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December 25, 1909

8,000 KIDS YELL
SANTA GREETINGS.

POLICE IN BATTLE ROYAL WHEN
GIFTS ARE ANNOUNCED AS
READY FOR CHILDREN.

Officials of Mayor's Christ-
mas Tree Well Pleased
With Its Success.

Santa Claus, the magnanimous patron saint of good will, was the hero of the hour in Convention hall yesterday afternoon when 8,000 needy, little children were happy objects of his unbounded generosity.

For the second time the mayor's annual Christmas tree was brought forth loaded with playthings and goodies for the poor youngsters, who otherwise would not know of the joys of the giving spirit of the Yuletide. Every child, irrespective of color or race, was made the recipient of a sack filled with things that gladden the juvenile heart.

By 2 o'clock the bill hall was crowded with boys and girls from every portion of the city, and for fully an hour the expectant thousands were entertained by a band organ, furnished by the Hippodrome, and a clown band which marched about the hall playing the most tuneless tunes imaginable, but doing antics that amused all.

Mayor T. T. Crittenden was slated for a speech, but in the attempt failed, owing to the impossibility of inducing the anxious auditors to desist in their yelling. However, the mayor was able to yell "A Merry Christmas" occasionally during the distribution of presents, and this laconic well-wishing accomplished all that could be asked, for every child left the hall with smiling faces which revealed the joyousness they were experiencing.

MAYOR SATISFIED.

"Isn't this going some?" smiled the mayor as he took a view of the remarkable scene. "Just so every one of these poor children get something, I will be satisfied. It is a grand sigh and a gloriouis manifestation of the great Kansas City spirit, which we all love to see.

"It's a greater success than ever," declared Steve Sedweek, a member of the executive committee. "It is one of the biggest charitable undertakings in the country to care for so many needy children, and I am sure the whole committee feels gratified in noting the remarkable demonstrations in evidence here this afternoon."

At times during the big event it was not an easy task to keep the guests properly marooned for their own safety and comfort. Every child present wanted to get his or her present first and the police, under the direction of Sergeant Charles Edwards, had their troubles, but handled the crowds well. Most of the officers present were attired in Santa Claus make-up. In fact, Saint Nick was there six times strong in the persons of Jack Darnell, S. F. Cox, James F. Campbell, A. D. Royer, Joe McCormick and Elvin Gray.

The idea of having a mayor's tree for the poor children every Christmas was conceived by Steve Sedweek, who outlined his plan at an Eagle banquet over a year ago. Mayor Crittenden forthwith promulgated the scheme, and now the affair is to be annual and of increasing success, no doubt.

Yesterday afternoon there were representatives from twelve different cities of the Middle West present to witness the distribution of gifts to the poor. These men came with the view of seeing how Kansas City made its needy ones happy on Christmas and to take the idea back home in the hopes of starting the same kind of wide-spread charity. The mayor's tree is strictly a Kansas City institution and bids fair to be in vogue in many other cities ere many years.

POLICE WERE BUSY.

It was no easy matter even for a dozen military policemen under the careful personal direction of their drill master, Sergeant Charles Edwards, to keep the 8,000 children in their places in the hall yesterday when the line was formed for the distribution of presents. Between boxes, in which the visitors sat, and the gallery seats, where those really interested in the affair were penned in, was a four-foot fence of iron. It did not look very high to the boys, but it looked even smaller to the cops. To the latter it looked infinitely long, however, for at the first call for gifts a scrambling mass of children swept over it, inundating the boxes below and surging out into the hall. For a space of a minute the line seemed actually in danger. The policemen rushed forward, brandishing their clubs and shouting. A dozen members of the reception committee joined hands and formed a wall near the threatened quarter. The mayor raised his deep bass voice in mild disapproval.

Just then, at the crucial moment, the reserves threw their ponderous weight into the fray and the regiments of insurgents broke for cover like the old guard in the rout of Waterloo. The victorious newcomers were the six big officers doing duty as Santa Claus close to the Christmas trees and their tinsel had a better moral effect than the regulation uniforms or the white committee badges. There were no youngsters in that host who wanted to endanger their good standing with St. Nicholas and his assistants. Not much!

There was just one way in which gifts were classified according to the age of the child receiving them yesterday. The presents were in flour sacks, each bearing the label, "Mayor's Christmas Tree, 1909." On the sacks containing gifts calculated for older children the letters were printed in blue, while on the others they were in red. There were eighteen persons at each "gift bench" handing out the sacks.

MOURNER'S BENCHES FOR THE LOST.

A great number of visitors at the mayor's Christmas party wondered why two long benches ere arranged alongside the trees. They were told by ushers that these were the mourners' benches. This was proved to be true later in the day when children who had somehow got lost from their parents or elders lined up from one end to the other. Two little girls, Edith Shoemaker, 2311 Euclid avenue, and Menie Marcus, who said she lived near Eighteenth and McGee streets, were prominent among the mourners.

Edith's tear-stained face and Menie's extraordinary composure seemed to attract the attention of everyone. They had never seen each other before, but they were two lost little girls whose ages were on the tender side of 10 years, and in that circumstance there was union. With arms locked about each other's neck, they sat for an hour until Mayor Crittenden personally took charge of Edith, and Jacob Billikopf of Menie, and sent them home, loaded with presents.

Two wagon loads of toys arrived at the hall after the crowd had been treated and were only partially disposed of. The sum of the donations for the tree amounted to $4,880. It was announced last night by Albert Hutchins, chairman of the finance committee, that $200 of the money has not been used. The presents remaining after yesterday will be distributed at the Grand theater Monday night.

Several instances of highway robbery, in which large boys despoiled smaller ones of their trinkets or tickets were reported to the committee of distribution during the afternoon.

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December 24, 1909

MAYOR'S CHRISTMAS
TREE IS ALL READY.

CANDY AND TOYS FOR THOU-
SANDS OF CHILDREN.

Convention Hall Doors Will Swing
Open at 1 o'clock Today to
Admit the Eager
Youngsters.

Nimble fingers, hastened and made dexterous by kind hearts, effected a transformation in Convention hall yesterday, and today the great auditorium is a Santa Claus land for the poor children of Kansas City. At 1 o'clock this afternoon the doors of the hall will swing open for the mayor's Christmas tree, and at 2:30 they will close, while Santa Claus distributes Christmas presents to at least 7,000 little boys and girls who, by force of circumstances, might otherwise have had no Christmas.

Notwithstanding unceasing efforts, the committees of the Mayor's Christmas Tree Association have been unable to locate all the poor children in the city to give them the tickets which are necessary to entitle them to gifts, and these children who have been overlooked are asked to apply at Convention hall this morning from 8 o'clock until noon. Tickets will be supplied these children any time between those hours.

The Fraternal Order of Moose caught the Christmas spirit in earnest yesterday and notified the Mayor's Christmas Tree Association that it would have twenty-five wagon loads of coal at Convention hall at noon today for distribution among poor families. Each wagon will contain two tons of coal.

