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November 27, 1909

ORIENT MAY ENTER
NEW UNION STATION.

THE STOCKHOLDERS WILL MEET
WITH MR. HARMON TODAY.

Special Train With Pres. Stilwell,
Vice Pres. Dickinson and East-
ern Financiers Will Be
Here For Hours.

When the main line of the Kansas City, Mexico and Orient railroad is completed into Kansas City, it is likely that the Orient trains will enter the new Union passenger station. At least efforts to this end will be made this morning.

A. E. Stilwell, president of the road, and E. Dickinson, vice president and general manager, will arrive in Kansas City this morning with a party of Eastern capitalists and stockholders. The party will arrive in a special train of seven sleepers over the Rock Island, at 8 o'clock. While here there will be a meeting with President H. L. Harmon and other officials of the Kansas City Terminal Railway Company, and admittance to the organization will be sought.

The Orient officials have but little doubt that satisfactory arrangements can be made as there is no real opposition to the plan. It is not known as yet just how the Orient will enter the city, whether on their own tracks or those of one of the other roads, or the exact location of on their own tracks. The right of way from Wichita to Kansas City has not been secured. The company, however, expects to be operating trains from Kansas City within the next four years, probably by the time the Union depot is completed.

Mr. Stilwell and his party will remain in Kansas City until noon, leaving for Wichita over the Rock Island. From Wichita and inspection of the system will be made, as far as the present tracks are built.

The greater part of the Orient system is already in operation. From Wichita, Kas., to San Angelo, Tex., is a stretch of track 510 miles in length over which three through trains each way are to be operated daily.

From Marquez, Chihuahua, 300 miles southwest of San Angelo, there is another completed stretch of track 287 miles in length extending to Sanchez, Chihuahua. A train each way is operated daily over this portion of the system.

After another uncompleted stretch of 200 miles the Orient is complete from Fuerte, Sinaloa, to Topolobampo, the terminus of the system on the Gulf of California, over which daily train service is provided.

The only other uncompleted portion of the system is from Kansas City to Wichita, 208 miles, making in all about 500 miles of the system and 1,659 miles yet to be completed.

The Orient party headed by Messrs. Stilwell and Dickinson will spend a month in the United States and Mexico inspecting the system and making whatever arrangements are necessary to hasten its completion.

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November 23, 1909

TERMINAL DIRECTORS
ACCEPT DEPOT PLAN.

KANSAS CITY'S UNION STATION
TO COST $5,750,000.

Great Structure Will Have Every
Facility for Handling Trains
and Travelers -- Dirt to Fly
in a Few Months.
New Union Passenger Station Faces on Twenty-Third Street and Has a Frontage of 512 Feet.
SOUTH ELEVATION OF NEW UNION PASSENGER STATION.

Five million, seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars will be the cost of Kansas City's new Union passenger station.

The plans prepared by Jarvis Hunt, a Chicago architect, were accepted yesterday by the board of directors of the Kansas City Terminal Railway Company. As soon as the stockholders of the several railroads that are to use the depot ratify the action of their representatives, work will begin on the structure. This consent is expected to be immediate. In a few months dirt will be flying and construction under way.

GENERAL PLAN OF STRUCTURE.

The main entrance to the station will face south. It's exact location will be twenty-five feet south of Twenty-third street, and 100 feet west of Main.

The frontage of the main building is to be 512 feet. The train sheds are to be 1,400 feet long, and are to be constructed so that trains east and west can run through.

The exterior will be of stone, concrete and steel. The roof will be rounding or barrel shape. The general lobby is to be 350 feet long and 160 feet wide, and the decorations and accommodations will be rich and elaborate.

Especial care has been taken in lighting and ventilation; the ceiling will be arched, and will be 115 feet high. The interior walls will be of marble, and massive columns will grace each side of the passageway into other parts of the building.

The center of the lobby will be the ticket office. Adjacent will be the baggage room, where passengers can check their baggage and not be annoyed with it again until they reach their destination.

ON THREE LEVELS.

In a space of 75x300 feet off the lobby will be the restaurants, lunch rooms, waiting rooms, men's smoking rooms, and other utilities. Telegraph and telephone stations, a subpostal station and other accessories will also find places within this space.

