Find Kansas City Antiques and Collectibles at the Vintage Kansas City Marketplace ~ Own a Piece of Old KC

Vintage Kansas City.com

 

THE JOURNAL COMPANY, Publisher
EIGHTH, M'GEE AND OAK STREETS.

Old News
Headlines and Articles from The Kansas City Journal

BELL & HOME TELEPHONES
Business Office...4000 Main
City Editor.....4001 Main
Society Editor....4002 Main

Two cents. Subscription Rates:  By carrier, per week, 10 cents; per month, 45 cents.  By mail, daily and Sunday, one month, 40 cents; three months, $1.00; six months, $2.00; one year, $4.00.  Sunday only, six months, 75 cents; one year, $1.50.  Weekly Journal, 25 cents one year.

Like Vintage Kansas City on Facebook

As We See 'Em ~ Caricatures of Prominent Kansas Cityans

The Isis Theatre ~ Kansas City, Missouri

The History of Fairmount Park

Claims of Cancer Cured by Dr. Bye in Vintage KC Missouri

Special Cut Prices ~ Always the Same

Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

June 7, 1909

WALDO CHURCH IS
DEDICATED.

Bishop Quayle Conducts Services at
Broadway Methodist Edifice.

The new Broadway Methodist Episcopal church in Waldo, at the corner of Seventy-fourth street and Broadway, was dedicated yesterday and nearly $10,000 was raised to liquidate the congregation's indebtedness. The total cost including the lot, amounts to $14,200. The edifice is of stone. The Rev. H. G. Humphrey is the pastor. Bishop W. A. Quayle of Oklahoma conducted the dedication at both the morning and afternoon services and was assisted by the pastor and District Superintendent S. B. Campbell.

In 1907 a Sunday school was organized and was held in a blacksmith shop. The Rev. O. M. Stewart, who had charge of the work in Waldo, took the first subscriptions for a church and later the Sunday school was removed to Pitkin hall at Seventy-fifth and Broadway.

In October of 1907 the church was organized and in March of the following year, the contract for the new building was let. Dr. C. B. Hewitt and wife presented the church with a lot of nearly an acre as a site, valued at $1,350. In April of the same year the Rev. H. G. Humphrey was assigned to the church at the Springfield conference. The cornerstone was laid last August and addresses were made by the Rev. C. C. Cissel and Dr. John Punton.

Labels: , , , , ,

August 25, 1908

ASHLAND CORNERSTONE LAID.

School Building Will Be One of
The Best in the City.

Accompanied by appropriate ceremonies the cornerstone for the new Ashland school, in course of construction at Twenty-fourth street and Elmwood avenue, was laid yesterday afternoon.

Joseph L. Norman, president of the board of education, who was to have delivered the principal address, was unable to attend the ceremonies because of illness, his place being taken by Hale H. Cook, a member of the board. Mr. Cook, during the course of his remarks explained that when the new school, when completed, would be one of the best in the city, and that he was of the opinion that within the course of a short time an addition would become necessary.

A. C. Wright, who was acquainted with the school in its earlier days, delivered an interesting address. Mr. Wright said that he could remember when the school was a small one-story frame, a considerable distance out in the country. He read some interesting documents having to do with transfers of the property when the first permanent building was erected. Ex-Mayor H. M. Beardsley also was one of the speakers.

Before the stone was placed in position a box containing the superintendent's last annual report, documents having to do with the history of the school, coins contributed by pupils and other articles were deposited in it by Mrs. Gertrude Edmondson, principal of the school.

Labels: , , , ,

July 15, 1908

WILL HANDLE SILVER TROWEL.

Judge J. Patterson to Cement Cor-
nerstone of Poor Farm Buildings

Final arrangements for the laying of the cornerstone at the new county poor farm building will be made Friday afternoon,when the committee which has the matter in charge will hold a meeting. J. D. Jackson, superintendent the farm, is chairman.

