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February 8, 1910

MONSTER STADIUM
WILL BE BUILT.

TEN-ACRE TRACT BOUGHT NEAR
ELECTRIC PARK FOR AN
ATHLETIC FIELD.

Kansas and Missouri Uni-
versities Offered Use of
Park for Football.

A monster stadium which will seat 30,000 people, and an athletic field large enough for football games, track meets and baseball will be constructed on a ten-acre tract of ground within two blocks of Electric park by the Gordon & Koppel Clothing Company within the next six months. The ground was purchased yesterday for $30,000 and work on the stadium will start immediately.

The land is located between Forty-seventh and Forty-eighth streets and Lydia and Tracy avenue. It is on two car lines and crowds can be handled as well as they are handled at Electric park. The stadium will be of wooden construction, and it will be an up-to-date athletic field, such as has been proposed in the many stadium propositions talked of recently for football games between Kansas and Missouri universities. It will be known as the Gordon & Koppel Athletic field and will be under the management of George C. Lowe, a member of the firm.

TO VISIT M. S. U. TODAY.

This project is the result of the talk of erecting a stadium for university football, although the management has made no proposition to the universities to date and has not been promised the annual Thanksgiving day game. Mr. Lowe will go to Columbia, Mo., today to put the proposition before the athletic management of the university. He will then outline his plans to the Kansas university management. He will offer the field to those institutions for 10 per cent of the gross receipts of the annual game, but says that no matter whether those schools can be interested in it or not his plans will be carried out because football is but one of the many athletic events this stadium will be used for.

This is a private enterprise. For more than two months the backers have been trying to purchase the ground, but did not agree to terms until yesterday, when the transfer was made. The ground belongs to the Davis estate and the sale was made by G. E. Bowling & Co. The stadium will be built on ground 500 by 600 feet, the rest of the tract of ground to be used for other purposes. The inside of the field will be large enough to allow a quarter of a mile track to be built, which will be outside of the baseball diamond, and football gridiron.

MODERN IN EVERY RESPECT.

There will be bath rooms and lockers for the players. The stadium will be so constructed that there will be five entrances in front of it and as patrons of the park enter they will go up incline walks to the top of the seats, as they do in Convention hall. A walk will be built around the top. A grandstand will be constructed on each side of the athletic field and the ends will be bleachers. A row of boxes will be constructed around the entire field. The field will be laid out so that in case football crowds are more than 30,000 people, about 5,000 can be seated in chairs on track.

This field will be open to the public for use for all athletic evens and the management announced last night that in case a circus or anything of that nature could be put in the inclosure it will be rented for such purposes. Director Barnes of the Y. M. C. A. favors the enterprise for athletic events in which his men take part. City League baseball will be played there and Sunday School Athletic League and ward and high school athletic meets will have the privilege of using this ground.

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December 24, 1909

GAS COMPLETES RUIN
OF RIALTO BUILDING.

FLAMES UNDER CONTROL WHEN
MAIN BREAKS, EXPLODING.

Firemen Grope Way to Street as
Third Roar Is Heard and Fire
Raging for Hours, Leaves
Only Ice-Coated Walls.
Fire and Explosion Destroy the Rialto Building.
CHARRED WALLS OF THE RIALTO BUILDING, ALL THAT REMAINS OF A "FIRE TRAP."

Flames fed by a broken gas main destroyed the Rialto building at the southwest corner of Grand avenue and Ninth street at 3:30 o'clock yesterday morning. The building was erected in 1887 by Albert Marty, its present owner. The fire started in the basement and raged virtually unchecked for three hours until everything inflammable had been consumed. Nothing remains but the ruined and ice-coated walls. The loss is estimated at $300,000.

The building was one of the few remaining big Kansas City fire traps which are a terror to the fire department. Almost entirely of frame construction inside, it burned like tinder. In the language of Assistant Chief Alex Henderson, "not all the fire companies in Missouri could have stopped it."

The fire was noticed first by J. W. Johnson, a negro janitor, who had for many years been a fixture in the building. Johnson was sitting in one of the offices on the second floor at 3 o'clock in the morning, when he was startled by a rumbling sound like the report of a muffled cannon. He jumped from the chair in which he had been resting after several hours of hard work in policing the building, and bounded down the stairway.

He was confronted by dense smoke, and forgetting everything but that there were several person in the building who were in imminent danger of losing their lives, he bounded up the steps and shouted fire from each landing. In this manner he aroused Dr. J. W. Gaines, Dr. Robert O. Gross, Dr. Emil Thielman, Dr. Oliver F. Jones, Dr. A. Talbot, Dr. B. E. Jordan, Dr. J. B. Jones and Dr. Frank Jones. On the fifth floor Johnson came upon Charles R. Manley, senior physical examiner of the Y. M. C. A., in a semi-conscious condition, the result of striking his head against a post in his efforts to escape while groping his way through the dark, smoke-filled hallways. Johnson himself was beginning to feel the effects of the smoke, but not thinking of his own life in his efforts to save others half carried and dragged Mr. Manley down the stairway and out into the streets to safety. In the meantime, A. E. Perrine, night watchman in the building of McGowan, Small & Morgan, gas grantees, which is the first building south of the Rialto, discovered smoke and noticing the glare of flames which by that time had gained considerable headway in the trunk factory, hastened to a telephone and turned in the alarm.

FIRE FIGHT BEGINS.

The fire department soon was on the scene. The fire at first looked to be easy to extinguish. The firemen had the flames smothered, when a terrific explosion, caused by the breaking of a gas main, shot the flames up through the building to the top floors. At the time of this explosion Assistant Chief Alex Henderson and a squad of men were on the first floor of the building. The force of the explosion shook the entire building and as the flames were spreading to all parts of the structure, it was as much as a man's life was worth to stay inside, as another explosion could be expected at any time. While Chief Henderson and his men were extricating themselves from the trap, Captain Pelletier, with several men, were groping their way about in the basement of the Ninth street entrance. In what seemed to be hours, they emerged through the smoke and debris into the street. It was none too soon, as the third explosion occurred a few minutes later and had any of the firemen remained in the building they would have been buried beneath the floors and walls. By this time twenty companies had arrived and were throwing streams of water into the burning building from all sides, but it was of no use. The interior of the building was mostly wood and the outside wall kept the streams from getting to the center of the building, where the fire was worst.

The Rialto was the only old-time building of any consequence on Grand avenue. Albert Marty, the owner, is an active real estate and building man of Kansas City. He purchased the ground in 1886 and in 1887 constructed a five-story building on the corner. In 1889 he purchased forty-eight feet on the south side of the corner lot and the same year erected the south half of the building which burned yesterday morning.

The building was occupied by many prominent physicians and dentists, some of whom have been in the building twenty-five years.

"The number of occupants is in the neighborhood of 100," said Dr. H. D. McQuade, who had offices in the building for many years. "Many of us will be up against it for offices for some time, but I expect to contract for offices on the fifth floor of the Keith & Perry building tomorrow. Many of us received offers from other physicians to share their offices while looking for locations."

VALUED AT $125,000.

The building was valued at $125,000, although at the time of its erection it cost in the neighborhood of $200,000. That was more than twenty years ago. There was $81,500 insurance carried on the structure. The heaviest loser among the occupants was Hugo A. Brecklein, a druggist, occupying the first floor. Mr. Brecklein estimated his loss at $20,000, with $12,000 insurance.

J. H. Langan, son of John P. Langan, a grocer at 4601 Independence avenue, was walking north on Grand avenue yesterday morning when the fire started, and in attempting to awaken some of the men who were sleeping in the offices, he broke the glass in one of the doors, severely cutting his hand. But he saved the life of a man who was sleeping through all the disturbance, and succeeded in helping him to the street.

