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February 10, 1910

KLING AT MERCY
OF COMMISSION.

Fans Fear Supreme Body in
Baseball Will Make an
Example of Him.

Will the national commission establish a precedent in organized baseball by rendering a decision unfavorable to Johnny Kling, local billiard man and Cub holdout now on the blacklist, who has applied for readmission to the fold? This is a question that is bothering the fans and judging from talk in baseball circles, the one-time Cub star is certain to encounter rough sledding before he lands back in good standing minus the black mark which now bedecks his name in the records of the court ruled over by Garry Herrmann.

The fat that the national commission is without opposition in the world of baseball at the present time makes it appear certain that it will make use of its authority when the time comes to pass upon the Kling case. Up to this year there existed on the Pacific coast the "outlaw" league, which seriously hampered the work of the commission, and a practice of granting concessions to players who had kicked the traces was followed by those in charge of the affairs of organized baseball.

This was exemplified in the case of Hal Chase, who committed a most flagrant offense by jumping from the New York Americans to the California League, only to be restored to good standing a short time after, none the worse for his rash act. This was done with the one hope of eventually wearing down the opposition to the national agreement and finally proved effectual, as last fall the "outlaws" were taken into the fold, leaving the jurisdiction of the great national game under one tribunal, the national commission.

COMPARE CASE WITH OTHERS.

"Since Kling sent in his request to Garry Herrmann for a consideration of his case with the purpose of seeking the good graces of the high tribunal, stories have sprung up regarding the Chase and Mike Kelley incidents in which the commission fought a losing battle. Chase was out on a charge of contract jumping in the middle of the 1908 season, when he left the Highlanders to play with the California outlaw league. Mike Kelley was in the same boat as Kling at the present time, and his restoration was due more to an error of the St. Louis club than anything else. Kelley refused to report to the St. Louis American in 1905, and as a result was kept out of organized baseball for two seasons, returning when the Mound City club failed to place his name on the reserve list through oversight, practically relinquishing claim to him.

In the face of these two verdicts, principally, it has been stated that the commission is hardly liable to turn around and refuse concessions to Kling that were granted to the others. Conditions have changed since then, however, and apparently this has been overlooked, as the national agreement is now absolute and its power, and for this reason the commission will no longer be forced to take a conciliatory attitude towards violators of the rules that govern baseball.

COMMISSION'S POWER ABSOLUTE.

In the event of Kling being turned down in his request for reinstatement, it will be the first case of this nature in which the commission has won out, due to the fact that opposition to organized ball is a thing of the past, and the trio now headed by Garry Herrman are in a position to govern, absolutely without the wayward players having "outlaw" leagues to fall back upon.

The fate of Kling will probably be known February 23. Mystery surrounds the purpose of the gathering, as Herrmann failed to state anything in detail, but it is taken to mean that the application of Kling will be the principal business to come up for disposal.

The date of the meeting is four days before the departure of the Club squad on their spring training trip to New Orleans and in the event of the commission giving out a decision of the case Kling would know his fate in time to prepare to accompany his old teammates, provided the act of the commission is favorable. There is a possibility, however, of the supreme court of baseball acting upon the case and then withholding their final decision until near the opening of the season.

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February 4, 1910

PATRONYMICS OF THE GREAT.

Sly Attempt of Wrongdoers to En-
list Official Sympathy.

"Did it ever occur to you," asked Inspector Edward P. Boyle last night, "how many men when arrested will take the name of the chief of police, the police judge or some other official with whom they have to come in contact? They hope to gain sympathy by that ruse. We got a man yesterday for horse stealing, and, by gosh, he gave the name of Edward P. Boyle, my full name. He is in the county jail now under my name, but when we looked him up in the National Bureau of Identification, we find that he has a goodly supply of names."

"Boyle" was arrested by L. C. Barber, a motorcycle policeman, on complaint of of the Kirby Transfer Company, Missouri and Grand avenues. It appears that he rented a horse and wagon from Kirby to do a huckster business and disposed of the rig.

"Boyle's" picture is in the book sent out by the National Bureau of Identification at Washington. He appears there under the name of James J. O'Neil, which, bu the way, is the name of a former chief of police of Chicago. He also bears the names of Edward Riley and Edward Connors, the last being believed by the police to be his. He has done time in the Rochester, N. Y., Industrial school, the Elmira, N. Y., reformatory, and two years in the Auburn, N. Y., penitentiary. He was five years in Elmira. The man of many "police" names also has done short terms elsewhere.

When Hugh C. Brady was police judge there hardly was a week that some bum did not give the name of "Hugh Brady, sir, yer honor."

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February 1, 1910

POISON WAS FOUND,
DECLARE CHEMISTS.

COLONEL SWOPE'S DEATH AS-
CRIBED TO STRYCHNINE, PROB-
ABLY GIVEN IN DRUGS.

DR. B. CLARK HYDE SUES.

Asks Damages Aggregating
$700,000 for Statements
Regarding Deaths.

DR. B. CLARK HYDE,
Physician Who Sues for $700,000 for Statements Growing out of the Swope Poison Cases.

CHICAGO, Jan. 31. -- Colonel Thomas H. Swope of Kansas City died from the effects of poison, according to the findings of Dr. Ludwig Hektoen and Dr. Walter S. Haines, announced in Chicago this afternoon.

It was formally declared by the doctors that Colonel Swope died from the effects of strychnine poisoning.

The report of the experts does not include the result of the analysis of the contents of the stomach of Chrisman Swope, nephew of Colonel Swope, who died soon after the demise of his uncle, under similar circumstances.

ATTORNEYS HEAR REPORT.

The investigation of the mysterious deaths of the late Colonel Swope and his nephew was shifted to Chicago today. For several weeks the internal organs of the bodies have been here in the laboratories of Dr. Hektoen and Dr. Haines, toxicologists. Today Attorney John G. Paxton, administrator of the Swope estate, Attorney James A. Reed, his associate, Virgil Conkling, prosecuting attorney at Kansas City; Dr. B. H. Zwart, coroner there, and Thomas H. Swope, nephew of the dead millionaire, came to receive the report of the experts as to whether or not poison had been found in sufficient quantities to cause death.

PAXTON'S TERSE ANSWER.

The visitors arrived on a Santa Fe train at 7:28 a. m., and went at once to the Hotel La Salle, where a room was engaged. Later a conference was held at the University Club, at which the findings were revealed.

Attention of Attorney Paxton was called to the fact that suits for $100,000 had been instituted against him for slander in connection with his share of the investigation.

"I have nothing to say about this suit except that I feel somewhat flattered," said Mr. Paxton. "I have received the news by wire that Dr. Hyde has sued myself and Drs. Hall and Stewart in suits aggregating $700,000 because of slander in connection with the Swope case. I have nothing further to say.

Mr. Paxton would make no further comment beyond saying that the investigation was not fully concluded yest, and would say nothing of the investigation of Chrisman Swope's death. It was said that strychnine had been found in the stomachs and livers of both men.

Coroner Zwart returned to Kansas City tonight, but Mr. Paxton, Mr. Reed and Attorney Conkling remained. They will leave Chicago tomorrow night, Mr. Paxton said. An inquest over the bodies of Colonel Swope and his nephew will probably be started next Monday. Any criminal warrants that will be issued will probably follow the inquest.

DR. HYDE SUES FOR DAMAGES.

Through Frank P. Walsh and John M. Cleary, attorneys, Dr. B. Clark Hyde filed suit yesterday in the circuit court at Independence demanding damages aggregating $700,000 from J. G. Paxton, executor of the Swope estate and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. The petition declares that published interviews pointed to Dr. Hyde, son-in-law of the Swopes and their family physician, as the instigator of a plot to murder Swope heirs.

The damages are asked on three counts and newspaper men are named as witnesses to statements alleged to have been made by Mr. Paxton which the plaintiff declares destroyed his professional standing and were meant to oppress, impoverish and wholly ruin him. The first suit against Mr. Paxton charges slander and the amounts asked are $30,000 actual damages and a like amount for punitive damages. The complaint in the suit against the publishing company states that headlines in the Post-Dispatch over a purported Paxton interview said that the man who "planned to kill family with typhoid germs," which, the petition alleges meant Dr. Hyde, "who has been continually watched by five detectives and will not be allowed to escape punishment."