WORKED ALL DAY.

Poor families who need fuel are requested to notify the mayor's office by 'phone or in person up to 11 o'clock this morning. These cases will be investigated and if the applicants be found worthy the coal will be delivered at their homes at noon. The offer from the Order of Moose was made by W. A. McGowan, secretary of the local lodge.

That the Convention hall association is heart and soul in the Christmas tree project was shown when Manager Louis W. Shouse and the directors placed the whole Convention hall force at the disposal of the Christmas Tree Association. As soon as the railroad ball was over Wednesday night, Manager Shouse put a force of men to work taking up the dance floor and before 6 o'clock yesterday morning the building was ready for the decorating committees of the Christmas tree.

Steve Sedweek was the first of the association workers to appear on the scene. He arrived at 6 o'clock and within a short time a large force was at work, setting up the Christmas trees, decorating them and packing the gifts into sacks ready for distribution. The committees worked all day and this morning they will have the hall ready for the great event.

That the people of Kansas City may inspect the work of the "best fellows" a general invitation is extended to any who care to do so to stop into the hall during the morning hours, up to noon today.

THE GIFTS IN SACKS.

Among the busy people at the hall yesterday were Captain John F. Pelletier, A. E. Hutchings, Steve Sedweek, Captain W. A. O'Leary, Hank C. Mank, the Rev. Thomas Watts, Gus Zorn and a Mr. Bennett of Wichita, who is here to gain ideas for a similar event to be inaugurated in his city next year.

Among the most valued workers were the members of the committee of twenty. Their duties consisted of the packing and arranging of the gifts in sacks. They worked from early morning till late at night and ate luncheon and dinner in the hall. Mayor T. T. Crittenden was present at the luncheon and sat at the head of the table, commending the women for their work.

The workers were assisted by seven men from No. 6 hook and ladder company, Thirty-first and Holmes, detailed for the duty by Fire Chief John C. Egner. Chief Egner had intended detailing twenty men, but the fire in the Rialto building made it impossible for him to do so.

The giant Christmas trees, which will be among the objects of chief interest to the children, were decorated in magnificent fashion by the employes of the Kansas City Electric Light Company and the Webb-Freyschlag Mercantile Company.

The presents for the children will be arranged in sacks bearing the inscription, "Mayor's Christmas Tree, 1909." The sacks for the boys will be placed on the east side of the arena and those of the girls on the west side. The sacks for children up to 8 years of age are printed in blue and those of children from 8 to 12 are printed in red.

Each child will receive two suitable toys and candy, nuts and fruit, all arranged in Christmas style.

A CLOWN BAND, TOO.

The programme for the mayor's Christmas tree will be a simple one. The doors will open at 1 o'clock, when the children can come in to feast their eyes upon the great Christmas trees and enjoy a fine musical entertainment. The doors will close at 2:30, so that it will be necessary for the tots to be in the hall by that time.

Preceding the distribution of the presents, the Eagles' clown band will give a dress concert on the arena and a large electrical organ will also furnish music. Old Santa Claus, who, it is said, resembles very much in appearance Captain John F. Pelletier, will be present and he will have six assistants with him to mingle among the children. At 2:30 o'clock Santa will introduce Mayor T. T. Crittenden, who will make a short talk, and the presents will then be distributed.

"We have plenty of funds and plenty of gifts for all the city's poor children," said A. E. Hutchings, "and if they do not come and get their share it will not be the fault of the committees, which have labored incessantly to get in touch with every child entitled to the pleasures of the tree."

Although it was announced that no more funds were needed, and that no further cash donations would be received, the financial committee of the association was forced to decline donations yesterday to the amount of several hundred dollars.

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December 22, 1909

TOYS THAT ATTRACT
GROWN-UPS, BOUGHT.

BIG DEPARTMENT STORES ARE
OPEN EVENINGS THIS WEEK.

Crowds Down Town at Night -- Fire
Department Playthings Most
Popular, Patrol Wagons
and Aeroplanes Next.

The announcement posted early that most of the big department stores would be open evenings this week up to Friday night inclusive brought the usual Christmas crowds to the down town districts last night in all the stores people who had braved the crisp winter air to be present with their shopping bags meant business.

The department stores which did not open last night were Emery, Bird, Thayer's, John Taylor's and Bernheimer's. The music stores did not close and while the crowds in them were only comfortably dense their sales were large from the viewpoint of the money taken in.

Some of the heavy sellers among toys last night were mechanical fire department outfits, patrol wagons and flying machines of different patterns.

Fire engines and hose wagons, toy salesmen say, have always been favorites. This is because a fire is spectacular and exciting and inviting to the imagination of old and young people alike. A child is most apt to get the toy in his stocking Christmas Eve that his elders enjoy and appreciate, they say, and so the manufacturers try to please both. Patrol wagons have always sold next to fire apparatus until this year.

Now they are running a distant third with miniatures of Wright's invention in full working order and capable of making short flights running close to first.

The theory of all toy shopmen interviewed last night was that little boys and girls might appreciate a good many gifts more than a flying machine, but that their parents, brothers, sisters and other relatives are anxious to see how the machine works.

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September 22, 1909

COOK-PEARY TOYS ARE HERE.

Partisanship Must Be Shown, How-
ever, in Selection of Playthings.

It is here. The Cook and Peary controversy, with the ingenuity of American toymakers in mind, could not end otherwise than in a toy.

No matter how bitterly the controversy may rage in scientific quarters or how the peace of households be threatened, children will be left to themselves to enjoy the new toy, though, though they will have to be partisans to the extent of choosing between the two explorers who claim they have been first in finding the "big nail."

A Philadelphia toy seller landed here yesterday with samples of the new toy. It follows the old Teddy Bear in some respects, though a white coat on the bear figure has replaced the brown teddy, showing that it is a genuine polar bear.

The old monkey-on-a-stick device is used. You pull a string and the polar bear climbs to the top. A United States flag slides out of the center of the stick. If you are a Cookite, a slim pennant with that explorer's name will float out to the breeze. If you are a Pearyite, out comes his name on the pennant. It's merely a question of whether you bought a Cook or a Peary polar bear.

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August 23, 1909

TOY AIRSHIP TO TEST IDEAS.

Kansas City Men Building Craft
Near No. 19 Fire Station.

In a shed near No. 19 fire station at Shawnee avenue and High street, Kansas City's most prominent aerial craft is almost completed. It is being constructed by a fireman, Frank Marvin, after designs of his own and those of Edgar C. Faris, an architect.

Mr. Faris fell from a street car Monday and sustained a broken ankle, but expects to be ready to experiment with the air craft by the time it is completed. The present ship is the third built by the two. The former ones were not successes. The second one was demolished when it dashed to the earth in a trial flight.

