortly before 4 p. m. Mr. Walsh and Mr. Lucas took their client to the criminal court building. Dr. Hyde was smiling. They hastened to Mr. Conkling's office where they remained until they were told that Mr. Conkling and Mr. Paxton had returned from Independence and were in the marshal's office.

Prosecutor Conkling handed the warrant to Marshal Mayes and told him Dr. Hyde would be in the office in a few minutes.

"Is your name B. Clark Hyde?" inquired Marshal Mayes of Dr. Hyde a few monents later when he was brought into the office by Attorneys Walsh and Lucas.

Dr. Hyde nodded his head in reply.

WAIVES READING WARRANT.

"I have a warrant which I am directed to serve on you. Shall I read it?" Marshal Mayes inquired.

"We waive the reading of the warrant," spoke up Attorney Walsh and the party including Dr. Hyde smiled.

Dr. Hyde and Marshal Mayes entered into a conversation on temporal subjects. The afternoon was delightful, remarked the marshal.

Prosecuting Attorney Conkling and Attorneys Walsh and Lucas drew to one side of the room.

"I have recommended that Justice Loar take a bond of $25,000 for the appearance of Dr. Hyde at the preliminary hearing which has been set for a week from today," said Mr. Conkling.

COULD MAKE IT A MILLION.

"That is satisfactory to us," replied Mr. Walsh. "Mr. Cleary is out now and will be here very shortly with a bond that will be good for a million dollars if necessary.

"That is not necessary," replied Mr. Conkling. "I have suggested a bond which I deem sufficient."

Attorneys Conkling, Walsh and Lucas then withdrew to the outer office, leaving Dr. Hyde with Marshal Mayes.

"I am very much interested in knowing what they are going to do with me next," said Dr. Hyde to Marshal Mayes.

"Do we have to go to Independence, and will I have to stay there all night?" asked Dr. Hyde.

"If your attorneys are unable to get bond for you, you will remain with me tonight. If they do get bond, you will go to Independence with me and then go on home," said Marshal Mayes.

Dr. Hyde was inclined to be almost talkative while in the marshal's office. He talked on almost any subject not pertaining to the case, and his face, for the first time during the week, was wreathed in smiles.

About 4:30 p. m. Mr. Walsh suggested that the party depart for Independence, as he expected Mr. Cleary had already started there. Assistant Prosecutor Jost accompanied the party in the Walsh automobile, representing Mr. Conkling. A moment later they were on their way to Independence.

At 5:15 o'clock a large automobile glided up to the bank building at Independence. In it was the county marshal, having in custody Dr. Hyde. Accompanying the party were Frank P. Walsh, John Cleary and John H. Lucas. They immediately went to the office of Justice Loar.

Dr. Hyde followed his lawyers closely, and as soon as he entered stepped to one side, and motioning to a newsboy, bought an evening paper, scanning the headlines. Not once did he raise his eyes, but kept them riveted on the columns which contained the latest developments in his case. After reading the full account, he turned the paper over and reread it.

MAYES SIGNS RETURN.

County Marshal Joel Mayes drew up his chair to the desk and signed the return, turning it over to the justice.

Dr. Hyde, who was standing near, found room on a window sill where he kept reading his paper, only looking up sufficiently long to buy another, which he read with as much eagerness as the first.

Frank Walsh left the court room, stating that he would be back in a short time. Upon his return he placed the bond before the justice of the peace for $50,000 instead of the $25,000 expected.

"I expected bond for $25,0000, but this is better still," said Justice Loar.

Mr. Walsh signed the document, then handed a pen to Dr. Hyde. Dr. Hyde wrote in a plain, bold hand, without a tremor, and his signature was affixed with as much indifference as if writing a prescription for a patient. After Dr. Hyde, John M. Cleary and John H. Lucas signed the bond.

LAWYERS SIGN BOND.

After this preliminary Dr. Hyde, followed by his lawyers, went to their automobile and soon were out of sight.

"This is a good bond," said Justice Loar, after the crowd had left the office. "Mr. Neal is president of the Southwest National bank, and the others I am given to understand are stockyards men. I do not expet that there will be a preliminary examination here. I am confident that it will go to the criminal court at once.

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February 2, 1910

BOY AFRAID OF AUTOS
KILLED BY BIG CAR.

Frank Smoot, 15, Crushed Under
Overturned Delivery Van --
Had Premonition of
Disaster.
Frank Smoot, Who Was Killed Under a Delivery Van.
FRANK SMOOT.

Frank Smoot, 15 years old, delivery boy for the John Taylor Dry Goods Company, was instantly killed at 7:20 o'clock last night when a new twenty-four horsepower delivery wagon in which he was riding struck a pile of bricks on Baltimore avenue between Thirty-eighth and Thirty-ninth streets and turned over, crushing him.

Frank Limpus, who was driving, works for the company which sold the car and was teaching a man to drive it.

They were just finished making deliveries and were returning when the accident happened. Limpus and J. J. Emmert, who had charge of the deliveries, were on the seat and young Smoot was seated on Emmert's lap.

"We were going north on Baltimore about six or seven miles an hour," said Limpus. "It was rather dark and we did not see the pile of bricks until we were almost upon them. I tried to pull away from them, but did not have time and our right front wheel hit with a crash. The bricks were piled about seven feet high and when the car, which weighs about 3,500 pounds, struck them the corner of the pile was torn away. The force of the collision did not stop us and the wheels on the right side ran up onto the pile until the car was overbalanced and turned over. The three of us were thrown out, young Smoot falling beneath the heavy car, the weight of which crushed his life out, almost instantly.

"It all happened so quickly that we did not realize he was hurt until Emmert and I had picked ourselves up. I saw that the boy was caught under the car and tried to remove him, but was not able to lift the car off him. A crowd of people came up and several men helped me lift the car and we pulled him out."

Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, deputy coroner, had the body removed to the Freeman & Marshall undertaking rooms.

The victim of the accident was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Smoot, 19 East Thirty-first street. Mrs. Smoot was at home preparing supper for her son when she was informed of his death.

"I knew something would happen," she said. "He did not want to go to work this morning. He is not used to automobiles and does not like to be around them. Just before he left for work he said to me, "Mamma, I expect John Taylor's will be getting air ships before long and deliver the packages with a long rope down the chimneys."

Mr. Taylor was notified of the accident and called at the undertaking rooms last night.

The dead boy had had been working for the dry goods company for the past year. He was born in Chicago, but was brought to Kansas City when he was six months old. The father of the boy runs a dress goods sample room at 406 East Eleventh street. Besides the parents, two little sisters, Addie and Edna, survive.

No one responsible for the bricks being piled in the street could be located last night, but several persons who live in the immediate neighborhood of the accident assert that no warning lights were placed.

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January 25, 1910

3 KILLED, 3 HURT
WHEN AUTO SKIDS
OVER CLIFF DRIVE.

MACHINE DROPS EIGHTY FEET
AND IS DEMOLISHED
ON ROCKS.

John Mahoney and Wife and
Thomas McGuire the
Victims.
Wrecked Automobile Plunged Over Cliff Drive.
WRECKED AUTO WHICH PLUNGED OVER EMBANKMENT ON CLIFF DRIVE, KILLING THREE.

