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February 5, 1910

BLIND WOMAN WAITED
AT DEPOT IN VAIN.

Hostess Detained by Accident -- Mrs.
Aldrich Writes Literature
for the Blind.

Mrs. Clara Aldrich, totally blind and a stranger in Kansas City, arrived at the Union depot last night from Joliet, Ill. She was expecting friends to meet her at the station, but was disappointed. She told Mrs. Ollie Everingham, matron at the depot, that Mrs. O. P. Blatchley of 220 South Ash street, in Kansas City, Kas., had promised to meet her. The matron called the Blatchley home over the telephone and found that Mrs. Blatchley had fallen on the ice near her home yesterday morning and received injuries which confined her to bed. The matron sent Mrs. Aldrich to the Young Women's Christian Association boarding house for the night.

Dr. O. P. Blatchley said last night that his wife's parents were friends of the parents of Mrs. Aldrich, and that she had arranged to locate her in Kansas City, Kas. Dr. Blatchley said that Mrs. Aldrich for many years has been engaged in writing religious literature for students in the blind schools over the country.

Mrs. Blatchley suffered a dislocated left shoulder and a ruptured artery over her left eye in her fall yesterday.

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September 15, 1909

AID FOR CRIPPLED BLIND MAN.

Friends Are Starting a Subscription
Fund for Edward Harris.

Men who knew Edward Harris, the blind newspaper vendor who stood each day at the Junction and who was injured by being run over by a team Monday afternoon, met at the Kensington Avenue Baptist church last night and arranged to take up a subscription to aid him in his time of trouble. Harris was seriously injured, and may be a cripple permanently. He has a wife and a daughter to care for.

Reverend A. E. Burch, pastor of the church, presided at the meeting. Many residents of Kansas City were familiar with Harris and bought papers from him.

The members of the committee in charge of the subscription for Harris are Rev. Mrs. Burch, A. C. Wright, S. A. Faires and M. A. Randall.

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June 23, 1909

AGED MAN'S SEARCH FOR SON.

Blind and Partially Deaf, G. E.
Keller Fails to Locate Him.

When G. E. Keller, 88 years old, blind and partially deaf, arrived in the Union depot yesterday morning, having come to Kansas City in quest of his son, Charles Keller, whom he believes to be ill and out of money, he did not know his address and a search through the directory failed to show the name. Mr. Keller came here from the state of Washington.

A letter received from the son a few weeks ago told of his illness and an operation. The boy was then living in a rooming house, and funds were sent to him at the time. The aged father lost the letter giving the son's address.

Mrs. Ollie Everingham, depot matron, asked the police to aid in the search for the boy, but at a late hour last night he had not been found.

The old man was made comfortable at the depot, where he spent the night.

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October 28, 1908

LONELY OLD MAN WEEPS
FOR HIS MURDERED SON.

Elle Bassin Has a Load of Grief and
Labor Almost Too Heavy
to Bear.

Sitting alone in his little shoeshop at 1221 West Twenty-fourth street there is an aged, white-haired man. The police say he has no more heart for work. He stares vacantly into space and occasionally a tear drops from his furrowed cheek. The old man is Elle Bassin, father of Nathan Bassin, the young man murdered in the shop at 10 o'clock Saturday night by highwaymen. The aged man is nearly blind and depended upon his son to take the work off his hands. Now the support of the widowed daughter-in-law and her two children has fallen on him, and the burden is a heavy one.

Edward Cassidy, Slayer of Nathin Bassin
EDWARD CASSIDY.
Confessed Slayer of Nathan Bassin.

Confined in separate cells two young men sat in the county jail all day yesterday. It was their first day there, and no one called on them. They were Edward Cassidy, who has a home at 908 West Thirty-first street, and Thad Dyer, 703 Southwest boulevard. They are the cause of the aged shoemaker's grief. Cassidy confessed that he and Dyer went to the shop bent on robbery. They met with resistance from Nathan, the son, and Cassidy shot him dead. Dyer was guarding the door at the time. Both men say they are sorry, really sorry, that they took a human life.

