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November 5, 1909

MAY DIVORCE JESSE JAMES.

Mrs. Stella S. James Files Suit --
Friends Think James May Re-
Enter the Tobacco Business.
Jesse James, Jr., Kansas City Attorney.
JESSE JAMES.

Jesse James, lawyer, son of the famous bandit, and one of the best known men in Kansas City, was made defendant in a divorce suit filed yesterday by Stella J. James, who says they were married January 24, 1900.

Jesse and his wife were married while he was running a cigar store in the Junction building at Ninth and Main streets. It was not long after his celebrated trial in which he was acquitted of a charge of complicity in the Blue Cut train robbery. Jesse was one of the most talked of men in all the country in those days, and his cigar business prospered.

That he and his wife led a happy married life was the general opinion of their friends. In her petition, however, Mrs. James says that her husband has been getting homo late at night, and on these occasions has refused to tell his wife where he had been. The wife says that she is ill and under a doctor's care and without means of support. Their home is at 809 Elmwood avenue.

Friends of Jesse James have noted a change in his demeanor within the last few days. That he was troubled was apparent. Long ago he quit the cigar business, and for a time was the proprietor of a pawn shop. Then he began to study law, and after his graduation he began to practice in local courts and gave evidence of doing well. He devoted his attention largely to criminal business.

Only a few days ago Jesse confided to friends that he had decided to quit the law and intended to go on the road for the American Tobacco Company. It was Jesse's first intimation that he was not satisfied with the legal profession.

Jesse James was not at the Elmwood avenue address last night, and persons at the house said that Mrs. James was sick in bed and could not discuss the case.

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September 15, 1909

AID FOR CRIPPLED BLIND MAN.

Friends Are Starting a Subscription
Fund for Edward Harris.

Men who knew Edward Harris, the blind newspaper vendor who stood each day at the Junction and who was injured by being run over by a team Monday afternoon, met at the Kensington Avenue Baptist church last night and arranged to take up a subscription to aid him in his time of trouble. Harris was seriously injured, and may be a cripple permanently. He has a wife and a daughter to care for.

Reverend A. E. Burch, pastor of the church, presided at the meeting. Many residents of Kansas City were familiar with Harris and bought papers from him.

The members of the committee in charge of the subscription for Harris are Rev. Mrs. Burch, A. C. Wright, S. A. Faires and M. A. Randall.

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June 13, 1909

KANSAS CITY'S CROSSING SQUAD.

A Fine Appearing Body of Men.

CROSSING SQUAD OF THE POLICE DEPARTMENT.

It doesn't take the oldest inhabitant to remember the time when the crossing squad, which now numbers twenty-nine men, was limited to one or two members. At one time Sergeant James Hogan was the whole squad himself with the exception of a patrolman who has been stationed at the Junction for more than twenty years. Kansas City cannot boast of the largest squad in the country, but its members are noted for their general efficiency.

In the mind of the ordinary person the crossing man leads a life of ease. In fact, the majority of the police department envy the crossing men until they have been given a trial. Then it is found that a man must know the location and name of all the office buildings, the streets in every section of the city, the routes of the different street cars and most of the public men.

"Can you tell me the way to the depot?" is a question heard every five minutes.

"Where is the nearest shoe store?" asks a woman.

"Do you know Charley Smith?" asks a farmer who feels hurt when the crossing man shakes his head. "You see he was a great feller to make acquaintances in our town, and I was sure you would know him."

Answering questions, directing the careless drivers who persist in driving on the wrong side of the street and dodging street cars on his own account, are only mere incidents. The constant strain on the system is generally the cause for a man's departure from the squad. Some men ask to be relieved in less than a week.

When the cable cars formerly ran on Ninth street and when some one was injured nearly every week as the cars swept around the corner at high speed, a patrolman was always stationed at that particular spot. The second patrolman to be placed at a crossing was James Hogan, who commenced patrolling the corner at Eleventh and Walnut streets, just eleven years ago.

Four years ago the crossing squad was increased from eight members, who worked from 8 o'clock in the morning until about 7 o'clock in the evening. Patrolman Hogan on account of his seniority and his general knowledge was made a sergeant of the squad.