Three persons were killed and three, who by a miraculous streak of providence escaped death, were injured yesterday afternoon when a large automobile plunged over an eighty-foot embankment on the Cliff drive, at Scarritt's Point. The dead:

John Mahoney, aged 51, grading contractor, 616 North Seventh street, Kansas City, Kas.
Mrs. John Mahoney, aged 46 years.
Thomas McGuire, 50, a foreman for Mr. Mahoney; resided at 53 South Forest avenue, Kansas City, Kas. Father of six children.

THE INJURED.

John O'Connor, 42 years old, of Fifty-first street and Swope parkway.
Miss Nellie Mahoney, 19 years old, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Mahoney.
Lillian, 6-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Mahoney.

The O'Connors also have two other children, John, age 8, and Anna, age 13, who were in school at the time of the fatal crash which claimed their parents.

The accident is ascribed to a slippery condition of the driveway, water which trickled from the cliff having frozen. The machine, in rounding the curve at Scarritt's point, evidently skidded on the ice toward the precipice at the outer edge of the drive. Mahoney, who was the contractor that had charge of the grading work on this scenic drive, was driving the car. He evidently tried to steer it toward the cliff, with the result that t he heavy rear end of the car was thrown completely around, the rear wheels crashing through a fence and over the abyss.

FORTY-FOOT DROP.

At the point where the machine went over the cliff there is a sheer descent of probably forty feet, with probably forty feet more of steep hillside ending in an accumulation of boulders. Tracks in the roadway showed where the rear wheels of the car had backed over the precipice and the entire car was precipitated upon the rocks below, alighting on its side and crushing two of the victims. The others either landed on the rocks or were caught in the wreckage.

The scene of the accident is just above and a little to the southeast of the Heim brewery and the men who witnessed the tragedy, or who were attracted by the piteous cries of the victims, rushed to the place and gave first aid to the injured. Police from No. 8 station, who were notified, carried the injured down the cliff, which owing to the slippery condition of the ground, is almost impassable even for pedestrians, placed them in the police ambulance and hurried them to hospitals. The dead were removed later to undertaking establishments, the bodies of Mr. and Mrs. Mahoney being taken to the Leo J. Stewart parlors and that of Mr. McGuire to Carroll-Davidson's.

BODIES UNDER CAR.

The scene following the tragedy was a sickening and pitiable one. the first persons to arrive found pinioned under the wreckage of the big motor car the mangled bodies of Mr. Mahoney, Mr. McGuire, Mr. O'Connor and the two girls. Mrs. Mahoney lay on the rocks at the rear of the machine unconscious, but still alive. She expired within ten minutes. Mr. Mahoney and Mr. McGuire were killed outright evidently.

The younger daughter of the Mahoneys still grasped a doll which she had carried in her arms in the machine and, gazing upon the forms of her parents as they lay still puon the frozen ground she cried piteously:

"I want my papa, I want my mamma."

It was with difficulty that she was induced to leave the spot and her childish grief brought tears to the eyes of every bystander. Miss Mahoney was dazed badly. She talked little, though seeming to partially realize what had happened, and just before she was placed in the police ambulance she was prostrated. Mr. O'Connor also was dazed, though he walked about and declared he was not hurt.

TWO SEE ACCIDENT.

Daniel Ferhnback, 19 years old, of 28 Bigelow street, just below Scarritt's Point, with Thomas Nelligan, 10 years old, were eye-witnesses to the accident. Ferhnback was chopping wood in his yard and the Nelligan boy was with him when they glanced up and saw the machine go over the brink of the hill.

"It was terrible," said Ferhnback. "The rear end went over first and the whole thing fell down into the hollow. It was done so quickly I hardly knew what had happened, but it seemed to me that the machine partly turned over. The noise sounded like a bunch of sewer pipe falling and hitting something."

For a moment, Ferhnback said, he scarcely knew what to do. Then he heard a cry, "O, God! O, God! " It was Mr. O'Connor pinioned under the car.

Ferhnback and his boy companion at once started up the hill but Nelligan, being more nimble, arrived at the top first. The boy took one look at the mass of twisted iron and wood and at the blood covered bodies under and about the machine and he ran back the winding path to where Ferhnback was hurrying up.

"It's awful," said the boy, covering his face with his hands as if to shut out the sight.

CRASH IS HEARD.

About the time that Ferhnback and Nelligan were horrified to see the machine plunge over the cliff, M. G. Givson, of 2026 Charlotte street, was walking along the Chicago & Alton tracks, far below the Cliff drive. He hears a crash but paid no attention to it and was startled by the screams of a woman, evidently one of the Mahoney sisters. He also rushed up the hill, arriving about the time that Ferhnback reached the top.

Mr. Gibson picked up the little Mahoney child and bandaged her head with handkerchiefs. Mrs. Mahoney lay free of the car, and Mr. Gibson said that she still breathed when he arrived. He took one of the cushions which had been hurled from the automobile and placed it under the woman's head, but within ten minutes she was dead.

Miss Nellie Mahoney was carried to one side by the two men, who made her as comfortable as possible. Mr. O'Connor lay with one leg pinioned under a rear wheel of the car, a short distance from the body of Mrs. Mahoney. Mr. Gibson and Mr. Ferhnback managed to lift the rear portion of the car enough to extricate the man and Mr. O'Connor immediately got up and walked about, declaring that he had no pain and that he was all right.

POLICE NOTIFIED.

The accident happened at 3:15 o'clock. It was not so very many minutes later that Mr. Gibson, having done everything he could to help the injured, ran to No. 8 police station, 3001 Guinotte street. Sergeant Edward McNamara, Patrolman Gus Metzinger and Motorcycleman George A. Lyon responded at once. They were joined later by Park Policeman W. F. Beabout and the police carried the two Mahoney girls and assisted Mr. O'Connor down the cliff to the ambulance.

Coroner B. H. Zwart went in peerson to view the bodies, and he summoned undertakers. It was 5 o'clock before the bodies finally were removed, the conditions in the vicinity of the scene of the horror making it difficult to carry the bodies out.

Even the coroner, accustomed as he is to such things, was moved at the horror of the scene. Mr. Mahoney lay crushed under the car and a piece of the spokes of the machine was found to have penetrated his adbomen.

The Point, which is the highest on the Cliff drive, lies under the shadow of the north side of the cliff. the sun does not strike there, save during a small portion of the day, and water which runs down the hill is frozen, as it trickles across the roadway, into a mass of treacherous ice, making it difficult for motor cars without ice clutches to round the curve at that point without skidding.

Mr. Mahoney, who was driving the machine, sat in the front seat with Mr. McGuire, and the others sat in the rear seat. The car was a seven-passenger Pierce-Arrow. The tracks in the driveway show that the machine came round the curve well within the middle of the roadway and away from the precipice. It is probable that Mahoney had noticed the slippery condition of the pavement and purposely kept away from the brink.

When the fatal stretch of ice was reached, however, the auto was shown to have skidded greatly toward the chasm and the theory is that Mahoney, in order to avoid the very thing which happened, headed his car toward the inside of the road. If he did, he miscalculated terribly, for this swung the heavy rear of the car around over the edge of the cliff and the ill-fated occupants were hurled down up the rocks. The wooden fence, through wh ich the auto smashed, was erected as a warning to daring motorists. It went out as if made of egg shell.

