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February 2, 1910

WILL REBUILD AT ONCE.

First Christian Science Church Di-
rectors Authorized to Proceed.

The First Church of Christ, Scientist, Ninth street and Forest avenue, which was burned last Saturday night, is to be rebuilt at once. It is to be an absolutely fireproof structure, and will cost approximately $75,000. Of this amount $10,000 was contributed Sunday night and the board of directors were authorized to start the construction at once. Plans are being prepared by Edwards & Cumberson, architects.

"There will be no trouble whatever in raising the $75,000," said J. K. Stickney, president of the board of directors last night. "There is plenty of money in the congregation and all are willing to do their share.

"The congregation subscribed $42,000 in 1905 and 1906 toward the extension of the mother church in Boston, so there will be no trouble in raising all the funds we need for our own church. We expect to have the new structure completed and ready for occupancy by the first of September. In the meantime we have secured a place for our regular services. On next Sunday the afternoon services and Sunday school will be held in the Second Church of Christ, Scientist, Thirty-second street and Troost avenue, at 3 o'clock. Evening services will be held at 8 o'clock. After next Sunday services will be held at the same hours in the Jewish synagogue, Linwood boulevard and Flora avenue. Wednesday evening services will be held in the synagogue at 8 o'clock."

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February 1, 1910

TO HURRY NEW THEATER.

Work on Empress Starts Today;
To Be Finished May 1.

"We will start the foundation of the Empress theater today," said Fred Lincoln of Chicago, representative of the Sullivan-Considine circuit, which is to erect a new play house at Twelfth and McGee streets. "We expect to put three gangs of men at work on the building, working in 8-hour shifts and will have it ready for occupancy by May 1. Lee DeCamp of Cincinnati, the architect, will be here today. The house will cost about $100,000."

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November 23, 1909

TERMINAL DIRECTORS
ACCEPT DEPOT PLAN.

KANSAS CITY'S UNION STATION
TO COST $5,750,000.

Great Structure Will Have Every
Facility for Handling Trains
and Travelers -- Dirt to Fly
in a Few Months.
New Union Passenger Station Faces on Twenty-Third Street and Has a Frontage of 512 Feet.
SOUTH ELEVATION OF NEW UNION PASSENGER STATION.

Five million, seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars will be the cost of Kansas City's new Union passenger station.

The plans prepared by Jarvis Hunt, a Chicago architect, were accepted yesterday by the board of directors of the Kansas City Terminal Railway Company. As soon as the stockholders of the several railroads that are to use the depot ratify the action of their representatives, work will begin on the structure. This consent is expected to be immediate. In a few months dirt will be flying and construction under way.

GENERAL PLAN OF STRUCTURE.

The main entrance to the station will face south. It's exact location will be twenty-five feet south of Twenty-third street, and 100 feet west of Main.

The frontage of the main building is to be 512 feet. The train sheds are to be 1,400 feet long, and are to be constructed so that trains east and west can run through.

The exterior will be of stone, concrete and steel. The roof will be rounding or barrel shape. The general lobby is to be 350 feet long and 160 feet wide, and the decorations and accommodations will be rich and elaborate.

Especial care has been taken in lighting and ventilation; the ceiling will be arched, and will be 115 feet high. The interior walls will be of marble, and massive columns will grace each side of the passageway into other parts of the building.

The center of the lobby will be the ticket office. Adjacent will be the baggage room, where passengers can check their baggage and not be annoyed with it again until they reach their destination.

ON THREE LEVELS.

In a space of 75x300 feet off the lobby will be the restaurants, lunch rooms, waiting rooms, men's smoking rooms, and other utilities. Telegraph and telephone stations, a subpostal station and other accessories will also find places within this space.

On the upper floors will be located the offices of several railroads using the depot together with rooms for railway employes.

Space has been set apart for dining and lounging, reading, and billiard rooms.

From the center of the lobby and above the track will extend the main waiting room, on either side of which there will be midways or passages leading to the elevators to carry passengers to the trains. Smoke and gases from the locomotives will be s hut out from the station by a steel and glass umbrella shed.

There will be three levels to the depot. These are to be known as the passenger level, the station proper; the train service level, from where passengers take the trains, and which is connected with the midways by eight big elevators on either side, and also, stairways; and the level on which are the baggage rooms, express and postal service.

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November 6, 1909

CIGARETTES IN 10,000 LOTS.

That Is the Way Louis Curtiss,
Architect, Buys Them.

Louis Curtiss, the architect, is not the champion cigarette smoker of Kansas City, but there is a well grounded belief that he is the champion individual buyer. Asked as to the source of his cigarette supply yesterday, the architect said that he had made his order by a New York manufacturer and made his purchases in lots of 10,000.

"The thousand cigarettes," said Curtiss, "will last me ten months. That would indicated that I smoke a thousand cigarettes a month, but I don't. I give about 25 per cent of them away. I figure that I smoke twenty-five cigarettes each day.