The petition is long, and is a narrative leading up to the final mention of the family doctor's name and alleged insinuations that he plotted to kill. Interviews with the county coroner, Dr. B. H. Zwart and Dr. Frank J. Hall, specialist in analytical work, are made a part of the contentions of the plaintiff. The damages asked in the first count total $200,000, and after this comes a similar charge on another published interview and another $200,000 is asked. The third is based on the publication of Dr. Hyde's picture, which the petition alleges clearly identified him as the "man," meant in all the interviews charging murder plots.

Dr. Hall and Dr. Edward L. Stewart are made defendants along with the newspaper. The plaintiff estimates the total wealth of all the defendants at $5,000,000.

Mrs. B. C. Hyde, formerly Frances Lee Swope, yesterday gave out a signed statement insisting that she was constantly at her husband's side, and knew his every movement.

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February 1, 1910

TO HURRY NEW THEATER.

Work on Empress Starts Today;
To Be Finished May 1.

"We will start the foundation of the Empress theater today," said Fred Lincoln of Chicago, representative of the Sullivan-Considine circuit, which is to erect a new play house at Twelfth and McGee streets. "We expect to put three gangs of men at work on the building, working in 8-hour shifts and will have it ready for occupancy by May 1. Lee DeCamp of Cincinnati, the architect, will be here today. The house will cost about $100,000."

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January 29, 1910

CHEMISTS FIND
POISON IN THE
SWOPE ANALYSES.

ARRESTS ARE NOT EXPECTED
UNTIL LAWYER RETURNS
FROM CHICAGO.

Attorneys Hurriedly Called
Together on Receipt
of Telegram.

That poison in a large enough quantity to produce death has been found in the stomachs of Colonel Thomas H. Swope, Kansas City's millionaire benefactor, and Chrisman Swope, his nephew, is known almost to be a certainty. The Chicago chemists telegraphed the result of their analysis yesterday afternoon to John G. Paxton, a Swope attorney.

Mr. Paxton will leave today for Chicago. He will return immediately with the official report of the two chemists and the internal organs of the Swopes, to be sustained in evidence at the coroner's inquest early next week.

An arrest is expected to be made Friday or Saturday of next week.

Mr. Paxton received the telegram from the Chicago specialists at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon. when in that city he arranged with Drs. W. S. Haines and Ludwig Hektoen that they should wire him the results of the post mortem examination as soon as completed. From Chicago it is learned that a message of one word was to convey the information that poison in quantities large enough to produce death had been found, and that he, Mr. Paxton, was to go to Chicago immediately.

CHEMISTS' WORK FINISHED.

Though the attorneys here refuse to divulge the information contained in this message, it is known that the work of the chemists has been completed, and that the men here who are pushing the prosecution are satisfied with the results. Prosecuting Attorney Virgil Conkling said last night that he expected the official report of the chemists, and all other evidence in the case, in his hands within forty-eight hours -- or Monday at the latest. The coroner's inquest will probably be held Tuesday. Two or three days after this, if the evidence is found satisfactory, warrants will be issued.

"I am satisfied with the results," said John H. Atwood, after reading the telegram.

"Ifs the examination of the stomach completed?" was asked.

"Drs. Haines and Hektoen are through with their work," was the reply.

Further than this Mr. Atwood refused to make any statement. Mr. Paxton was non-committal. He would neither affirm nor deny the report that poison had been found.

"Are you going to Chicago?" was asked him.

WILL SLEEP AT HOME.

"I will sleep at my home in Independence tonight," was his answer.

Neither the coroner nor the prosecuting attorney has received one word from the Chicago chemists. A duplicate copy of the report is to be sent to the coroner. The prosecuting attorney was apprised of the receipt of the telegram by Mr. Paxton yesterday afternoon, but concerning the contents of the message, the prosecutor refused to say what it contained.

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January 28, 1910

HARD TOIL, MONEY
AND BANKER GONE.

"LITTLE ITALY" AROUSED OVER
THE DISAPPEARANCE OF
PETER ISNARDI.

Many Italians Deposited
Savings With Missing
Consular Agent.

Little Italy was never before stirred as it was yesterday, when the announcement was made that Peter Isnardi, consular agent of the United States government, had left for parts unknown. Several hundred Italians are worried about sums aggregating about $12,000, the savings of years, which they had deposited with him. Most of those who entrusted their money to Isnardi were railroad section hands and laborers, recent arrivals from Sunny Italy, and unable to speak the English language. Some had been saving to pay the passage of wives or sweethearts to the land of promise; others that they might some day return to their old homes in Italy and to pass the sunset of their lives among friends and amid familiar scenes and surroundings.

A subscription paper will be started today by J. P. Deo, publisher of an Italian newspaper at 210 East Fifth street, to raise money with which to hire lawyers and detectives to seek Isnardi. A committee of Italians will call upon the United States district attorney today to learn what can be done in the matter.

"We intend to secure an order tomorrow from the prosecuting attorney," said Deo last night, "to open Isnardi's safe. He kept all his books locked in it. Not until we can see the books will we know the facts in the case."

A telegram was sent to the minister of foreign affairs at Rome to find whether or not the money that Isnardi was to forward to the bank at Rome was ever received there.

The Italian consul-general at Chicago announced yesterday that the Kansas City office would be abolished. Roma Ladife, vice consul at Chicago, arrived here yesterday to close the office. He took possession of the Italian flag, which hung in front of the agency at 512 East Fifth street, also the seal of the Italian government and the coat-of-arms. Consul Guido Sabetta, in Chicago, that the Italian government funds were not involved.

OPERATED PRIVATE BANK.

In addition to occupying the office of consular agent, Isnardi operated a private bank. This was wholly outside of his official duties, and for any losses that might occur the Italian government is in no way responsible. The consular agent is supposed to have received nearly $8,000 in savings of Italians in the three and one-half years he has held the office. The remaining $4,000 is money he collected for steamship tickets and to be sent to Italy, to be deposited in the bank of Rome.

Local Italians were opposed to Isnardi from the day he was appointed. charges have been filed against him several times with the Chicago office. Though there were rumors among Italians in Kansas City regarding the consular agent, deposits continued to come from those who lived in the country or in railroad camps.

Ten per cent interest was offered by Isnardi on deposits. This was more than the Italian Central bank at Rome pays, which they had all known in Italy. The Italian bank pays 3 1/2 per cent on time deposits. Those who did not want to send their money to Rome could deposit it with their consular agent, Peter Isnardi, in his private bank.

The office of consular agent pays no salary. It is an honorary position. Isnardi had no other business here, and no apparent private income. The Italians say his sole income was from money he collected from his private bank.

APPOINTMENT WAS PROTESTED.

Isnardi succeeded G. G. Lanvereri as consular agent in Kansas City. Isnardi was appointed by Count A. L. Rozwadowski, who died shortly after the appointment. His office was in Chicago. Signor Sabetta succeeded him. A committee of Italians went to Chicago when the count died and asked for the removal of Isnardi. Charges of dishonesty were made against him, but Sabetta refused to act without first having an investigation.

Before his appointment as consular agent here, Isnardi was a traveling book agent. H represented an Italian publishing house and sold his books for $10 each. His home was then in Pueblo, Col. Isnardi was in Kansas City when the question of a vice consul arose.

Isnardi went immediately to Chicago. Count Rozwadowski and he had known each other in Italy. Against the protests of a committee of Kansas City Italians, who wanted a man from here appointed, Isnardi returned two weeks after the dismissal of Lancereri with the commission of consular agent. His appointment, though recommended by the consul at Chicago, was made directly by the foreign minister at Rome.

The consular agent is an American citizen. A consul general, however, must be a subject of the king. This being the case, as an American citizen, the Italians here think that Isnardi can be prosecuted under the laws of this state, in case the funds are not intact. The consul general, under the extra-territorial provision of international law, is immune from arrest and prosecution in the country where he represents his government.

PROSECUTOR WILL ACT.

"I will thoroughly investigate these charges," said Virgil Conkling, prosecuting attorney, last night. "If I find that consular agents are amenable to the laws of this state, Isnardi will probably be arrested and prosecuted."