It has already been decided to observe the day, July 29, with a picnic, which will be in the nature of a county holiday, for all the county offices will be closed. Noel Jackson will be master of ceremonies and J. M. Patterson, presiding judge of the county court, will handle the silver trowel which is to be presented to him. Choice of mementos to be placed in the stone will be made by the Rev. C. W. Moore. The following have been invited to speak at the cornerstone laying:

Senator William Warner, Attorney General H. S. Hadley, Governor Joseph Wingate Folk, Champ Clark, H. M. Beardsley, Judge John F. Phillips, Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., Judge H. L. McCune, the Rev C. W. Moore, the Rev. S. M. Neel, the Rev. George Reynolds, the Rev. William J. Dalton, Rabbi H. H. Mayer and Llewellyn Jones, mayor of Independence.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

November 18, 1907

CORNERSTONE LAID.

Beginning of the Redemptorist Fathers'
Church, to Cost $150,000.

The ceremony of breaking ground for the new church of the Redemptorist Fathers, at Hunter avenue and Broadway, took place at 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Father Ferreol Girardey presided. Work will begin this morning, and within a year and a half the Fathers hope to see the building completed.

The stone spire, 230 feet high, and the gothic architecture of the structure will be the features. The church will face on Broadway, a little south of the present group of buildings. The dimensions are 72 x 204 feet, and the estimated cost $150,000. Wilder & Wight are the architechts.

Labels: , , ,

May 9, 1907



ONLY ONE KNOWN DEAD IN UNIVERSITY FIRE, THOUGH IT IS BELIEVED RUINS HOLDS ANOTHER BODY

GROPING HIS WAY THROUGH SMOKE FILLED HALLWAYS, GEORGES DeMARE BECAME CONFUSED AND LEAPED OR FELL TO HIS DEATH
WOMAN CANNOT BE FOUND.

Miss Aurora Wittebart Believed
To Have Perished in the
Doomed Structure
WOMAN FALLS FROM LADDER.

Through Blinding Smoke Fight for Life Waged.

The University building, at the northtwest corner of Ninth and Locust streets, was totally destroyed by fire yesterday afternoon, causing a loss of $125,000 on the building and resulting in the death of Professor Georges De Mare, head of the art department in Central high school, who jumped or fell from a window on the fourth floor of the burning building.

The body of Miss Aurora Wittebart is supposed to be still in the ruins.

The loss to the various tenants cannot be known with any degree of definiteness for some time. With the exception of Montgomery Ward & Co., who occupied the first two floors, most of the occupants of the building were musicians and artists. The Radford pharmacy occupied the room at the corner of Ninth and Locust, and the Kindergarten Supply Company occupied the room immediately to the west of the pharmacy.

The fire caused more excitement than any which has occurred in Kansas City in years, owing to the ancient architecture of the building and the large number of women who had studios in the building, and the fact that several hundred girls were employed by Montgomery Ward & Co. There were many sensational escapes and displays of heroism, the most notable being the rescue of Miss S. Ellen Barnes, a music teacher, by Fireman Charles Braun.



She Died of Suffocation?

Death by suffocation is thought to have been the fate of Miss Aurora Wittebart, and artist who had an office in the fifth floor of the building, and was there when the fire started. She was last seen by Miss Barnes just as Professor de Mare jumped to his death. She is thought to be the woman Mr. Farrel saw with de Mare, as he groped his way through the smoke to safety. De Mare leaped to death from a window leading out of her studio.

Miss Wittebart is the daughter of a glass manufacturer who lives at Coffeyville, Kas. She was only 22 years of age, and had been studying art and painting in Kansas City for several months, and was to have been married to George Jackson, an employe of the Missouri-Kansas Telephone Company.



Last to See Miss Wittebart.