"Hurt me? Not at all. That is the secret of having them made to order. My cigarettes are manufactured of the mildest tobacco on the market and are free from dope. There is nothing in them but pure tobacco. Years ago I used to smoke a readymade brand and frequently suffered from sore throat. Then I turned to the tailor-made article. Cheaper, too. These are as fine a cigarette as a man ever smoked, and they cost, in 10,000 lots, only $18 a thousand. That sounds dirt cheap to me."

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August 23, 1909

TOY AIRSHIP TO TEST IDEAS.

Kansas City Men Building Craft
Near No. 19 Fire Station.

In a shed near No. 19 fire station at Shawnee avenue and High street, Kansas City's most prominent aerial craft is almost completed. It is being constructed by a fireman, Frank Marvin, after designs of his own and those of Edgar C. Faris, an architect.

Mr. Faris fell from a street car Monday and sustained a broken ankle, but expects to be ready to experiment with the air craft by the time it is completed. The present ship is the third built by the two. The former ones were not successes. The second one was demolished when it dashed to the earth in a trial flight.

The airships are merely toys by which ideas of the two inventors are being tried out. The one under construction now is much larger than either of its predecessors, being ten feet long and four feet wide. The engines used in former experiments will not be large enough to drive the new ship. Two were used, each having one-sixteenth of one-horse power. The power will probably be quadrupled. When the ship is ready to fly, an electric light wire will be attached to it to furnish power for the engines. It then will be loosed and the value of the ideas used its construction will be learned.

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August 9, 1909

THE TRIBUNE IS GENEROUS.

Chicago Paper Runs Cut of Alleged
Kansas City Depot.

In yesterday's Chicago Tribune there was a write-up of Kansas City's proposed new Union passenger station. An illustration of the building was presented, but Kansas City railroad men say that it is not a correct representation. Some two years ago a Chicago architect by the name of Jarvis Hunt, prepared drawings and sketches for the directors of the Kansas City Terminal Railway Company. They were but tentative in their scope, and did not receive the approval of the board of directors of the company for two reasons. One was the prohibitive expense they entailed, and the other that the company was not ready to finance so elaborate a building.

"Mr. Hunt evidently intends to build a monument to his genius, and to make the railroads foot the bill," was the comment made by one of the officers of the terminal company when the sketches were submitted. It is now understood that the architect is now at work on a more modified scale, and is preparing plans for a building the cost of which will be in keeping with the contract agreement, $2,800,000.

A building of the character illustrated in yesterday's Chicago paper would cost $5,000,000 to build.

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July 7, 1909

PLANS A RIVERSIDE
DRIVE FOR THE BLUE.

BOULEVARDS AND PARKWAYS
ALONG BANKS.

If Bonds Are Voted Tuesday, Kess-
ler's Ideas of Beautifying the
Blue Valley Will Be
Considered.

Preparatory and unofficial sketches for the redeeming of the Blue river and its tracks, and the addition of boulevards and parkways on both sides of the stream from the Missouri river to Swope park, have been prepared by George E. Kessler, engineer and landscape architect, for the consideratoin of the park board.

To carry out the plans of beautifying the Blue valley will necessitate funds from a bond issue, and there is not much likelihood of the park board giving it serious consideration unless bonds to be voted next Tuesday carry. If the bonds are approved by the voters the board will go over the territory and determine the applicability of Mr. Kessler's suggestions.

"The beautifying of the Blue valley and making it accessible to the use of the public for boulevards and other pleasures is a big undertaking," said Mr. Kessler yesterday. "There are many propositions involved that will have to be figured out before any definite engineering plans can be settled. The natural possibilities are there, and I have some excellent ideas.

"I believe it is possible to increase the water area of the stream by the acquirement of 100 or more acres of land at the bend in the river at about Twenty-seventh street and the installation of a dam."

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April 6, 1909

NEW 30-APARTMENT HOUSE.

In Course of Construction on Lin-
wood Boulevard, and Will Be
Ready October 1.

Work is being pushed on the new thirty-apartment flat building now in the course of construction on Linwood boulevard, covering the entire block from Prospect to Wabash avenue. It is expected it will be completed and ready for occupancy by October 1.

The building is to be three stories high, and constructed of brick and cut stone. Facing on Linwood boulevard, it will have five entrances, each one leading to six apartments. Four large stone columns supporting individual porches line the entrances.

Each apartment will have six rooms, two living rooms, a parlor, a bedroom, kitchen and dining room. This is exclusive of the bath room. The interior decorations are to be of polished oak and mahogany with the exception of the bath and bedrooms, which will be finished in white enamel. The parlors will open onto the porches. Floors in all the apartments are to be of polished oak.

The building, which has not yet been named, is being built by W. H. Collins at a cost of about $100,000. John W. McKecknie is the architect. Already the foundations have been laid and work on the first story will be commenced about the middle of this week.

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March 16, 1909

BUILDING FOR WOOLF BROS.

New Structure on Site Formerly Oc-
cupied by T. M. James & Son.