At least sixty physicians and twenty dentists lost their office furnishings and instruments in the Rialto building fire yesterday. The average loss for each tenant is said to have been about $700, and that only a small part of it was covered by insurance.

For years the Rialto has been the doctors' office building of Kansas City. Many of the most prominent physicians of the city were established there. Owing to the fact that in many buildings dentists and physicians are not allowed to rent offices, because the odors arising form the mixtures of medicines is objected to by other tenants, this building has long been recognized as the headquarters of men engaged in these two professions.

VALUABLE RELICS LOST.

About 1,000 specimens of prehistoric stone implements and two ancient violins were cherished treasures of Dr. A. H. Cordier, which were lost in the Rialto fire. Dr. Cordier occupied room 310, third floor.

A collector of prehistoric implements, Dr. Cordier, on trips to Mexico, Alaska, Ohio, Kentucky, Arkansas and through Missouri, got several thousand specimens, and he had about 1,000 of them on display in his offices. His is a collector of old violins and had two of these instruments, which he prized highly, in his rooms. Another relic which Dr. Cordier lost was the mounted head of a mountain sheep which he shot while on a hunting trip in British Columbia. Dr. Cordier's office had been in the Rialto building eighteen years.

DR. ANDERSON LUCKY.

A long distance survey of the Rialto ruins makes it appear that Dr. R. V. Anderson, a dentist, is the only tenant of the burned structure whose effects were not destroyed, and he recalls the fact that once before in a fire in the Rialto building he also was lucky.

Dr. Anderson's office has been in the building nearly eighteen years, ever since he began to practice, and some years ago ago fire broke out beneath his office, and his rooms, enveloped in smoke and flame, seemed doomed. The firemen, however, extinguished the blaze before his effects suffered any serious damage.

ORDINANCE NOT ENFORCED.

At the burning of the Rialto building yesterday morning the firemen were greatly handicapped by dangers from exploding gas, and they were in continual danger of being burned by flame of escaping gas. Had the building been equipped with a Siebens' shut-off gas valve it would have been possible for the firemen the moment they reached the fire to turn off the gas in the entire building and thereby lessen the danger occasioned by the escaping gas. The building code requires the installation of gas shut-off devices on all buildings, but for some reason the ordinance has never been enforced.

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October 24, 1909

EVERY HYMN BOOK GONE.

Hymnless Service Today Threaten-
ed Central Presbyterian Church.

The janitor of the Central Presbyterian church on Harrison street, between Ninth and Tenth streets, was sweeping out the church yesterday morning in preparation for today's services when he found there was not a hymn book in the building.

Thieves had taken them, he believed. He notified W. S. Canine, treasurer of the church. The police were notified. Detectives were assigned to the case. They found that the books had been borrowed by the Y. M. C. A. for the dedication of its new home.

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October 23, 1909

Y. M. C. A. FORMALLY OPENED.

Moving Pictures Show Asso-
ciation's Work Around
The World.

In the chapel, festooned with flags, a small audience, composed mostly of chief contributors to the building fund, formally opened the new Y. M. C. A. building, Tenth and Oak streets, last night. the speeches, interspersed with songs, were led by Henry M. Beardsley, president of the association.

Beardsley said, in introduction, that the new building is a credit to the city it represents, he said, an expenditure of about $377,000. After next month there will be no indebtedness. The building committee at present is only $2,000 behind the appropriation and this amount will be raised at a carnival to be held one week beginning November 16. His remarks were cheered.

John Barrett, long connected with association work in foreign countries, spoke lightly of conversations he has had with diplomats, presidents or magnates. With the versatility of a moving picture machine, Barrett called up mental views of Japan, Africa, Asia Minor, Argentina and Mexico. He compared statements of a viceroy of Manchuria with that of the president of a Central American republic or of a may or of a little town in Iowa.

In ever country, Barrett said, the association is leading the vanguard of civilizing influences.

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October 10, 1909

COLONEL SWOPE LEFT AN
ESTATE OF $3,000,000.

ENTIRE INSTRUMENT WRITTEN
IN HIS OWN HAND JUNE 15, '05.

Full Text of the Paper as Filed in
Independence Shows the Wide
Extent of Kansas City's
Benefactor's Holdings.

An estate of $3,000,000, by the provisions of the will filed yesterday in the Independence division of the probate court was left by Colonel Thomas H. Swope to his near relatives, friends and to charity. The greater part of his property is bequeathed direct to his blood relations. City lots left to the Humane Society is the largest gift to charity.

The will was filed for probate by J. G. Paxton, an attorney of Independence, Mo., who framed it June 17, 1905. Mr. Paxton since has been its custodian. In filing the will, Mr. Paxton was accompanied by Stuart S. Fleming, Mr. Swope's nephew, who lives in Maury county, Tenn.

Colonel Swope named Mr. Paxton, Mr. Fleming and James M. Hunton of Independence his executors, and requested that they be allowed to serve without bond. George B. Harrison, Arthur F. Day and F. T. Childs, all of whom live here, signed as witnesses. The three men were present yesterday morning in court to attest their signatures.

A "HOLOGRAPHIC WILL."

The instrument states that "this is my holographic will." This is to indicate that it was written by Col. Swope. There were no changes in the instrument as written by him.

The bequests to charity are as follows: To Humane Society, two lots in Turner Company's addition; to Park College, two lots in West Kansas addition; to the Women's Christian Association, $10,000 cash; to Young Women's Christian Association, $10,000 cash; to Young Men's Christian Association, $10,000 cash; to the Provident Association, $25,000 cash.

After providing for charity and making specific bequests to his near relatives and friends, the balance is left to his nephews and nieces, to be divided share alike.

S. W. Spangler, attorney for Mr. Swope, has prepared a conservative estimate of the values of some of the real estate bequests made in the will. The values are as follows:

One-half of the two story building at 1017-1019 Main street, left to Ella J. Plunket, $75,000; the other half of the same property, left to Gertrude Plunket, $75,000; the undivided half of lots Nos. 10 and 12 on East Fourth street, left to Felix Swope, $13,250; the northeast corner of Hickory and Joy streets, now occupied by the John Deere Plow Company's warehouse, left to James Hunton, $40,000; the northeast corner of Twelfth and Walnut streets, 85-115 feet, left to Margaret Swope's five unmarried children, $400,000; 1112-1114 Walnut street, left to the same children, $190,000; 916-918 1/2 Main street, to the same children, $120,000; the northwest corner of Mulberry and Eleventh streets, to the same five children, $50,000; the southeast corner of Twelfth and Campbell streets, left to the five children, $60,000; 915 Walnut street, left to Frances Swope, $87,500; 120 acres, to the south half of the ground occupied by the Evanston Golf Club, to Thomas H. Swope, Jr., $240,000; the eight-story building at the southeast corner of Eleventh street and Grand avenue, to his nine nephews and nieces, $400,000.

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October 7, 1909

SWOPE PROVIDED FOR
AGED, POOR AND NEEDY.

ORPHAN'S HOME AND CHILD-
REN'S OUTINGS REMEMBERED.

Will Gives $25,000 to Provident As-
sociation and Contains Other
Charitable Bequests,

PUBLIC BEQUESTS BY COLONEL SWOPE:

To the Humane Society of Kansas City, Mo., I give, grant, devise and bequeath in trust forever lots 1 and 2 in clock 43 of Turner & Co.'s addition to Kansas City, Mo., the proceeds of the rental thereof to be used by said Humane Society in the entertainment of children in Swope park, near Kansas City, annually, forever.

To Park College, situated in Platte county, Missouri, I give lots 15 and 16 in block 3, West Kansas addition No 2 to Kansas city, Mo.

To the Women's Christian association I give the sum of $10,000.

To the Young Women's Christian Association of Kansas City, Mo., I give the sum of $10,000.