That the machine did not take fire and add to the horror is believed to have been due to a final effort of Mr. Mahoney. the engine was found to have been shut down entirely, and it is believed that Mr. Mahoney automatically pulled his lever as the machine shot backward over the precipice.

At the emergency hospital, whither the two Mahoney girls and Mr. O'Connor were removed, it was stated last evening that Mr. O'Connor's case is the least serious of any of the injured. He sustained a wound on the back of his head and some bruises. He probably will recover.

After being removed to the hospital, little Lillian Mahoney lapsed into a coma and Miss Nellie Mahoney became hysterical. It was stated that neither of the girls knew that their parents are dead. It was feared neither could stand the shock.

The condition of both the girls is regarded as serious. Miss Nellie sustained a dislocation of one of the shoulders, a fracture of the right arm and bruises about the body.

The younger girl received a bad cut about the back of the head and bruises about the body. Both girls are suffering terribly from nervous shock, and this is what makes their cases so grave.

It was said at St. Margaret's hospital at midnight that Lillian Mahoney is probably fatally injured. The child is under the effects of opiates. It is belived her skull is fractured.

BUILT THE DRIVEWAY.

Mr. Mahoney executed the grading work on the very driveway where he, with his wife, met death. It is said that he was familiar with every foot of the ground along the roadway and that because of the pride which he took in the work he particularly liked taking a spin in his machine along the course.

John Mahoney, One of the Victims of the Cliff Drive Motor Car Accident.
JOHN MAHONEY.

The ill-fated machine was purchased by Mr. Mahoney from the estate of Mrs. Mary S. Dickerson, who died. It is said that Mr. Mahoney paid $3,500 for the car.

FRIENDS SHOW SYMPATHY.

A telegram telling of the death of Mr. Mahoney was dispatched late last night to his old schoolmate and business partner, Justice Michael Ross, who is now visiting in Jacksonville, Fla. Mrs. Ross went to the residence of the dead contractor last night and arranged to take charge of the children.

"My husband and Mr. mahoney were lifelong friends. I know if Michael were here he would want me to take care of the children and and give them a temporary or even a permanent home," Mrs. Ross said.

Annie and Johnny Mahoney heard about the catastrophe at 4:30 o'clock in the afternoon. They were overwhelmed with grief.

CHILD PREDICTED ACCIDENT.

"Oh, I told papa not to buy that auto. I told him all along it would lead to some accident," sobbed the girl.

The boy, four years younger, soon quieted himself and began to assure his sister. The children were taken last night to the Ross home, where they may stay permanently.

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January 18, 1910

"HONK! HONK!" IS
THIS WEEK'S TUNE.

CONVENTION HALL IN THROES
OF FIRST AUTOMOBILE
SHOW OF THE 1910 SEASON.

Thousands Surged Through
Great Hall -- Beautiful
Decorations a Feature.

"There was a sound of honking by night and bright the lights shone on fair women and brave men" -- slightly to modify a well-spouted quotation. All the "fuss" was over the opening in Convention hall last night of the automobile show given their this week under the auspices of the Motor Car Trade association and never was the debut of such an enterprise more signally successful.

Miracles of order had been wrought out of the chaos which prevailed in the big hall yesterday morning. By the time the doors were thrown open to the general public at 6 o'clock yesterday evening the hall had been transformed from a wilderness of glittering confusion into a most charming garden of exhibits, with trim paths winding in and but a green hedge dividing the big arena floor into two sections.

Overhead the "sky" was a beautiful canopy of blue and white bunting while the horizon was one of the most novel decorative effects ever seen at a Kansas City automobile show. It consisted of a huge panel running entirely around the hall and composed of heroic reproductions of Western paintings by the late Frederic Remington, a most tasteful and effective emphasis of the fact that this is a western event and that Kansas City is the "center, hub and core" of all the expanse of territory made famous by the gifted brush of the artist who "should have died hereafter."

"But the people! A, the people!" as another lamented American remarked. They were part of the show, and not the least interesting part. They came by the thousand and they swarmed, literally swarmed, all over the huge building, which seemed "cablined and confined" under the stress of their seemingly endless numbers.

Never were there such crowds at such a function in this city. If the spirits of the horses that were wont to attract other thousands of enthusiasts in days gone by were privileged to look down on that spectacle, they would not have been in the mood for any "horse laughs." Their occupation's gone. At least, their friends were not in evidence last night, for those interested throngs had gathered to worship at the shrine of the limousine and the coupe, the runabout and the chassis, the town car and the tourabout, even the elephantine commercial trucks.

No, it was not a horse crowd that filled Convention hall last night and if there were any horses in the vicinity they were the patient draught animals outside in the alley that had hauled accessories, exhibits and other loads of material to make up the "side lines" at the big show. That was "rubbing it in" just a little, and the more sensitive of the horses might have been pardoned for imagining that there was a note of derision in the occasional "honk! honk" t hat resounded throughout the hall.

AN IMPRESSIVE SCENE.

It was really an impressive scene that greets the spectator as he enters the arena at the southern end of Convention hall. Far at the other end of the hall he sees, in a delightful perceptive, a fairy grotto rising in tiers seemingly to the roof. That beautiful feature is the Japanese tea garden, one of the most effective pictures in the whole show so far as decorativeness is concerned. Above the spectator's head he hears the inspiring music of the Berry Military band.

By the time the spectator has taken in the general effect, he is ready for details. As he threads his way amid this orderly maze of about 175 cars of forty different makes, he realizes to some degree at least the extent of the automobile industry, the reason for the firm grip which the "buzz wagons" has on the pocketbooks of the people of the United States -- and why Kansas City sold something like $10,000,000 worth of automobiles last year.

The green hedge divides the central space of the arena into two sections, taken up with the exhibits of six local agencies. A wide walk runs entirely around this central space and between this walk and the arena boxes are other spaces filled with immense varied and complete exhibits, beginning with the Studebaker lines at the right, next to the arena entrance and ending with the big Ford display on the left, after the circuit of the hall has been completed, during which the exhaustive displays of Maxwells, Marmons, Reos, Detroit electrics, Hupmobiles, Regals, Mitchells, Stoddard-Daytons and other lines carried by the McGee-Huckell Company have been included.

IN THE ARCADE.

While the interior decorations this year are more cleverly done than ever before, the other parts of the hall have not been overlooked. As there are automobiles, touring cars, runabouts, electrics, and trucks on every inch of available floor space, pretty decorations have to go with them.

The entire arcade is crowded with displays and some of the best exhibits of the entire show have been placed here, for the arena floor is by no means all there is to Convention hall for exhibition purposes. The big Columbus-Firestone, Standard Six and Hupmobile exhibits are in this section of the building. Every nook and cranny of the balcony is taken up with accessories exhibits and it will require more than one visit to exhaust the treasures of this big carnival of automobiles.

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January 18, 1910

NEARLY WRECKS STORE.

Horse Smashes Through Plate Glass
Window and Damages Stock.

Frightened by a passing automobile, a blind horse attached to the market wagon of Maurice Abramovitz, a vegetable peddler, stampeded and did $300 worth of damage to J. E. Biles' shoe store at 21 East Fifth street, yesterday morning. The horse freed itself from the shafts of the wagon and broke through a $150 plate glass window into the store and badly damaged the stock.

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December 26, 1909

BEST OATS BRING
BIG HORSE LAUGH.