Ground is being cleared for the construction of Langston Bacon's new five-story building to be occupied by the Woolf Brothers Furnishing Goods Company at 1020-22 Walnut street. The contract for the ten-year lease of the building by Woolf Brothers was closed yesterday by Blanchert & Kipp, who were agents in the transaction. The tenants will move in about August 15. Although only five stories will be built at first, the foundation will be so constructed as to carry three additional floors.

The present building was occupied by T. M. James & Sons who were burned out February 11. Woolf Brothers, who have been in business in Kansas City for thirty years, will pay an annual rental of $20,000, or a total of $200,000 for ten years' use of the building.

Root & Siemens are the architects.

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January 5, 1909

FRANK M. HOWE DIES
OF HEART DISEASE.

WAS AN ARCHITECT OF INTER-
NATIONAL NOTE.

R. A. Long Building, Jewish Temple
and Many Other Important Kan-
sas City Structures Were
Planned by Him.

Frank Maynard Howe of the firm Howe & Hoit, an architect of international note whose name is associated with some of the most important buildings in Kansas city, died at his home, 1707 Jefferson street, at 7:30 o'clock last night of heart disease.

Mr. Howe, who was 59 years old, had been quite ill since June last. On July 6, accompanied by Mrs. Howe and their daughter, Miss Dorothy Howe, he toured Great Britain, Holland, Germany and France, in the hope of recovering his failing health, but when he returned October 7 he was but little improved.

Besides the widow, Mrs. Mary E. Howe, and the daughter, Miss Dorothy, there is another daughter, Mrs. Katherine Howe Munger, who lives at the family home. There is one grandchild, Nancy Munger, 3 years old.

When Mr. Howe came to Kansas City in 1885, the architectural firm of Van Brunt & Howe was established, in connection with a similar firm in Boston, Mass. Several years later Mr. Van Brunt came here. At the death of Mr. Van Brunt, seven years ago, the firm of Howe & Hoit was organized.

PLANNED SOME BIG BUILDINGS.

Mr. Howe was the architect of some of very prominent buildings, among them the Electricity building at the Columbian exposition, Chicago, in 1893, where he was also a member of the board of consulting architects. He held a similar position at the Louisiana Purchase exposition in St. Louis in 1904. Among Mr. Howe's first works was the Union station at Worcester, Mass.

He was born in West Cambridge, Mass., now known as Arlington, and was a graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Some of the well-known home buildings of which Howe was an architect were the following: R. A. Long building, Emery, Bird, Thayer Dry Goods Company store, Fidelity Trust Company, United States and Mexican Trust Company, Reliance building, Scottish Rite temple and St. Mary's hospital.

Among the houses of worship he planned were the new Jewish temple, the Independence Boulevard Christian church and he was building the Linwood Boulevard Christian church. He also planned the homes of Kirk Armour, Mrs. F. B. Armour and Charles Campbell.

When Mr. Howe died he was planning to build for R. A. Long a $1,000,000 home at Independence and Gladstone boulevards, which with stables, conservatory and other buildings, will occupy a full block.

Mr. Howe was a member of the Elm Ridge Club and the Knife and Fork Club, and was president of the Philharmonic Society throughout its existence. As a great-grandson of Isaac Howe, who fought at the battle of Lexington, he was selected for membership in the Sons of the Revolution. Mr. Howe's ancestors were English Puritans and came to Massachusetts in the seventeenth century. He was a member of Ararat temple, Mystic Shrine, and a thirty-second degree Mason.

His principal avocations were painting water colors and music. He played the piano and the pipe organ.

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November 24, 1908

ROOF OF HIPPODROME FELL.

Accident Was Due to Workmen's
Lack of Foresight.

Owing to the carelessness of workmen on the building a portion of the roof of the Hippodrome, Twelfth and Charlotte streets, fell at 3 o'clock yesterday morning. The accident was due to the moving of two of the supports to the main beams upholding the roof. The work was being done to make room for an aerial act which is to be put on, and the two supports were moved at practically at the same time, thus leaving the heavy beams without support. The walls of the old street car barn, where the Hippodrome is located, are of unusual thickness, and were not damaged to any extent. The floor likewise was built to stay and, although the mass of timbers crashed down on the skating rink, this portion was not damaged. No one was injured.
It was stated yesterday that the building would be repaired in two days, and would be opened for the Thanksgiving crowds. The loss is estimated at about $200 and is covered by insurance. Owing to the way the building was originally constructed, no other portion was damaged in the slightest.

The building inspector inspected the building yesterday and pronounced it absolutely safe.

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November 21, 1908

ON INSTALLMENT PLAN.

Additional Stories May Be Added to
Architect's Building.

The old building at 1118 McGee street is being torn down and a three-story brick and steel structure will be built on the lot by Louis Curtiss. The new building will be so constructed that five additional stories may be built. Mr. Curtiss is an architect and he plans to use part of the building for his business. The property was leased by Mr. Curtiss for ninety-nine years from George S. Myers. The consideration is $2,500 a year. Denison & Carter represented both parties.

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November 19, 1908

IT IS BAD TURKEY WEATHER.

Demand Is Light When There's No
Frost on Thanksgiving.