To the Young Men's Christian Association of Kansas City, Mo., I give $10,000.

To the Provident Association of Kansas City, Mo., I give the sum of $25,000 to be known as the "Swope Fund," and to be used for the benefit of the poor and needy of Kansas City, Mo.

Before the body of Colonel Thomas H. Swope was removed from the family home in Independence, Mo., yesterday afternoon to be brought to this city to lie in state in the rotunda of the public library building, J. G. Paxton, an attorney who had possession of the philanthropist's will, gave out the public bequests mentioned therein. They are enumerated above.

"It was thought befitting," he said, "that bequests made to public institutions and to charity should be published before the funeral. The complete will, enumerating private as well as public bequests, will be filed for probate Saturday."

The lots left to the Humane society are situated at the southeast corner of Union avenue and Mulberry street in the West Bottoms. The corner lot is occupied by the Union Avenue Bank of Commerce. Good rentals are secured from the two buildings of the property.

"The bequest of Colonel Swope to the Humane Society is not a surprise to me," said E. R. Weeks, president of the society last night. "Colonel Swope had a life membership in the society and for several years has been its first vice president. He has been identified with the work for more than twenty-five years and was our closest friend.

WROTE PORTION OF WILL.

"Several years ago Colonel Swope sent for me to come to his office. When I arrived he told me that he intended to remember the society in his will which he intended writing himself. At his suggestion I wrote that portion of his will which he later copied. That is why it is no surprise. There is a provision regarding this bequest to the effect that the society may sell this property at any time it deem necessary or advisable."

The property left to Park college, Parkville, Mo., also is situated in the West Bottoms and is said to pay a good annual rental.

The Women's Christian Association, to which Colonel Swope left $10,000, has charge of hte management and maintenance of the Gillis Orphan's Home and the Armour Memorial Home for Aged Couples, Twenty-third street and Tracy avenue. Colonel Swope gave the land on which the orphanage is built. It is a large tract and later Mrs. F. B. Armour built the home for aged couples which bears her name. Sometimes it is known as the Margaret Klock home, named for Mrs. Armour's sister.

"We had hoped that we might be remembered in a small way," said Mrs. P. D. Ridenhour, acting president of the Women's Christian Association, when informed of the $10,000 bequest. "But this comes to us as a most pleasant surprise, and I might say that it comes at a time when we need it most. We had not expected anything so handsome as our benefactor has given us and to express our thanks would be the smallest way in which we can show our gratitude. In honor of his memory we will endeavor to do the greatest good with what he has left us.

Y. W. C. A. GIRLS REJOICE.

"Have you heard of the $10,000 left the Y. W. C. A. by Colonel Swope?" a young woman at the association rooms was asked over the telephone last night.

"Humph," she replied quickly, "he gave us $50,000."

"But this is over and above the $50,000," she was informed. "This is a bequest in his will."

"Oh, goody, gracious, goodness, isn't that just scrumptiously grand," she cried, dropping the telephone to fairly scream the glad news to other young women present. "Won't we have a dandy home, now, God bless him."

At that moment someone began a song of praise in honor of the welcome news. The telephone was forgotten.

"This certainly comes to us as a glad surprise," said Miss Nettie E. Trimble, secretary for the Y. W. C. A.

"Colonel Swope was so good to us when we were struggling for our new building that we had no idea of getting a bequest from his will. Years ago when the building of a home for the Y. W. C. A. was mentioned, he said he wanted to have a part in it. While committees were out working he sent us $25,000 unsolicited. Toward the close, when it looked as if we would not reach the $300,000 mark by the time set, he sent for me and asked how much we lacked. When told that we needed $22,000 to complete the figure he promptly gave us $25,000, making a total of $50,000 which he gave toward our new home.

AN ENDOWMENT FUND.

"As we have plenty of money to complete our home it is possible that Colonel Swope's bequest of $10,000 will be made a nucleus for an endowment fund to carry on industrial and Bible work. The industrial department never has been self sustaining and teachers for both have to be hired and paid. That the name of Colonel Swope will forever remain dear to the members of the Y. W. C. A. goes without saying."

Henry M. Beardsley, president of the Y. M. C. A. was out of the city and James. B. Welsh, a member of the board of directors, was notified of the bequest of $10,000 to that association.

"Good, good," he cried, "that comes to us at a time when we need it most. We have been in pretty hard straits to complete our new building and this most gracious gift will put us on our feet under full sail. The association, no doubt, will take appropriate action when notified officially of the bequest. I will sleep better tonight and so will many others."

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Octoberr 4, 1909

GIFTS TO CITY AND OTHERS.

Swope Park But One of His Contributions.

During his lifetime, Colonel Swope did much for the city in which he amassed his fortune. He gave to the city Swope park, 1,354 acres of land valued at $1,000 per acre. This beautiful tract of land has been converted into one of the finest natural recreation grounds in the Middle West, and it gave the donor much pleasure to see it appreciated as it is.

The land for the new city hospital at Twenty-third and Locust was given to the city by Colonel Swope.

He gave the Young Women's Christian Association $50,000 for its building fund. To the Young Men's Christian Association he gave $5,000.

He gave the ground for the Home for the Aged at Thirty-first and Locust. He recently gave the Franklin Institute, a charitable organization at 1901 McGee street, $50,000 to be used in building a new home, on the condition that the organization raise another $50,000 to add to it.

Many other smaller donations were made toward the work of extending charity to the needy and afflicted and it is said that never did he refuse to heed a plea for funds to conduct such work.

Colonel Swope devoted his time and energy almost entirely to his business. He was at his office early and late. He had been absent from his office but a few days in four or five years until he was taken ill September 2. On that day he was at his office the last time, but he directed his affairs from his sick room and took the same keen interest in the transaction of his business.

HELPED HIS OLD SCHOOL.

The first gift known to have made by the philanthropist was for the sum of $1,000 to the Presbyterian church in Danville, Ky., where he had worshiped so long as a student at Center college. Being a graduate of the famous old institution, Colonel Swope never lost interest in his alma mater, and learning that the school needed a library he made it possible for the old college to obtain one. He offered to give $25,000 to the school for the purpose if another $25,000 was raised. On March 15, 1902, the authorities of the school notified him that the required amount had been subscribed, and he sent his draft for $25,000. The name of the donor had not before been given, as he had requested that it only be given out that an alumnus had offered the money.

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October 4, 1909

HE DIDN'T FLATTER HIMSELF.

Colonel Swope Told Kelly Brent He
Was Not the Smart Man Many
Thought Him.

"Many persons think me a smart man but the truth of it is I'm an old fool," Colonel Thomas H. Swope said one day to Kelly Brent.

The two had a real estate deal on, and the colonel concluded at the end of long negotiations not to make the investment.

"Some years ago I concluded to sell off a great deal of my real estate holdings," said Colonel Swope, "and hang me if I didn't sell for a song the best of it. What I sold is worth millions today and a great deal I have left is not worth paying taxes on."

When the park board a few years ago suggested placing of a brass medallion of Colonel Swope at the entrance to Swope park he protested earnestly. He wrote to the board saying that while he lived he wanted no monument to be erected. It was explained that the medallion was not intended as a mark of the memory of the donor of the beautiful park, but as a slight token of appreciation and esteem from the city. After a long parley Mr. Swope reluctantly gave his consent to the installation of the medallion.

No man was more averse to publicity in the making of public bequests than was Colonel Swope. Just a hint being dropped that he contemplated a gift would anger the philanthropist and he would abandon his purpose. Some years ago Colonel Swope visited Roosevelt hospital in New York and asked to be shown through the institution. He incidentally remarked to the attendant that he was from Kansas City and that it was his purpose some day to build a hospital here and present it to the city.