Two years ago the squad was increased to fourteen members and more crossing were included in the list. But the hours were long and the men asked to be relieved. At last the problem of long hours was solved by Sergeant Hogan, who recommended that the squad be doubled and the hours shortened. Fourteen of the men now go to work at 8 o'clock in the morning and are relieved at 1 o'clock in the afternoon by the other division. After six hours of rest they report at police headquarters and are assigned to the parks and theaters. On the following day the second squad are given the same hours and report at 8 o'clock in the morning, as did the opposite squad on the previous day.

Sergeant Hogan, who has been on the force for nineteen years, probably has a better general knowledge of Kansas City than any other man. One glance through an information guide can tell him whether the pamphlet is up to date or not.

"I don't see the name of the Sharp of finance building," he informed a book dealer the other day when his opinion was asked in regard to the reliability of a guide recently issued. He also knows the name of every street in both Kansas Citys and places of general interest. With such a leader it isn't any wonder that the crossing squad is rated as highly efficient.

Names of the officers, from left to right:

First row -- Crowley, Kennedy, Quayle, Darnell, Rogers, Kincaid.
Second row -- Kearns, Keys, Madigan, Harkenberg, Doman, Nichols.
Third Row -- Lillis, O'Roark, Noland, McCormick, Briden, Jackson.
Fourth Row -- Roach, Coffey, J. T. Rogers, Ryan, McFarland, Hoskins.
Fifth Row -- Hodges, Koger, Sergeant Hogan, Zirschky, Wilhite.

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June 5, 1909

YOEMEN TO MINNEAPOLIS.

Two Hundred Members Will Parade
Tonight to Special Train.

A parade of 200 members of the Brotherhood of American Yoemen will take place at 8:30 tonight, preliminary to t heir departure for Minneapolis, Minn., to attend the national conclave. The parade will take the route from the hall, 1013 Holmes street, to Fifteenth street to Grand avenue, then to Twelfth street and over to Main street, where it will turn north to Ninth. Cars for the depot will be boarded at the junction.

In the party going North will be the young women's military drill team, young men's military drill team and the degree staff. They have chartered a special train for the trip.

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November 27, 1908

WANTS DRINKING FOUNTAIN.

Humane Society Secretary Favors
One at the Junction.

To the Journal:
I am glad to see that the long talked of public comfort station seems in a fair way to become a certainty; also that a statue, or ornament of some kind will probably be placed at the Junction. This is a very favorable location for something of that kind, as it could be seen for several blocks from east, west and south. The ornament should, therefore, be imposing and significant.

In connection with the station and ornament there should also be placed in the vicinity of the Junction, and close on the sidewalk, a drinking fountain, for persons only, where the thirsty, at all times, day or night, might obtain a cool refreshing drink of pure water. This fountain should be placed so as to be accessible from the sidewalk, at proper distance from the station, and arranged so as to drain through it. The two fountains erected by the Humane Society, one at Fourth and Broadway, the other at the western terminus of our great intercity viaduct, are proving great conveniences for horses and dogs. Now let the city do as well for thirsty humans, as this seems a favorable opportunity. -- F. M. FURGASON, Secretary Humane Society

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November 19, 1908

COMFORT STATION
AT THE JUNCTION.

CITY TO SPEND FIFTEEN THOU-
SAND DOLLARS THERE.

Opposition of Property Owners With-
drawn and Long Needed Neces-
sity Will Be Established.
Architects to Compete.

Fifteen thousand dollars will be spent by the city for a comfort station at the Junction. An ordinance authorizing the apportionment of the money will be introduced in the council Monday night. The work of the construction will be under the supervision of the board of public works.

J. M. Townley, A. P. Nichols and S. M. Williams of the civic improvement committee of the Manufacturers and Merchants' Association and J. A. Runyan, secretary, presented the matter to the board yesterday. The committee was supported in its recommendations by Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr. City Comptroller Gus Pearson said the funds could be provided.