"Just before I learned that the building was on fire Professor de Mare was in my studio," said Miss Helen Barnes last night. "We were talking about music and art, and finally he arose to go, saying that he was expecting a visitor in his studio. He walked to the door and opened it. A gust of black smoke burst through the open door, and it was then we realized that the building was on fire. Professor de Mare called to me to get out of the building immediately and started down the hall. I started to follow, but soon realized that I could not find my way through the dense smoke. I went to a window from where I saw Miss Wittebart standing at a window on the floor below. She was near the rear fire escape and I supposed she had descended. Professor de Mare had opened a window and was preparing, I thought, to mount the landing of a fire escape. I returned immediately to my studio and, raising a window, made a feeble attempt to call for help. the smoke strangled me, and I threw my purse out to attract the people below. That was needless, though, for I had been seen by the firemen, and at that time ladders were being rapidly placed to reach me. I saw the fireman who rescued me climbing upward. There was determination in his manner, and I seemed to realize when I looked upon his smoke-begrimed, upturned face that he would surely reach me. It was his determined look that strengthened me and seemed to give me new courage."


Cleveland Laid Cornerstone.

The building was constructed nearly twenty years ago for the Y. M. C. A., Grover Cleveland laying the cornerstone in 1887 during his first term as president. It cost $112,000, and after the Y. M. C. A. was compelled to relinquish it the building passed into the possession of the Pepper estate, being in turn sold to the Sunny Slope Realty Company. There was an insurance of $72,000 on the structure.

The first alarm was turned in a few minutes before 3 o'clock by O. W. Hoover, proprietor of the Kindergarten Supply House, next door west from the drug store on the corner. Mr. Hoover heard the girls employed by Montgomery Ward & Co. hurrying down the stairs and out of the building and soon afterwards smelled the smoke. He called up the fire department and was informed that no alarm of fire had yet been turned in. Mr. Hoover thereupon turned in the alarm.

Dr. William West, formerly a fireman and later a police surgeon, who ha an office in the Rialto building, saw the smoke pouring form the building and was one of the first physicians to reach the scene of the fire. He attended Fireman Braun, who rescued Miss Barnes, and did valiant and effective service throughout the fire in extending first aid to the injured.


300 Girls in a Panic.
The fire started in a pile of 8,000 pounds of hemp rope, which was stored in the pit of the building. Until recently the Kansas City Athletic Club had occupied the premises and it had made the basement and main floor a single room. Around this room ran a balcony. Montgomery Ward & Co. were occupying the room and in it they had a pile of hemp stored for immediate use. Without any warning whatever smoke began issuing from it and a crackling sound was heard. There were some of the 300 girls the mail order house employed in the Kansas City general offices, within two feet of the rope, and scores of them within sight. Immediately on hearing the sound of the crackling and seeing the little jets of smoke at the same moment, the girls began to tell each other there was a fire, and precipitously prepared to leave the place. O. Q. Massey and J. M. Miller, clerks, at the same time made a rush for the starting fire and tried to trample it out. Despite their efforts the fire gained on them, jets coming from twenty parts of the pile. A rumor that someone had stepped on a match, igniting it, is completely discredited by the evidence given by a dozen or more clerks who were sitting in the pit where the hemp blazed.

While Henderson, Massey and Miller were trying to stamp the fire out, Mrs. Lucille Baker, in charge of the squad in that particular room, began getting her forty subordinates out of the place. Manager W. P. Walker had 200 girls at work in what once was the swimming pool. Their only avenue of escape was to walk toward the burning hemp and up a temporary staircase. In the most amazing manner, the manager succeeded in getting the clerks to stand perfectly still until they could march out of the place in twos, and in that manner he got every one of the 200 out of the pit and to the street level without the slightest confusion. There was every possibility of a jam at the staircase, which could only have resulted in a great loss of life.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

Google
 
Web vintagekansascity.com


Get the Book
Vintage Kansas City Stories ~ Early 20th Century Americana as Immortalized in The Kansas City Journal
Vintage
Kansas City Stories



Early Kansas City, Missouri


>>More KC Books<<

The History and Heritage of Vintage Kansas City in Books
Vintage Kansas
City Bookstore

Powered by Blogger

Vintage Kansas City.com

Vintage Antique Classics ~ Vintage Music, Software, and more Time Travel Accessories

In association with
KC Web Links.com ~ The Ultimate Kansas City Internet Directory