Scores of turkeys were brought into Kansas City yesterday by the neighboring farmers, and the produce merchants are getting ready for the Thanksgiving sale of gobbler meat. But the weather is worrying them. If warm and sun-shiny days are to be the lot of Kansas City for the next week, there will not be chants. It is always the case; cold weather increases the demand and warm weather decreases it.

There is no particular reason for this strange fact, according to many commission men. It is because it is. Years past have proved it to be a fact. Some say that Thanksgiving without cold weather and snow doesn't seem like Thanksgiving and people would just as soon eat beefsteak on the last Thursday in November, if it is warm, as to taste of the the time honored gobbler meat.

At the present turkeys are being sold at from 13 to 15 cents a pound wholesale, and from 17 1/2 to 20 cents retail. These prices are a little higher than the cost of chickens, so all who can afford chickens on Thanksgiving may take their choice between the two kinds of fowl.

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September 1, 1908

WILL RUSH NEW HOSPITAL.

Board of Public Works Agrees to
Help Architect Root.

"I could turn the new hospital over to the city in ten days if I were not continually annoyed by orders from the city hall," declared W. C. Root, one of the architects on the building. He visited the board of public works yesterday to straighten out some bills due contractors.

"This board will assist you. Tell us what you want us to do," suggested R. L Gregory, president.

"There ought to be a key rack made and installed, the gas company should be ordered to install meters and the furniture ought to be put in place," replied Mr. Root.

"If that is all, the secretary of the board will attend to it at once. You ought to be able to have the hospital ready for the new health and hospital board by the time the new charter becomes operative, September 3. Can you do it?"

"I guess so," answered the architect.

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June 29, 1908

WELL KNOWN ARCHITECT DIES.

Bertram August Von Unworth De-
signed Many Kansas City Homes.

Bertram August Unworth, 69 years old, died at his home, 2903 Gillham road. Born in Germany Mr. Von Unworth graduated from the gynmasium at Glogau and afterwards studied architecture at the University of Berlin. He was an officer for many years on the staff of General Count Von Moltke and served in the campaign of 1859, the Polish campagn of 1864 and the war of 1866. After leaving the army he married Fraulein Moldzio, who is still living, and came to America in 1870. In 1877 he located in Kansas City, and has lived here ever since. He practiced his profession of architect and many of the beautiful homes in Kansas City are the product of his brain.

Besides the widow, six children survive, Hans, Hermann, Frida, Gertrude, Erdmuthe and Margarethe. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock at the home. Burial will be in Elmwood.

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June 10, 1908

PLEASED WITH M'CUNE HOME.

County Judges Find Things in First
Class Shape There.

Conditions at the McCune home for boys, located a few miles from Independence, were found to be satisfactory by two of the three judges of the county court who visited there yesterday for the purpose of making an inspection. Judges J. M. Patterson and C. E. Moss, accompanied by Frank Ray, the architect, and William Southern of Independence, county examiner for Jackson county, made the trip of inspection.

"We are much pleased with the way Thomas N. Hughes, manager of the home, has conducted its affairs," said Judge Patterson last night. "We found seventeen boys at the home and they seem to be happy and contented. The boys have a garden in which they raise many vegetables and this keeps them busy and out of mischief. Yesterday Mr. Hughes was putting some shingles o n the house and five of the boys seemed to enjoy helping him.

"We are planning to erect a temporary barn or shed in which the boys can play on rainy days and which can be sued as a sleeping room in case the home becomes crowded. We are also planning the erection of a series of cottages, but this work probably will not be taken up before net fall."

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May 21, 1908

TO BUILD NEW OFFICE BLOCK.

Will Be Seven Story Structure at
Twelfth and Main.

A real estate transaction involving the building of a new seven-story modern store and office building at the north-west corner of Twelfth and Main streets was consummated yesterday afternoon. James W. Pennock of Syuracuse, N. Y., owner of the Pennock building at Twelfth and Main streets, leased the property to James O'Reilly, president of the Owl Drug Company, for a period of ninety-nine years at a net rental of $26,000 per year. The property has a frontage of twenty-four feet ten inches on Main street and 130 feet on the north side of Twelfth street.

As a part of the consideration, O'Reilly agrees to replace the four-story building now occupying the property with a modern seven-story office building. Six small stores on the first floor and in the basement will front on Main and Twelfth streets. The second will be devoted to business offices, while the four upper floors will be especially equipped for doctors and dentists. The architect is Lewis Curtis, who was architect for the Baltimore hotel.

Until recently Pennock and Curtis engaged to plan the building with the idea of retaining it himself, but the negotiations for a long lease were closed late yesterday afternoon.

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May 21, 1908

SEEKS MODEL FOR PARK ZOO.

Comptroller Pearson Will Visit Chi-
cago in Search of Ideas.

City Comptroller Pearson will leave for Chicago tonight on two missions. One is to get pointers from the Lincoln park zoo for a similar attraction to be installed at Swope park. He will be accompanied by Herbert Seddon, an architect who is to prepare the plans for the zoo buildings here. The other purpose of his trip is to pilot to the waters of the Blue and Missouri rivers a new gasoline launch, in which Pearson and others have an interest. The course to Kansas City will be through the Illinois, Mississippi and Missouri rivers.