Thad Dyer, Accomplice in the Killing of Nathan Bassin.
THAD DYER.
Accomplice of Cassidy in the Bassin Murder.

Dyer's father, Edward Dyer, is a member of the fire department, and the boy had a good home, but he was wild and often fell into the hands of the police. Both boys were born and reared near the Southwest boulevard, and have known no such thing as restraint since childhood, the police say. Cassidy has an impediment in his speech that gives the impression that he is not very strong mentally. Neither boy attended school to any great extent.

They are being held in the county jail without bond awaiting trial by the criminal court on an information charging them with murder in the first degree.

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October 17, 1908

CARES FOR AN AGED WANDERER.

Joseph Belile, 98 Years Old, Is Lodged
at Helping Hand.

A man who lacks but two years of crossing the century age mark was housed at the Helping Hand Institute last night. The officials at the Union depot found the old man wandering about the station and took charge of him. He is nearly blind.

To F. H. Ream at the Helping Hand the wanderer gave the name of Joseph Belile. He is French-Canadian and hard to understand. When questioned he puts his hand to his head and says: "Stop, you make my head hurt."

No one appeared to know how the centenarian came to be here until he was searched late last night and papers of explanation were found. On the back of a Wabash envelope was written: "Ticket to Kansas City enclosed." On a slip of paper with a Danville, Ill., heading was written: "Destination Liberal, Kas. -- J. Belile."

It is now believed that the aged man is the subject of charity and that some organization in Danville swent him here. The matter of sending him on further will be taken up as soon as it can be learned if Mr. Belile has any one in Liberal, Kas., who will care for him.

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October 1, 1908

POLICE ARE HUNTING
FOR MISSING PEOPLE

FRANTIC RELATIVES THINK
THEY ARE HEADED THIS WAY.

The List of Nine Includes a 75-Year-
Old Farmer Who Forsook
the Plow for Gay
City Life.

The reports made to the police yesterday concerned missing people principally, there being nine in all, whose ages range from 13 to 75 years. E. L. Barrett of Hamilton, Mo., telephoned that his daughter Nellie, 17 years old, whom he described, had left on an early morning train without leaving her future address. He was following on the next train and wanted the police to detain the girl.

For some reason or other George W. Shepard, 75 years old, took French leave of the dear old farm near Lone Jack, Mo., and headed for the gay city with its turmoil and strife. His aged wife was worried about him and, through a friend, asked the police to keep a weather eye out for Mr. Shepard. He is described as "black suit, sandy whiskers, soft black hat and blind in left eye."

Mrs. H. Gunther, 309 Washington avenue, Chicago, Ill., who signs herself "a broken-hearted mother," wants the police to find her son, Georg, 17 years old, who has been missing from home since June 25 last. She gives the police a minute description on which to work.

W. Emerson, 713 Washington street, this city, asks aid of the police in locating his wife. She is 27 years old, he says, five feet four inches tall and weighs 112 pounds. She has dark complexion, dark eyes and hair. Mr. Emerson said she left home with a man whom he names and describes.

The county attorney of Bedford, Ia., telephoned the police to be on the lookout for Fred W. Evans. Among other distinctive features given the poilce to aid in the identification is a "Roman nose that turns up." An officer went to Bedford to take Evans back to Cripple Creek, Col., it is said. He got out on a writ of habeas corpus and left for here. Henry von Pohl, sheriff of Teller county, Col., offers $50 reward for Evans.

W. Harry Walston, pastor of the Christian church at Minnie, Ill., writes that his son, Eugene Walston, 13 years old, left home last Friday with the intention of beating his way to Clearwater, Kas. As he would have to pass through Kansas City, the police were asked to be on the lookout for and detain the boy.