The airships are merely toys by which ideas of the two inventors are being tried out. The one under construction now is much larger than either of its predecessors, being ten feet long and four feet wide. The engines used in former experiments will not be large enough to drive the new ship. Two were used, each having one-sixteenth of one-horse power. The power will probably be quadrupled. When the ship is ready to fly, an electric light wire will be attached to it to furnish power for the engines. It then will be loosed and the value of the ideas used its construction will be learned.

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July 5, 1909

QUIET FOURTH, BUT
MANY ACCIDENTS.

TWO KANSAS CITYS HAVE LONG
LIST OF CASUALTIES.

Big Demand for Tetanus Anti-Toxin
at Emergency Hospital -- Four
Boys Hurt in One Explosion.

It was one of the quietest Fourths of July the two Kansas City's ever experienced. But the real test will come today. Many minor accidents were reported yesterday, and there were a number of applications to Dr. W. L. Gist of the emergency hospital for injections of tetanus anti-toxin to ward off the possibility of lockjaw from injuries.

Victim No. 1 to ask for aid at the dispensary was Willie Parrish, 9 years old, 1230 Drury avenue. Willie was playing with a friend named Clarence Cott, who was handling a pistol. It was accidentally discharged and a piece of the gun wad entered the palm of Willie's left hand.

A blank cartridge which S. Stern, 10 years old, 571 Campbell street, accidentally discharged, injured his right hand. He went to the emergency hospital and Dr. Gist cauterized the wound and gave him an injection of tetanus anti-toxin.

CHILD MAY LOSE EYE.

William Meyer, 14 years old, 2108 West Prospect avenue, was wounded yesterday afternoon while playing with a 22-caliber pistol. A wad struck him on the left hand, which was dressed in the emergency hospital. The surgeon made use of 1,5000 units of the anti-toxin which Dr. W. S. Wheeler secured to prevent tetanus infection.

Powder burns, suffered when his brother, John, snapped a toy pistol containing a blank cartridge, probably will cost Charles Grube, aged 6 years, 838 South Pyle street, Armourdale, the sight of his right eye.

Only a few boys and no grown-ups were arrested yesterday for noisy celebration of the Fourth. One boy was taken in at Central police station during the forenoon for exploding a cannon cracker on West Fifth street. His father appeared in a few minutes. Only $4 was necessary too get this juvenile lawbreaker from behind the bars. Police station Nos. 9, 5, 4 and 6 also made an arrest apiece, all the boys being released on minimum bonds.

Thomas Rogers, a negro 14 years old, applied at the emergency hospital last night for treatment, saying he feared he was suffering from lockjaw. Thomas shot himself in the hand with a toy pistol July 2. A piece of the cap was imbedded in the skin. One thousand five hundred units of anti-toxin was administered, and the boy sent home. He was instructed to keep his hand in hot water during the night.

Probably the most serious accident in Kansas City, Kas., was the injury sustained by S. A. Brophy, a street car conductor, living at 332 North Tenth street. The wadding from a blank cartridge entered his left thigh on the inside of the leg and caused a wound which Dr. W. R. Palmer, the attending physician, said last night might prove serious. Brophy was talking to a fellow street car conductor, L. J. Clark, when the latter pointed a gun at him and pulled the trigger.

BOY MAY LOSE HAND.

Roy Irvine, 5 years old, was injured by a piece of tin which flew from a torpedo and buried itself in the third finger of his left hand. He was treated at the home of his father, R. W. Irvine, 727 Central avenue.

Herman Fielder, 11 years old, was shot through the palm of his left hand by the wadding from a blank cartridge. He was attended by Dr. J. A. Davis, and removed to his home, 940 Ohio avenue. Charles Orr, 931 Tenney avenue, held a firecracker in his left hand while it exploded and may lose the index finger of his left hand as a result. He was attended by Dr. J. A. Davis. Mrs. M. Westerman, 318 North Tenth street, fell and dislocated her left shoulder while attempting to get away from a bunch of firecrackers which had been thrown near her. Mrs. Westerman is 62 years old, and was suffering great pain last night. She was attended by Dr. J. A. Davis.

Nathan Spicer, a merchant at 40 North James street, shot himself through the palm of the right hand while explaining the mechanism of a revolver to a prospective customer. He was attended by Dr. C. H. Brown, assistant police surgeon. James Whipple, 20 North James street, was struck by a flying particle during an explosion near his home and was burned on the left hand.

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June 30, 1909

PALE ALE AT AUCTION.

Customs Officials Also Will Sell Her-
ring and Garlic Saturday.

Loyal Britons may be expected to rally when eight and a half casks of pale ale is put up, and Scotland ought to be heard from when fifteen kegs of Glasgow herring are cried at a government rummage sale scheduled for Saturday morning at 10 o'clock at No. 228 West Fourth street. C. W. Clarke, surveyor of the port, is sending to the hammer imports which were not cleared during the present year.

The customs officers find that the ale arrived without any manifest and, though it is a knock to admit it, the herring were "abandoned," whatever that may mean.

Great Britain is not to have everything her own way. Two hundred and nine pounds of Garlic will tempt the Italians. "Coke" fiends will get a chance at two dozen hypodermic syringes. Six rolls of Japanese matting and 12,000 Japanese postal cards and some jute from India complete the offering for the grown ups.

The surveyor also will put up for sale a case of souvenirs, brought to Kansas City by a globe trotter, who evidently went broke buying the toys, for he could not or would not pay the duty on them. In this lot are four dolls, a cuckoo clock and twenty-five pieces of carved wood representing Santa Claus, bears, dogs, deer, cows and jumping jacks.

Some of the bears, so says the custom house list, are smoking, one is playing a piano, a quartette are gambling and one is painting a picture.

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June 29, 1909

WOMAN FIRST FOURTH VICTIM.

Mrs. Williams Sharp Injured While
Playing With a Toy Pistol.

Mrs. William Sharp, 26 years old, 1025 Harrison street, was last night distinguished by being the first person in Kansas City to be injured by the premature explosion of Fourth of July noisemakers. She was in her home and picked up a toy pistol loaded with a blank 22-caliber cartridge. In some manner the cartridge was exploded and the index finger on her right hand was badly lacerated. She was treated at the emergency hospital.

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May 9, 1909

MERCY HOSPITAL IS
OPENED TO PUBLIC.

$10,000 BUILDING DONATED BY
CHARITABLE PERSONS.

Distinctive Kansas City Institution
Is Now Prepared to Care for
More Patients -- Its
Great Record.

After some years of hard work on the part of the directors of Mercy hospital, the handsome new hospital building has been finished and yesterday afternoon and evening it was thrown open to the public for inspection. The new building, outside of labor and many donations of work, was erected and furnished at a cost of something over $10,000, the whole sum being donated by charitable persons. Those who attended the reception yesterday were struck with the appearance of the new hospital building and were unanimous in their belief that the money had been well spent.