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April 25, 1908

NEW ST. TERESA'S ACADEMY.

It Will Be Near Fifty-Fifth and Main
Streets and Will Cost $300,000.

Architects Wilder and Wight are drawing plans for a new school building which is to be erected by the Sisters of St. Joseph in charge of St. Teresa's academy, near Main street and Fifty-fifth. The Sisters recently closed a deal with E. S. Yoemans for the purchase of a twenty-acre tract in this vicinity at a cost of $40,000, and will shortly begin the erection of the school building. It is understood about $300,000 will be expended on the building. St. Teresa's academy is exclusively for girls.

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December 5, 1908

BOMB IN FIRST
NATIONAL BANK.

EXPLODES, DAMAGES BUILDING
AND INJURES TEN.

BANK'S BASEMENT IS WRECKED.

WAS BOMB PLACED BY INSTITU-
TION'S ENEMY?

This Is Belief of Officers Who Worked
on Case -- Explosion Took Place
When Janitor Closed a
Closet Door.

Mystery which is baffling the entire police and detective forces of Kansas City and the local members of the Pinkerton Detective agency surrounds an explosion in the basement of the First National Bank building, Tenth street and Baltimore avenue, at noon yesterday, which wrecked the basement of the institution and endangered the lives of employes and officers of the bank, as well as pedestrians on the street outside.

The Infernal Machine That Exploded in the First National Bank Building.
INFERNAL MACHINE,
Such As Might Have Caused the Explosion.

That an infernal machine, probably a bomb made of dynamite or nitro-glycerin, caused the explosion, and was set there by an enemy of the bank or a crank, who may have lost money through the failure of financial institutions during the financial stringency, is the belief of nearly every expert or officer who worked on the case yesterday. Another belief is that it may have been a crank who had money in the First National bank and had failed to obtain as much as he wanted during the panic who used this as a means of getting revenge. The officials of the bank are unaware of any person who might be an enemy of the institution and do a thing of this kind.

Damage to Windows Across the Street
DAMAGE TO WINDOWS ACROSS THE STREET.

The explosion was so terrific that it was felt by persons in the offices of the bank building, the New York Life building and the Shubert theater building. A cloud of smoke rose through the windows and up the elevator shaft, which smelled like that of dynamite or nitro-glycerin. Glass in the skylight of the bank building, which is fully 200 feet from the place of the explosion, was shattered. Had not the building been strongly built it would have been blown into a mass of ruins, according to expert builders and architects who made an investigation. They say the structure is absolutely safe, and that the only damage was to the basement, which will not in their estimation exceed $3,000.

As it is only a portion of the basement was wrecked. Two walls, made of tiling marble and concrete, were blown down. One of these walls was 12x18 feet, and the other was 20x18 feet, both being 18 inches thick. An iron beam supporting the ceiling, which is about nine inches wide and two inches thick, was bent and the door casing, which is made of iron, was warped out of shape. A hole two feet in diameter was blown in the wall directly back of the point of explosion, and there is a hole in the concrete floor about four inches deep.

In Wrecked Cellar of Bank.
IN WRECKED CELLAR OF BANK.

There was a row of closets made out of marble, and a wash sink of the same material, in the room, and these were broken into fine pieces. The lockers for employes' clothing, which are made of sheet steel, were bent out of shape and tipped over. There were int eh adjoining room. The iron bars on the windows of the basement were blown across Baltimore avenue and wrecked the windows of the Robert Stone Investment Company. The sewer pipes and water pipes were blown into fragments near where the explosion took place.

ONE MAY DIE.

At the time of the explosion there were about 250 people in the bank. Elbert Ward, a negro porter, was nearest the scene of the explosion. He was closing the door of the toilet room when the explosion took place and probably the door saved his life. He was rendered unconscious and lay partly covered with a pile of debris when he was found by Logan Wilson, a mail clerk in the bank, who helped Ward get to the upper floor. Ward was taken to a hospital. He was very seriously cut about the head and body, a piece of iron was found in his leg and it had severed an artery. He will probably die.

Ward, the porter, is the only one of the injured who is considered in a serious condition. Most of the others were considerable distances from the explosion and their injuries will not prove serious unless some of the pieces of broken tile or glass are embedded in their flesh. The other injured are:

R. H. Klapmeyer, bank clerk, cut on the head by flying pieces of tile or glass.

Charles Grant, a pedestrian on Baltimore avenue, bruised by flying iron.

George Evans of the Evans-Smith Drug Company, who was walking on the opposite side of Baltimore avenue from the bank, cut on the head by flying pieces of tile.

Val Jean Brightwell, clerk, cut on head and fa ce by flying pieces of tiling.

J. D. Wilson, an employe of Bell, Egolf & Co., in the United States and Mexican Trust Company building, cut on face by flying glass.