NEW MEANING GIVEN PHRASE
AT CHRISTMAS FEED FOR
POOR "COBS" AT HALL.

Rules Given Masters and "Black
Beauty" Books Also Distri-
buted by Humane Society.

A new meaning was given yesterday to the "horse laugh." From 1,000 to 1,500 horses in Kansas City not accustomed to a square meal stood in their stalls, free from work and protected from the weather, and munched full portions of the best oats the market affords.

And these horses laughed. It was Christmas day and they were enjoying a Christmas celebration planned especially for them.

The "feed' for poor work horses was given by the Kansas City Humane society as the result of a plan evolved by Mrs. E. D. Hornbrook and Mrs. E. H. Robinson, members of the board of the society.

For the purpose of carrying joy to the hearts of the poor animals which struggle under burdens on the streets of Kansas City every day and which are indifferently fed and kept, largely because of the poverty of their owners, the Humane society purchased a half dozen tons of the best white oats and did the grain up in five and ten pound sacks, giving out these packages to owners of horses whose cases had been investigated by the society and to whom tickets previously had been given.

THOUSAND TICKETS.

About 1,000 of these tickets were given out and sacks of the grain were also given to others who had not received tickets. Provision was also made for still other cases and an automobile furnished by the Kansas City Rapid Motor Transfer company will take "feeds" to the cases which were reported too late to be cared for as were the others.

It was at Convention hall that the Christmas dinners for the poor horses were given out and the committee in charge of the distribution was composed of Mrs. F. D. Hornbrook, J. W. Perkins and E. R. Weeks, president of the Humane Society.

The sacks containing the oats were placed on long tables and when horse owners applied for the "feeds" they were required to present their tickets, give their names and the names of their horses. They were then given the sacks of feed, a tag which they promised to read and a copy of "Black Beauty." Where owners had sick horses they were also given blankets for the disabled animals.

RULES FOR MASTERS.

The tag which each owner promised to read contained this "horse" talk:
"What is good for your horse is good for his master.
Your horse needs good care as well as good food.
Never work your horse when he will not eat.
Water your horse often. Water should always be given fifteen minutes before feeding grain.
Daily grooming will improve the health as well as the looks of your horse.
Give your horses rock salt, and head shelter from the heat.
Economize by feeding good oats and good hay.
Good drivers are quiet, patient and kind, and have little use for a whip..." and so on.

EXAMPLE IS SET.

"This horse dinner means a great deal more than most people think," said Mrs. Hornbrook. "It is intended to show the horse owners that their animals must be cared for and to set an example for them to follow. Some of the papers have made a humorous affair out of it, when it is anything but humorous and has a most humane object.

"It is not intended simply to fill the empty stomach of some poor animal for the time being," said Mr. Weeks, "but is to create a kindly sentiment for dumb animals. We show the horse owners what a sample meal is and that is something some of them know very little about. The ten pounds of oats we give them is a double portion of a standard feed. The owners of all the big fine animals we see hitched to drays on the streets feed their horses five pounds of the best oats at a meal. Along with the oats we give out, we also give the horse owners a copy of 'Black Beauty' and the tag containing advice about the care of horses an d we hope your Christmas dinner for the horses will do good."

To many horse owners, who called for feed at Convention hall between 9 a. m. and 6 p. m., Mr. Weeks, Mrs. Hornbrook and other workers agents of the Humane Society gave good advice. Some of the callers were persons with whom agents of the society had come in contact in their work and there were scores of promises, such as "well, we'll take better care of our horses from now on."

Posted about the corridor in Convention hall yesterday, were copies of new cards issued by the Humane society. They read, "Be kind to your horse. Do not forget his water, feed and shelter."

Christmas day was the most notable day for the poor work horse in the history of Kansas City. No wonder a new meaning was given to the slang expression, a "horse laugh."

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December 19, 1909

COP'S SPEED LIMIT IS WALK.

Threatens to Arrest Autoists, They
Say, If Machine Goes Faster.

Formal protest was made last evening by Mrs. Victor Bell and her son, Dr. Charles Bell, to A. J. Dean, president of the park board, alleging that park policeman No. 14 on Cliff drive was unduly harsh yesterday afternoon in threatening them with arrest if their automobile was driven faster than he could walk on the Cliff drive. Mr. Dean will take up the matter at the next meeting of the park board.

Mrs. Bell and her sons, Dr. Charles Bell and Harold Bell, were halted in their big 60-horse landaulet in about the middle of Cliff drive. They were taking their usual afternoon ride when park policeman No. 14 shouted to them to halt. The chauffeur stopped.

"We were traveling very slowly," said Dr. Bell, who lives at the Hotel Baltimore, last evening, "when the policeman stopped us. At first we were threatened with arrest. Then we were told we might proceed, but that if the policeman ever caught us driving faster than he could walk that he would arrest us without further notice. We objected to this threat because a man's walk is certainly too slow a pace for an automobile. Our driver is familiar with the speed laws. Yesterday the driver took extra precautions because of the ice and snow. This in itself is sufficient for any driver to remain well within the speed limit. I know that we were not running faster than we do in Petticoat Lane.

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December 4, 1909

INDIAN WIDOW WANTS AUTO.

Guardian Refuses to Buy One, So
She Used a Hired Machine.

"Just wait until my 'guardy' gets back to Pawhuska, and I will be willing to make a wager that he allows me the money to get a machine," said Mrs. Blanche Keeler, the pretty Indian widow who, though very wealthy, has been denied an automobile because Eugene Scott, trustee of her estate, thinks that it would be extravagance for her to have it.

"I could not have used one of my own any oftener than I have a hired one since last Saturday, when I arrived here," said Mrs. Keeler, "so I guess if I come up to Kansas City often enough I could do without one of my own.

"I want an auto for my home in Pawhuska, and I am going to have it. Mr. Scott will come around to my way of thinking. I just know that he will, for it won't be a bit extravagant for me to own a machine, and it will be of much benefit to my health. The ponies and horses are all right, but I want action, something faster than horse-flesh."

With three big trunks packed to their capacity with pictures, new clothes, music and books, Mrs. Keeler departed early this morning for her home in Oklahoma.

"I did not get what I wanted, an auto, but I am taking back with me all the pretty things I fancied while here," said Mrs. Keeler at the Hotel Victoria last night.

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November 21, 1909

BOYS RUN DOWN BY
FIRE AUTOMOBILE.

CHARLES COLE, 12 YEARS OLD,
MAY DIE OF INJURIES.

Two Kansas City, Kas., Lads, Coast-
ing, Collided With Machine
While Latter Is on
Test Run.
Earl Sheirel, Injured in Collision With Fire Automobile.
EARL SHEIREL.

Charles Cole and Earl Sheirel, aged 12 and 13 years, were run down yesterday by a combination hose and chemical fire automobile at Armstrong avenue and Seventeenth street in Kansas City, Kas., and received injuries which may result fatally in the case of the little Cole boy. The boys were seated on a small coasting wagon, riding north on Seventeenth street, which has a gradual slope for several blocks. The fire automobile, which has recently been undergoing tests in Kansas City, Kas., with the prospect of being purchased by the city, was going the same direction, being driven by S. O. Harpster. Stories of the collision which occurred between Ann and Armstrong avenues, differ. The Cole boy was seated on the rear of the little wagon and the heavy fire wagon passed entirely over his body, rolling along the asphalt pavement. The Sheirel boy was thrown to one side and a wheel of the wagon crushed a thumb on the right hand.