A reporter for The Journal heard of the colonel's intentions and printed the story. The colonel became exasperated over the premature announcement and asked the reporter to visit him at his offices. The reporter to this day remembers the wrath displayed by the colonel and his ears still tingle with the tongue lashing administered.

"By your interference, sir," the colonel loudly declaimed, "you have deprived Kansas City of one of the best hospitals in the country. When people get to knowing my business it is time for me to quit."

It is unnecessary to state that Colonel Swope did not build the hospital, but he did give the ground on which it stands.

"I have known Mr. Swope a great many years, and knew him to be a kind, generous man," said J. J. Swofford last night. "Several times in the past five years I have approached him for donations for the Y. M. C. A. building fund and other funds for the promotion of the association's enterprise. He usually contributed from $100 to $400 a year.

"I know very little of Mr. Swope's business tactics, but I remember a peculiar thing about the manner in which he made these donations. He kept absolutely no account of his charities and when he signed a check to give me for the fund he used a check without a number and stub. He seemed very modest and sensitive about what he gave away.

"About three months ago, I think it was, he made and arrangement with my son Ralph Swofford of Thirty-first and Summit streets, who is president of the executive board of the Franklin Institute, to endow the institution with $50,000 providing as much more could be raised. A campaign has already been started and I believe is pretty well under way to raise the required $50,000.

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October 1, 1909

OUT OF THE OLD BUILDING.

Y. M. C. A. Members Make the Move
Into Their New Building a
Memorable Occasion.

The Y. M. C. A. building at 810 Wyandotte street -- if a building may have a memory -- never will forget last night. It was the noisiest night the building had ever experienced in the thirteen years it has been occupied by the association. The organization deserted it last night and about 1,000 of the younger members celebrated the occasion by a parade to the new building of the association at Tenth and Oak streets.

Before they left, using bar bells, they tapped and rattled the floors and tables in the building and turned on and off the electric lights, romped up and down the stairs and did other stunts that occur to youthful cut-ups. Then they went out on Wyandotte street, fell into eight platoons, each of which represented one of the teams competing for the most new members, and marched thought the business streets giving a yell half-human and half-coyote that left none of the auditors along the streets in doubt as to the identity of the marchers or the fact that they were celebrating.

When the marchers reached the new building, they raced up unlighted stairs and produced noises that made the former sounds excruciatingly jealous, providing again that noises get jealous. Incidentally, the association members advertised the fact that it was looking for new members. Up to last night 610 new members had been secured. The competition to gain 1,500 new members ends tomorrow night. Those in charge say that they will have them.

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August 26, 1909

FIGHT ON TOP OF FLYING TRAIN.

Man Thrown Under Car in Struggle,
Dies of Injuries.

While a westbound fast freight was running through the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe railroad yards at Argentine at 2 o'clock yesterday morning, switchmen in the yards saw two men struggling on top of one of the box cars of the train. One of the men was seen to fall between two cars. He caught at a brake beam as he fell, clung to it for a few seconds and then dropped to the track beneath the moving train.

The switchmen carried him to the Y. M. C. A. building, a short distance from the Santa Fe depot in Argentine. He was attended there by Dr. D. C. Clopper, a surgeon for the railroad company. A hole was found on the left side of his head, his left leg was severed below the knee and his left arm was badly mangled. He was taken to St. Margaret's hospital in Kansas City, Kas., where he died at 3:15 o'clock yesterday afternoon.

The injured man was unconscious when picked up, and nothing could be learned of the struggle on the car, or the identity of his companion. He wore a button of the United Mine Workers of America and letters found in his pockets identified him as Albert Winter of Roanoke, Ill. Daniels & Comfort, the undertakers who took charge of the body, telegraphed to the authorities of that city and received orders to hold the body until the arrival of his relatives from Roanoke. Winter was about 35 years old.

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July 28, 1909

NEAR TO DEATH IN POOL.

With Twenty Swimmers Close at
Hand, Bather Goes Down
Third Time at Y. M. C. A.

With more than a score of persons swimming within ten feet of him yesterday afternoon in the swimming pool in the Y. M. C. A. building, P. H. Hanner, a deaf mute 23 years old, living at 517 Washington, was almost drowned before he could attract the attention of anyone. Hanner struggled several minutes and had sunk for the third time before it was realized that he was drowning. It took two hours to resuscitate him.

When Hanner's limbs began to tire and he realized that he couldn't reach safety, he tried to motion for help. No one saw him. He could not cry out, and the water with its splashing bathers , made invisible his signals for help.

He sank for the first time and rose to the surface; a moment later his lungs filled with water. In desperation he waved his hands. The second time he sank he began to think that the end was near.

"That's a pretty good diver," said someone. "See how he stays under water."

Just as he was sinking for the third time, one of his companions noticed the agonized expression on his face. The attention of several others was called, and he was pulled to safety. The ambulance from police headquarters was called and Dr. F. R. Berry induced artificial respiration until he recovered consciousness.

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May 19, 1909

THIRD PARALYTIC
STROKE WAS FATAL.

FRANCIS M. FURGASON WAS ILL
THREE WEEKS.

Seventy-Six Years Old, Mr. Furgason
Had Long Been Active in
the Charities of
the City.

As the result of a paralytic stroke which came to him over three weeks ago, Francis M. Furgason, president of the Furgason & Tabb Underwriting Company, with offices in the Dwight building, and a pioneer among the progressive men of this city, died quietly at his home, 1006 East Thirty-third street, at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon. He was 76 years old.

Until a few days ago it was hoped that the stricken man might partially recover, although it was conceded by family physicians that a third stroke would cause his death. At times there seemed to be even chances that the third stroke would not come, for the patient and frequent rallies and the advantage of a hardy physique. Monday, however, he began to fail and early yesterday morning it was known that there was no hope for him. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock from Calvary Baptist church. Dr. F. C. McConnell, Rev. J. M. Cromer and Rev. H. T. Ford will officiate in the services. The deacons of the church will act as active pallbearers. Interment will be in Elmwood cemetery.

WAS ONCE Y. M. C. A. PRESIDENT.

Mr. Furgason was born near Indianapolis, Ind., April 1, 1833. His father was a pioneer of sturdy Scotch extraction, who had pushed west to the Hoosier state when it was yet a wilderness and staked out a farm at what is now the very center of Indianapolis. Mr. Furgason spent his first years on the farm, but at 18 his father sent him to Franklin college.

Mr. Furgason was graduated at Franklin when he was 22 years old, at the head of a large class for that time. The following year he was made a teacher at the college, and three years later elected to the presidency, which place hie filled, it is said, with credit to himself and the institution until the year 1867, when he gave up his collegiate work and came to Kansas City, where he became involved in the insurance trade.

In 1861 the Y. M. C. A., which was then only an infant organization, was in bad financial straits and temporarily suspended. The war, which had been the cause of the trouble, was now over and many members had returned and were anxious to revive the association on a more active basis than ever before. The board met and Mr. Furgason was elected president of the Y. M. C. A. D. A. Williams, an electrician, was made secretary. The move proved a fortunate one for the associaton.

Under Mr. Furgason's management headquarters and a reading room were established on the south side of Missouri avenue on Delaware. Rent was obtained free from the late D. L. Shouse, then a banker, and the four years of the Furgason administration saw the Y. M. C. A. on an improved financial basis, with a membership that was twice as large as it had been at any previous period. Mr. Furgason never gave up his interest in the Y. M. C. A. and other organizations for the benefit of the younger element of the city.

Soon after his connection with Y. M. C. A., Mr. Furgson was hired as a teacher in the Franklin school at Fourteenth and Washington streets, and served in this capacity eight years. After this he resumed his former occupation of insurance agent and followed it until his retirement from active business a few years ago.

MEN RESPECTED HIM.