Joseph Patch, carpenter, living at 1315 Lydia avenue, cut by glass. Not serious. Patch was taken to the emergency hospital, where his wounds were dressed. He was in a dazed condition and told the police that he had been shot.

R. M. Cole, knocked senseless by concussion. On sidewalk.

Jay Donaldson, pedestrian on Baltimore avenue, cut on head.

As soon as the explosion took place the fire department and police headquarters were notified and the patrons of the bank were hurried out of the building, the police working on the theory at that time that persons in the building were responsible for the explosion, which may have been true, although no one was arrested at the time in connection with the case. The street was soon crowded with curious people, including depositors of the bank, and a score of police were employed to watch the building.

THEORIES OF EXPLOSION.

There are several theories about the origin of the explosion, all of which are that it was probably caused by an infernal machine and the explosive used was no doubt dynamite. One theory is that the bomb was taken into the basement by an outsider, which, according to President E. F. Swinney, would be an easy matter on account of the new clerks working in the bank since the increase of business caused by the failure of the National Bank of Commerce, and was placed there with the intention of blowing up the cash fault. That when the stranger got to cellar he became confused because of the winding stairway leading to it and made a mistake in the location of the vault, thinking it directly above where the machine exploded. He is supposed to have thought that an iron door in the wall directly above the spot where the explosion took place, might have a connection with the vault, which led him to believe that to be the location of the money chest of Kansas City's largest bank.

TRYING TO BLOW VAULT?

Surroundings of the scene of the explosion lead officers working on the case to believe this theory and also to point out the operation of the person supposed to have placed the bomb. It is believed the bomb was made of a piece of water pipe, about two inches in diameter and eight inches long; that it contained dynamite which was packed in gun cotton; that the bomb was sealed at each end with some kind of material, such as sealing wax, and at one end was placed a quantity of nitro-glycerin. This bomb could have been placed under the water sink in the toilet room where the explosion took place, and attached to the door in such a way that when the door was moved by some one entering or going out, the infernal machine exploded.

Remains of What Probably Was a Bomb.
REMAINS OF WHAT PROBABLY
WAS A BOMB.

The broken pieces of such a piece of pipe were found in the room next to the scene of the explosion. They had been blown through the wall. They were badly shattered, but the fact that they showed no signs of having been connected with other pipe previous to the explosion leads the police to believe that they were used in making the bomb.

BELIEVE IT WAS GAS.

President E. F. Swinney of the First National bank, and Detectives Dave Oldham and Edward Boyle, who are working on the case, believe it was an explosion of natural gas or sewer gas, but experts who examined the surroundings say this is impossible.

Walter M. Cross, city chemist and an expert on explosives, was asked to examine the bank after the explosion. His statement was that gas could not have caused it because the effect of the explosion was too concentrated; that if it had been caused by gas the whole wall behind would have been pushed out, and not a small hole blown, as it was. He also said that the explosion was too violent to have been caused by gas. He says he believes the explosion was caused by dynamite or nitro-glycerine.

Fire Warden Trickett said: "I am able to arrive at no other conclusion but that the explosion in the First National bank was from dynamite. I made a close examination of premises and the room in which the explosion occurred. There is no gas connection about the building so the explosion could not have been from escaping gas."



AND THEY STICK TO GAS.

Detectives working on the case reported last night that the explosion was caused by natural or sewer gas. Detective Oldham, ho claims to have done some work with a mine drill, gave this as his theory, as did also Boyle, who was formerly a plumber, despite the statement of City Chemist Cross. John Hayes, ex-chief of police, believes it was a bomb set for the purpose of wrecking the institution.

Joseph Patch, a carpenter who was injured and was supposed to have been on the opposite side of Baltimore avenue when the explosion occurred, was arrested last night and taken to the police station, where he was questioned by Assistant Prosecution Attorney Hogan. Ward, the injured negro janitor, also made a statement to Hogan.

Patch, who it was first thought might have had some connection with the affair, because of his story about being shot, and also the fact that he is a union carpenter and the unions have had trouble with the builders of the different bank buildings, was closely questioned by Hogan. Patch has a long police record, most of which was family trouble, but he was released late last night because his testimony led the police to believe that he was not in any way connected with the explosion. His wife was also detained at the police station for a time last night, but she gave no evidence against her husband that would lead the police to believe that he was connected with the affair.

While the gas theory is believed by officers they were ordered to continue working on the case last night, and members of the Pinkerton detective agency also put on the case by the bank. No more arrests had been made at a late hour last night.

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July 27, 1907

COMPLAINS OF A 'HOME'

CHILDREN MISTREATED BY AT-
TENDANTS, IT IS ALLEGED.


Matron at Joseph's Home Denies
Charges Made by Mrs. Ambie
Russell -- Juvenile Court to
Decide Next Monday.


Joseph Home, 2610 Cleveland Avenue
THE JOSEPH HOME, 2610 CLEVELAND AVENUE.

Upon a complaint of Mrs. Ambie Russell, who has had four children in Joseph's home at 2610 Cleveland avenue since last Thanksgiving day, petitions were filed in the juvenile court yesterday afternoon alleging that the children were neglected.