Following the accident the occupants of the motor wagon picked up the unconscious boy and removed him to the home of his father, J. B. Cole, 1604 Minnesota avenue. The Sheirel boy, who lives at 1606 Minnesota avenue, refused to ride in the wagon, and walked to his home, where he was treated by Dr. W. H. McLeod.

S. O. Harpster, a representative of the Anderson Coupling and Fire Supply Company, A. Zertman, of the Zertman-Tiller Motor Car Company, and a Mr. Lamb, of Bowling Green, Ohio, the occupants of the car stated that they were in no way to blame for the accident.

Charles Cole, Whose Injuries May Be Fatal.
CHARLIE COLE.

"We were several blocks behind the boys when we first saw them," said Mr. Harpster. "I had intended to turn east on Armstrong avenue and had the car going about five miles an hour and under perfect control. We were ringing the bell constantly. When we neared the boys I started to pass them on the right side. They turned to the right and then when I turned to the left they appeared to become confused and as we started to pass they ran into us. I stopped within a car length of where we struck the boys."

This version of the accident differs materially from that told by eye witnesses to the accident. Mrs. R. Carpenter of 1619 Armstrong avenue said yesterday that the automobile was traveling at a high rate of speed.

"I tried to warn the boys, but the rattle of their wagon drowned my voice," she said. "It seemed to me that the automobile just ran right into them. The car ran at least 100 feet beyond the place where the boys were struck before it was stopped. The little coasting wagon was broken into small pieces."

A number of laborers who were working near the scene of the accident examined the tracks of the car and the little wagon, and they stated yesterday that the coasting wagon was within eight feet of the left-hand curbing when it was struck.

Dr. W. R. Palmer, who attended the injured boy, stated last night that his condition was serious. He sustained a broken collar bone, a possible concussion of the brain and severe cuts and bruises over his head and body. One particularly painful bruise is over the spine. J. B. Cole, father of the injured boy, is bailiff of the Wyandotte county court.

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November 21, 1909

BOY JUMPS OFF CAR;
KILLED BY AUTO.

NOT THE HOPPING KIND, JUST
PLAYING, COMPANION SAYS.

Edgar Palin, Aged 12, Dies in Hos-
pital From Injuries Received in
Alighting in Path of Machine
Giving Children Ride.
Edgar Palin, 12-year-old Killed by Automobile.
EDGAR PALIN,
Twelve-Year-Old Boy Who Leaped from Street Car Fender and Was Mortally Injured by Automobile.

As Edgar Palin, 12 years old, 2802 East Sixth street, jumped from the back fender of an eastbound Independence avenue car yesterday afternoon at Prospect avenue, he was run over and fatally injured by a motor car driven by E. T. Curtis, 3338 Wyandotte street. He died at 7 o'clock last night at the German hospital, without recovering consciousness.

With Allen Compton, 400 Wabash avenue, the boy had been playing all afternoon. About 3 o'clock the two lads started northward on Wabash avenue, and at Independence avenue both noticed an approaching street car.

"Let's catch the fender," called Edgar, as he waited along the curbing. The car was moving at moderate speed and the boy ran behind, and caught hold of the fender. His companion, 10 years old, ran behind on the sidewalk. At Prospect avenue Edgar, without looking around, jumped from the fender directly in front of an approaching auto, barely fifteen feet behind him. Curtis attempted to dodge the boy. The left fender of the auto struck the child and he was sent tumbling on the pavement. He was picked up by Curtis. Several children were in the auto. With Curtis was Herman Smith, of 3606 Olive street, whose father owned the car. In a nearby drug store it was found the boy had been injured seriously.

GIVING CHILDREN RIDE.

"I was driving at about fifteen miles an hour," Curtis said. "The auto belonged to young Smith's father and I was running it because I had the most experience. A party of school children were with us. We were taking them for a ride around the block. I noticed the child on the fender and did not have the least idea that he was going to run in my path. I swerved to one side, but the machine skidded and the fender of the auto struck him in the back. I realized at once that he had received a fearful blow."

After the child was given emergency treatment in the drug store by two neighboring physicians, he was taken to his home in the motor car, and after being attended by Dr. Max Goldman, was removed to the German hospital. Dr. Goldman found that the boy's spine was broken and that his skull was probably fractured.

Allen Compton, his playmate, was in a condition bordering on hysterics last night. The two had been gathering old papers during the forenoon and had just been to the paper mill, where they had received a few pennies with which they intended to buy Christmas presents.

"Edgar wasn't no car hopper," Allen said last night, in defense of his friend. "He was just running behind and holding on to the fender. Edgar wasn't that kind."

With Judge J. E. Guinotte, a friend of the family, young Curtis went to police headquarters last night and made a statement to Captain Walter Whitsett. After consulting Virgil Conkling, prosecuting attorney, it was decided not to hold him. He promised to come to the prosecutor's office Monday and make a complete statement. He said that he had been running a car for eight years. He is the son of W. E. Curtis, a live stock commission man.

The injured boy was the son of W. M. Palin, a real estate dealer in the Commerce building. The body will be taken to Gridley, Kas., for burial.

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November 10, 1909

PLEASURE TRIP AUTO BURNS.

Miss McCourt, McPherson, Kas., and
Friends Return on Street Car.

A pleasure trip came to an abrupt end for Miss Gertrude McCourt and party of friends who were riding in an Oldsmobile touring car late Monday night, when the car caught fire and was five miles south of Rosedale. Miss McCourt, who lives in McPherson, Kas., refused yesterday to give the identity of her friends.

"I want to spare them the publicity," she said. "The engine simply went dead and when I got out to crank it, some gasoline caught fire and in a moment everything was a blaze. We came to the city on the electric line and abandoned the ruined machine.

G. L. McCourt, the father of the young woman, died several years ago. He at one time represented McPherson county in the legislature.

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November 6, 1909

'RED MILL' KIDDIES 'STOLEN.'

Loaded Into Auto and Taken to Ban-
quet at the Elks' Club.

When the "Red Mill" company, which is to play at the Grand next week, came through Kansas City on its way to Leavenworth at 9 o'clock yesterday morning, seven of its members, consisting of the six children who appear as the Dutch kiddies and Jocko, the monkey, who has a place on the programme, were kidnaped for a few hours, loaded into the automobile of City Treasurer William Baehr, which was in waiting, and transported to the Elks' Club. There a breakfast was served, a separate table being provided for the monk. After breakfast the little show folk were shown the sights of the city.

The "Red Mill" company played at the Soldiers' home last night and the kiddies were there in time for the performance. The feature of their day's outing was a ride to Leavenworth in the motor car.

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October 27, 1909

TO LANSING FOR SAFE KEEPING.

M'MAHON BROTHERS, PATRICK LAMB
ESCORTED IN AUTOMOBILES.

Bum Tire Delays Journey; Mc-
Mahon "Guesses" He Is
Sorry.