Thomas Atkins, chief of police of Davenport, Ia., wrote that Mrs. Chris Miller, aged 19 years, but looks more like 16, had left home and was headed this way. He gives a very accurate description of the missing woman, from her gold teeth to the four points on her jacket. He does not say w2h y she left home or what is wanted with her, only asking that she be arrested and notice given him.

Mrs. R. D. Curren, 811 Robidoux street, St. Joseph, Mo., said that her boy, Cleo Curren, 14 years old, had been missing since September 21. The Carnival, she thinks, may draw him there.

W. L. Myers, 1313 West Jackson street, Bloomington, Ill., is shy his son, Bert Myers, who has been missing from home for some time. Thinks he may head in here for Carnival week.

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June 3, 1908

WHAT LARKS THERE'LL
BE IN THE BIG ROOM.

WHEN IT'S OPENED FOR PLAY
AT MERCY HOSPITAL.

Little Patients Look Forward to the
Day With Impatience -- A
Gleam in Their Mel-
ancholy Lives.

"Wait till our new playroom's done." That is what the little boys and girls, inmates of the Mercy Hospital, Fifth street and Highland avenue, are saying. Everything now centers about that large new playroom which is almost completed, and every morning and afternoon the nurses have to take the children back into the new building and let them feast their eyes on the room which is to mean so much fun to them.

Some of the little patients in the hospital have been there for seven months, and in some cases there are not many signs of improvement. Their lives are not full of pleasure, and it is seldom that visitors who take more than a patronizing interest in them are seen. The little fellows feel that they are being made spectacles of and they can see the pity in their visitors' eyes. That is not what they want; they want comradeship. Their games are few, and in bad weather they must stay indoors. For this reason they look forward to the large playroom with such promise of rainy day pleasure.

At present there are eleven patients in the hospital, ranging from 10 days to 8 years in age. The older children are unusually bright and quick to learn, and in the most instances they desire to keep up their school work while in the hospital. Slates and school books have been provided for that purpose and the nurses take turns in teaching them. Few of the children, except the infants, are confined in beds, and so they find ample time to play at their games.

Running games are on the "blacklist" among them for one of their number is a cripple and cannot move without the aid of crutches. The children themselves have passed the rule that no game which calls for running or jumping shall be played, and so most of the time is spent in telling stories and piecing card maps.

"You see Joey, he's got hip d'sease, and it ain't fair to him if we play tag cause he'd have to sit and look," said one little girl in telling about their games.

But the nurses take the most interest in the infants. Maybe it is because every unnamed infant which is brought to the hospital is named for one of the nurses. There are Anne, Ruth, Carmen and Marjorie. Then the male infants are named for the doctors or particular friends of the nurses, such as Ralph and Billy. Billy is the pet of the hospital. He belongs to a mother and father who wish he did not belong to them, and consequently they are never seen about the hospital. Billy is 2 years old and is almost blind, totally in one eye. He can not talk, but his actions are so pathetic, say the nurses, that "you just can't help loving him." And so Billy gets the cream.

Miss Virginia Porter, superintendent of the hospital, says that older children are all well behaved and that they grow fond of the hospital and nurses. Even though they come of parents who do not love them, for the most part, Miss Porter tries to teach them that they should love their home and their parents above all else. The children all show the effect of this teaching, for when one little girl in the hospital was asked if she would rather stay in the hospital or go home, her little face grew long and she said: "I'd rather go home, I guess, for Mrs. Porter says that homes are the best places in the world."

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February 25, 1908

DEATH DEEPENS MYSTERY.

P. A. M'Millan, Blind, Was Shot in
Rooming House.

P. A. McMillan, a blind man, who was found in the stairway of a rooming house at 601 Delaware street the night of January 16, suffering from two bullet wounds, died last Sunday night at the general hospital. McMillan was shot through the neck and chest. An autopsy yesterday morning deeloped that it was the neck wound that caused the man's death.

Although McMillan was shot more than a month ago, the police have been unable to uncover the mystery of the strange tragedy. Stella Arwood, keeper of the rooming house, was arrested the day following the shooting, and a charge of felonious assault was made against her. She is now out on $1,200 bail.