"He was one of the kindest and gentlest old men I have ever had the pleasure of knowing," said the Rev. F. C. McConnell of the Calvary Baptist church recently. "I knew Mr. Furgason for thirty-five years," said George Peake, a veteran accountant, who has offices in the First National bank building. "It seemed as if he had the perpetual desire to extend sunshine in all directions."

Mr. Furgason was married twice, once in the early 50s, the last time to Mrs. Laura Branham in 1858. His widow and one son, Frank, who has taken his place in the firm of Furgason & Tabb, survive him. A son, Arthur, and a daughter, Emma, died within a few months of each other three years ago.

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May 7, 1909

CHEERING THRONGS
BID WESTON WELCOME.

AGED PEDESTRIAN SET HOT
PACE DURING THE DAY.

Arrived in Kansas City Fresh and
Strong With Admirers Trailing
at Heel -- Proceeds to
Kansas Today.
Edward Payson Weston, the Aged Pedestrian.
EDWARD PAYSON WESTON.

Cheered by thousands of people, Edward Payson Weston, the aged pedestrian, who is enroute from New York to San Francisco, swung briskly into the downtown section of Kansas City yesterday afternoon at 4:15 o'clock and reaching the Coates house at 4:45 completed the day's walk, having made twenty-nine miles from Oak Grove, his stopping place last night, to Kansas City in eight hours and thirty minutes, with ease. He was not travel worn nor weary, and walked the last few miles of the day at a terrific pace.

"It was the greatest day of the trip to date," said Weston, as he waved adieu to the crowd that followed him through the downtown streets to the doors of his hotel. "Never have I been so royally received. And never on any of my jaunts have I traveled such roads and passed through such beautiful country as I did today. I will never forget this day and the kind people of Kansas City."

IN GREAT FORM.

Greatly refreshed by ten hours sleep at Oak Grove, Weston set out from that place yesterday morning at 7:30 o'clock. In the cool, bracing morning air he reeled off the miles in great form, little like he entered Oak Grove the night before, when he was on the verge of collapse as the result of a most trying walk under a broiling sun. The trip to Independence was made without incident. With the exception of a stop for a glass of milk and another to eat some raw eggs, the veteran never broke his stride, and at 1:30 o'clock he entered the public square at Independence. Scores of people cheered him and sought to give him a more demonstrative welcome, but he dodged them and made his way to the Metropolitan hotel, a stopping place in the early days for ox teams en route from the Atlantic to the Pacific over the same route the "hiker" is following.

At the Metropolitan, Weston ate heartily a generous portion of oatmeal. Lying on a cot he talked between bites to newspaper men and Y. M. C. A. athletes who had journeyed to Independence to meet and accompany him to Kansas City. After fifty minutes of eating and resting, he arose, walked backwards down the stairs of the hotel to prevent any jar to his knees, and started rapidly for the city.

CHILDREN CHEERED HIM.

The route out of Independence was down West Maple street. On this thoroughfare is located the Central high school, and as Weston approached the school hundreds of school children were released from their studies to greet him. To the wild cheering of the boys and girls and the handclapping of the many people who lined the curbs of the street, the old man lifted his hat and bowed again and again. The short, stubby stride was broken for the first time, and the walker grasped the hand of George S. Bryant, principal of the school, a friend of years ago. A hurried greeting and adieu and Weston was again on his way. Twice between Independence and Kansas City, the old fellow was again greeted by throngs of school children, and each time he bowed his appreciation. "It does me more good than anything else to have these children greet me," he said. "It cheers me, and makes my journey easier."

The Y . M. C. A. hikers who were accompanying the old pedestrian on his entry into the city, were hustling to keep a pace when the city limits were reached at 3:12 o'clock. Weston was averaging, as he did early in the day, four miles an hour, and the pace was a little too fast for the unseasoned striders, but they struggled gamely on. At the city limits, the escort of mounted police joined the party, and it was well that this escort was provided, for along Fifteenth street and through the business section of the city the crowd that followed the pedestrian and rushed into the streets to greet him would have been uncontrollable.

Such an enthusiastic welcome as was given Weston has seldom been given an athlete in Kansas City. On every side there were cheers of "Hello, Weston," "You're all right, old boy," etc. To all of these Weston bowed his thanks. He stopped but twice, once to greet John DeWolfe, who lives near the Blue river. Weston and DeWolfe were friends thirty-nine years ago.

After reaching the Coates house Weston Hurried to his room where he changed his clothes and bathed his feet in the preparation he always uses, briny water.

LECTURES AT Y. M. C. A.

Last night Mr. Weston spoke before a large audience in the gymnasium of the Y. M. C. A. building on Wyandotte street. His remarks were confined principally to events on his present long hike, and he predicted he would arrive in San Francisco on schedule time. By 9 o'clock he was through with his lecture, and a half hour later was snugly in bed at the Coates house. He left a call for 4 o'clock this morning, and by 5 o'clock he expects to be well on his way to the West.

Weston goes from Kansas City to Lawrence, and will cover the distance over the roadbed of the Union Pacific railroad. He is due in Lawrence tonight, where he will rest until Saturday morning, when he will start out for Topeka, again taking the railroad right-of-way, by which he saves eleven miles in distance as compared with the open highway. He is scheduled to lecture in Topeka.

Weston is a most picturesque character. Clad in a white blouse that is fringed with embroidery at the neck and wrist, plaid walking trousers suspended by a broad belt and heavy shoes with gaiters, his dress does just what he wishes it to do -- attract attention. He shows his seventy years only by his wheat head and a drooping white mustache. He is of wiry build, about 5 feet 6 inches in height and weighs 140 pounds. As he walks he allows his body to weave slightly from side to side, removing to a great extent the jar of the walking. At this stage of the journey he is in excellent physical condition. Yesterday was the hardest day he has experienced on this or any other walk, according to his own statement. Barring a succession of several such days he should be able to finish his long journey on schedule time and in good condition.

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April 21, 1909

PHYSICAL CULTURE AT JAIL.

Regular Exercise Good for Health
and Morals of Prisoners.

Physical culture is coming for the prisoners in the county jail. Believing that the prisoners would be better both as to health and morals if given regular exercise, James P. Gilwee, chief deputy in the county marshal's office, started in the gymnastics yesterday. He asked F. B. Barnes, physical director of the Y. M. C. A., to exercise the prisoners.

Mr. Barnes confined his efforts to those on the first floor of the jail, teaching them some of the motions of rudimentary gymnastics. The prisoners took to the innovation with a will. Later Mr. Barnes is to return and give instruction to those confined in the upper tier of cells. All the exercise the prisoners generally get is a walk about the corridor.

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March 4, 1909

CUSTER SURVIVOR TO TALK.

Older Boys Will Hear "What Makes
a Soldier."

A meeting of older boys will be held at the Academy of Music Sunday at 3:30 p. m. under the auspices of the Y. M. C. A. An address on "What Makes a Soldier" will be delivered by Colonel T. W. Goldin, mounted messenger for General Custer and a survivor of the battle of the Little Big Horn.

This will be the first of a series of meetings for older boys which will be held at the same place every Sunday afternoon. Moving pictures representing biblical scenes will be shown after the lecture. Special music will be furnished. admission by ticket only.

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November 7, 1908

Y. M. C. A. TO CELEBRATE
ITS 48TH BIRTHDAY.

WILL HOLD EXERCISES IN MANY
CHURCHES SUNDAY.

Organization Began as a Prayer Meet-
ing in London 54 Years Ago
Local Branch One of
First in the West.

The local organization of the Young Men's Christian Association will be 48 years old Sunday, and in commemoration of this even plans have been completed for meetings to be held in thirty-seven churches in Kansas City. Prominent workers in the association from various cities will make the addresses at the night services and a meeting for men will be held at the Willis Wood theater at 3:30 o'clock in the afternoon. At this meeting Henry M. Beardsley, president of the local association, will preside, and L. Wilbur Messer, general secretary of the Y. M. C. A., will make the principal address. A special male quartet will furnish music.