Even before James McMahon's confession that he alone killed his two sisters and brother-in-law, Sheriff Al Becker had concluded that it would be best not to keep the prisoners, McMahon and his brother, Patrick, and Patrick Lamb, an employe at the McMahon farm, in Kansas City , Kas., over night and arrangements were made to take them to the penitentiary in Lansing. Telephone messages were coming into the sheriff's office informing him that there was much bitterness expressed in the vicinity of the McMahon and Van Royen homes and that a lynching was being planned.

Acting upon this advice the sheriff deemed it well to remove the prisoners at once, so that when Patrick McMahon had completed his confession to Taggart, the brothers and Patrick Lamb, together with officers and reporters, started for Lansing.

In an automobile with Patrick and James McMahon were Sheriff Becker, Under Sheriff Brady and Deputy Sheriff Brady. Patrick Lamb rode in another car with Deptuy Sheriffs Charles Lukens, U. S. G. Snyder, Harley Gunning, William McMullen and Clyde Sartin. In two other motor cars were newspaper reporters.

Never in all his life, probably, had James McMahon contemplated such a tour as he was then making. Every officer was well armed, and there was anxiety on the part of the sheriff, who did not know to what extent the movement to lynch the prisoners had progressed. The party drove out State street as far as Ninth street, then wheeled into Minnesota avenue and connected with the Reidy road.

The journey was continued on this road to a point where a cross-road offers an outlet to the Parallel road. If the junction of the Reidy road and the cross-road could be passed safely the officers felt confident that they would not meet violence.

PATRICK QUIET AND SULLEN.

Farmers in wagons and buggies lined the thoroughfare, and while the prisoners were peered at curiously, there was no demonstration. That everybody along the route knew of the apprehension of the McMahons was evident.

Riding with the sheriff and under sheriff, James McMahon appeared nervous during the first stages of the ride, but Patrick McMahon sat at his side, quiet and sullen, and seemingly totally oblivious to his surroundings.

At the junction there was not a person in sight when the motor car party arrived and, turning into the road, the machines were speeded rapidly to the main thoroughfare that led directly to Lansing. Near Bethel, Kas., the machine in which the McMahons were riding punctured a tire and the entire party got out and watched the chauffeur make the repairs.

During this interim, James McMahon, who was now feeling safe from a mob attack, appeared more cheerful and talked willingly to those about him. Again and again he said that he could give no reason for his crime and again and again he described it. He seemed unconcerned regarding his strange situation.

"GUESSES" HE IS SORRY.

"Guess you know this country pretty well, don't you, Jim?"

"I've walked over every foot of it," said the prisoner. "And I guess I won't walk over it any more."

"How do you feel by this time?"

"All right, all right, I'm glad I confessed."

"Sure that no one else was implicated in this affair?"

"No one else; Pat ain't guilty of anything," said Jim. "I did the whole thing."

"Are you sorry?

"I guess I am.

"Did you think they were going to catch you any time last week?"

"No, I didn't get afraid until this morning, then I knew the jig was up."

"How have you been at night? Did you sleep?"

"Yes, I slept all right; sometimes I got nervous."

"Didn't you get kind o' creepy when you walked about the Van Royen house?"

"No, not much."

"How about this man you said you saw talking to Van Royen on that Tuesday morning?"

"O, that was a lie."

"And about seeing Rosie when you were going to the pasture to milk the cows?"

"That was a lie, too," said James.

As he answered these questions the prisoner chewed tobacco at a furious pace. His lips were covered with the stains of the weed.

The repairs on the tire completed, the journey was resumed. At a point about fourteen miles from Leavenworth the same tire broke again, and there was another delay.

NEVER IN AN ASYLUM.

"We're outside Wyandotte county now, ain't we," said Jim, as he stepped to the ground the second time.

"Yes."

"Well, I feel safer now. There won't be any feeling over in this county."

"Were you ever in an insane asylum, Jim?" someone asked.

"No, but I guess I ought to have been."

"Ever have any insane fits or anything like that?"

"Not that I know of."

For a second time the obstreperous tire on Henry Zimmer's automobile was repaired and another start made, but in a few minutes the rim of the wheel rolled off. Then Zimmer tore off all the wheel fixings and the machine carrying the McMahons, rolled into Lansing limping on one side.

At the penitentiary Sheriff Becker and his prisoners were received by Warden J. K. Codding, who said that while the prison officials were willing to keep the men they would have to be willing.

"DON'T KNOW WHY I DID IT."

"We're willing," said Jim. "I'd rather be here than in Wyandotte."

"What do you think about it?" Patrick McMahon was asked.

"I guess this is the better place for tonight, anyhow," said Patrick.

Henry Zimmer offered to take Pat Lamb back with him, but the latter, at first willing, later decided that he would remain at the prison.

"I don't know what they're thinking down there," said Lamb, "so I'll just stay here for a few days."

The party remained in the warden's office fully a half hour, and during all that time Patrick McMahon spoke scarcely a word. When spoken to he answered, but his answers were brief. Jim McMahon, apparently not badly frightened, apparently not greatly concerned, sat in one of the warden's easy chairs and answered all questions put to him. The substance of all his answers were:

"I killed them, and I don't know why I did it."

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October 17, 1909

"JOY RIDER" NOW SORRY.

Didn't Anticipate Arrest for Giving
Another's Name to Auto Firm.

Representing himself as a Grand avenue furniture dealer, a man who yesterday told the police that his name is Charles E. Lach, engaged a motor car from the Royal Auto Company Friday night. After running up a bill of $67.50 he returned the auto and told the company to send up the bill "any time." Naturally the furniture dealer remonstrated yesterday when the bill was presented and then the police were notified. The "joy rider" was discovered and locked in a cell at police headquarters.

"I have always wanted to entertain my friends in a lavish fashion," he told the officers. "You see I'm a stranger in the city and after looking through the city directory to see if there was any one by the name of 'Lach.' Sure enough, I noticed the furniture dealer and decided to place the expenses of a motor trip on him. I didn't anticipate any such result, however, and I'm heartily sorry that I took such a notion."

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October 14, 1909

GREAT CROWD SEES
TWO NEAR ACCIDENTS.

MULES DASH FOR GATE OPENED
BY MISTAKE.

Women Avert Collision in Chariot
Race and Are Applauded --
Horses and Poultry Draw
the Most Attention.
American Royal Livestock Show of 1909.

The rise in the temperature, combined with a cloudless sky during the better portion of the day aided materially in increasing the crowd attending the American Royal Live Stock show and a conservative estimate yesterday placed the paid admissions at about 14,000. There was, by far, more congestion than on either of the previous days, and in some of the exhibitions it was difficult to move around without elbowing someone out of the way. The crowd was made up largely of visitors from the small neighboring towns, though there was a number of country people and a goodly sprinkling of city folk in the throng.

The horses and poultry continued to be the mecca for the crowds and the barns in which they were exhibited were crowded all day. The cattle and swine also came in for a good share of attention, and, in fact, there was nothing on the grounds that was not visited by a fair portion of the visitors.

CHAMPION IS SHOWN.

The usual exhibition and parade was given in the pavilion during the afternoon. In addition to the Morris six, the Anheuser-Busch mules and the Clark ponies, Casino, the undefeated world's champion Percheron, was shown in the parade, together with $3,000 worth of medals which he has won in various parts of the world.

Two accidents were narrowly averted in the arena. The first came when, through a mistake, some one opened the upper gate while the Anheuser-Busch mules were being exhibited. The animals thought it was for them to go through and they swerved toward it. The crowd beyond the gate made a rush to get out of the way but the driver, by a quick manipulation of the reins, managed to turn the leaders back into the arena and no damage was done.