Mercy hospital is a distinctive institution in Kansas City. The only patients it will take are the sick babies and children of parents who cannot afford to secure competent medical attention. Mercy hospital has a record for the past four years, having lost but two patients who were over two years of age.

ITS WORK WELL KNOWN.

The little babies taken there range from a few hours in age to several months. The greatest death loss has, naturally, been of the newborn babies.

So well was the work of Mercy known to the public that the old building was constantly filled with patients. It had a capacity of eighteen patients and then the nurses and attendants had to live in halls and corners. Each day, in the old building, applicants had to be turned away because of the lack of facilities.

The new hospital has a capacity of 100 patients and the nurses and attendants will occupy the old building which adjoins. The new building is three stories in height containing all of the latest appliances for hospitals and a great amount of equipment which is used for children only.

On the first floor the most noticeable room is the children's playroom. Heretofore, when the weather was bad, the children have had no place for their games. The new playroom has been fitted with toys, blocks and some gymnastic apparatus.

The second floor is given over to wards entirely, one noticeable ward being the room allotted to the incurable cases so that the children need not be sent away from the hospital because they had stayed so long a time and could not be cured.

FLOODED WITH LIGHT.

Bordering the entire second floor is a sixteen-foot sun porch, which is to be filled with a long line of little white iron beds for those children who need the outdoor air.

The third floor is also given over to wards, but there the nurses' dining rooms are located.

The whole building is flooded with outdoor light, and the ventilating system is of the most modern type. The institution is run wholly by the charity of the people of Kansas City, having no endowment whatever.

Yesterday morning the twenty-one little patients were moved from their old, cramped quarters into the new and roomy wards. They were greatly delighted and entertained by the many visitors who went to Mercy hospital to see the good work of the directors and the people of the city. Only those infants who are dangerously ill were kept in the old building.

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December 27, 1908

KIDS TRY TO REPEAT
AT THE GIFT GIVING.

More Presents From Mayor's
Christmas Tree.
It was announced in yesterday's Journal that about 700 children had failed to get a present at the mayor's Christmas tree in Convention hall on Christmas, and that tickets had been given them to return Saturday at 2 p. m., when sacks would be given them. About noon a telephone message was sent to police headquarters that over 2,500 boys were massed at the hall and police were asked for to keep order.

A great many of the policemen who were sent had been on duty there the day before and they recognized scores of boys whom they had seen get a package on Christmas day. When the kids were asked what they were doing there they answered, "We are after what we kin git that's what we're here fer." That class of repeaters were put out of line and only those who had tickets were admitted. With all of that care the little sharpers managed to get in on the second day's festivities.

After the packages fell short Christmas day -- on account of so many children from the outside which were not counted on -- Captain J. F. Pelletier, head of the purchasing committee,, went that evening and bought 1,000 more substantial toys and candy, nuts and fruit to go in the bags. Early yesterday morning, in response to a notice in The Journal, about twenty of the tired women who had worked so hard all week, reported at the hall and when the gifts arrived began work. All was in readiness at 3 p. m., but there was no crowding or jamming in the hall, as only those with tickets were admitted.

J. C. Chafin of the Franklin institute arrived at the hall soon after the long line of boys had been formed. As he walked up the line many of them ducked out, hid their faces and ran to the end of the line and got in again.

"Every child from my district was here yesterday," he said as he came in the hall. "They all got something, for I saw them. They are all outside again."

E. T. Bringham, superintendent of the Helping Hand institute, recognized many familiar faces from the North End which he had seen in the lines with sacks on Christmas day.

Many women came yesterday with one ticket and from two and a half dozen children. They wanted one ticket to admit them all. They swore that they had been overlooked, but when the little fellows were taken aside -- those little ones who know only the truth -- they would tell just what they had got when they were there the day before.

One woman with one little girl and one ticket was admitted. "I have four at home with the whooping cough. I want a bundle for them." She was given four extra bundles, appropriate for the sick ones and asked where she lived. "Over in Armourdale," she said, "and I want one of them whips for each one of them, and one of them tops that dance, and one of anything else you've got." She was given a street car ticket for her little girl and told to try and be satisfied with her five packages. She was mad and showed it by what she said in the most spiteful manner.

Two small boys who had succeeded in washing the stamp from their hands Christmas day in time to get back to the hall and get tickets of admission to yesterday's event, were heard to say after they examined their sacks, "Huh, dis is better'n we got yesterday, ain't it?"

Most of those who were admitted on tickets yesterday and who got sacks were of the very deserving kind. The were of the more timid ones who had been crowded out Christmas day and their joy was depicted in their faces as they marched happily away, bundles in arms. Between 500 and 700 packages were given out yesterday on tickets. The rest were put aside and will be sent out to the homes where there are sick children who could not get to the hall.

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December 26, 1908

GAVE PRESENTS
TO 5,700 CHILDREN.

MAYOR'S CHRISTMAS TREE WAS
A TREMENDOUS SUCCESS.

LATE COMERS
GOT NOTHING.

BUT THEY WILL GET THEIR
SHARE OF GIFTS TODAY.

Little Ones Came From Suburban
Places and Swelled the Throng
Beyond Expectation -- More
Toys Have Been Bought.


Was it a success, the first Mayor's Christmas tree in Kansas City? It was, even more than a success, and if the committee had counted on delegates from Kansas City, Kas., Armourdale, Argentine, Rosedale, Olathe, Kas., Independence, Holden and Pleasant Hill, Mo., and a few from Chicago, Ill., all would have gone off swimmingly. As it was there were more present than presents.

The women sacked and separated 5,000 bags for boys and girls, and 2,500 sacks lay on tables on each side of the hall. Besides those, about 700 Christmas bags had been prepared specially for children in hospitals and those who were ill at home and could not come to Convention hall. It was the intention to deliver them by wagons late yesterday afternoon.

In one short hour every sack was gone, including the ones prepared for the hospitals, and many children were still in line. Over 700 tickets were given to them to come to the hall at 2 o'clock this afternoon when an effort will be made to supply them. Captain J. F. Pelletier of the purchasing committee bought toys, candies and nuts last night and a committee of tired women will be at the hall at 8 o'clock this morning to prepare them. It is estimated that fully 1,000 children who were last in line failed to get a Christmas sack.


CAME HOURS TOO SOON.

It was stated that he doors to the main floor would be opened at 1 p. m. and that the distribution would begin at 2 o'clock. But the children began gathering at 10 o'clock, and as the wind was raw, they were admitted to the balconies of the hall.

Shortly after 1 o'clock some one gave the word "Ready" and the girls and boys rushed from the balconies and jammed into one living mass before the entrance to the arena. The wee ones were being smothered and, in order to save lives, the crowd had to be admitted to the floor.