Two of them, Irene, 10, and Katie, 7 years old were found at the home, taken to the detention home and later to the day nursery of the Institutional church by Probation Officer Edgar Warden. The other two, Earl, 13, and Eddie, 14 years old, were not found at the home. Subpoenas were issued for Mrs. Anna Baker, manager of the home; Mrs. Nellie Shaw, who is usually in charge, and for Mrs. Leslie Lewald, an employe, to appear before Judge Goodrich of the juvenile court Monday morning.

In a signed statement which Mrs. Russell made to Humane Officer Frank McCrary yesterday afternoon she charges that Mrs. Lewald and Frances Robinson, a negro woman who was until recently employed at Joseph's home, frequently punished the children by strangling them in basins of water and by beating them in the face until their little noses bled.



ARE NEGLECTED, WOMAN SAYS.
"There are about thirty children in the home and they are not properly clothed and fed," Mrs. Russell says in her statement. "I have bought clothes during the last eight weeks for my children and upon one occasion when I visited the home I saw a dress I had taken out for Katie on another child and Katie was dressed in rags.

"One one occasion during my stay Mrs. Shaw, an assistant to Mrs. Baker, struck Earl with a stick and then hit him on the nose with her hand and dragged him off to bed. I went to his room and found his pillow saturated with blood."

Mrs. Russell was deserted by her husband four years ago in Herrin, Ill. she has lived in Kansas City several months and when she became ill went with her children to the Joseph home. Several weeks ago she left the home by request because it was said that she had spoken disparagingly of the place to prospective contributors to its support. Mrs. Russell is now employed at the Hotel Kupper.


WHAT AN OFFICER FOUND.


Edgard Warden, who brought the Russell girls to the detention home yesterday, reported that he had found Mrs. Shaw to be a very pleasant woman, and that the children seem to like her. He also said that the home has solicitors working in nineteen states. There are about thirty children there.


The two little Russell girls were neatly dressed when brought to the detention home. They said they and the other children at Joseph's home attended the Greenwood school, Twenty-seventh and Cleveland streets. They looked bashful and would not answer when asked if they had had enough to eat and were well treated.

The Associated Charities, through G. F. Damon, secretary, issued a circular December 5, 1906, containing what purports to be a history of Mrs. Baker.

Mrs. Nellie Shaw, the matron in charge of Joseph's home, emphatically denies the charges made by Mrs. Russell. Mrs. Shaw was formerly assistant matron at the Institutional church.

"There is no truth in any of the charges made against this home," said Mrs. Shaw yesterday. "I came here to take the management of the children in February, and since I have been here I can answer that there has been no cruelty of any kind. I have two children of my own who live here, and I treat them just as I do the others. The only punishment which children ever receive is a spanking. It is necessary where there are so many children that discipline be kept. But no one ever punishes the little ones but myself, and I only spank them whenever it is necessary, with my open hand."


CHILDREN LIKE MRS. SHAW.

The little boys and girls in the home do not seem to be afraid of Mrs. Shaw, but play about her in what seems to be the most affectionate manner.

"I think the boys and girls love me, and I have always wanted them to," said she.

Mrs. Shaw says that Mrs. Russell, who was an inmate of the home with her four children for months without cost, became angry at her because she suggested that some of the money which Mrs. Russell earned after she finally secured a position at the Kupper hotel be spent on the children.

" 'My money is my own,' she said, and seemed angry at the suggestion. 'I'll spend it as I please.' "

Eddie, Mrs. Russell's 14-year-son, was placed by the home on a farm at Arthur, Kas., and his 13-year-old brother Earl is on another farm a few miles from there. Mrs. Shaw says that the boys were not placed in adoption, but were simply put on the farms for a summer's outing. She says that is the custom of the Institution church and other charitable institutions in Kansas City to place children with private families, sometimes for adoption, unless a part at least of their board is paid. Mrs. Russell consented that her two boys be sent to Kansas for the summer, she says.


FOUNDED FOUR YEARS AGO.

St. Joseph's home was founded four years ago by Mrs. Annie Baker, who had run a similar institution for two years in Joplin, Mo. Mrs. Shaw says the home was founded by Mrs. Baker after being left destitute with two children, in order to help mothers where were in a similar condition. It is supported by public subscription.

"The whole trouble is that we do not give an accounting of our finances to the Associated Charities," said Mrs. Shaw. "They have been trying to get us to do this for a long time, and when we consistently refused to make regular financial reports to them they became angry and have been trying to do the home harm ever since.

"We cannot see why we should give up the management of our enterprise to the Associated Charities, who had nothing to do with its beginning or its development."

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May 31, 1907

CHANCE FOR VENUS

SCHOOL BOARD WILL PASS ON
QUALIFICATIONS MONDAY.
NOW KEPT IN SECLUSION

PARK BOARD MEMBER AND EN-
GINEER EXPRESS VIEWS.
Both Call It a Perfect Work of Art --
Mr. Buchan, the Donor, Says
Cleveland Accepted a Sim-
ilar Statue Without a
Single Blush.
Venus Statue at Center of Library Controversy
THE STATUE OF VENUS GENETRIX REJECTED BY
THE KANSAS CITY, KAS. SCHOOL BOARD.