On the upper floors will be located the offices of several railroads using the depot together with rooms for railway employes.

Space has been set apart for dining and lounging, reading, and billiard rooms.

From the center of the lobby and above the track will extend the main waiting room, on either side of which there will be midways or passages leading to the elevators to carry passengers to the trains. Smoke and gases from the locomotives will be s hut out from the station by a steel and glass umbrella shed.

There will be three levels to the depot. These are to be known as the passenger level, the station proper; the train service level, from where passengers take the trains, and which is connected with the midways by eight big elevators on either side, and also, stairways; and the level on which are the baggage rooms, express and postal service.

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October 18, 1909

TO ADD 600 MORE BEDS.

Helping Hand Institute to Double
Accommodations.

Six hundred beds will be added at the Helping Hand institute this fall to provide for the influx of unfortunates expected to come in search of work on the new Union station.

The officers of the institute are now looking for a new building. New beds and equipments have been ordered. It is expected that the new building will be ready by November 1.

The two dormitories at present will accommodate 600 men. In the winter heretofore some deserving applicants have been turned away. By doubling the number of beds, the officers expect to be able to provide for all.

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October 3, 1909

LORD BERESFORD IS A
KANSAS CITY VISITOR.

FORMER BRITISH ADMIRAL
TRANSACTS BUSINESS HERE.

Meets Manager of Texas Ranches
and Clears Up Accumulated
Business Details -- Drives
Over City Boulevards.
Lord Charles Beresford.
LORD CHARLES BERESFORD.

Lord Charles Beresford, former admiral of the British navy, in company with his solicitor, Orlando Hammond of New York city, dropped into Kansas City from Chicago yesterday morning for a conference with Robert Moss, manager of the Texas and Mexico ranches Lord Beresford owns. Incidentally Lord Beresford received a check, the proceeds of a sale of 1,000 head of cattle which had been sold on the Kansas City market during the last week. The shipment was made from his ranch at Ojitos, Chihuahua, Mexico. Lord Beresford thought when he left Chicago that he might have to make a trip to his ranches to settle some business affairs, but last evening he said he would attend to all of his business in Kansas City.

He and Mr. Hammond were met yesterday morning by Robert Moss, his manager and the trio drove to the Hotel Baltimore, where they breakfasted. They were joined there by J. MacKenzie and T. J. Eamans, who took them for a ride over the boulevards and then for luncheon at the Country Club. Another ride followed and the party returned to the Hotel Baltimore, dust covered and hungry, about 6 p. m. Lord Beresford and Mr. Hammond will remain in the city until Monday evening.

ENJOYED THE PLAYGROUNDS.

"I have been in Kansas City before, but I have never had the pleasure of a trip over your boulevards and through your parks," said Lord Beresford, "until today. Even this morning I feared that I would not have the time to thoroughly enjoy it. I want to say that the ride was a surprise to me. I have been over many drives and boulevards but I cannot recall a city I have ever been in that the boulevards excel those of Kansas City.

"Next to the boulevards, I was impressed with the playgrounds. We drove to each of the playgrounds, and I was greatly interested in watching the children as they scampered about and enjoyed themselves with the swings and apparatus. In this your country is ahead of England. You have so much more room, though, than we have. Ground is so much more expensive in England than it is here, but England has taken the cue from America, and she has begun the establishment of these playgrounds.
MOST PLEASANT TRIP.

"I saw the site of the new depot and the plans were explained to me. I am surprised that Kansas City has gotten along as long as it has with that old excuse for one. You will no doubt appreciate the new one much more, as the contrast will be so great that you will forget all about the inconveniences of the old one.

"Your residence section, especially the newer sections, impressed me greatly. They are different than the sections in the East, where the houses are all crowded on little lots. They remind one more of the English country houses with their wide stretches of lawn and tree-bordered drives and boulevards Altogether I shall remember my trip about Kansas City as one of the most pleasant I have ever taken."

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September 24, 1909

CLEANING UP M'GEE STREET.

Eight Rooming Houses Must Move
by October 1.