Plans for the station were prepared during the Beardsley administration, but further progress was delayed on account of opposition from adjoining property owners. It is said this opposition has been withdrawn. The drawings that have been prepared were submitted to the board yesterday with the understanding that they will not have to be followed.

R. L. Gregory, chairman of the board, felt that on account of the importance of the utility, there should be some scope permitted for competition among architects in preparation of plans, and he favored the offering of a purse of $100 for the best design. The main adjuncts to the utility will be underground, and it is proposed to make the surface appearance as attractive as possible. The plans already in hand call for a tower of bronze fifteen feet high, to be illuminated at night by an immense gas burning torch located on the crown. There is a probability of this tower being made taller.

Just as soon as the council appropriates the money, the board will advertise for competitive bids for plans and construction. It is thought that by energetic action work on the station can be commenced in thirty days, and finished within sixty days.

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July 28, 1908

OLD NEWSBOY ONCE
A PROSPEROUS MAN.

EDSON E. PHELPS HAD CITY'S
LEADING BOOKSHOP.

That Was Twenty Years Ago -- Sold
Papers Until His Death Sunday,
Forgotten by Those Who Once Knew Him.

They will be burying Edson E. Phelps today somewhere or other. He died in a third floor back on Sunday, which explains why the doubled-up, little, prematurely old man was not on his camp stool at Eleventh and Main yesterday or the day before, selling newspapers.

When the newspapers yesterday published the announcement of the death of the old "newsboy" they dismissed it in a line or two. There was no mention made about Mr. Phelps, formerly a book seller with a large establishment on Delaware street, and before that the head bookman in M. H. Dickinson's great store at 620 Main street.

The writers who picked up the death of Phelps, the old newsboy, and the undertakers who got his remains, and the deputy coroner who viewed them, were not old enough to remember the days when The Journal was on Fifth street and the town ended at the Junction, where Dr. Munford was talking of putting up one of the biggest buildings in the West, which he had somebody do afterwards, sure enough, and it is there today.

In those days Mr. Phelps, the best known book seller in this part of the country and an authority looked up to from New York and the shops in Churchyard street, London, no less. Mr. Phelps, without a doubt, was the best posted man on books in private trade. He would not snap his fingers to sell a set of new stuff, but he could make T. B. Bullene go miles to look at a hand-tooled Bible, and then made Mr. Bullene buy it and, which may be news to some people interested, he got Father Dalton interested in some other rich old books and the upshot was that Mr. Bullene gave Father Dalton his precious old hand-tooled Bible, that Mr. Phelps had secured for him, one of the only three of the kind in the world.

WITH GREAT FINANCIERS.

And Mr. Phelps could walk slap bang up to the desk of Simeon B. Armour, one of the great Armours, and talk books to him. Mr. Armour said once that he understood there was a Mazarin Bible for sale. Could Mr. Dickinson find out about it? Mr. Phelps was sent for, and he told that excepting for the copies in the British museum and the Lenox, N. Y. library, the only other copy was in the hands of a rich Chicago candymaker, and might be bought. What would Mr. Armour care to offer?

Thank you, he would run up and see if Gunther would take $10,000 for the book.

Last week Phelps would say thanks for two pennies for a copy of a newspaper he was selling, and he would take off his hat for a nickel.

Mr. Phelps -- this is going back to the '80s, when Dickinson's bookstore was the literary center of the city and the public library was on the second floor of the old trap at northeast Eighth and Walnut -- handled a Breeches Bible, and he negotiated for a Caxton Golden Legend, finally terminating the deal by deciding the copy was spurious. He knew the whereabouts of the only First Psalter, Caxton movable type print, and bought over half a dozen copies of Mlle De Maupane, excommunicated though it was and hard to get through the postoffice or customs house without having all the pictures and most of the pages torn out. He thought nothing of charging a $100 commission on a two or more volume set of old works when he was Mr. Phelps, and he cried like a child last winter one cold morning when a man, instead of buying a paper which old Phelps, the newsboy, was wobbling about as an offer, slipped a half a dollar in his hand and said, "Pretty cold this morning, Mr. Phelps."