A dozen complaints have been made the past two months at the prosecuting attorney's office against the consular agent. Isnardi was charged with taking money from Italians to send to the bank at Rome, and appropriating it to his own use. Two weeks ago today the consular agent was called to the prosecutor's office. There he was told that if he did not refund $800 to an Italian who gave him the money for deposit, that criminal action for embezzlement would be begun. He was given until March 1 to refund the money.

Isnardi left Kansas City January 16. His wife said yesterday he had gone to Chicago, but reports from that city say he has not been seen by the consul general. Mrs. Isnardi has been conducting the business since her husband left.

When the news that the office had been closed spread among the Italians in the North End a crowd of 200 m en and women, most of them depositors in the consular agent's private bank, gathered in front of Isnardi's office. At dark the crowd dispersed. when the door to the office would rattle a dog's bark could be heard. The dog had been turned loose in the office to prevent the angry foreigners from making a forcible entrance.

"What will you do if he does come back?" was asked one in the crowd.

"String him up," was the prompt answer of an Americanized Italian.

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January 16, 1910

TRACE OF POISON
FOUND, IT IS SAID.

MYSTERIOUS WHITE POWDER
DISCOVERED IN CHRISMAN
SWOPE'S STOMACH.

Representatives to Confer
With Chemists Before
Decisive Action.

According to attorneys representing the Swope estate poison has been found in the stomach of the late Chrisman Swope. It is said this fact was known before the body of Colonel Thomas H. Swope was taken from the vault at Forest Hill cemetery last Tuesday to Independence, where the stomach was removed for the purpose of a chemical evaluation by Chicago specialists. The white powder found has been declared to be either strychnine or some other poison.

"Chrisman Swope's stomach was sent to Dr. Haynes in Chicago nearly two weeks ago," said John H. Atwood, attorney for the Swopes, last night. "An analysis was immediately made. The result was the finding of white powder in a large quantity. This powder was either strychnine or some other deadly poison. The name of the second poison I am unable to tell you. there is no doubt in the minds of the attorneys or of the Chicago specialists that the white powder is poison."

COUNSEL GOING TO CHICAGO.

John G. Paxton and Mr. Atwood, counsel for the Swope heirs, will leave this evening for Chicago. Mr. Paxton will return Tuesday night. Mr. Atwood may remain longer. When Mr. Paxton returns he will probably bring with him the official report of the doctors' investigation.

At a conference yesterday at the Swope home in Independence, participated in by Prosecuting Attorney Virgil Conkling and counsel for the Swopes, the nurses who attended Thomas Swope told their stories.

A dispatch to The Journal from Chicago last night stated that Dr. Walter S. Haynes, the toxicologist, worked all day on the analysis and examination of the stomach of Thomas Swope with a view of tracing the typhoid bacilli which are said to still exist in the stomach and other organs. The work was carried on behind closed doors in the laboratory of the Rush Medical college.

Professor Ludvig Hektoen of the University of Chicago medical faculty has left Chicago for a few days, but when he returns he will work in conjunction with Dr. Haynes.

NO PUBLIC REPORT YET.

"I have not progressed sufficiently to make any statement as to my findings," said Dr. Haynes. "The examination will occupy several days at least. Professor Hektoen will carry on the work of making the exact microscopic tests."

The case is one of the most extraordinary presented for criminal investigation for some years.

Dr. J. V. Bacon in discussing the investigation in Chicago yesterday said that the placing of life in jeopardy by administering the bacilli of typhoid, tuberculosis or another diseases was simple, the only thing necessary being to administer the germs in milk, soup or other foods, wherein it would be impossible to detect by taste.

"The result in administering typhoid germs would simply be to create a case of typhoid," said Dr. Bacon. "The patient might recover or might die, just as in the case contracted in the ordinary way, and the percentage of recoveries is high enough to render such a method of attempted murder very uncertain. Of course in the case of an old man, enfeebled already by years, the risk of death in typhoid is heavy."

INTENDED CHANGING WILL.

It was not until a week ago, when an unofficial report was received from the Chicago specialists that poison had been found in the stomach of Chrisman Swope, that the family realized the extent of this alleged plot. Colonel Swope's body was removed from the vault in Forest Hill cemetery. The autopsy was held Tuesday and the following day the stomach and other vital organs sent to Chicago to be examined.

The investigation branched from this to the presence of typhoid fever among the Swope heirs. Eight members of the family had been taken down with typhoid fever, between December 1 and 18. Physicians were called in. then it was believed that the members of the family had not contracted the disease by natural means.

It is known that the millionaire benefactor was planning several days before his death to give $1,000,000 or more to Kansas City.

"This fund, held as a residue and bequeathed to no one," said John Paxton, attorney for the Swope estate, "contained about $1,000,000. He realized that he had provided for all his relatives handsomely, and this reside he had, I think, made up his mind to give to the public of Kansas City or for some charity. He died before he could change his will, and this residue of over $1,000,000 consequently was divided among the heirs."

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January 15, 1910

INDEPENDENCE "HOUSE OF
DEATH" CLOSED TO VISITORS.

Swope Home in Independence
Guarded Day and Night by
Special Officer.
The Home in Independence Where Occurred the Deaths of Several Members of the Swope Family.
The Swope Home in Independence.

The Swope home, a magnificent three-story brick structure on South Pleasant avenue in Independence, is regarded as the abode of death by nearly every resident of that rural city.

The sudden death of J. Moss Hunton, closely followed by that of Thomas H. Swope, the millionaire benefactor and that of his nephew, Chrisman Swope, awoke suspicion that all was not well and that the Swopes were a marked family among even the most easy-going of the inhabitants. Men and women passing to or from their homes during church hours of a Sunday evening gazed fearfully up at the now tomb-like building with its darkened windows and barred doors. If they ahd been asked ubruptly why they did this they would have stammered out the answer that they did not know. It was all so mysterious that one after another of the same family should be stricken with a fatal illness of different kinds, but uniformly ending in convulsions.

Where there are suspicions there are those to invent tales of various sorts or to uncover significant incidents from the charmed house of the past. Some of the stories were undoubtedly founded on fact. Many were as wild and incredible as any ever bandied about the boar's-head dinners of King Arthur's court or the tales taken as evidence in the days of Salem witchcraft.

Some of the followers of Joseph Smith, the Independence seer and prophet, it is said, believed that sometime in the life of the philanthropist he had offended his God and that a curse was now being visited on his household. There would be no end, they said, until the last vestige of the family was swept away.

Another rumor that always had credence was that someone skilled in the use of subtle poisons was profiting by his knowledge.

WATER FREE OF GERMS?

Soon after the death of Chrisman Swope, it was announced by physicians of the family, that a city chemist of Kansas City had been summoned and that he had declared the presence of typhoid germs in the water used by the Swopes. In the same statement was added that the well formerly used by the family had "played out" and that another long out of commission was furnishing the supply. The water, it was said last night, was analyzed and said to be free from typhiod bacilli, notwithstanding the report.

"There is evidence that Mrs. Logan O. Swope believed the house unsanitary. About the time the well story was given out, she sent word to John Welch, a plumber, to come to the place and overhaul everything. This was done. Not a pipe but was inspected, not a hydrant or sewer outlet but was dested and disinfected. They were, according to the plumber, in ship-shape. No trace of disease laden decomposed matter was found.

HOUSEHOLD TERRORIZED.

All this time solicious neighbors were making inquiries of Mrs. Swope and others closely conneted with the family, touching the cause of the unusual spread of typhoid in the home. They seemed at their wits end to account for the disease.

Thus it was given out that the milk used in the kitchen was tainted; that the water was stagnant; that there was a quantity of decaying sewage in the pipes and that a servant girl, recently hired, who had had typhoid, had thrown her infected clothing in the milk house adjacent to the kitchen. No one knew what to believe.

Just when Mrs. Swope or her lawyers awoke to the real peril is not known definitely It is supposed to have been less than a month ago, when the doors of the palatial home were shut finally upon all visitors and a private detective employed to watch that no one should step within.

This detective is William C. Rice, former chief of police at Fairmount Park. A reporter who knockked at the big outer folding doors last night was met by him and warned off the place.

"I am here to see that no one shall see Mrs. Swope," said he. "There is no hope of getting an interview. She is indisposed and would not talk for publication. It is impossible."