The Young Men's Christian Association was organized fifty-four years ago in London, England, and the movement spread into the United States the next years. Although started as a young men's prayer meeting, with the first meeting held in a small room, it has grown until a building is located in every city of any size in the world and work is being carried on even in heathen countries. Millions of men are banded together under one banner, and a member of the association in Kansas City is welcomed at any association in the world.

The Kansas City organization was one of the first to be started west of the Mississippi river. The local organization now has 1,500 members and has a campaign in progress whereby at least 400 more are to be secured.

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November 4, 1908

STAYED UP NEARLY ALL
NIGHT TO READ RETURNS

Great Crowds in Front of Newspaper
Offices -- Returns at the
Clubs.

Republicans and Democrats alike, not to mention members of the lesser parties, stood cheek by jowl for hours last night -- not in beatific political harmony -- but in a common desire to rubber over the other fellow's shoulder and catch the flashes of election news that were thrown on canvass screens by the stereopticon in many parts of the city. Everybody jostled and laughed and gently roasted each other, and when the returns suited them yelled approval, but never was an ugly bit of temper put on unpleasant display.

Kansas City stayed up late enough to learn the approximate fate of its favorite candidate, and then went to bed with a fair assurance that it would awaken in the land of the free whether Taft, Bryan, or somebody else were elected. For once in the year at least, Papa Casey had a healthy excuse to present to Mamma Casey for staying out so late, but for the fact that in many cases that she was out with him and all the little Caseys.

HOW IT WAS DONE.

Most of the crowd didn't see the men behind the stereopticon, seated at tables and busily transcribing telegrams to the little glass slides in black drawing ink. They had to write minutely so as to get all of a telegram on one of the three by four panes of glass, but the phonographs and cartoons kept the people standing until another fresh slide was ready to put in.

The adding machine was in much demand and whole batteries of them did nocturnal duty in the various newspaper offices, with experts from the banks who knew how to punch the keys properly. Though serpentine in name, the adders produced some straight figures that won't miss the official returns very far, for the benefit of the multitude.

AT THE CLUBS.

In the lodge room of the Elk's Club the furniture was swathed in roughing-it covering and the members held forth for the night, as was true at the Commercial Club, where the attaches of the club and transportation bureau were enlisted in the work of handling the returns.

At the Y. M. C. A. a wire was cut in and between telegrams the waiters were entertained by a stereopticon lecture on California by Aldred Foster of New Zealand.

Members of the Railroad Club heard the returns at the club rooms in Walnut street and after the theaters closed Thespians came up to join them.

Federal officers and employes for the most part heard the returns in the federal court room on the third floor of the postoffice building, and in Convention hall and at the corners of Eighth and McGee, Tenth and McGee and Eleventh and Grand great crowds stood far into the night to get the returns as they came in.

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November 3, 1908

RETURNS AT Y. M. C. A.

Special Service by Telegraph and
Telephone Tonight.

Returns from the election will be received at Y. M. C. A. rooms, 810 Wyandotte street, tonight, commencing at 7:30 o'clock. At the same time stereopticon slides of the Yosemite valley will be shown by Alfred Foster of New Zealand, who will give a short explanation of each. Special service will be installed by both the Bell Telephone Company and the Postal Telegraph Company. Lunch will be served in the building.

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October 5, 1908

CURIOUS CROWD HEARS TAFT.

Persons Disperse as Soon as Roosevelt's
Candidate Appears.

William H. Taft may have saved his voice, as he planned to do, by refusing to speak in Convention hall yesterday afternoon, and choosing a church which would seat 1,200 persons instead, but he caused much discomfort to hundreds who heard him and disappointment to others who stood for several hours only to be finally refused admittance altogether.

Mr. Taft spoke from the pulpit of the Independence avenue Methodist church, under the auspices of the local Y. M. C. A. Before the doors were opened a patient crowd had assembled, a majority of whom, to judge from the good natured raillery with which they wiled the time away, were actuated by curiosity.

The crowd, like Mary's little lamb, still lingered near and when, a few minutes later, Mr. Taft appeared in a red automobile, accompanied by former Mayor Henry M. Beardsley and one or two other local celebrities of like political faith, the consuming curiosity was evidently appeased and it thinned rapidly.

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October 3, 1908

TAFT TO BE HERE TOMORROW.

Republican Presidential Candidate Will
Spend Sunday in City.

The train bearing William H. Taft from Topeka to Kansas City is expected to arrive tomorrow morning at 7 o'clock where a reception committee consisting of Senator William Warner, Congressman E. C. Ellis and W. S. Dickey will meet the presidential candidate and escort him to the Baltimore hotel.

In the morning Mr. Taft will attend the Beacon Hill Congregational church and will then lunch at the home of W. S. Dickey. In the afternoon he will go to the Independence Avenue M. E. church, where he will address the Y. M. C. A. at 3:30 o'clock. His subject will be "The Foreign Work of the Association."

Monday morning Mr. Taft will be taken over the intercity viaduct to Kansas City, Kas., where he will address the populace from the steps of the public library.

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August 1, 1908

HE WAS AFRAID TO GO HOME.

Robert Parker, Suing for Divorce,
Often "Sat Alone at Y. M. C. A."

In the divorce suit against his wife, Sidney, filed by Robert Parker in the circuit court at Independence yesterday, Mr. Parker states that when he returned home late at night, after attending to business affairs, his wife was always waiting for him, but not with love and kisses. He avers that the bric-a-brac and small articles of furniture often greeted him.

The evening volley from the front door got to be such a regular thing that Mr. Parker says he was really afraid to go home in the dark. Like the man in the song, his only refuge was the Y. M. C. A., and he often stayed there all night, he says, instead of risking his head by going home.

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July 31, 1908

HE'LL MAKE STRONG CHINAMEN.

Dr. M. J. Exner Is Going to Asia to
Teach Athletics.

Dr. M. J. Exner, for the last eight years physical director of the Kansas City Y. M. C. A., has announced that he will resign his position here to go to China.

Dr. Exner is a graduate of the Kansas City Medical college and the Springfield Training schook, where he made a reputation in athletics, playing on the famous football team of 1896, which was the only team to score on Yale that year. Dr. Exner played end on the football team and also distinguished himself in other lines of athletics. His work in Kansas City has been uniformly successful and he has gained the friendship of a great number of young men here.

In his new position Dr. Exner will make his headquarters in Shanghai, where the Y. M. C. A. is very strong and has a large number of native members. Dr. Exner has been making a study of the conditions among the Chinese in regard to physical education and exercise and he finds them deplorable.

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April 9, 1908

WALKING WEST ON A WAGER.

If He Goes 3,000 Miles in Sixty Days
This Youth Gets $450.

To walk 3,000 miles cross-country from New York city to San Francisco in sixty days is the task which a young man, who arived in Kansas City last evening, says he is now in the midst of on a wager of $450. The continental pedestrian, Frank McAllister, figures the total distance by wagon roads and railroad tracks at 3,000 miles, and that he must cover fifty miles each day to win the purse He is now about three days behind on his schedule, he says.

McAllister said last evening that he had walked from Pleasant Hill, Mo., yesterday, a distance of thirty-five miles. He plans to walk toward Topeka, Kas., today on the Santa Fe tracks, but may remain here a day to rest. He says, if he stays here today, he can be found at the Y. M. C. A. club rooms.

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February 3, 1908

PROGRESS OF THE NEGRO.

Defined in Address Last Night by
W. T. Vernon.

In an address delivered to negroes at Allen chapel last night, W. T. Vernon of the United States treasury department said that the possibilities of the negro are encouraging to all those who desire a better era for these people. He claimed that the negro appreciates all the opportunities which may be opened to him. He declared that with the negro's freedom was made the most radical change in social order.