On the right side was a big placard reading "BOYS" and on the left another reading "GIRLS." Instead of mingling about the hall and looking at the trees and watching the antics of the five Santa Clauses under the two great evergreens, the boys massed before the chute leading to their side and the girls did likewise on the other side.

Patrolmen William M. Meyers, Elvin Gray, T. L. Savidge, George H. Moseley and Thomas McNally, who were rigged in full regalia as the five Saints Nick did all they could to detract the attention of the children, but they had their eyes on those Christmas bags, and the lumbering antics didn't even win a grin.

There was nothing to do but start the ball, and start it they did. The first boy to get his goodies was George Cook, 11 years old, of 115 North Prospect avenue. A committeeman placed the imprint of a little Christmas tree on the back of George's left hand with a rubber stamp and indelible ink. He grabbed his sack, sailed through the chute and squatted immediately outside the door to see what he had. He was soon followed by a mob of other boys, just as curious, and soon the doorway had to be cleared by a policeman as there was a boy to every square foot.


SHE HAD A DOUBLE LOAD.

At the head of the girls' line stood Ester Cronkhite, 11 years old, 1700 Fremont avenue. In her arms she carried her 2-year-old sister, Alice. Both were given appropriate sacks and, heavily laden, little Ester labored on. The children were given street car tickets home. One ticket entitled tow to a ride.

Most attention was paid to the boys, as it was believed that they -- the little scamps --- would do some duplicating. Soon after it was seen that their hands were being stamped several boys appeared in line with gloves on. And so did some of the girls. When the jam on the boys' side got beyond control Detective Thomas Hayde mounted a box and, in stentorian tones commanded, "Here, you kids, quit that pushing. Don't you see you're smothering these kids here in the front? Stand back there. Quit that."

"Hully chee," said one boy, "dere's de chief. Skedoo back kids and beehave er we won't git nuttin."

From that announcement there was a line formed out of the boys and there was little crowding. "De chief's here," went down the line. "See 'im hollerin' on de box dere." That settled it with them.

SHOVED POLICE ASIDE.

On the girls side there was nothing short of chaos. About nine stalwart coppers -- out of thirty detailed at the hall -- under Captain John Branham, could no t keep them in line. They actually shoved the police to one side. "O'm demmed, eh? Oi aint timpted tuh give 'em the loight schlap," said one policeman, who had been shoved about ten feet by the little girls, "but 'twudn't do, all being gerrels, ye know."

While the bulk of the eagle eyes were on the boys to see that they played no tricks and did no repeating, the girls did a rushing business on that very line. At the head of the line were bags for little girls, and the big ones got theirs further on. Many of the "mediums," which could pass for both, got both. One was seen to get a sack, hold it under her cloaK with one hand, while with the other hand she gratefully received another.

Still others would get their sack and immediately pass it over the chute to a waiting companion on the outside while she passed on and got a second present from another woman. Many of the sharp boys whose hands had been stamped and who could not get back in line were seen to do this same thing.

"GIMME 'NOTHER, MISTER."

"Gimme 'nother for my little brother what's sick at home an' can't come. Gimme one fer my sister with th' mumps. Gimme one fer my little cousin what has fits an' can't come. Gimme 'nother one fer my half little brother what's visitin' an' won't be home 'till New Years. Gimme 'nother, please, fer a kid what lives by me an' sprained his leg so he can't git his shoes on any more this year."

The foregoing excuses were given by the boys and girls in line, and there were possibly a hundred others. No one could refuse them, as many cried to make the play strong.

Many little ones got lost from brothers and sisters, and the five Santa Clauses were kept busy carrying them about hunting for relatives and companions with whom they had come. All were crying. R. S. Crohn found a little fellow's brother for him three times, and when he got lost again turned him over to Santa Claus. Finally a room was set apart for the lost ones and by the time the festivities were over all lost children had been restored.


THE MAYOR WAS LATE.

Mayor Thomas T. Crtittenden, Jr. , mistaken in the time he should have been there, arrived at Convention hall with Franklin Hudson, just as the last of the bags had been given out to the children. There was to have been an entertainment, with a speech by the mayor, but that had to be left out. Devaney's orchestra furnished music while the children were waiting.

"It's the happiest day of my life," said the mayor. "I wouldn't have missed the little I have seen for anything. We will know better how to proceed next year, however, and will begin earlier. Another thing we will know is just how many children will be here and just what sort of presents to put up for them. Other cities may profit by our example next y ear and relieve us of such an unfortunate incident as took place today. We have more money, however, will buy more toys, more nuts, candy and fruit, and will be ready for the leftovers Saturday at 2 p. m."

"It was more than what we bargained for," said Franklin Hudson, chairman of the executive committee. "We were counting on our own children only -- but what's the difference, they are all children anyway."

"I don't care if they came here from Europe," said Captain J. F. Pelletier. "We were not looking for 1,500 outsiders, but as they weere here we are glad of it. I wish all the kids on earth had been here. At one time I thought at least half of them were here.

Another large bundle of Santa Claus letters were received at the hall yesterday, some of them being handed in by the children who came. They will be classified by districts and an effort made as far as possible to give each child just hwat it asked for. It may take several days yet, but the committee says: "We are not going to do this thing by halves."

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December 24, 1908

NO COLOR LINE AT THE
MAYOR'S BIG PARTY.

BLACK AND WHITE WILL SHARE
CHRISTMAS GIFTS.

All the Children Need Do Tomorrow
Is Apply at Convention Hall.
There's Plenty for
Everybody.

Convention hall yesterday resembled many lines of business. In one section where all the bananas and oranges were being placed into sacks, it looked something like a fruit packing establishment. Another section resembled candy packers at work, while still another had to do with the sorting and arranging of toys. It had the appearance of one great combined establishment where every line of goods was handled and everybody was busy.

There was a rumor out yesterday that the gifts were to be only for white children. This is wrong, as the committee says the color line will not be drawn. Poor negro children are to be made happy, too, and they are all invited.

At the close of the evening the first 2,500 bags to be given out on Christmas day to the children who attend the mayor's Christmas tree, were well filled, sorted for boys and girls and placed in position. The other 2,500 will be packed today. Women from the different charitable organizations were doing most of the work.

It was discovered when it came to placing the trees in position that five would take up too much room and that the decorating of them would take up entirely too much time -- in fact that it would be an imposition on the Squires Electrical Company, which his donating the labor. Something had to be done on the spur of the moment, so the committee in charge decided that two large trees would be sufficient, as no presents are to be placed on the trees anyway. The two large evergreens were placed in position in the center of the hall about noon yesterday and by evening the men from the electrical company had finished stringing the colored lights. They were tested just after dark and found to be in perfect working order. Today the tinsel and other decorations will be strung under the supervision of the women who have the matter in charge.

COIN-DEVOURING BEASTS.

Some of the toys bought by the committee are really expensive and of fine workmanship. There will be enough to place a good and a cheap toy in each bag.