The bland officer said this with a degree of finality. Without another word he stepped backward into the lobby. the heavy doors swung to. A bolt dropped in place. While the disappointed interrogator was yet on the porch a distant click like that made by an electric switch, was heard. The great house was as dark as a tomb.

SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES.

The story of several deaths in the Swope family, as told by some of their intimate friends last night, points to many susicious circumstances.

The family from the oldest member to the youngest was described as about of one disposition, kind, generous and impulsive. Thomas H. Swope would travel many a mile to help a friend.

Logan O. Swope, brother of Thomas H., died about ten years ago leaving a large inheritance in property around Independence. Naturally the burden of hte care of htis estate would devolve on the shoulders of Thomas, who already was loaded with business cares of his own. the year following Logan's death, Thomas sent for a cousin, J. Moss Hunton, then in Kentucky.

Hunton was a good manager anda man of high social standing in St. Louis, where his father, Judge James Hunton, is conisdered an authority on corporation law. Hunton came to Independence nine years ago and assumed the management of Mrs. Logan O. Swope's estate. He was acting as her major domo at the time of his death.

BECAME CONFIDANTS.

The Swopes, with the exception of Thomas Swope, a son of Logan, who owns a farm three miles northeast of the city, resided in the home on South Pleasant avenue. Hunton also lived there and as time went on Thomas H. Swope and he became inseparable companions and confidantes. Not a charity did the philanhopist indulge in but was previously laid before Hunton and met with his approval. The people of Independence came to love one as the other and Hunton acquired the unique reputation of being the only man in the city who would give a cigar or a box of candy to collectors presenting him with his month's end bills.

"I am Colonel Swope's bodyguard," Hunton told a friend on one occasion. "there is no danger of his ocming to grief when I am about. I guess things would go different if I shou ld die."

On the evening of Friday, October 1, the night of Hunton's death, he came home from a trip to the business district in good humor.

Suddenly, a few minutes after supper, he complained of feeling mortally sick and threw himself on a lounge in the sitting room, calling Mrs. Swope to his side. they had always been the greatest of friends.

"Maggie," said Hunton, "I believe this is the end." He then closed his eyes and the fatal convulsions came. Two hours later he was dead.

The death of Homas H. Swope came quite as suddenly two days from that of his confidant and friend, at about 8 o'clock the following Sunday morning. The abrupt taking away of all that was dear to Mrs. Logan O. Swope, except her children, was a great strain on her nerves and for several weeks she was on the point of a break down. She was advised to go to Chicago to recuperate. She followed the instructions and went in company with two of her personal friends, Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Thomas.

HURRIES TO DEATH BED.

While she was in Chicago word was sent to her that her eldest son, Chrisma, 31 years old, and a daughter, Margaret, were very sick of typhoid fever. She hurried back and arrived at the home four days before the death of Chrisman.

The home to which Mrs. Swope returned wsa one of hte blackest sorrow and apprehension. Margaret and Chrisman were both at death's door. One of hte servants was sick and MIss Cora Dickson, Margaret's governess who had thrown over her position as teacher of the third and fourth grades in the Columbian ward school to attend to her mistress, was down with the fatal malady.

In mortal dread of impending trouble as deep and poignant as any that had occurred heretofre, the widow cabled at once another daughter, Stella Swope, taking music lessons in Paris, to come home as quickly as steamship and train could carry her. Before she arrived in America, however, Chrisman was dead from a convulsion which turned the trend of his sickness to the worse at the climax.

Perhaps Mrs. Swope at this time believed as did some of her neighbors, that there was something supernatural in the calamities which had come to her in such close succession. anyway she sent a distant relative by marriage to meet Stella at New York and escort her home. Stella contracted typhoid fever on the train or home, it is alleged, and when she arrived was ready for the sick bed.
ADDED TO MYSTERY.

When the body of Thomas H. Swope was taken from its resting place in the vault in Forest Hill cemetery to the morgue of the H. J. Ott undertaking establishment in Independence it was about as much of a mystery as the more important details of this remarkable case. The physicians who examined the body, the lawyers at whose insistance the body was exhumed and the undertaker and coroner would not talk yesterday.

It is known that the body was at the Independence morgue, however, at 4 o'clock Wednesday afternoon, for it was at this time that a special coroner's jury was called to the Ott undertaking rooms to formally identify the body.

After they had been filed through the rooms and gazed at the face of the dead benefactor they were dismissed on call. The jurors were T. J. Walker, A. J. Bundschu, S. T. Pendleton, S. H. Woodson, Bernard Zick, Jr., and William Martin.

"We were asked merely to identify the body and our opinion as to how Colonel Swope came by his death was not asked," said T. J. Walker, one of the jurors, afterwrds. "We probably will not be called again until the contents of the stomach have been examined by the Chicago specialists.

Henry Ott of the undertaking firm would not give out a statement last night. He said he has been instructed to tell nothing and he intended to do as he was told.

Dr. B. H. Zwart, county coroner, said that Dr. Frank Hall asked his permission of the autopsy on the body of Colonel Swope, which was granted. the autopsy, he said, was performed by Dr. Heptoek of Chicago and Dr. Hall. A jury ws provisionally impaneled and viewed the body. This jury will be reimpaneled, according to Dr. Zward, providing an inquest is held.

"If there is a request for an inquest, I will order one," he said. "If after a reasonable time nothing further is done in the matter, I will then have to investigate and find why no request is being made for an inquest. It will be my duty to learn why the autopsy was made."

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January 14, 1910

COL. "TOM" SWOPE
VICTIM OF PLOT
OF POISONERS?

Scheme to Gain Control of
Millions by Wholesale
Murder of the Relatives of
the Great Public Benefac-
tor Believed to Have Been
Unearthed.

BODY OF CAPITALIST
TAKEN FROM CEMETERY.

Stomach Will Be Sent to Chi-
cago for Analysis -- Chris-
man Swope, Who Also
Died Suddenly, May Have
Been a Poison Victim --
Suspect Under Close
Surveillance.
The Late Colonel Thomas H. Swope.
COL. THOMAS H. SWOPE.

Was the late Colonel Thomas H. Swope, whose benefactions to Kansas City, including Swope park, amounted to more than a million and a half dollars, the victim of a scientific plot which had for its aim the elimination of the entire Swope family, by inoculation with the typhoid fever germs, looking to ultimate control of the $3,000,000 estate?

Acting on the theory that a poisoning conspiracy rivaling in fiendish ingenuity the most diabolical deeds of the Borgias was responsible for the death of Colonel Swope, October 3, last, and later of his nephew, Chrisman Swope, the body of Colonel Swope was removed Wednesday from the vault where it rested in Forest Hill cemetery and taken to Independence, where an autopsy was held.

The stomach was removed and will be taken to Chicago for analysis by chemists and toxicologists of national repute, in the hope of finding traces of poison, which members of the Swope family, their counsel and friends believe to have caused death.


RESULT OF AUTOPSY.

The autopsy of Colonel Swope's body Wednesday, attorneys for the Swopes say, resulted in the finding that death was not due to apoplexy, as was given out at the time. All the organs, including the brain, were found to be in normal condition. This could not have been the case had he died of apoplexy. The same was found in the Chrisman Swope autopsy. His brain was found to be normal, as were the other organs of his body. A slight trace of typhoid bacilli was found, but not enough, it is claimed, to have caused his death.e

But with this the plot does not end. After Colonel Swope and his nephews were out of the way, a plot was hatched, it is alleged, to kill off the entire family.


NEPHEW'S BODY EXHUMED.

Suspicion of foul play was aroused at the sudden death of Chrisman Swope last month. An autopsy was held, the stomach was removed and a thorough examination made. The stomach is now in Chicago, where it is being analyzed by a commission of eminent chemists and toxicologists.

"It will be several days before an arrest is made," said John H. Atwood of the law firm of Reed, Atwood, Yates, Mastin & Harvey. "We have the evidence well in hand. There is not a particle of doubt in my mind but that both Thomas Swope and Chrisman Swope were poisoned, and that they did not die of the diseases which they were said to have in the newspaper accounts."


TO KILL THE HEIRS.