"The passage of the war amendments was necessary and just," said Mr. Vernon. "They prohibited peonage, defined citizenship, provided for the penalization of any state which should disenfranchise its citizens, and provided against this injustice on account of color. Then came the upward struggle of 4,000,000,000 people and as a result of such legislation and protection, the race has made achievements unparalleled in the world's history by any race similarly environed. From 1870 to 1900 the illiteracy of the face was decreased 43 per cent. At the close of the civil war the negro was without a home. In 1900, thirty-five years later, 372,414 were owners of homes of which 225,156 were free from incumbrance. He has nearly 30,000 school teachers, 500 young negroes pursuing special courses in the greatest institutions of learning in this and foreign countries, and he is paying taxes on quite $800,000,000 worth of property.

"Unbiased men will admit that such a record deserves encouragement, and gives just ground for the belief that he is daily becoming an appreciated, potent factor for good.

"The South today is struggling industrially with the rest of the world. The building up of this section can not be accomplished without the labor of the negro. These people, discriminated agaisnt, with thier schools diminishng, are not given an opportunity to do the best within them, and thus give to their country the splendid efforts which they could otherwise give. Blind indeed to right and justice -- blind to the best interests of our country is he who denies to any class of our citizens that which he asks for himself. As a race we must remember that education, sobriety, thrift and energy are the qualities which will give us success, permanent and lasting.

"While seeking industrial opportunity and progress in the business world, the spiritual side, which has to do with literature, art, science, culture and soul growth, should not be neglected. Here in the midst of a growing developing population, with less racial antagonisms and discriminations than are found elsewhere, I believe the race can rise to its highest possibilites. I would advice that we remain here and work out our destiny."

At Lincoln high school, Nineteenth and Tracy, Mr. Vernon addressed the colored Y. M. C. A. yesterday afternoon.

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September 2, 1907

MILTON J. OLDHAM HURT.

The Attorney Struck by a Passenger
Train and May Die.

Milton J. Oldham, 2905 Euclid avenue, an attorney with offices in the Scarritt building, was struck and dangerously hurt by a westbound passenger train on the Santa Fe railroad, at Turner, Kas., at about 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon.

Oldham had been visiting Mrs. Emma Moffett, of Turner, during the day and had just sepped behind one train, only to get in front of another. He was thrown several feet by the cowcatcher and was unconscious several hours. Mr. Oldham was put on board a Kansas City bound train and put in care of Dr. D. E. Clopper at Argentine. It was found that he sustained internal injuries, from which he may die.

Mr. Oldham was placed temporarily in the Argentine Young Men's Christian Association rooms last night, and will be sent to a hospital in Topeka this morning.

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July 10, 1907

THIS IS "LEMONADE DAY".

Railroad Y. M. C. A. to Give Annual
Drinkfest.

This is "lemonade day" at the Railroad Y. M. C. A. at the Union depot. Following a time-honored custom of the association, Secretary Parsons and his assistants will serve free lemonade to all who may visit the rooms today, and each man will be allowed to drink as much of the concoction as he may desire.

Once every summer, usually some time in July, the association takes this means of entertaining its members, and the affair has proved successful from a social standpoint.

Music and the usual table games help to make the day a pleasant one for the "railroad boys".

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May 9, 1907



ONLY ONE KNOWN DEAD IN UNIVERSITY FIRE, THOUGH IT IS BELIEVED RUINS HOLDS ANOTHER BODY

GROPING HIS WAY THROUGH SMOKE FILLED HALLWAYS, GEORGES DeMARE BECAME CONFUSED AND LEAPED OR FELL TO HIS DEATH
WOMAN CANNOT BE FOUND.

Miss Aurora Wittebart Believed
To Have Perished in the
Doomed Structure
WOMAN FALLS FROM LADDER.

Through Blinding Smoke Fight for Life Waged.

The University building, at the northtwest corner of Ninth and Locust streets, was totally destroyed by fire yesterday afternoon, causing a loss of $125,000 on the building and resulting in the death of Professor Georges De Mare, head of the art department in Central high school, who jumped or fell from a window on the fourth floor of the burning building.

The body of Miss Aurora Wittebart is supposed to be still in the ruins.

The loss to the various tenants cannot be known with any degree of definiteness for some time. With the exception of Montgomery Ward & Co., who occupied the first two floors, most of the occupants of the building were musicians and artists. The Radford pharmacy occupied the room at the corner of Ninth and Locust, and the Kindergarten Supply Company occupied the room immediately to the west of the pharmacy.

The fire caused more excitement than any which has occurred in Kansas City in years, owing to the ancient architecture of the building and the large number of women who had studios in the building, and the fact that several hundred girls were employed by Montgomery Ward & Co. There were many sensational escapes and displays of heroism, the most notable being the rescue of Miss S. Ellen Barnes, a music teacher, by Fireman Charles Braun.



She Died of Suffocation?

Death by suffocation is thought to have been the fate of Miss Aurora Wittebart, and artist who had an office in the fifth floor of the building, and was there when the fire started. She was last seen by Miss Barnes just as Professor de Mare jumped to his death. She is thought to be the woman Mr. Farrel saw with de Mare, as he groped his way through the smoke to safety. De Mare leaped to death from a window leading out of her studio.

Miss Wittebart is the daughter of a glass manufacturer who lives at Coffeyville, Kas. She was only 22 years of age, and had been studying art and painting in Kansas City for several months, and was to have been married to George Jackson, an employe of the Missouri-Kansas Telephone Company.



Last to See Miss Wittebart.

"Just before I learned that the building was on fire Professor de Mare was in my studio," said Miss Helen Barnes last night. "We were talking about music and art, and finally he arose to go, saying that he was expecting a visitor in his studio. He walked to the door and opened it. A gust of black smoke burst through the open door, and it was then we realized that the building was on fire. Professor de Mare called to me to get out of the building immediately and started down the hall. I started to follow, but soon realized that I could not find my way through the dense smoke. I went to a window from where I saw Miss Wittebart standing at a window on the floor below. She was near the rear fire escape and I supposed she had descended. Professor de Mare had opened a window and was preparing, I thought, to mount the landing of a fire escape. I returned immediately to my studio and, raising a window, made a feeble attempt to call for help. the smoke strangled me, and I threw my purse out to attract the people below. That was needless, though, for I had been seen by the firemen, and at that time ladders were being rapidly placed to reach me. I saw the fireman who rescued me climbing upward. There was determination in his manner, and I seemed to realize when I looked upon his smoke-begrimed, upturned face that he would surely reach me. It was his determined look that strengthened me and seemed to give me new courage."


Cleveland Laid Cornerstone.

The building was constructed nearly twenty years ago for the Y. M. C. A., Grover Cleveland laying the cornerstone in 1887 during his first term as president. It cost $112,000, and after the Y. M. C. A. was compelled to relinquish it the building passed into the possession of the Pepper estate, being in turn sold to the Sunny Slope Realty Company. There was an insurance of $72,000 on the structure.

The first alarm was turned in a few minutes before 3 o'clock by O. W. Hoover, proprietor of the Kindergarten Supply House, next door west from the drug store on the corner. Mr. Hoover heard the girls employed by Montgomery Ward & Co. hurrying down the stairs and out of the building and soon afterwards smelled the smoke. He called up the fire department and was informed that no alarm of fire had yet been turned in. Mr. Hoover thereupon turned in the alarm.

Dr. William West, formerly a fireman and later a police surgeon, who ha an office in the Rialto building, saw the smoke pouring form the building and was one of the first physicians to reach the scene of the fire. He attended Fireman Braun, who rescued Miss Barnes, and did valiant and effective service throughout the fire in extending first aid to the injured.