There were no witnesses to the shooting, as far as the police know, and the officers admit taht definite evidence against the woman is lacking McMillan was able to tell the police that someone whom he did not know led him into the stairway.

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January 18, 1907

HE SAYS A WOMAN SHOT HIM.

Blind man May Not Recover From
His Wounds.

T. A. McMillen, the blind man who was found in a stairway at 601 Delaware street late Thursday night bleeding from a bullet hole in his neck and another in his chest, lies at the emergency hospital in critical condition. He insists that he was shot by a woman as he ascended that stairway. Stella Arwood, a woman who runs a rooming house at 601 Delaware,who was arrested soon after McMillen was taken from the hallway, was arraigned late yesterday afternoon before Justice Shepard on a charge of assault with intent to kill. Her plea was not guilty and she was released on a bond of $1,200 to appear in the same court next Wednesday for a preliminary hearing. The shooting still remains a mysterdy to the police. McMillen is said to have been seen in a saloon in company of an unknown man shortly before he was shot.

James Gibson and William Bulger of 1031 Cherry street, who formerly lived in Harrison county, where they knew McMillen, saw in The Journal yesterday an account of his accident, and called on him at the emergency hospital. From them it was learned that the blind man had been married twice. His first wife is dead, but a son, Albert McMillen, now lives in Gentryville, Mo. . Ten years ago he married Miss Jennie Strong in Harrison county, but they soon separated. They had a son, Winford, now 9 years old, who is with his mother in Washington, where she is married to a railroad engineer named Crosby. George Strong, a brother-in-law of McMillen, used to live at 341 Haskell avenue, Kansas City, Kas. McMillen, has been blind about five years. He was formerly a painter, but since he lost his eyesight he has been a book canvasser.

If McMillen does not die from his injuries he may become paralyzed in part of his upper extremities.

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November 15, 1907

DEATH RATHER THAN BLINDNESS.

Probable Cause of the Suicide of
Leo Mainhardt.

"I believe I am going blind. I can't see to read the paper at night at all."

Before Leo Mainhardt, the cigar dealer, left his store at 601 Delaware street Tuesday night that was a remark he made to one of his clerks. It is the belief of his business associates that he may have wandered about the streets until 12:00 when he went to the Centropolis hotel, engaged a room, then committed suicide.

Mr. Mainhardt's eyesight was rapidly failing and he was constantly worrying about his inability to see.

Constant worry over his ailment," Mrs. Mainhardt said this morning, "is the only cause to which I can attribute his act. He has never said anything that would indicate that he intended to commit suicide, however."

The funeral will be held this afternoon at the house, 1322 Euclid avenue.

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April 19, 1907

FROM ROSEDALE, NOT SEDALIA.

Police Cast Doubt Upon Mrs.
Henderson's Story of Hardships

The police and the authorities at the Helping Hand institute have grave doubts of the story told by Mrs. Mable Henderson, who, with her blind baby, insists that she walked all the way from Sedalia, Mo., to this city, a distance of ninety miles, in three days. She says that she left there at sunup Monday morning , and arrived here at about 5:30 o'clock Wednesday evening, having had only 25 cents for expenses.

Mrs. Henderson was found by the police in the bottoms late Wednesday night, and sent to headquarters and then to the Helping Hand. She said she was not tired when she came in, refused food, saying she was not hungry, and neither her dress nor shoes were at all worn as they would have been from such a long tramp.

Early yesterday morning a man called Captain Weber at police headquarters and said: "I know the Mrs. Henderson with the blind baby mentioned in the papers this morning. She has lived with several others in a tent on the outskirts of Rosedale all winter. The men named in the paper as brothers-in-law, for whom she is now looking, lived there also. They all left recently and I don't know where they went."