This plot, said to have been planned with more deliberation, and even more heinous intent than the now famous Gunness affair, had for its supposed end the extermination of all the Swope heirs. Shortly before Chrisman Swope's death, it is charged, a man visited the office of a well known bacteriologist of Kansas City and secured some typhoid germs. With these deadly bacilli, those pushing the matter believe he hoped to innoculate the members of the Swope family.

Colonel Thomas H. Swope and Chrisman Swope are said to have both died after the same manner. The former died October 3. He arose the fateful morning, and was given a bath. An hour afterwards he died in convulsions.

Chrisman Swope was a man of about 30, young and vigorous. Shortly before this it was given out that he was suffering from typhoid fever. He was taken down December 2 and died four days after. He is said to have been administered a capsule an hour before his death. the nurses say that he died in convulsions.


EIGHT OTHERS STRICKEN.

The man suspected secured his typhoid bacteria November 10. His first visit to the Swope home in Independence was made Thanksgiving day. It was only a week after this that Chrisman Swope was taken down with the contagion. The plot is thought to have been to kill off the heirs by typhoid fever.

The sudden death of Chrisman Swope, following so close after the fatal illness of Colonel Swope, immediately aroused the suspicions of the family. An autopsy was held with the result that it was claimed that the last member of the family had not died of typhoid, as was said. The stomach was soon after sent to Chicago.

During this time, it is claimed, there was more evidence of a plot to kill off the entire family. Mrs. Logan Swope was taken down with typhoid fever early in December.

In rapid succession other members of the family were taken down with typhoid fever. They follow in chronological order:
Dec. 2 -- Margaret Swope.
Dec. 4 -- Miss Dixon, the governess. A negro servant by the name of Coppidge, Miss Compton, seamstress.
Dec. 5 -- Stuart Flelming.
Dec. 9. -- Sarah Swope, 14 years of age.
Dec. 11 -- Stella Swope.
Dec. 22 -- Lucy Lee.

None of the victims were in a critical condition.


NURSES FIRST SUSPICIOUS.

Lucy Lee was on her return trip from Europe. It is thought that she was inoculated with the typhoid germs in route to Kansas City. It is known that it takes from six to seven days after inoculation, for the first symptoms of the disease to show. In the case of Miss Lee, she was taken down four days after her arrival in Kansas City.

The investigation which resulted in these startling disclosures was largely at the insistence of the nurses employed in the Swope home during the illness of Chrisman Swope. At their suggestion Dr. G. T. Twyman of Independence was called in to make an investigation. He found the house to be in a sanitary condition and no place from whence the disease germs could possibly originate. Dr. Frank Hall also made an investigation with the same results.

FIVE DETECTIVES ON GUARD.

Mrs. Logan Swope and other members of the family told their suspicions to John G. Paxton, attorney for the Swope estate. At first Mr. Paxton would not believe that there could be anything in these charges. But after an investigation he, too, became convinced that there was truth in them. Mr. Paxton yesterday employed the law firm of Reed, Atwood, Yates, Mastin & Harvey, to push the investigation.

One man suspected is now under the espionage day and night of five private detectives employed by the Swopes.

Dr. Hekpeen of Rush Medical College, Chicago, is in Kansas City making investigations. He will take the stomach of Colonel Swope back with him for a thorough examination. Dr. Haynes of Chicago, a chemist of national reputation, will assist in the chemical tests to be made in the effort to find a trace of poison.

"The Swope millions will be used to run this mystery to the ground," said Mr. Atwood.

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January 11, 1910

HELD AS SUSPECTS
IN HEIRESS CASE.

KANSAS CITY POLICE THOUGHT
THEY HAD FOUND MISS-
ING COUPLE.

Arrested as They Disem-
barked From Train From
Excelsior Springs.
Marie  Horton, Suspected of Being Henrietta Von Etten.
MARIE HORTON, ALIAS HENRIETTA VON ETTEN.
Reed's Companion and for a While Believed to Be Roberta De Janon.

While the Kansas City police were arresting a man and a woman suspected of being Ferdinand Cohen and Roberta De Janon, respectively waiter and heiress, ho eloped from Philadelphia more than one week ago, the real Cohen and De Janon were being taken into custody in Chicago.

The Kansas City suspects were arrested by plain clothes officers from Central station as they alighted from a train from Excelsior Springs at the Union depot yesterday afternoon. Information leading to the arrest was given to Captain Walter Whitsett of the Central police district by R. E. Mackey of the Pickwick apartments at Excelsior Springs by long distance telephone. Patrtolmen John Torpey and T. H. Gillespie were awaiting them at the depot.

They were taken to police headquarters and examined by Captain Walter Whitsett. The man gave his name as H. J. Reed, and address as Chicago. He said he had been for some time in the gas fixture business with offices in the Holland building in that city. On his person was found $1,200 in currency, and letters addressed to H. J. Reed and H. J. Ross. He said he was not married to the woman in whose company he was arrested. He said he had known her for eight years. He refused to make any other statement.

H. J. Reed, of Chicago or Salt Lake City.
H. J. REED.
Arrested Under Suspicion That He Might Be Ferdinand Cohen.

Men from the Pinkerton detective agency who have been working on the De Janon elopement case declare that Reed resembles the missing waiter, Ferdinand Cohen, in almost every respect, and asked that he be held until information could be secured from their Philadelphia office.

WOMAN TALKED FREELY.

Reed's companion, although visibly worried over the fact that she was detained, was willing to talk. She said she was Marie Horton of Detroit, Mick., but after cross-questioning declared taht her real name is Henriette von Etten. According to her story she was born in Vienna, Austria, and was married in that country to a man who was at one time connected with the foreign embassy at Washington, D. C. She left her husband and went to the Pacific coast eight years ago, where she met Reed, who, she stated, was at that time conducting a place in Seattle, Wash. She says Reed is suing his Seattle wife for divorce. In March, 1909, she went to Detroit, where she conducted a rooming house. She came to Kansas City two weeks ago and met Reed. They lived in a hotel on Baltimore avenue until they went to Excelsior Springs. They intended going on to Salt Lake City.

Two big trunks, a dress suit case, a valise and a handbag were brought from the baggage room at the Union depot by the police officers. The contents were emptied and examined, but no further indenifying evidence was obtained.

Pinkerton men and the police were soon convinced the woman is not Roberta De Janon. The eloping girl is only 17 years old, while the woman at present in custody appears to be 25. Marie Horton has several false teeth, while Miss De Janon has none.

SHORT STAY IN EXCELSIOR.

The man and woman had spent Thursday night at the Elms hotel. They registered as H. J. Reed and wife of Chicago, and rented rooms Friday in the Pickwick apartments, saying they would remain a month. They kept close to their room during their stay. Considerable wine was delivered to the rooms. The woman was in Kansas City Saturday.

They gave no reason for leaving here hurriedly. When asked by another guests of the apartments to show credentials as to who he was the man exhibted papers from Salt Lake City and Tacoma, Wash., but had nothing to show he was from Chicago.

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January 7, 1910

CURED OF ILLS
OVER THE PHONE?

ABSENT TREATMENT PUT MRS.
MOSTOW UNDER SPELL,
WITNESSES SAY.

Spiritualist Seeks to Prevent
Heirs From Depriving
Him of Bequests.

That by giving her absent treatment over the telephone for rheumatism and in other ways, John H. Lee, said to be a spiritualist, won the confidence of wealthy Mrs. Victoria Mostow, 71 years old, and thus influenced her to bequeath him property worth $35,000, was the substance of testimony given yesterday in Judge J. G. Park's division of the circuit court.

The occasion was the trial of a suit by which Lee seeks to have set aside deeds transferring to James P. Richardson, principal of the Prosso school, and nephew of Mrs. Mostow, the property left to Lee by will. The heirs have a suit pending to set aside the will.

The story told by witnesses in substance follows:

Mrs. Mostow was the wife of the late Randolph Mostow, and a sister of the late Dr. De Estaing Dickerson. From the latter she inherited a large amount of property. Mr. Mostow died in the summer of 1908. During his last illness, he summoned Lee and was given treatment. In this way Mrs. Mostow became acquainted with the spiritualist.

TREATED BY PHONE.

