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November 14, 1908

WINNER WAS NOT SO CERTAIN.

That He Had the Better of This Elec-
tion Bet.

T. S. Davis thought he had won an election bet of John Rooney, but while receiving payment yesterday, he was not so sure. Both men are cattle dealers, in the business yards. By the terms of the engagement Rooney had to wheel Davis around the yards and the Exchange building in a wheelbarrow, wearing a placard announcing that he, Rooney had bet on Bryan. Yesterday was the time set for paying the bet, and when Rooney arrived with his wheelbarrow where Davis and his exulting friends were standing he had a band and a whole army with him. The losing Democrat had employed a negro band, by hook or crook had found two one-legged negroes and supplied them with police coats, helmets and clubs, and in addition he had a party of six little school girls, neatly clad. There was also the wheelbarrow and one of the biggest crowds ever packed in front of the Exchange building.

"Davis believes in social equality," read a banner carried alongside the "winner," by a negro.

"Rooney does not," read another banner, read another banner carried by one of the school children, who walked beside the "loser."

The parade stopped business for almost half an hour during its formation, progress, and disbanding.

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November 8, 1908

PAID A FREAK BET.

H. D. Gibson Pushed E. L Yeat
Through Streets in a Wheelbarrow.

Amid the shouts and laughter of a big crowd, H. D. Gibson, a traveling salesman for a wholesale jewelry house, last night paid off an election bet by wheeling the winner in a wheelbarrow from Twelfth street and Forest avenue to Twelfth and Harrison streets and back. The bet was made with E. L. Yeat of Twelfth street and Forest avenue, and Mr. Gibson wagered that Taft would carry Nebraska. Friends of the two men had been informed that the ride would come off last night and had gathered to witness the humiliation of the loser. A whellbarrow festooned with flags and a large banner on which was printed "I bet Taft would carry Nebraska" was teh paraphernalia used. At the starting point at Twelfth street and Forest avenue nearly 500 people had congregated. The crowd followed the principals over the coucrse. Mr. Gibson lives at 1211 Virginia avenue and tips the scales at 240 pounds. Mr. Yeat, the winner, weighs 180 pounds. Both men have red hair and the friendly crowd took advantage of that circumstance to poke fun at them.

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April 12, 1908

WEARING HIS NEW STAR.

Independence Marshal Given Wheel-
barrow Ride by Defeated Candidate.

J. J. Hammontree, a defeated candidate for city marshal of Independence, wheeled Robert Combs, the successful candidate, around the square yesterday morning. The new marshal had on his new uniform and a very large star of authority. After the trip around the square, which was enjoyed by a large crowd, the wheelbarrow was placed on auction and purchased by Colonel Moses Hanton for $4.50.

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April 9, 1908

PAYS PECULIAR ELECTION BET.

Youth Trundles Winner Around Ar-
mourdale in Wheelbarrow.

From 8 o'clock until noon yesterday a thin young man with nose glasses and a wearied look of regret, trundled a wheelbarrow in which another young man was sitting about the streets and byways of Armourdale. Starting at the Red Cross pharmacy the pair went south to Shawnee, east to St. Paul, north to Kansas avenue and west to Packard. There the youth with the glasses tilted the barrow over on its nose, unbent his back and mopped his brow with a handkerchief.

All this time not a word had been spoken by either party and many people passing on the walks thought they were fakers and dropped in behind to see what they were selling.

In this they were disappointed, however. The lonely occupant of the wheelbarrow said he was M. A. Gillespie of the Red Cross pharmacy, and that his propeller was Frank Bryant, a salesman at the Clanville furniture store at Armourdale.

"Just an election bet I won," said Gillespie. "I've got another bet, if there's any takers. That is, that I got the worst of this transaction. I've had my knees tucked under my chin so long I can't get them straightened out."

Bryant had made a bet with Gillespie that Timothy Lyons would not be re-elected to the city council.

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July 6, 1907

WHEELBARROW PATROL WAGON.

Independence Council Will Now
Furnish Gong for Vehicle.

William Smith, a Kansas Cityan found intoxicated in the court house yard at Independence, won his point in police court when he told the judge he ought to be turned loose. When aske dthe nature of his argument Smith said he had been punished heavily enough.

"What punishment has been administered to the prisoner?" asked the court.

The policeman who appeared against Smith said nothing had been done to his prisoner.

"But you took me to the station in a wheelbarrow," said Smith, and the judge sided with him and gave him liberty and the pursuit of happiness -- outside of the city limits.

It then developed that the two policemen who found Smith in the court house yard had borrowed a wheelbarrow at a livery stable to tote their prisoner to the lockup. Independence has no patrol wagon. After the council meeting last ngit members of the council made up a purse to buy a gong for the barrow.

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