Among the toys are several mechanical banks where a coin is placed in the mouth of an animal, which immediately devours it. A carpenter connected with the hall tried one of them Tuesday night with a dime -- the last coin he had, too, by the way. It was swallowed and the carpenter walked home. Several others were caught on the same trick yesterday, and some poor child -- no one knows who it will be -- will find some news in his bank.

A large wagon load of toys and useful things such as baby carriages, bicycles, wagons, etc., arrived yesterday from Montgomery Wart & Co. They will be distributed in homes where they are most needed the day after Christmas.

The Long Bros. Grocery Company sent two dozen big dressed dolls. They will also be given out at the homes, as will 200 pairs of baby stockings donated by The Baby Shop, 202 Lillis building. The wholesale dry goods merchants, besides other donations, sent two large boxes of boys' and girls' socks, stockings, gloves and mittens to the hall yesterday, and the Faxon & Gallagher Drug Company sent three big boxes of toys.

LOTS OF GROCERIES.

Grocery stores are still responding liberally, and one room which has been set aside at the hall looks like a general store. Among the donations are bunches of fresh celery and a lot of onions. Several big jack rabbits were also received. The George B. Peck Dry Goods Company sent a lot of fancy toys and two caddies of assorted candy. The Loose-Wiles Candy and Cracker Company's wagon arrived with six caddies of assorted candies. The Coal Dealers' Association donated $150 in cash and many of its members said they stood ready to deliver coal to families where it was most needed.

Two women waited on the outside of the hall for a long while yesterday morning. They seemed to want something, but were afraid to go in and ask. Finally Steve Sedweek approached them and asked if they wanted anything.

"Yes, we do," said one of them. "We are poor and have nothing for Christmas. We read in The Journal where all poor children would be welcomed here. I have seven and this woman has five. We want to know how to get them in h ere, and if all can come."

"Just you bring all you have and all you can find in the neighborhood, or in any other neighborhood," instructed Mr. Sedweek. "Bring them right here to the hall and they will be given tickets and admitted."

"And I know of others, too," said the first woman who had spoken.

"That's what it is for," they were told, "bring fifty if you can find them, and each one will be made happy.

WON'T THE KIDS BE GLAD!

Many children flocked about the hall yesterday asking where they could get tickets that would admit them to the mayor's Christmas tree. They were told to be there Christmas afternoon -- with all their playmates -- and that tickets would be given them. Many of them stole timidly into the rotunda of the hall and took a peek through the cracks at what was going on. They would run away ever time any of the grown ups put in an appearance, afraid they would be corrected for it. But they had seen a little of the glories that are to come, anyway, and they left happy.

The work of distributing groceries, clothing and toys to the homes will take place Saturday, and even on Monday, if it is not completed. Letters asking aid are arriving fast.

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December 23, 1908

MONEY AND GIFTS
FOR MAYOR'S TREE.

EACH CHILD WILL GET A BIG
CHRISTMAS BAG.

And It Will Be a Big Bag, too, big
as a Sack of Flour -- Many
People Are Giving
Liberally.
Gift Bags From the Mayors Christmas Tree, as Big as a 20-Pound Bag of Flour.
Markings on the Sacks to Be Distributed
From the Mayor's Christmas Tree.

Three automobiles which left the city hall at 10:30 o'clock yesterday morning and were out only two hours collected $233 for the mayor's Christmas tree. The machines contained Mrs. J. F. Whiting, Mrs. L. H. Gaskell, Mrs. George F. Pelletier, Mrs. Mead W. Harrian, Mrs. Harry C. Wing, Mrs. A. L. Stocker, Mrs. Jule J. Levy, Mrs. Lee Lyon, Mrs. Albert S. Cahn, Mrs. Jules Davidson, Mrs. B. L. Sulzbacher, Mrs. Clarence D. Babb and Miss Lorena Whiting. A policeman went with each auto and one of them carried a one-legged newsboy and as a mascot.

"We did not have time to get over all the ground we wished," said A. E. Hutchins, chairman of the auto committee, "ans we did not realize what a sacrifice the women were making in giving their time to the project right at this time. The machines will be out again Wednesday, however, and the stock yards, the packing houses and those big office buildings which have not been covered will be visited. We will start earlier and stay longer next time."

The women, who were out yesterday, the policemen, the chauffeurs and the one-legged newsboy were given a luncheon at the Elks club at 1:30 p. m.

CALLING ON GROCERS.

Three big transfer wagons started out yesterday morning calling on the retail grocers. A policeman was with each wagon. In soliciting the first few loads the police failed to get a list of the donors of goods. The committee wants all those who gave and whose names were not taken to send their names and addresses to Steve Sedweek at Convention hall, that they may be enrolled with the others.

Louis F. Shouse yesterday turned Convention hall over to the committee, and from now on all donations will be received at the main entrance. The bags, just the size of a twenty-five pound flour sack, were delivered in the afternoon and the work of filling them with candies, nuts, fruits and appropriate presents will begin at once.

At a meeting of the Musicians' union yesterday it was decided to furnish two concerts for the children, afternoon and evening. A big orchestra will be under the direction of Professor W. E. Devinney. Besides this, Alexander Christman will have a big mechanical organ in the hall which will play while the orchestra is resting. Music all the time, is the idea.

LOOKING FOR 6,000 CHILDREN.

At a meeting of the committee yesterday it was decided to make preparations for 6,000 children at the hall Christmas day. If any more appear they will be cared for. A unique scheme has been decided upon to prevent repeating by those who would do such a thing. The committee will not divulge what the scheme is.

All of the gifts of groceries gathered by the wagons yesterday are being stowed away separate from the children's goods. This will be delivered to unfortunate families by wagons the day after Christmas. All letters received are now being carefully sorted and classified by districts for that purpose. No one is to be overlooked. Poor families who want anything of this kind can get it by writing to "Santa Clause, Care of Mayor Crittenden, Convention Hall," giving correct names and addresses.

5,000 TOYS IN A BUNCH.

Steve Sedweek, H. C. Manke, president of the eagles, and four firemen found plenty of work at Convention hall yesterday, real labor it was, too. One of the first loads to arrive was a box of 5,000 assorted tops, a gift from the employes of the Jones Dry Goods Company.

"We have toys for the children whom we expect at the hall on Christmas day," said Mr. Sedweek, "so these will be laid aside and put up in packages to be delivered to little ones who, through sickness or any other reason, cannot come to the hall.

"I have lots of Santa Claus letters here now and a package will be prepared for each child mentioned in them, and besides that the parents will get something substantial."

Among the articles gathered by the wagons yesterday canned goods led the list. Then there was flour, meal, potatoes, apples, oranges, bananas, jellies, bacon, ham, butter in bulk and otherwise, eggs, soap -- both toilet and laundry -- crackers, matches, breakfast foods of all kinds, in fact everything that may be found in a grocery store. Candies in buckets, baskets and boxes were donated along with dried fruits of all kinds on the map. There is plenty of salt and pepper, if it could be evenly divided, and a few cocoanuts, with all kinds of small nuts.