After her husband's death, Mrs. Mostow became a believer in spiritualism. Through the medium of spirits and mesmeric powers Lee claimed that he could cure every known ill. Mrs. Mostow put in a telephone at her home, at Thirty-fourth and Wyandotte streets, and when she became troubled with rheumatism, Lee would give her absent treatment over the phone. At this time he lived near 4800 East Eighth street, several miles across the city from his patient.

In January, 1908, Mrs. Mostow made deeds to property at 817 Main street, and her home on Wyandotte, to her only surviving heir in Kansas City, James P. Richardson, owner of the Prosso Preparatory school. This was done to escape the payment of the collateral inheritance tax, and to prevent the heirs in Chicago from securing any of her property. The deeds were not to be recorded until after her death.

LIVED WITH HER.

In the summer of 1908, it is charged, Lee secured so great an influence over Mrs. Mostow that he secured permission to move himself and family into her home. Here they have lived since. The taxes are said to have been paid by the Mostow estate, and during her lifetime all the household expenses were met by Mrs. Mostow.

After Lee had been living in the Mostow home a few months, it is charged, it was seen that he gained an influence over the aged woman, and she began deeding small pieces of property to him.

Mr. Richardson, seeing the trend of affairs and fearing that he might lose the property that was to be his at the death of his aunt, immediately recorded the two deeds. When Mrs. Mostow died, it was found that she had bequeathed the same two pieces of property to Lee.

Suit was brought in the circuit court by Lee to set aside the deeds, charging undue influence. A similar suit was also brought by Richardson and the Chicago heirs to set aside the will.

The evidence was all submitted yesterday in Judge Park's court. The final arguments will be heard some time next week.

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January 6, 1910

JEU BING FLEES
FROM TONG WAR.

CHINESE BOY, ESCAPING FROM
FRISCO, SPENDS HOURS IN
KANSAS CITY.

Hides in Union Depot to
Evade Prying Enemies
of His Family.

So that he, at least, might escape the tong war in San Francisco in which an uncle has met death and in which his relatives are all involved, Jeu Bing, a Chinese boy, was spirited from the California city at night and with $500 in gold in his pocket was placed aboard a train for Chicago. His ticket called for a change of trains at Kansas City, and he spent a couple of hours yesterday morning in the Union depot. The boy has letters to several Chinese merchants of Chicago and it will rest with them as to whether he continues East or remains there. A price, it is said, has been placed on Jeu's head by the tong faction said to be responsible for the death of his uncle.

Jeu is 16 years old. He was born in San Francisco's Chiatown and was left motherless when a little child. The boy attended the Presbyterian Sunday school there and acquired the English language rapidly. With his knowledge of the Chinese tongue and his familiarity with the denizens of his section of the city he was frequently called on by the authorities as an interpreter. It was while engaged in some of these cases that he gained the enmity of influential Chinamen who were his father's rivals in business.

MARKED FOR DEATH.

After the earthquake, Jeu was constantly in demand. The authorities wanted information on the mysteries of the Chinese section. They thought that they could get it from Jeu. If they did, it is a secret, for Jeu declares that he knew nothing of the underground passages and the hovels and haunts of the criminal Chinese. After the restoration of Chinatown much of the blame for the activity of the authorities was laid to the Bing family.

Then came the tong wars. How his family were interested in these, Jeu could or would not say. It was sufficient that there was bad feeling, he said, and to make matters worse his uncle was one of those who was stabbed in the back one night. His body was found the next day. There was much excitement in the Chinese quarter. There were other assaults and the other members of the Bing family remained indoors. Two weeks ago a friend notified them that Jeu was one of the Chinamen on whose head a price had been put by one of the tongs.

Friendly Chinamen were called in consultation. The authorities, who were told of the threat, suggested that Jeu secure the names of some of the Chinamen suspected and they would be arrested. He was unable to do this, and at a friendly council it was decided to send Jeu away from the city.

DONNED WOMAN'S DRESS.

This was the hardest part of the programme. It was known that the house was under surveillance, and it was with difficulty that Jeu was spirited out. He was dressed in a woman's walking suit with a heavy veil, and in this costume made his way to the railroad depot, where a detective purchased his ticket. He had a purse containing $500 in gold, the most of which he brought to Kansas City with him.

Arriving here early yesterday morning, Jeu presented a note to Station master Bell. The latter escorted him to Matron Everingham, who made the boy comfortable and kept him out of sight until the time for departure of his train to Chicago. The boy feared that if his presence in the depot became known some Chinamen, enemies of his family, might telegraph to San Francisco and that members of the tong who were sworn to kill him would follow.

Jeu was an entertaining conversationalist and also a good quizzer. He asked hundreds of questions of the "red caps" as to the size of the city, the number of Chinese in the town and also expressed wonder that there was no Chinese quarter and no Chinese servants. He took the names of several who had been kind to him and said that he would send them a little token of his regard when he returned to San Francisco, which he hoped would be soon.

Jeu said that he was a nephew of Lee Bing, the deceased Chinese philanthropist of St. Louis. Over a score of members of the Bing family, he said, came to America about a quarter of a century ago. Many of them are dead, while some live in El Paso, Chicago and New York. The rest all live in San Francisco.

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December 25, 1909

MOTHER COULDN'T MEET HIM.

Claud Bullus, 15 Years Old, Learns
She Is Dead.

One year ago Claud Bullus, now 15 years old, was sent by W. G. Leeman, probation officer of Dallas, Tex., to the boys' industrial school at Nashville, Tenn. A few days ago the officials of the school received a letter from Mr. Leeman containing a ticket and a request that Bullus be allowed to go to Kansas City to spend Christmas with his mother. When the boy arrived in Kansas City night before last he found that his mother had died of tuberculosis at the old general hospital a month ago.

Claud tells a pitiful story. Six years ago he lived in Chicago with his father and mother and two other brothers. The father and mother separated and that is the last he has heard of his father. His oldest brother, Thomas, joined the navy while the mother and other two boys went to Fort Worth, Tex., where her sister resided. They lived with her four months and then went to Dallas where the boys worked at different jobs to support the mother.

About a year ago the mother and her son, Robert, now 18 years old, went to Denver, Col. Claud remained in Dallas and was sent with twelve other boys to the industrial school in Nashville, Tenn. He received a letter once a week from his mother while she was in Denver. About four months ago she and Robert came to Kansas City, where the mother worked as a domestic until she became ill and was taken to the hospital.

Instead of spending a happy Christmas with the mother and brother, Claud will spend the day as he did yesterday, looking for his brother Robert, whom he thinks is still in Kansas City. The boy is being cared for at the old general hospital, where he will remain until he finds his brother or secures a position.

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December 17, 1909

MILLION IS RAISED
FOR ORIENT SYSTEM.

Result of Recent Trip of
Officials and Capitalists.

The sum of $939,000 in subscriptions for the promotion of the work on the Kansas City, Mexico & Orient Railway is the result of the recent trip conducted by President A. E. Stilwell and Edward C. Dickinson, vice president of the railroad company. The trip was taken the first of this month, lasted fifteen days, ending the first of this week. Mr. Dickinson was accompanied by a party of Eastern business men and capitalists. He pronounces the trip a success from a business standpoint as well as in every other way. Before the trip was completed $789,000 had been subscribed by the men of the party and since then the other $150,000 has been sent in.

The trip started at Chicago, the party being taken in a special train. Th intention was to go straight to El Paso and down to the City of Mexico directly from there. However, storms, washouts and swollen streams made that particular rout out of the question. So the party had to give up the idea of going over that section of the company's tracks. The trip South was therefore by way of Chillicothe, Fort Worth, San Antonio and Laredo to Mexico City. The latter part of the trip was made over the Orient lines.

The return trip took the party over the Mexican Central to El Paso, over the Texas Pacific to Sweet Water and on into San Angelo. The Kansas City, Mexico & Orient line was then followed as far as Altus where the Frisco was traveled to St. Louis. At the last mention place the party disbanded. Mr. Dickinson returned directly to Kansas City, disappointed in only one thing -- the party had not been able to travel over as much of the company's tracks as had been desired.

The work on the road is to be pushed as fast as possible and all of the improvements contemplated will be made in both roadbed and rolling stock.