Notice to move before the first of October was served by Lieutenant C. D. Stone of the Walnut street police station yesterday, to eight women now conducting rooming houses between Thirteenth and Fourteenth on McGee street.

The order is direct from the police commissioners and is a movement, Lieutenant Stone said last night, to clean up districts in the line of travel to the new Union station when it is erected.

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September 16, 1909

BUY LAND FOR NEW STATION.

Western Sash and Door Company
Sells Grand Avenue Site and
Buildings for $125,000.

As forcasted in The Journal a week ago, $125,000 was paid yesterday by the Grand Avenue Building Company to William Huttig, president of the Western Sash and Door Company, for the property and building of the company at Twenty-third and Grand avenue.

There are 45,000 square feet in the tract, wh ich faces 168 feet on Grand avenue and runs through to Walnut street. About 5,500 square feet will be taken by the Kansas City Terminal Railway Company in the building of the Union passenger station, and it is understood that eventually a hotel will be built on the remaining part of the property.

The offices of the sash and door company will be occupied and used at once by the engineering forces of the terminal company, and the balance of the building will be used by the Huttig company for one year.

"A year from today the Western Sash and Door Company will have a big new plant built somewhere along the line of the Belt railway," said Mr. Huttig yesterday. "We have three different sites under construction."

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September 10, 1909

NEW DEPOT WINS
BY BIG MAJORITY.

OF 26,368 VOTES CAST ONLY 700
WERE AGAINST.

Kansas City declared in favor of progress at the special election yesterday to decide whether or not the voters favored a new $30,000,000 Union station near Twenty-third street and the Belt Line, and freight and passenger terminals which form a part of the plan.

The vote in favor of progress was almost unanimous. The total vote in the fourteen wards of the city and in the newly added precincts caused by the recent extension of the city limits shows in a general way a uniform expression of opinion by the voters.

The main proposition voted upon was that granting the Kansas City Terminal Company, which is to build the new Union station and terminals, a franchise for 200 years. It was necessary to put this before the voters owing to the state constitution limiting franchises to thirty years. The vote on this was 25,668 in favor of the proposition and 700 against it.

Two other propositions were offered the voters. The most important of these to the people of the entire city was that amending the charter so that the park board would be empowered to sell to the Terminal company certain lands needed for the widening and improvements on the present tracks on the Belt Line. The vote on this proposition was 24,644 for and 639 against.

The third proposition concerned the proposed change of grand of three streets crossing the present Belt line. It will be necessary, in building the passenger and freight tracks of the terminal company, to depress the grades of three crossings, so as to allow vehicle and foot traffic under the railroad tracks. As property owners concerned presented a majority remonstrance, the new city charter provided that the voters should pass upon the proposed plan.

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September 9, 1909

GET IN LINE EARLY AND
VOTE "YES."

Vote Today.
KANSAS CITY UNION STATION SPECIAL ELECTION TODAY.

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August 9, 1909

THE TRIBUNE IS GENEROUS.

Chicago Paper Runs Cut of Alleged
Kansas City Depot.

In yesterday's Chicago Tribune there was a write-up of Kansas City's proposed new Union passenger station. An illustration of the building was presented, but Kansas City railroad men say that it is not a correct representation. Some two years ago a Chicago architect by the name of Jarvis Hunt, prepared drawings and sketches for the directors of the Kansas City Terminal Railway Company. They were but tentative in their scope, and did not receive the approval of the board of directors of the company for two reasons. One was the prohibitive expense they entailed, and the other that the company was not ready to finance so elaborate a building.

"Mr. Hunt evidently intends to build a monument to his genius, and to make the railroads foot the bill," was the comment made by one of the officers of the terminal company when the sketches were submitted. It is now understood that the architect is now at work on a more modified scale, and is preparing plans for a building the cost of which will be in keeping with the contract agreement, $2,800,000.

A building of the character illustrated in yesterday's Chicago paper would cost $5,000,000 to build.

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April 15, 1909

SPEAKER C. B. H AYES
DIES OF PNEUMONIA.

FATAL ILLNESS FOLLOWS COLD
CAUGHT ON CHICAGO TRIP.