The second came in the chariot race in which Mrs. Georgia Phillips and Miss Fra Clark participated. At the second dash around, while the ponies were going at top speed, Miss Clark failed to make her turn short enough and the pole of her chariot almost crushed into the one occupied by Mrs. Phillips. Quick driving on the part of the women prevented an accident and the race was finished amid a storm of applause.

BARKERS OUT IN FORCE.

The barkers were out in full force yesterday, much to the delight of the rural housewife. There were apple parers that could be utilized in a hundred different ways, can openers, milk skimmers, knife sharpeners, and in fact, all descriptions of household gimeracks which could be purchased from ten cents to a quarter, and nearly every farmer's wife availed herself of one or more of the implements.

The candy paddle wheel man was also in evidence, and he did a rushing business. The feature which appealed largely to the country brethren, though, was a hill-climbing automobile demonstration. A runway sixteen feet long, built on a 50 per cent grade, was erected and the car, in charge of a competent chauffeur, would, like the French general, go up the hill and down again. There was no charge for riding and many a love-lorn swain and his sweetheart from the rural districts enjoyed their first auto ride.

HOT SOUP AND COFFEE.

From a financial standpoint the women of the Jackson Avenue Christian church have the very best proposition on the grounds. They are operating a lunch stand where hot soup and coffee, together with other edibles, can be obtained on short notice at a moderate sum. The place is crowed all the time, as the air chilled one in the barn and the soup and coffee are used to "heat up." Of course there are some who do not heat up on soup and coffee, but they seem to be in the minority, and the church women reap a harvest, between those getting warm and those really hungry.

The Kellerstrass farm of Kansas City, which has a large exhibit in the poultry barn, after the first of the year will add a new industry to its line, that of raising fancy pheasants. The farm has been experimenting along that line for some time and the past year raised 700 pheasants. This decided them that it could be done successfully, and after January pheasants will be listed in the Kellerstrass catalogue. The birds will be sold only to fanciers.

STALLS ARE DECORATED.

Many of the owners in the horse barn have decorated in a most handsome manner, the stalls allotted to them. Among these are the McLaughlin and Robinson exhibits. They have their stalls in white, green and yellow bunting, together with the cups, ribbons and other trophies, won by their animals, over the stall occupied by the horse which won them. The effect adds beauty to the barn and is quite pleasing to the visitors.

The sale of Herefords in the Fine Stock Sale Pavilion yesterday was attended largely. It began at 2 o'clock and continued until 5:30 at which hour fifty head had been disposed of at fairly good figures.

The highest price of the afternoon, $800, was paid by J. P. Cudahy of Kansas City to W. S. Van Natta of Fowler, Ind., for the bull Pine Lad 38th. The animal has one prizes all over the country and is an exceptionally fine specimen. The average price of the day was $166 1/2, which is $15 less that the average prices realized at the sale last year.

There will be a sale of Galloways in the sale pavilion today, while in the show proper the judging of sheep will be started and several classes will be finished up.

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October 13, 1909

BULL TACKLES MOTOR CAR.

Animal Takes the Count While Auto
Is Uninjured.

Leading behind his wagon a fine bull which he had purchased at the stock sale at the yards yesterday afternoon, G. W. Mercer of Independence was slowly toiling up the Allen avenue viaduct when a big motor car of the unfortunate color of red attempted to pass the cavalcade.

As soon as his bovineship caught sight of the carmine car there was a vigorous shaking of the head, a kicking of the heels. In his frantic efforts to get at the strange and wonderful thing, the bull got in the path of the car. There was immediately a mixup of auto, bull and wagon.

When the dust cleared away the bull was found to be down on his back, badly tangled up in the wheels of the wagon. The motor car was uninjured. Mr. Mercer reported to the police that he would prosecute the driver.

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October 7, 1909

DR. COOK WILL DISCOVER
KANSAS CITY TODAY.

En Route from St. Louis for Lecture
at Convention Hall.
Dr. Frederick A. Cook.
MONTGOMERY, MO., Oct. 7. -- Dr. Frederick A. Cook, now on the Wabash train on his way to Kansas City, sends this message: "Say to the people of Kansas City that I appreciate their attitude and fair treatment of the polar problem."

Kansas City will be told all about the North Pole tonight in Convention hall by Dr. Frederick A. Cook, the first man to reach the top of the earth. Dr. Cook will arrive at 7:30 o'clock this morning in a private car over the Wabash. He comes from St. Louis, where he lectured last night.

The Kansas City welcome will consist of automobile rides and banquets. He will be met at the Baltimore hotel this morning by city officials and their wives. They will all shake hands and get acquainted. Dr. Cook is accompanied by his wife and two daughters. The women in the party have been detailed to show them a good time. The officials will devote their time to the hero.

The Cooks will be taken for an automobile ride. The course will follow the boulevard system through the city, and the visitors will be shown the city parks. The ride will end at the Country Club.

Here the women in the party will be left behind. Mrs. Cook and her daughters will be entertained by committees of Kansas City women. The directors and their guests will be driven to the Evanston Club. Here the men will get better acquainted with their noted guest.

While in St. Louis more than 10,000 persons packed the Coliseum as Dr. Cook narrated the horrors and tortures of his dash to the North Pole to his breathless audience.

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October 6, 1909

FOR PETTICOAT LANE
8 MILES IS TOO FAST.

Too Slow for Boulevards,
Auto Dealers Say.

"It is a crime to run a machine down Petticoat Lane at eight milees an hour," declared Harry E. Rooklidge, president of the Automobile Dealers' Association, at their dinner yesterday at the Hotel Kupper. "It is far more dangerous to run a machine at even six miles an hour on this particular street than it is to run at twenty or twenty-five miles an hour on the boulevards. We want the speed of automobiles regulated, but we want this done in a common sense way.

"We all know that eight miles an hour is too slow for driving on the boulevards, while it is entirely too fast for the downtown district. I am in favor of members of the Dealers' Club assisting in framing speed laws which will protect the autoist as well as the pedestrian.

"There are men in Kansas City who do their best to stand in the way of automobiles downtown so that they may be injured and get damages from the auto owner," said Mr. Rooklidge. "It is not a far cry until we shall have a law similar to the one in force in Paris; that is arrest of the person injured in a collision, as well as the person who drives the car."

The date for the automobile show was fixed at the first week in March. It was decided to hold a meeting on November 27, at which a committee will be selected to take charge of the affairs of the show which will be held in Convention hall.

There was some talk about giving some sort of a race meet this fall, but this idea was abandoned because of the lack of time in which to make the necessary preparations.

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September 28, 1909

MADE HIS ROUTE IN 2 HOURS.

Independence Rural Route Carrier
Used an Automobile.

Daniel Riske, a rural route carrier at Independence, started out with his auto yesterday to deliver route No. 3. He made the trip in two hours. With a horse it takes a carrier six hours to make the trip. The auto is a light one and built especially for the work. The route is over some of the best rock roads in the country and if it is successful as a carrier other autos will be placed in commission.

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September 19, 1909

ANONYMOUS LETTER CAUSES
CHAUFFEUR'S FATAL INJURY.