WHEN HE WAS MR. PHELPS.

"Mr. Phelps" was getting back to the days of uncut first editions of "Pickwick Papers," second edition "Shakespeares," fully illumined "Arabian Nights," and Frank Tyler, and Cameron Mann, and when Miss Sheldley used to buy her expensive editions through Mr. Phelps.

Mr. Phelps would show his precious smuggled copies -- most of them consigned --to the biggest people of the city, and he had the right to walk into the private office of Colonel W. H. Winants in the old Armour bank and talk original plates to him.

But that was a long time ago. That was as long ago as twenty years, and twenty years are twenty decades in this rapidly revolving West.

The self-same Mr. Phelps did not dare to go into the humblest office where they let out desk room in his last years. He had the bad luck to live too long. He ought to have died when Herb Matthews, his old partner in the bookselling business in the Delaware street store, died, or when his other old running mate, Ed Burton, the stationer at Dickinsons, died. The three were the literary authorities of Kansas City. Two of them died ten years ago, and went to their graves in honor.

Phelps buried himself about the same time, but kept on breathing until last Sunday, and the longer he lived the deeper he buried himself, till he got so deep down and so far out of sight that he could come out in the open and sit on a cap stool at Eleventh and Main and sell papers for coppers, getting into greater ecstasy over a nickel than when he was Mr. Phelps and making $100 commission on a single deal. He did not have to die to be forgotten, but old-timers like D. P. Thompson, whose gallery in those days was near Dickinson's store on North Main street, turned up who remembered when Phelps, the newsboy, was Mr. Phelps, the bookseller and literary antiquarian, and the identity of the man was fixed.

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February 25, 1908

CONSTABLE SETS
PRISONERS FREE

POLICE MELODRAMA IN WHICH
CASEY IS COMEDIAN.

TWO CONFIDENCE MEN ESCAPE.

THROUGH CONSTABLE'S MED-
DLING, AFTER ONE IS SHOT.

Two confidence men, who had fleeced J. W. Burrows, and Oklahoma ranchman, out of $1,000, were captured last night after an exciting chase, in which several shots were fired, and then, after being in the safe custody of two officers, made their escape at Eighth and Delaware streets through the alleged interference of Roy Casey, a constable of Justice Remley's court.

Both confidence men were arrested by Detective Lyngar, who captured the smaller of the swindlers as he was emerging from a Leavenworth car at the Junction. The larger of the confidence men jumped through the car window and fled down Delaware street. Lyngar, dragging the smaller prisoner with him, gave chase and finally fired at the escaping prisoner. The bullet entered the right arm and the man fell exhausted near the rear of the American Bank building.

Lyngar, determined to catch his man, turned the uninjured prisoner over to Patrolman Regan, and then grabbed the second man. The officers and prisoners then started for the call box at Eighth and Delaware streets and it is here, witnessees say, that Casey interfered.

STOPS THE POLICEMAN.

Casey, in company with David S. Russell and C. E. Reckert of the city engineer's office, pushed through the crowd that had gathered and stopped Lyngar. Casey's explanation is that he did not know Lyngar was an officer and thought that he was going to shoot Patrolman Regan, who was marching in front with the injured prisoner. O. P. Rush of 3015 Olive street and L. R. Ronwell of 1902 East Thirty-first street witnessed the affair and told the police that they heard Lyngar tell Casey that he was an officer.

At any rate an arguent ensued. Patrolman Regan, who was holding his prisoner by the collar of his overcoat, turned around to ascertain what the trouble was. In an instant the inured prisoner slipped out of his overcoat and dived into the crowd. Regan pursued him, firing three shots at the criminal as he ran west on Eighth street. None of the bullets seem to have taken effect.

These shots created fresh excitement and Lyngar, furious with Casey's interruption, loosened his hold on the other man. In an instant the prisoner had jerked away from the officer and was lost in the crowd.

RAPPED CASEY'S HEAD.

The only satisfaction Regan and Lyngar got was in arresting Casey. Regan rapped him twice over the head and Lynar took the constable to the Central station, where he was released on $26 bail. Casey had been attending the Republican convention.