When asked in regard to the personnel of the party Mr. Dickinson said he preferred not to give out the names yet because of reasons which also he didn't care to make public. However, he said that John F. Wallace, former chief engineer of the Illinois Central railroad and chief engineer of the Panama canal, who is also a vice president of the Kansas City, Mexico & Orient railway, was one of the party. Mr. Wallace, said Mr. Dickinson, has only recently been made vice president of the road to fill the place of George Crocker, recently deceased. Further that the above Mr. Dickinson said he could say nothing for publication.

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December 8, 1909

K. C. HORSES BEST IN WORLD.

Win All French Coach Class Prizes
at International Show.

A clean sweep of all the prizes in every class of the French coach breed, is the record made by McLaughlin Bros., Kansas City horsemen, at the International Horse Show, held in Chicago last week and continuing this week. William McLaughlin, one of the firm, has returned from Chicago, with one silver trophy cup, and cash prizes aggregating $1,050.

The big prize own by McLaughlin Bros., was the silver loving cup, the first prize in the grand championship, which was open to horses of all ages, and was won by Decorateur, a chestnut stallion six years old. Decorateur proved a two time prize winner, taking the blue ribbon in the competition of all French coach horses of four years and over.

Two other individual first prizes were also won by the McLaughlin's. In the three-year-old class, Valina, a brown stallion, won the first place. And in the two-year-old class, Balanceur, a bay stallion, took the first prize. Another first prize won by McLaughlin Bros. included best group of five horses in French breed. All the other horses winning the prizes in the last two classes were imported.

All the second prizes were also won by McLaughlin's, in competition with the largest breeders from all sections of the world. Thirty-one horses were taken to Chicago by this firm, from which the prize winners were selected.

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December 2, 1909

AFTER TEN YEARS
'GATOR HAS A HOME.

STUFFED SAURIAN'S CAREER
FULL OF VICISSITUDES.

Hoodoo to a Chicago Saloon, Brought
to Kansas City by a Bartender,
and Sold to a Doctor for
a Small Sum.

Homeless, disowned and an outcast, the mounted form of a once giant saurian occupies floor space -- by sufferance only -- in Schaefer's buffet on Wyandotte and Twelfth streets. It changed ownership three times yesterday and is now the property of Dr. James O. Lee, who before he can remove it from the saloon must build an addition to his office.

Ten years ago Dan Flannigan, a saloonkeeper at Twenty-second street and Wabash avenue, Chicago, loaned a curio man $10 on the stuffed "gator," which was twelve feet long, and its age estimated all the way from 1,000 to 2,000 years. A taxidermist said it was worth at least $50 to mount the reptile, so Flannigan thought he was in the clear.

ONCE A SHOW WINDOW PIECE.

Joe O'Brien was a bartender at Flannigan's, and he helped put the gator on a shelf in the saloon. From that time on, it was said Flannigan's business suffered reverses. Whether the look that a man would give the 'gator w hen he stepped in the saloon sobered him or made him think that he "had 'em" or whether the 'gator was just a hoodoo Flannigan never decided.

When O'Brien left for Kansas City five years ago, however, Flannigan gave him the saurian. O'Brien shipped the thing along with his household furniture, and the story is told around the freight house that three pay checks still await the claim of negro laborers who looked in the car.

The 'gator passed into several hands and for a couple of years was a showpiece in an Eighth street saloon. Then it came into possession of Jack Murty of 1031 Wyandotte street, who put it in the window of his cleaning establishment. This show got tiresome after a while and he placed it farther back in his store. All his friends admired it, but none would purchase it.

One day W. C. Schaefer happened in. Yes, he would purchase the stuffed reptile. He would give all of $3 for it. Murty clasped his hand to seal the bargain. Yesterday morning four men carried the 'gator to Schaefer's saloon. Not until it was deposited on the floor did Schaefer realize that an elephant would have taken up less room.

AND THE DOCTOR BUYS HIM.

"Give him to me," said his brother Al.

"All right," responded Schaefer and the deal was closed. A short while later Dr. Lee happened in. He could use the 'gator all right and would give $2.50 for him. Again Mr. 'Gator was sold. Dr. Lee had forgotten to measure him before he purchased him and when he discovered that the reptile was 12 feet long and a yard wide, he discovered that he did not want him as bad as he had a short while before. The Schaefers would not take him back as a gift.

A carpenter gave Dr. Lee an estimate on an addition which will have to be built into his office to accommodate the alligator. Meanwhile "Ivory," the porter, will have to mop around Mr. Gator.

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November 23, 1909

TERMINAL DIRECTORS
ACCEPT DEPOT PLAN.

KANSAS CITY'S UNION STATION
TO COST $5,750,000.

Great Structure Will Have Every
Facility for Handling Trains
and Travelers -- Dirt to Fly
in a Few Months.
New Union Passenger Station Faces on Twenty-Third Street and Has a Frontage of 512 Feet.
SOUTH ELEVATION OF NEW UNION PASSENGER STATION.

Five million, seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars will be the cost of Kansas City's new Union passenger station.

The plans prepared by Jarvis Hunt, a Chicago architect, were accepted yesterday by the board of directors of the Kansas City Terminal Railway Company. As soon as the stockholders of the several railroads that are to use the depot ratify the action of their representatives, work will begin on the structure. This consent is expected to be immediate. In a few months dirt will be flying and construction under way.

GENERAL PLAN OF STRUCTURE.

The main entrance to the station will face south. It's exact location will be twenty-five feet south of Twenty-third street, and 100 feet west of Main.

The frontage of the main building is to be 512 feet. The train sheds are to be 1,400 feet long, and are to be constructed so that trains east and west can run through.

The exterior will be of stone, concrete and steel. The roof will be rounding or barrel shape. The general lobby is to be 350 feet long and 160 feet wide, and the decorations and accommodations will be rich and elaborate.

Especial care has been taken in lighting and ventilation; the ceiling will be arched, and will be 115 feet high. The interior walls will be of marble, and massive columns will grace each side of the passageway into other parts of the building.

The center of the lobby will be the ticket office. Adjacent will be the baggage room, where passengers can check their baggage and not be annoyed with it again until they reach their destination.

ON THREE LEVELS.

In a space of 75x300 feet off the lobby will be the restaurants, lunch rooms, waiting rooms, men's smoking rooms, and other utilities. Telegraph and telephone stations, a subpostal station and other accessories will also find places within this space.

On the upper floors will be located the offices of several railroads using the depot together with rooms for railway employes.

Space has been set apart for dining and lounging, reading, and billiard rooms.

From the center of the lobby and above the track will extend the main waiting room, on either side of which there will be midways or passages leading to the elevators to carry passengers to the trains. Smoke and gases from the locomotives will be s hut out from the station by a steel and glass umbrella shed.

There will be three levels to the depot. These are to be known as the passenger level, the station proper; the train service level, from where passengers take the trains, and which is connected with the midways by eight big elevators on either side, and also, stairways; and the level on which are the baggage rooms, express and postal service.

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November 20, 1909

NEGRO THEATER MANAGER
LOOKED FOR NO PROTEST.

Louis Woods Says His Company In-
vested $5,000 in Contracts for
Rebuilding Synagogue.

Louis Woods of 722 Charlotte street, owner of the Kansas City Son, a negro weekly paper, a negro who leased the Jewish Synagogue at Eleventh and Oak streets to open a theater for negroes, said last night that he was surprised at the opposition the proposed theater has received.

"For years I have been giving this matter much needed thought," he said. "I have seen white play houses in Kansas City prosper and added to every year. I noticed another thing -- that few negroes attend a white theater unless a negro troupe happened to be there. Then the first and second balconies are packed with negroes who pay nearly as much as those on the lower floor. It struck me that as all negro shows that come to Kansas City are liberally patronized by negroes, they might as do as well by a theater managed by a person of their own color.

"I talked with Sam Conkey, advance man for the Cole and Johnson show, with Bob Motts, proprietor of the Pekin, a negro theater in Chicago, and with Sir Green, supreme chancellor commander of the negro Knights of Pythias who just has completed a $100,000 negro theater in New Orleans. We combined on the project. It was our intention to have a chain of negro play houses over the country. We have been looking at a proposition in St. Louis.

"We had no idea that there would be any objection to our going by ourselves. White people usually want the negro to keep to himself, but just as soon as he attempts to do so, they object. We had no idea that we would meet the color objection with this theater.