The candy, nuts and fruit will be used by the committee in filling the children's sacks, but the groceries will be delivered by wagon to the homes the day after Christmas.

KNIVES FOR THE BOYS.

One package received yesterday was found to contain a rat biscuit. One paper sack contained about three dozen boys' knives. Another package contained a half-dozen lamp chimneys. Then there are several boxes of decorations for the trees, along with an assorted lot of fancy vases with which to decorate a little home.

A little package wrapped in newspaper yesterday was found to contain a pair of gloves, two little mirrors and two leather purses. One package labeled "place on the tree" contained a beautiful baby hood, all white, soft and fluffy.

Among other things received yesterday was a lot of pretty pictures in frames, some of them in special boxes. A lot of clothing has also been donated and the committee wants more. Several tons of coal have been given and will be delivered on direction of the committee.

The committee says it wants nothing but the children at Convention hall on Christmas day. It will be too great a task to try and handle the adults then. They will be seen to later.

Arrangements have been made with a local photographer to have a big flashlight picture taken of the children as they mingle beneath the five big trees, with the five corpulent Santa Clauses.

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December 18, 1908

CHILDREN WILL HELP
THE MAYOR'S TREE.

Their Pennies and Dimes
Will Swell the Fund.

Convention Hall Will Be Open Today
to Receive Gifts and Almost
Everything Is Solicited
by the Committee.

There's great activity among the committees that are co-operating with Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., in the arrangements for the municipally conducted Christmas tree at Convention hall next Friday, from 10 a. m. to 11 p. m.

Contributions of cash, in small and large amounts, are sought, as is also supplies, toys, wearing apparel and anything that is seasonable.

The northwest doors of Convention hall will be opened this morning and continue open every day until Christmas for the reception of merchandise and toys. A detail from the fire department will be in charge, and will receive all offerings.

School children are to be asked to assist in the event. They are to be appealed to for pennies, nickels and dimes, and it is thought the response will be substantial and liberal.

Tuesday or Wednesday afternoon next, A. Judah, manager of the Grand, will have the company playing at the house give a performance free to the poor and worthy children of the city. The tickets of admission will be distributed by the entertainment committee, and only those having tickets from the committee will be admitted.

Letters were yesterday mailed to the pastors of the several churches in the city, requesting them to call the attention of their congregations and Sunday schools to the Christmas tree.

NO COLLECTION IN SCHOOLS.

J. Franklin Hudson and J. F. Pelletier appeared before the school board last night with a communication from Mayor Crittenden on the Christmas fund question. They asked that the board suspend the rule made years ago and allow a general collection to be taken up among the schools for the mayor's Christmas tree fund.

"We would suggest that the children be allowed to contribute from a penny to 10 cents each, but no more than 10 cents. Those who could not, of course, would not be asked to contribute," the board was being told.

In explaining what the money would be used for the board was told by Captain Pelletier that it would go toward purchasing candy, fruit and small presents for the big tree in Convention hall, where from 5,000 to 10,000 poor children would be expected. Also that the little souvenirs were to be given to about 2,500 children who will attend the Grand theater next Wednesday.

After deliberating over the matter a long time the board decided to adhere to its rule of allowing no collections of any kind to be taken up among the children of the public schools.

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December 17, 1908

NO CHRISTMAS CHEER THERE.

Things Are Gloomy for Forty Boys at
McCune Home.

At the McCune home there are forty boys, and every night there are forty letters or attempts at letters, written to Santa Claus. All of these boys have heard something about Christmas trees and have heard people talk of Christmas and Santa Claus, but few, if any of them, have ever seen the result of the talking. Right now they are all hoping and wishing for a Christmas tree and Santa Claus, but it's mostly hope without expectation. And so far their chances for realization do look far away. No one has yet offered to present the home with a tree or any Christmas adornment to add to the Christmas cheer.

A visitor at the home yesterday was talking to the boys about the day of days for children. He was telling of the mysterious stranger from the North pole, how he made his yearly trips in his huge sleigh drawn by swift reindeer and gave toys and presents to all the good little boys.

"Aw, g'wan," ejaculated one little tot who had been listening with eyes wide open and a look of distrust on his face. "De guy whot youse tell of ain't comin' here." And it looks as if the little boy were correct.

The people in Independence take an interest in the boys of and the home, but since all of the inmates are from Kansas City, the people here are supposed to take care of that part of the institution, and so Independence and Kansas City both pass it by. The little inmates fear that the good fairies who live in Kansas City will overlook them, since they are so far out in the country.

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December 15, 1908

MRS. PRATT MAY NOT BE
TRIED ON MURDER CHARGE.

Probation Officer Believes She Should
Not Be Parted From Her
Children.

Toys in profusion are being sent to the Detention home for the four children of Mrs. Della Pratt, members of the band of fanatics who caused a street riot last Tuesday. In many cases no names are attached to the presents. The list of Christmas things includes xylophones, dolls and other creations of the toy maker which children in houseboats are not commonly supposed to have enjoyed.

The Pratts are getting along famously. The larger children are devouring their primers with lightning speed and it will not be long, at their present rate of progress, before they will be as far advanced with their studies as other children of their age. They seem quiet and well behaved and give the probation officers no trouble.

"We will have to enlarge the building if the contribution of toys keep coming in," said Dr. E. L. Mathias, probation officer, yesterday. Just then Mrs. J. K. Ellwood, the matron, came into the doctor's office and seized the city directory. "Need it for a high chair," she said. It was for one of the Pratt babies.

It is the opinion of Dr. Mathias that the Pratt family should be reunited. "Of course the children will be in the juvenile court on Friday and the mother is in jail. But if she is not prosecuted I would favor making the little ones wards of the court and aiding the mother to provide a home for them. Given the chance these children would behave like normal human beings of their age. They could go to school and their mother, no doubt, would be glad of a chance to be with them again."

I. B. Kimbrell, prosecuting attorney, said yesterday that he would try to have the trial of James Sharp, leader of the band of fanatics, set for next week. Sharp and Mrs. Sharp are to be prosecuted, but it is doubtful whether Mrs. Pratt and the other members of the band will have to go on trial. Christmas juries are usually more lenient towards prisoners, and Sharp may have this idea in mind.

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December 15, 1908

IT GIVES THE SHOPGIRL PANGS.

To See the Yearning of Poor Chil-
dren for Expensive Toys.

The shop girl seemed preoccupied when she was asked to show her line of dolls. "Tired?" asked the sympathetic purchaser.

"No. I was just thinking. Christmas ain't such a happy time as most people imagine it. Why, I am feeling blue about half the time at Christmas. Kids and toy departments don't bring smiles, not by a good deal.