The man refused to give his name. An official from the Helping Hand went to Rosedale and found the report to be true. He was also informed that Mrs. Henderson has two other children somewhere else. This she denied later. The investigation will be carried on further today.
"We have had at least twenty-five calls today offering to take both the woman and her baby," said Superintendent E. T. Bringham. "Several called in person and offered to assist in any manner desired. She was being cared for, however, and a specialist was secured for the baby, so all was being done what was necessary. The eye specialist, after a close examination, said that there was no hope for the baby ever regaining its sight, it having been blind from birth."

Mrs. Henderson said that she could get no place to work on account of her blind baby, the mother herself being blind in one eye. On this account it was said yesterday that an effort would be made to take the blind baby from its mother and place it in a blind institute, where it could be educated with others similarly afflicted. Left as it is, it would have little chance to make a living. The mother, when placing the child even in the nursery was mentioned, objected strenuously, and said that wherever the baby went she would go also.

"The woman is known to the Associated Charities," said Colonel Greenman, Humane agent, "and has been for some time. Agents from there are investigation the case now. Mrs. Henderson weighs only ninety pounds and her baby seventeen pounds. To reach here in three days she would have to walk at least thirty miles a day. That seems an impossible task for one so frail as she appears to be."

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April 18, 1907

AND THE BABY BLIND.

From Sedalia a Deserted Mother
Walks Here With It.

A tired and worn little woman carrying a baby was picked up by the police in the bottoms about 9:30 o'clock last night. She was wandering about aimlessly. When she was taken to police headquarters later she gave the name of Mrs. Mabel Henderson and stated that she had walked all the way from Sedalia, Mo., and had carried the baby, 15-months old. At the station it clutched at its mother's dress and held tightly to her baby with its little hands.

"My baby is blind," the mother said in explanation, "and he is afraid to be away from me. The noise is new to him and he is frightened.

"My husband, John Henderson, left me three months ago," went on the worn little mother who is herself blind in one eye. "Then I had a hard time, as no one would take me in with baby, and I had no place to leave him. I took in washing, though, and got along. Then I thought I could do better in Sedalia, and I saved money and went there. That was a month and a half ago, but it's just the same. Nobody wants a woman with a blind baby and me half blind, too. It's pretty hard, I'll tell you.

"Last Monday at sunup I left there. A man gave me a quarter as I was leaving the town. I saved that to buy something for Robert Earl. That's my boy's name. I have walked all the way and carried him, too.

"The 25 cents was all the money I had to live on. I bought crackers and cakes for baby with that. I walked as early in the morning as I could to as late as I could stand it. Yes, I'm pretty tired now, but not much hungry."

Mrs. Henderson reached here about 9 o'clock last night, having covered eighty-five miles, the distance from Kansas City to Sedalia. When she reached headquarters she was given a ticket and sent to the Helping Hand Institute for the night. She says that she has two brothers-in-law, Claarence and "Cal" Graves, in the city somewhere. The police will try and find them for her.

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April 12, 1907

CITY WINS "GLASS EYE" SUIT.

Laborer Washed Optic in Water
Impregnated With Dynamite.

John McCann became an employe of the city in 1902 as a member of the water works department. He had at the time only one good eye, the sight of the other having been destroyed and instead of a seeing pupil he had a glass substitute. After working hours one day he discovered, by the aid of a looking glass and the sight of his good eye, that his artificial eye was covered with dirt and he took it out of the socket and gave it a thorough washing in a bucket of water, which it was learned later had been used to wash off several sticks of dynamite. Following this act on the part of Mr. McCann, his other eye became blind and he filed suit against the city for $25,000, alleging that the dynamite washed in the bucket poisoned the water and thus caused the loss of his second eye.

After a trial lasting the entire day Judge McCune, in whose division of the circuit court the case was heard, instructed the jury to return a verdict in favor of the city. He held that the city was not responsible for the water in which its employes washed their glass eyes. The case has been in the courts for several years, the city in the last trial being represented by Charles Bush, assistant city counselor.

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