Double Pneumonia Sets Up and End
Came in Less Than a Week.
Business and Public
Career.

After an illness of less than a week with double pneumonia, C. B. Hayes, speaker of the lower house of the city council, peacefully met death this morning at 1 o'clock in St. Joseph's hospital. Relatives were at the bedside.

Last Thursday morning Mr. Hayes sat on the board of equalization at its meeting. At noon he was taken ill and went home. By night he was confined to his bed and the next morning taken to St. Joseph's, where his condition as found to be critical and remained so up to the time of his death.

The pneumonia was complicated by an affect of the heart. Yesterday afternoon he began to sink rapidly and members of his family were sent for. They remained with him all night until the end came.

Last Sunday morning at the Church of the Annunciation Rev. Father William J. Dalton asked for the prayers of his congregation for the speedy recovery or happy death of the stricken councilman.

EXALTED RULER OF LOCAL ELKS.

Mr. Hayes was born in Chicago July 20, 1865, and had been a resident of Kansas City since September 1, 1896. At the last municipal election he was elected alderman of the Eighth ward on the Democratic ticket, and was later chosen speaker of the lower house of the council as a compliment from his associates in that branch of the council.

Two weeks ago he was chosen exalted ruler of the local lodge of Elks. He was a member of the Manufacturers and Merchants' Association, the Currant Club, Turners, Knife and Fork Club, Third regiment, and secretary of the Missouri River Wholesale Grocers' Association.

Prior to coming to Kansas City, Mr. Hayes had held important positions with the Bliss Syrup Refining Company of Chicago, and as an appreciation of his services the company made him manager of its Kansas City branch.

HAD NO TIME TO MARRY.

He held this position for five years, resigning to organize the C. B. Hayes Merchandise Brokerage Company, a commercial concern with headquarters in the West Bottoms. Mr. Hayes always took a lively interest in the upbuilding of Kansas City.

He was active in negotiations for the building of the Union passenger station and freight terminals. He was unmarried, saying that he could "never find time to marry."

Mr. Hayes was a member of the council committee considering the building of the Twelfth street west trafficway, and the foundation for his fatal illness was contracted in Chicago when eh went with the committee to inquire into the Chicago plan as applied to the street railway companies. He caught a severe cold on that trip.

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August 28, 1908

BRYAN SAYS HE'LL
CARRY MISSOURI.

TOLD IT TO W. S. COWHERD, CAN-
DIDATE FOR GOVERNOR.

The Secret Was Imparted During the
Stimulus of an Appetizing
Breakfast at Hotel Bal-
timore Yesterday.

William Jennings Bryan thinks he is going to carry Missouri. He told W. S. Cowherd, Democratic candidate for governor, so yesterday morning at breakfast, at the Hotel Baltimore. He breakfasted with Mr. Cowherd and Mayor T. T. Crittenden, Jr., and then went his way to Topeka, where he had a speaking engagement.

Many Missouri politicians wished to get a talk with Mr. Bryan, but the presidential candidate didn't have much time to spare and all the politicians got was a handshake and a promise to "see you later" -- for Mr. Bryan was in a hurry to catch his train and make his speech at Topeka.

The presidential candidate told Mr. Cowherd that he believes more in Missouri than he ever did, and expects the state to go for h im this fall by a bigger vote than ever. Mr. Bryan didn't say anything about trying to aid in pacifying Dave Ball and did not delve into national politics at all, his only political suggestion being that Missouri will be for him stronger than ever.

Mr. Bryan came in yesterday morning at 7:30 o'clock from St. Louis. With him were a regiment of newspaper correspondents and Theodore M. Bell of California, who was temporary chairman of the Denver convention.

Mr. Cowherd and Mayor Crittenden had been notified the night before that the presidential candidate would spend a few hours here and they met him at the Union depot and took him to the Hotel Baltimore for breakfast.

Mr. Bryan, who had lost his purse, negotiated a loan frfom the mayhor of Kansas City, that he might get to Topeka, but the Pullman porter returned his purse of yellow-backed $20 at the depot and the loan was cancelled.

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