The fate of the statue Venus Genetrix, now reposing in the basement of the public library in Kansas City, Kas., will in all probability be finally decreed at Monday night's meeting of the board of education. The members of the board who have been keeping this particular piece of art in seclusion ever since its presentation by Senator W. J. Buchan, will be asked to render their final decision at the next meeting. It is understood that a large number of lovers of art will attend Monday night's meeting and try to convince the board that by turning down the gift it will be depriving the library of a valuable and beautiful work of art. Leading citizens are manifesting much concern in the matter. The majority of them are in favor of giving Venus the most conspicuous location in the library building.

George Kessler, landscape architect, who has been employed to lay out a park and boulevard system in Kansas City, Kas., examined the statue at a recent meeting of the Kansas City, Kas., park board and pronounced it a most beautiful work of art.


PERFECT WORK OF ART.

J. P. Angle, a member of the park board, to whose office the statue was consigned by the park board, says that he has never gazed upon a more perfect work of art.

"While I do not put myself up as a critic in statuary," said Mr. Angle yesterday, "yet I have visited many art galleries, and from the collections of fine art I have seen I am frank to say I I do not believe I could pick a more beautiful piece of statuary than that which the school board has rejected."

Nathaniel Barnes, former postmaster, in speaking about the statue says that no one with a spark of love for the fine art could find the slightest objection to Venus. However, he suggests that if the school board is in doubt as to the propriety of accepting the gift and giving it a proper place in the library building, a commission might be appointed to determine its worth as a piece of fine art and also decide whether or not it should be exhibited in the library.

Mr. Buchan, the donor of the statue, in speaking about his gift and the subsequent action of the school board, said:

"I think the whole affair is too ridiculous to discuss. I went over to Italy, in my trip around the world, and while there did not forget my home town. I saw this beautiful statue in the original at Rome and bought the fine replica I presented to the board of education in Florence. I made a special trip to Florence to get the piece and paid $450 for it. It cost in transportation another $100.

FUNNY TO BUCHAN.

"For the life of me, I can't understand the aversion of the school board for the statue. A man who was making the trip with me got a similar one for the library at Cleveland, O., and he tells me there were no objections from growing young people there.

"The funniest thing about the deal is that the excuse of the board is that young girls and boys who see the statue may have read Ouida's book in which it is criticized. Now, I may be wrong in my judgement of immoral things, but I think a girl or boy who reads Ouida's proscribed books can not be injured much by looking on the4 excellent piece of art work she condemns."

W. E. Griffith, a member of the board, said yesterday that the statue was too nude to be placed in the rotunda of the library, if not in a collection of such pieces.

"I am not prudish," said Mr. Griffith, "but I am opposed to tempting girls and boys who have not reached the age of discretion, to make remarks and draw inferences. The statue was given to us in good faith, but it is unfit. We can not help that. We are only sorry we can not use it out of courtesy to Mr. Buchan. The statue would not be half so suggestive if there was no drapery at all."

WOMEN NOT DISPLEASED.

Attorney Edward Barker, 713 Minnesota avenue, who has taken considerable interest in the disposition of the Venus, yesterday conducted a party of women, including his wife, to the park board rooms where the statue is stored temporarily awaiting further action of the school board.

"What do you think of it?" Mr. Barker asked them.

"Oh, it is just lovely," they answered in chorus.

Afterward, all of the women said they would not be ashamed to have the Venus installed in their parlors or hallways.

"The school board is trying to out-Comstock Comstock," is the way Attorney Barker expressed his opinion of the action of that body regarding the Venus.

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January 24, 1907

FROM STAGE TO FACTORY.

School Teacher from Nebraska
Must Wait Here for Father.

Wilma Frazier, a pretty 19-year old school teacher, who disappeared from Scribner, Neb., last Thanksgiving, at the same time as did Louis Roy Whitman, a barber and railroad employe, was found by the police yesterday morning at 706 Wyandotte street, and is being detained in the matron's room at police headquarters, waiting instructions from her father.
The girl is the daughter of Joseph H. Frazier, of Des Moines, Ia. When she left Scribner it was with the understanding that she ws going to visit relatives in Fremont, Neb. Howeever, both she and Whitman joined an aggregation of barnstormers, which toured the gasoline circuit until the light fund was exhausted. It was in LeRoy, Kas., that the footlights, after one consvulsive sputter, went out and jewelry, baggage and everything not required in the lightest of light marching order went by the board to satisfy cash due on meal tickets. Barely enough was saved to allow Miss Frazier to reach Kansas City. She went to work here in a candy factory, but Whitman stuck to the stage.
The girl said last night that she barely knew Whitman and that their simultaneous disappearance was only a coincidence. The last time she saw him, she says, was in LeRoy, when "The Runaway Tramp" came to a halt.

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