300 Girls in a Panic.
The fire started in a pile of 8,000 pounds of hemp rope, which was stored in the pit of the building. Until recently the Kansas City Athletic Club had occupied the premises and it had made the basement and main floor a single room. Around this room ran a balcony. Montgomery Ward & Co. were occupying the room and in it they had a pile of hemp stored for immediate use. Without any warning whatever smoke began issuing from it and a crackling sound was heard. There were some of the 300 girls the mail order house employed in the Kansas City general offices, within two feet of the rope, and scores of them within sight. Immediately on hearing the sound of the crackling and seeing the little jets of smoke at the same moment, the girls began to tell each other there was a fire, and precipitously prepared to leave the place. O. Q. Massey and J. M. Miller, clerks, at the same time made a rush for the starting fire and tried to trample it out. Despite their efforts the fire gained on them, jets coming from twenty parts of the pile. A rumor that someone had stepped on a match, igniting it, is completely discredited by the evidence given by a dozen or more clerks who were sitting in the pit where the hemp blazed.

While Henderson, Massey and Miller were trying to stamp the fire out, Mrs. Lucille Baker, in charge of the squad in that particular room, began getting her forty subordinates out of the place. Manager W. P. Walker had 200 girls at work in what once was the swimming pool. Their only avenue of escape was to walk toward the burning hemp and up a temporary staircase. In the most amazing manner, the manager succeeded in getting the clerks to stand perfectly still until they could march out of the place in twos, and in that manner he got every one of the 200 out of the pit and to the street level without the slightest confusion. There was every possibility of a jam at the staircase, which could only have resulted in a great loss of life.

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May 2, 1907

TO KILL BABY, TOO?

WAS THIS THE PURPOSE OF MRS.
GALBRAITH, A SUICIDE?

CHILD TELLS HER OWN STORY.


SAYS MOTHER WANTED HER TO
TAKE SOME "MEDICINE"
This Turns Out to Have Been Carbolic Acid -- Coroner Says Too
Much Was Taken to Substantiate Theory of Accident --
A Note Missing.

Many mysterious things have developed since the body of Mrs. Mary S. Galbraith was found in her home, 1610 Lister avenue, Tuesday night by her 3-year-old baby Mercedes. It seems now, from what her oldest child, Gladis, 5 years old, says, that Mrs. Galbraith made careful preparations for death. She left a note for her brother-in-law, Clay Galbraith, which cannot be found. From the child's story, lisped in broken sentences yesterday to the neighbors, it is inferred that Mrs. Galbraith may have tried to take Gladis with her.

Little Gladis said that shortly after the postman left the home Tuesday afternoon, which would have been about 3 o'clock, her mamma was reading a letter. The child said she read it over and over and cried bitterly while she was doing so. Then she called Mercedes, the baby, to her and, giving her a penny, sent her to the grocery at Seventeenth and Lister to buy candy. The grocer said she got it and went out to play.

Gladis said then that her mother wrote a letter to "Uncle Clay." After that, still weeping, she went to the bath room and took Gladis with her. The child says that her "mamma opened a bottle of medicine and wanted me to take some. I didn't like it and wouldn't take it," she added. "Then she gave me the letter to give to Uncle Clay and told me to run on out and play. She took a big dose of the medicine and went in her room and fell on the bed."

Little Gladis went out to play with her sister, Mercedes, and several other children. In her play she said one of the boys took the note to "Uncle Clay." The whole neighborhood was searched yesterday, but no trace of the note, which could explain everything, could be found.

It was after dark when Mrs. Charles Parsons found the little sisters playing out in the cold and took them to their kitchen door and placed them inside. They ran upstairs just as the front door opened and Clay Gallbraith, the dead woman's brother-in-law, arrived from his work at the Y. M. C. A. headquarters. He heard little Mercedes upstairs in her mother's room crying, "Wake up, mamma. I tan't wake my mamma. She won't talk to Mercedes any more." When Mr. Galbraith passed the door he saw the baby on the bed with the dead mother, patting her face and hugging her pulseless body. He called a doctor and the coroner was summoned.

The bottle of "medicine" of which Gladis spoke was found in the lavatory in the bath room. It was carbolic acid. Dr. O. H. Parker, deputy coroner, held an autopsy at Forster & Smith's morgue yesterday, and reported that carbolic acid had been taken in too large a dose for it to have been a mistake or an accident.

"Do you reckon she wanted to take Gladis with her?" many of the neighbors were asking yesterday. "Why did she send Mercedes away?" The little daughter said that her mother burned the letter she had been reading which "made mama cry." There was no trace of it to be found yesterday.

J. A. Galbraith, husband of the dead woman, was reached by wire at Dallas, Tex., and is expected home at 8 o'clock this morning. The arrangements for the funeral will be made after his arrival. The coroner said there was no need of an inquest, as he was satisfied as to the cause of death.

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May 1, 1907

STILLED IN DEATH.

EVEN BABY'S VOICE BRINGS
NO REPLY FROM MOTHER.

ASKS UNCLE TO WAKE HER.

LITTLE MERCEDES GALBRAITH
FINDS PARENT BEYOND HELP.
Traces of Carbolic Acid Indicate Poison as Cause of
Death -- Whether an Accident Is Yet to Be De-
termined -- Brother Is Attracted
by Child's Cry.

"Mamma! Mamma! Wake up, mamma, please wake up an' talk to Mercedes!"

When Clay Galbraith, a clerk at the Y. M. C. A. general offices, entered his home at 1610 Lister avenue at 7:30 o'clock last night, he heard his little 3-year-old niece, Mercedes Galbraith, calling to her mamma in a room on the second floor. Mr. Galbraith started to his room and as he passed the door he saw the child on the bed with its mamma.

"My mamma won't wake any more an' talk to me, Uncle Clay," the little one said. "You wake her."

Mr. Galbraith stepped into the room, thinking his sister-in-law asleep, but noting the deathly pallor on her face he ran to the home of Mrs. Willis Dunkerson and told her of his suspicions. Dr. A. R. Greenlee was called, but Mrs. Galbraith had been dead possibly five or six hours, he said.

Dr. Greenlee summoned Dr. O. H. Parker, deputy coroner. He found Mrs. Galbraith lying partly clad across her bed. Her shoes and stockings had been removed as if to prepare for a bath and all the soiled leinen in the house was in a laundry bag by the kitchen door. The neighbors told of a sick spell which Mrs. Galbraith had suffered in December last and suggested natural causes for her sudden death. In the lavatory in the bath room, however, Dr. Parker found a bottle labeled carbolic acid. The cork had been removed with a hair pin. The bottle was empty. Dr. Parker also said that the dead woman's lips showed traces of carbolic acid.

Mrs. Mary S. Galbraith was 34 years old. She was the wife of J. A. Galbraith, a traveling man for the National Surety Company. Her huysband left home last friday and is now somewhere in Texas. Wires were sent last night to try to locate him. There are two children, Gladys, 5, and Mercedes, 3 years old.

The neighbors said that the little ones were out at play all afternoon and some suggested that perhaps their mother had put them out. About 7:30 Mrs. Charles Parsons, a neighbor, saw them out in the cold and took them to a rear door and had just placed them inside when she heard the front door open. When she asked, "Who is that?" thinking it might be their mother, the little one replied, "It's Uncle Clay." She then ran on through the house and up to her mamma's room. Mr. Galbraith spent a mooment below before he heard Mercedes crying that she3 could not awaken her mother. The children were taken in charge by neighbors last night and have not yet been informed of their mother's death. An autopsy will be held today to determine the exact cause of death, but Dr. Parker said that from all external appearances and evidences found in the house he was of the opinion that Mrs. Galbraith's death had been due to carbolic acid poisoning.

"I will not be able to state until after the autopsy," he said, "whether death was an accident or suicidal."

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