"Oh, why I thought --"

"Um! Everybody thinks unless they know. Do you see that big engine up there on the top shelf? It costs $15, and every youngster in town wants it the minute his eyes light upon it. That little fellow in the brown coat over there is just crazy about it. His mother has had to bring him in three times already to look at it. And look at her! Why, she couldn't afford to spend even $1 on a toy engine.

" 'Say, mother,' he said, 'take a good look at that there engine, 'cause that's the kind I want Santa Claus to bring me.'

"She nodded.

" 'Now you'll be sure, mother,' he insisted. 'You know that's the kind I asked for last year, and he left me just that little tin thing. I do want an iron engine, mother.'

"And 'mother' looked as though she would give anything in the world to get it for him. But Christmas morning that kid will find a tin engine. I happen to know.

"If that toy isn't sold within the next few day, I'm going to ask the manager to cover it up or hide it. Otherwise I'll die of heartache long before Christmas."

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July 5, 1908

FOURTH REAPED
SMALLER CROP

NOT AS MANY ACCI-
DENTS AS USUAL.

ONE BOY NEARLY BLINDED.

MYRON KING INJURED BY IM-
PROVISED CANNON.

Toy Pistols, Cannon Cracker and
Gunpowder Claim a Number
of Victims -- Noisy across the Line.

As the result of an untimely explosion of an improvised cannon, Myron King, the 16-year-old son of A. J. King, 1705 Linwood boulvard, received painful and serious injuries about the face yesterday afternoon possibly blinding his right eye. Myron and about fifteen of the neighborhood boys and girls were gathered in the front yard of H. G. Brown's residence, 3219 Highland avenue, shooting off various kinds of fireworks. After all of the firecrackers had become exhausted, some of the boys decided to use a tomato can as a cannon. It was touching off this cannon that the King boy received his injuries.

The can was about half loaded with black powder and slugs, and then plugged with paper. A small priming hole was drilled through the top of the can and firecracker fuses sere used as a fuse. Myrom stooped over the can to light the fuse. As he struk the match the sulphur tip flew off, falling on the powder which had been placed about the priming hole. There was an explosion, and the powder and tin struck the lad full in the face.

Myron staggered back, grasping blindly at the air. His companions ran to him, and the little girls set up a scream which attracted the attention of the whole block. Mothers, whose boys were in the crowd, ran to the scene of the explosion.

Mrs. G. P. Kincade, 3220 Highland avenue, thinking it was her son who had been injured by the explosion, started to run to Mr. Brown's home. She got no further than the front steps of her own home when she fainted in her son's arms. He had come hurrying home to assure his mother that he was safe.

"DON'T SPOIL THEIR FUN"

None of the King family was at home at the time, so the wounded boy was taken into Mr. Brown's home and several physicians were summoned at once. Among them was Dr. J. W. McKee, an oculist. The boy's face was completely blackened by powder and was badly cut in several places. Immediately the physicians and the oculist began to pick out the grains of powder from the lad's face and eyes, and when they had done as much as was possible at one operation, he was taken to his home.

At the time of the accident Myron requested that his parents not be notified until they returned home, saying: "There is no use to spoil their fun today. The accident has happened and it would do no good for them to come home right now." Nevertheless the physicians thought it best that they should be home to take care of the boy as soon as possible, and they were called from Elm Ridge, where they had gone to see the races.

Concerning the boy's condition, Dr. McKee said: "Myron will have a hard fight for the sight of his right eye. It was badly burned with powder and is in a precarious condition. It is impossible to say at this time just what may be the outcome There is still some powder left in the eye and it was not practicable to remove it this afternoon. His left eye is in good condition and it will not take much treatment to make it as good as it ever was."

MAY LOSE ONE EYE.

The physicians who attended the boy say that his condition is not serious. They fear only infection from the can and powder. Most of the particles were removed from Myron's face yesterday afternoon.

According to the physicians and occulist it will be some time before Myron can use his eyes to any extent. It was said that it would take at least three days to determine just the extent of the injuries done to the right eye, and if it can be restored it will take much treatment and a hard fight on the part of the oculist and boy.

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May 4, 1908

RISKS LIFE TO RECOVER CAP.

Small Boy Pulls Red Wagon in Front
of Street Car.

A toy wagon, a 10-year-old boy and a blown-away cap looming up before a Grand avenue street car just before dark last night, made things look suddenly black for the motorman.

"You didn't stop for me," the boy said, indignantly, after he had been shunted off the track, his back sprained and his left thigh lacerated.

"I thought you'd stop when you saw me, for I had to get my cap," he went on. The boy was David Marcus, son of Aaron Marcus of 42 McClure Flats. His play had taken him to Twentieth street and Grand avenue. On a street car he was taken to a physicians office Four hours later he was still suffering, and Dr. Carl V. Bates from No. 4 police station was called. He says the boys injuries are only superficial.

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March 11, 1908

TOY SQUIRT GUN HIS WEAPON.

But Jones Wouldn't Be Bluffed and
Landed With Stiff Uppercut.

Roy Jones was walking slowly along Troost avenue near Fifteenth street around 2 o'clock yesterday morning. He was humming a love tune and paid little attention to a man who came up behind him, until he was jabbed in the ribs with something hard, held in the man's right hand.

"Hold up your hands! Give me your money!" the man commanded.

Jones was in for arguing the question, but the man was insistent. As the argued they passed beneath an electric arc light, and James saw the man had a toy squirt gun pistol as a weapon. With one stiff punch, Jones landed an uppercut on the man's jaw.

Just as the man ran away, Patrolman Michael Meany appeared and took a shot at him At Fifteenth and Holmes streets, almost exhausted, the bluff criminal ran into Patrolman James Mulloy and was arrested.

At the Walnut street station he gave the name of Howard A. Watson, an upholsterer. He told Captain Whitsett late in the day that he was "just kiddin'" an' wouldn't harm a fly." Captain Whitsett didn't like that sort of fun between entire strangers, and Watson was charged with highway robbery. He was arraigned before Justice Shoemaker, pleaded guilty and was bound over to the criminal court for trial.

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September 23, 1907

WOUNDED WITH TOY PISTOL.

Boy of Eight Shoots a Companion of
Thirteen.

A toy pistol owned by David Henry Butler, 13 years old, looked pretty and harmless to his 8-year-old guest, Alva Givens, as it lay in a drawer yesterday afternoon at the Butler home, 1520 Virginia avenue. Alva took out the weapon, looked it over curiously and pulled the trigger. A 22 BB bullet entered young Butler's abdomen. An ambulance was called and the wounded boy was removed to University hospital. The child who fired the shot, with a companion, Carl Hotzier, scampered to the latter's home, 1526 Virginia avenue.

Dr. J. M. Singleton was called and probed for the bullet, but did not locate it. No serious results are anticipated.

Young Givens is the son of Mrs. Joseph Givens, Quincy, Ill., who is visiting her sister, Mrs. Charles Hotzier.

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