"The theater was to be an investment. We examined the lease and found it without restrictions as to color. The building and the location were so well adapted to our needs that we put money into the business. We have let several contracts and have spent about $5,000.

"Had we known that our going there would have been offensive, it would have caused us to look for another location. So far as I am concerned I do not wish to raise any strife. I was born and reared in Missouri and expect to live and die here."

When it was known a negro theater was to be near them business men on East Eleventh street got up a petition remonstrating against the lease. It was signed by nearly every business firm near the theater.

A. P. Nichols, a real estate agent, has charge of the synagogue property for the owner who lives in Omaha. The principal objectors are D. O. Smart and the North-Mehornay Furniture Company. Mr. Smart has under erection a five-story building west of the proposed negro theater. There are many retail firms along East Eleventh street, members of all of which are opposing the lease to a negro theater.

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November 9, 1909

GRUELING BATTLE
WON BY M'FARLAND.

Packy Gains Ten-Round De-
cision Over Thompson.

The landing of five clean blows to his opponent's one, and outpointing him from the tap of the gong to the final ring, Packy McFarland, the Chicago stockyards wonder, gained a decision over Johnny Thompson, the Sycamore "Cyclone," at the Hippodrome last night, after the fastest and most grueling ten-round fight that has been staged in the West in years. Joe Coffey of Chicago was the referee and his decision was perfect.

Throughout the fight Thompson did a great deal of the agressive work, but his swings went wide of their mark on many occasions, due to the wonderful generalship, ducking the clever boxing of the stockyards boy. McFarland's backing away from Thompson most of the time and his hanging on at times counted against him in the decision, but he was so far ahead at the close of the battle on points that there was not a chance for a draw. Had many of the numerous swings Thompson started ever landed on dangerous places McFarland might have been lying on the mat for the fatal ten, but he dodged all but one or two of the hard punches the "Cyclone" tried to put over. On the other hand Packy landed jabs in rapid succession and pushed over some hard punches that stopped many of the wild rushes of Thompson. Thompson's blocking of blows was at times perfect and he should be given credit for putting up a good fight against his cleverer opponent.

CROWD APPRECIATES BATTLE.

The crowd which attended this bout numbered about 5,000 people and the doors were closed some time before the fight started as the hall was crowded to overflowing and it was impossible to put any more fans in the big hall where they could see the fight. It was the first of the winter smokers to be given by the Empire Athletic Club and was a decided success in every way. The crowd was handled in a skillful manner and there was not a word of complaint from anyone, except the usual few who wish to complain about the decision. It was the unanimous opinion of experts at the ringside that the decision of Joe Coffey, who is recognized as one of the best referees in the West, was correct.

When the fighters entered the ring Thompson wore a smile of confidence and believed he was sure to knock Packy out before the close of the fight. He had never had the gloves on with the Chicago Irishman before and he had evidently underestimated the speed of the winner. McFarland also wore a smile but at times looked a little bit worried as though studying his opponent. For two years these boys have been wrangling through the papers about fighting, each claiming the other was afraid. This bout was to settle this long argument. It has settled it. McFarland won and with the victory goes the biggest share of the local purse, about twenty weeks of theatrical work and the chance to make Battling Nelson fight him for the world's lightweight championship or back down. It is now up to Nelson, as McFarland removed in the bout last night the last obstruction in his pathway to a fight with the champion Dane.

THOMPSON WAS WILD.

The only blood drawn on McFarland was a cut over his left eye. This was an old wound and was opened up in the seventh round when Thompson landed a hard right in that vicinity. the cut was about an inch long and was sewed up after the battle. Thompson was marked about the head as the result of the numerous punches landed there and his mouth bled a little.

From the tap of the gong opening this battle Thompson began to bore in and he followed McFarland about the ring constantly waiting for an opening to land a knockout punch, which never came. He swung wild in the first round and in every round after that, but many times landed punches with telling effect. But once or twice during the fight did McFarland swing wild. Other times his punches and jabs went right to their mark and several times he rocked the head of his opponent with wicked jabs to the jaw. Thompson landed several wind and stomach punches which were effective, but McFarland blocked cleverly and the "Cyclone" could not land one that would put him out. Thompson's left shoulder, which he kept in Packy's way most oft he time and his clever blocking and ducking also stopped many of the stock yards boy's punches, but Packy so far outclassed his opponent in cleverness that Thompson had a chance to win without a knockout.

At the close of the battle Thompson walked slowly to his corner, and, although tired he did not seem to be in bad shape. McFarland was a little tired but was in shape to continue the fight, and was in just as good fighting trim at the close as his opponent. It was a great battle and the best boy won..

What these boys would do in a twenty-round battle no one can tell, but in ten rounds of such fighting as they put up last night -- and it was a fast battle from start to finish -- there was no question about the winner.

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November 1, 1909

NO, AWFUL, GOT NO BRIDE.

Building Barns, Not a Fine Home,
Declares Alderman on Return.

"Nothing to it. Wouldn't it have been awful if such a thing had been published?" gasped Alderman James Pendergast last night upon his return from a business trip to Chicago.

While he was away some wag said that the alderman would return with a bride.

"They say you have all the marrying symptoms; that you are building a fine home in the south part of town and buying automobiles," it was suggested.

"If they would say that I am building barns on my farms and buying harvesting machines they would be nearer the facts," replied the alderman, adding, "there isn't very much connubial sentiment about that, is there?"

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October 26, 1909

KLING TO BUILD HIS
OWN 1910 BALL PARK.

PLANNING FOR A BETTER CITY
LEAGUE FOR NEXT SEASON.

Has No Hope of Being Traded by
Murphy and Will Therefore
Form Fast Semi-Pro
Organization.

With the close of the Kansas City League, comprised of six clubs and which had a most successful season, comes the announcement from John Kling, the champion catcher of the world in 1908, that he will remain in Kansas City next year and will have a ball park, a team and possibly a league all his own. He will not own the league but he intends to have it run on the same plan as the Chicago semi-pro organization if he is connected with it.

Last season Kling tried to get away from Chicago and play with another National League club. Murphy refused to trade him. It cut the league out of a great ball player and Kling out of a neat salary. But Murphy had the whip end oft he argument, and Kling stayed out of the National League. He made almost as much money right here in the City League as he would have made in Chicago or any other city, but he wanted to play baseball. Now Clarke Griffith of Cincinnati, Charles Ebbets of Brooklyn and several others are trying to make trades for Kling but Murphy is as stubborn as ever, and it looks as though he intends to keep Kling right here in Kansas City for another year or force him to play in Chicago. The latter Kling refused to do, but he is willing to remain in Kansas City if he cannot play in any other major league city but Chicago, and he might play there if traded to the Cominskey crowd. Kling will play in the National League if traded but not with Chicago, and it looks as though Murphy will not allow him to make a change.

EXPECTS BIG CROWDS.

Therefore Johnny Kling is planning on staying right here for another year. He practically made arrangements yesterday to secure a ball park of his own for next season. He plans to have a park fully as large as Association park and it will be on one of the main car lines. He wants to get as near the center of the city as possible but may be compelled to go near Electric park. There are several good sites on good car lines which he has been considering and he will select one of them early in the year in order to have the grandstand, fences and bleachers completed before the opening of the playing season.

Kling is of the opinion that a good city league would be a big paying investment in Kansas City and he does not plan to have anything to do with a league run as the one this year was. Kling expects to have his park arranged so that it will accommodate at least 7,000 people, and he believes it will be crowded to overflowing on Sundays with a good ball team, which is undoubtedly true.

PLENTY OF TALENT.

There are many ball players of league caliber who would remain in Kansas City during the summer and quit league baseball if assured a good salary in the City League. Many of these players are married and do not want to leave their families half of the year as they are compelled to do traveling with league teams. Kling also has many friends who are playing semi-pro baseball in Chicago and other cities who would be glad of the opportunity to come to Kansas City and play ball here. There will be a lot of league baseball players who will retire next year, not because they will be too slow for the game, but because they are tired of the traveling they are compelled to do through the hot summer months and such men would be glad to earn a salary in a good city league. Kling's idea is to give Kansas City fans the best baseball possible and if this idea is carried this city should have a fast semi-pro league next season, which should meet with success.

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