L. L. Moore, Found Unconscious on
Pavement Friday Night, Dies
at General Hospital.

An anonymous letter was the cause of the fight which resulted in the death of L. L. Moore yesterday afternoon at the General hospital where he had been taken unconscious on the day previous. Moore was a chauffeur and had fought with Benjamin Lamon, another chauffeur at Fifteenth street and Troost avenue. It developed that his injuries were due to his fall on the pavement.

Lamon is employed by Charles S. Keith of the Central Coal and Coke company. He became angry when Mr. Kieth showed him a letter written by an unknown person which accused Lamon of "joy riding" in Keith's motor car. Suspicion pointed to Moore who was desirous of obtaining a position with Mr. Keith and had written an application for position as chauffeur. The handwriting in both cases were similar.

When Lamon accused Moore as the author of the letter at the Missouri Valley Automobile Company, 1112-14 East Fifteenth street, Friday night, Moore refused to make any explanation or denial. A fight followed, and when Moore fell to the sidewalk he struck his head on the curbing, resulting in concussion of the brain, according to surgeons at the General hospital.

Lamon was arrested early morning, and yesterday afternoon was arraigned in Justice Miller's court for second degree murder. He pleaded not guilty. He was released on a $2,000 bond furnished by Mr. Keith. Lamon lives at 1525 Oak street and is married. Moore formerly lived at Maryville, Mo., and had only been in the city a few weeks. He worked for Mrs. Amy Cruise of 1209 Commerce building.

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September 15, 1909

AUTOMOBILIST STOPS HORSE.

Grabs Reins From Cab and Prevents
Injury to Woman.

Grabbing the reins of a frightened horse while seated in an automobile, Joe Marks,a traveling salesman, stopped the animal yesterday afternoon at risk of serious injury to himself and saved from injury a young woman who drove. Marks was dragged from the tomeau of the machine and when he returned to the Coates house last evening his clothes were bespattered with mud and his trousers were torn.

After luncheon yesterday Marks and Ervan Wilson traversed Cliff drive in an automobile and then drove out towards Swope park. Marks noticed that a horse hitched to a runabout and driven by a young woman had become frightened. He told the chauffeur to hurry and he would try to grab the reins. The chauffeur turned the machine loose. The frightened horse dashed down the road.

Marks held on to the hand rail with one hand and reached out with the other. Wilson grabbed Marks's coat. The chauffeur swung the machine alongside the horse. Marks grabbed the lines and the driver set the brakes. The road was muddy, the machine skidded, the horse fought desperately to get away and Marks was suspended between the horse and the automobile.

"Let loose of me, I've got him," cried Marks to Wilson, and he jumped from the machine. The horse by this time had been brought to a standstill.

Neither the young woman nor the horse was hurt and after the animal was calmed she insisted on taking the reins and driving him home. Marks gave his name, but forgot to get that of the girl.

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September 4, 1909

ELM RIDGE FOREVER
LOST TO KANSAS CITY.

PUBLIC LOST INTEREST IN ITS
PRESERVATION.

Efforts of Committee to Raise
$169,000 Prove Fruitless and
the Plan to Purchase is
Abandoned.

After sixty days of hard work the committee of twelve, which had been trying earnestly to raise money enough to take over the splendid Elm Ridge tract for public uses, held a final meeting yesterday and threw up the undertaking as a bad job. Seemingly Kansas Cityans were not sufficiently interested in what was about their only opportunity to acquire an adequate outdoor arena, even to answer more than one out of a hundred of the letters sent them by the ways and means committee. At their own expense the committeemen mailed 10,000 letters to all classes of business men in the city, but the replies were few and far between.

Of the $169,000 required to purchase the grounds, about $100,000 was in sight when the matter was given up. Of late, meetings of the committee had been held nearly every day, but its members came to the conclusion yesterday that they could not get enough help to carry out their purpose.

DON'T REALIZE THE LOSS.

"I am heart-broken over the failure to purchase the tract," said W. A. Rule, chairman of the committee, last night. Mr. Rule himself subscribed $25,000 toward the amount required. "I don't believe the people of Kansas City will have another opportunity in ten years to acquire such an ideal site for all sorts of tournaments and races, but they probably don't realize their loss. For celebrations, horse shows, automobile and balloon races and nearly every kind of tournament, another tract as close in and available would be practically impossible to find. It is a tremendous loss, but as far as this committee is concerned all efforts are suspended. The owners of the tract, Alexander Fraser and Samuel L. Lee, have been notified and the deal declared off."

GAVE UP ITS TASK.

In the spring of 1903 Elm Ridge was formally opened as a race course by the Kansas City Jockey Club, which was organized the preceding year with C. C. Christie as its first president. At the time of its opening betting on the races was permitted by state law. In 1905, however, this law was repealed by the legislature and the track was maintained at a loss. Ever since then it has failed to pay as a race track and went into receivership about two years ago.

The properties, including the club house and about eighty acres lying between Brooklyn and Lydia avenues and Fifty-ninth and Sixty-third streets were sold to a Kansas City syndicate, headed by Messrs. Fraser and Lee.

June 23 a joint meeting of members of the Elm Ridge Club and the Kansas City Automobile Club was held with a view of taking steps to purchase the grounds. It was decided to form a stock committee which yesterday gave up its task through the lack of interest taken by the citizens.

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August 19, 1909

Y. W. C. A. GIRLS GUESTS
OF PROMINENT BANKER.

GIVEN A RIDE OVER BOULE-
VARDS IN HIS MOTOR CAR.

Regular Daily Programme Is Being
Carried Out by Devoted Father at
Daughter's Request -- Moth-
ers as Chaperones.

Three pretty young women, members of the Y. W. C. A., with one of their mothers as a chaperone, enjoyed a ride over the boulevards of Kansas City last evening in one of the most luxurious touring cars in the city. Their ride was through the generosity of a prominent banker of Kansas City who is greatly devoted to his daughter. She departed for a several weeks' visit North and when she left she asked that he arrange to take some of the Y. W. C. A. girls out in the machine.

Tonight another set of girls will be taken for a ride. This will continue each evening until the return of the daughter. The names and addresses of the young women to be taken on these rides will be furnished by Miss Ida Wilson, the desk secretary of the society.

That the idea will be a popular one and will be followed to a great extent by wealthy citizens who do not use their machines much while their families are away during the summer, developed last evening. Henry C. Lambert, cashier of the German American bank, said he thought that the idea should be taken up by the automobile club. "My machines can be placed at the disposal of such a cause at least once a week," said Mr. Lambert; " and I think there are probably a dozen other men in town who would loan their machines an evening or two a week."

"Some of our members have enjoyed the pleasure of auto rides while others have not," said Miss Ida Wilson yesterday afternoon. "Of course, to the majority of those who have not ridden in one of the big touring cars, such an invitation would hardly be refused. I believe that if other citizens hear about our banker friend they too will proffer their machines. If they do, I think we will have no trouble in furnishing the girls to ride. Our idea in this is, of course, to give the girl the full pleasure of the ride. The name and address of each girl and the chaperone will be given to the gentleman who drives the machine or his driver and the girls will be called for at their homes and returned there. In this way they will get the full pleasure of the auto ride.

"While we are not in any way soliciting automobiles for this purpose, I believe that as soon as this fact becomes known we will have several proffers of machines."

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