The inured thief not alone lost his overcoat, but in plunging through the crowd lost his hat and undercoat as well. He was traced as far as Second and Wyandotte streets, where he purchased a new hat and coat. Then he ran toward the Kansas City Southern yards.

STOLE $1,000 FROM BURROWS.

Upon the complaint of J. W. Burrows, Oklahoma ranchman, that he had been swindled out of $1,000 by the two confidence men, Detectives Lyngar and Lewis were assigned to the case. Lewis was called away, so Lyngar accompanied by Burrows, made the investigation alone. At the Junction, Burrows espied the two men inside a Leavenworth car at about 9 o'clock. Lyngar went after them. The larger of the men, finding the front entrance of the car shut off, jumped through a window. The smaller attempted to brush by Lyngar, but the detective grabbed him It was following this that the chase began, which ended in Casey's intererence and the escape of the men.

The coat lost by the injured prisoner contained a book which indicates that he lives in the vicinity of the Union stock yards in Chicago.

About 1 o'clock this morning police officers found the coat of the smaller of the two confidence men, from which he also slipped when he escaped from the officer's grasp. It was in Brannon's saloon, on Delaware street, near Eighth.

When the smaller "con" man squirmed out of the garment it fell in the crowd, which parted to allow him to pass. It is not known who took it to the saloon. It is the theory of the police that the $1,000 stolen from the ranchman was in the pocket of the little man's coat when he was captured. It wasn't there when the coat was found.

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October 6, 1907

BOOK FOR AUTOMOBILISTS.

A New Publication Which Seems to
Fill a Long Felt Want.

A booklet that will be immensely popular with every automobilist in the city has just been issued by Bertrand B. Clarke and James O. Westervelt, containing much valuable information for everybody who enjoys a trip into the country or a spin over the boulevards in the city. It is called the "Automobile Blue Book," and one of its most important features is a map of Jackson county showing the macadam and dirt roads, railway crossings as well as towns.

Starting from the junction at Ninth and Main streets, the distances are indicated by a system of circles, each circle showing a distance of five miles, so that the approximate position in relation to the other point in the county can be determined at a glance. There is a list of every automobile owner in the county, together with the license number of each car, name of the maker as well as the agent handling the different machines, and a number of "pertinent truths," which are intended to be helpful to those operating a new car.

The Automobile Blue Book will be issued quarterly.

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September 19, 1907

VISITS THE SLUMS.

REV. MR. M'GURK MAKES TOUR
OF THE NORTH END.

Rev. Daniel McGurk, pastor of the Grand Avenue Methodist Episcopal church, accompanied by Terrance Brigham, superintendent of the Helping Hand institute, and two policemen, made a slumming tour of the North end last night. The object of the minister's visit was to see conditions there at first hand.


"Several days ago Rev. Mr. McGurk came to me and asked for information about the North end," Mr. Brigham said, before going on the trip. "I told him the only way to understand the North end was to see it at night. That is what he intends to do now."


"Last Sunday I told a number of my church people what I intended to do," said Rev. Mr. McGurk. "I am gathering material for my sunday sermon. there has been much said in the newspapers about light for the boulevards. That suggested to me the question of what is being done for light -- moral light, in the North end. All the churches in the North end have been sold out. The Helping Hand, the Salvation Army and one little chapel are all that remain.


"It has been the history of this section of the city that as the need of churches grew the churches moved away or were sold out because the property became valuable. I am told that thirteen have old out in the past few years because the church people thought they were getting a good price for their property. In the two and one-half years that I have been in Kansas City I know of five churches that have sold out because it was believed a good price was being obtained. I think that the churches are moving in the wrong direction and that more light is needed in the North end.


"I want to see conditions here that I may better understand them. I am not making this trip for publicity. I may not even mention it in my sermon. It's purpose is that I may unerstand and be sure of my facts."


Rev. Mr. McGurk made mention of the fact that within a radius of six blocks from the Junction his was the only church remaining. He expressed regrt that the tendency of the churches was to move south and east, away from the North end.

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