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February 1, 1910

HOLIDAY LIBRARY HOURS.

Letter to Council Suggests Opening
Afternoons and Evenings.

An anonymous communication was read in the lower house of the council last night, asking that some one introduce an ordinance requiring the public library to pen from 2 to 10 o'clock p. m. on all holidays.

"Many men have no place to on on such days," said the letter, "and with the library closed they drift into the pool halls and saloons and come under evil influences. The library should be kept open part of the day for them."

The attaches of the library work from 9 o'clock a. m., to 10 p. m. every day and holidays are the only days they have for recreation. The letter was referred to the board of education, as that body controls the opening and closing hours of the library.

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January 21, 1910

NO LOVE NOTES IN
THIS GIRL'S SUIT.

Cigar Stand Manager, Young
and Pretty, Sues Rich
Saloon Keeper.

Miss Mabel Reeder, young and pretty, manager of the cigar stand in the lobby of the Savoy hotel, yesterday filed a suit in the circuit court against John E. Johnston, a saloon keeper at 810 Main street, demanding damages in the sum of $25,000 for alleged breach of promise of marriage. Johnston is said to be well-to-do.

It was on December 1, 1905, Miss Reeder asserts in her complaint, that Johnston promised to marry her. Since then, she alleges, he has discontinued his attentions and has informed her that he does not intend to marry her.

According to the complaint, the engagement of Miss Reeder and Johnston became publicly known and, it is set forth, Johnston's failure to perform his part of the agreement embarrassed, humiliated and wounded her "in feelings, affections, womanly pride and sensibility," and, it is added, her "prospects for life and eligible marriage are blasted."

"This isn't one of those love letter cases," said Miss Reeder last night in her rooms at the Tomlinson apartments, Eleventh and Broadway, "because I haven't any love letters to present. I would just love to give you a story, but I can't for several reasons. One is that my lawyer, Frank P. Walsh, tells me not to talk.

KNEW HIM IN WICHITA.

"You see, Mr. Johnston and I are from the same town, Wichita, Kas. We have known each other a long time and it was there that we became engaged. He was the proprietor of a hotel and I was working at the cigar stand in the hotel. We both came to Kansas City a couple of years ago and Mr. Johnston started a saloon here.

"I am unable to tell you why Mr. Johnston broke off his engagement with me. I don't know whether there is another girl in the case. He has known that I contemplated bringing this suit, because he was notified. Really, now, there isn't anything sensational about this case, and I want to escape all the notoriety I can."

Johnston refused last night to discuss the action brought against him by Miss Reeder.

"Let Miss Reeder do the talking now," he said, "and I will have my say later."

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January 17, 1910

DABNEY WAITS TO GET EVEN.

Wouldn't Trust His Temper After
Christmas Treat from Bartender.

Dabney had not been seen around the saloon near Eighth street and Grand avenue since Christmas. His absence was noticed by his friends, who asked the reason. Squires, the big, genial bartender, only smiled when anyone asked. "What's become of Dabney? I haven't seen him lately."

A few nights ago Dabney dropped in. He looked at Squires, and it plainly was evident that Dabney had something serious on his mind.

"I'll get even with you," he said, between clenched teeth, "if it takes the rest of my natural life and part of the hereafter."

The the cat was let out of the bag. It appears that the evil day for Dabney was Christmas night. He stood about the saloon most of the evening suggesting, "Most saloonkeepers give patrons a present on Christmas."

The proprietor was away, and Squires spoke of him as being the one to make gifts. Dabney persisted, however. It so happened that while he was making one of his curt suggestions Squires spied an empty whisky bottle beneath the bar. It was a dark red bottle and still had the "bottled in bond" stamp partly intact. The big bartender quietly filled the bottle from the water faucet. He replaced the cork and the stamp without being detected.

"Here," he said, as he wrapped up the bottle of water. "I will break the rules of the house in your case. Here is a quart of as fine a whisky as you ever tasted. Compliments of the house."

Dabney was delighted, for he recognized the brand. The following day was Sunday, and, being so well supplied, he did not take home is customary "life saver."

"Come up, boys," he said, inviting the house to the bar. "I will treat back when I get a quart of good booze like that."

He not only treated once, but twice. Carefully stowing the bottle of water away in his overcoat pocket, he set out for home. He is a bachelor, and a friend who was invited the next morning "to have a nip at some of the best stuff you ever tasted" told the rest.

"Dabney loves his hot toddy," said the friend. "He especially likes it on Sunday, because everything is closed tightly. On this day he called me and two others into his quarters to 'have a toddy' out of his Christmas present from 'Tom.'

"With great care he got his hot water, sugar and lemon all ready. The proper amount was pured into each glass. While the water was steaming and the smell of lemon was perfuming the air Dabney, with a great show of pride in his gift, unwrapped his bottle of 'whisky.' When the cork came out with a 'thop' Dabney smiled and said: 'Get ready for the big treat, boys.'

"After all that preliminary, what was our surprise when the contents of the bottle proved to be plain, old Missouri river water. We had no toddy, as hot and cold water, lemon and sugar make a very insipid drink. Dabney frothed at the mouth, he was so mad. He swore vengeance, for he had to wait until midnight before he could get a real drink -- but he never went to call on Squires that night. He said he feared he might lose his temper and spill blood."

Dabney is patiently waiting on his opportunity to "play even" with Squires. He swears he will "make somebody feel as they made me feel -- Sunday, the day after Christmas, and not a drop to drink."

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January 12, 1910

ADAMS IDENTIFIED AS
K. C. MURDERER.

LOCAL MAN PICKS YOUTH AT
OMAHA AS SLAYER OF M.
A. SPANGLER.

Victims of Holdups Insist on
Identity -- Lads Will Be
Brought Here.

OMAHA, NEB., -- Jan. 11. -- John Adams and Earl Brown, two youthful alleged desperadoes who were arrested by Detective Mitchell and others on December 10 for alleged connection with a series of holdups and one shooting affair, are wanted at Kansas City on murder and robbery charges.

They were identified this morning by several victims who came here from Kansas City.

This morning three victims of recent holdups in Kansas City arrived. They were S. W. Spanglerr, Al Ackerman and Joe Shannon. With them were Detective Wilson, Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Norman Woodson and Cash Welch, proprietor of a Kansas City messenger service.

Ackerman identified Adams as the youth who killed Spangler's father November 23 while attempting to hold up the latter's saloon. they said Brown resembled the companion of Adams on that occasion.

SHOT OMAHA MAN.

On December 7, E. S. Ashcroft, of 1811 Chicago street, Omaha, was held up at Seventeenth and Chicago streets by two young men, who ordered him to throw up his hands. He refused, and started to run. they fired two shots at him, one taking affect in his right arm. Two nights later Marvin Kohn, a young business man, was held up by the same two youngsters, it is alleged, at Twenty-fifth avenue and Douglas streets, and robbed of $5. Next Day Detective Mitchell located Adams and Brown in a lodging house at Fifteenth and Capitol avenue and arrested them on suspicion. Kohn positively identified them and they were held to the district court on a charge of robbery under $500 bonds. They are now in the county jail.

When arrested the two young men were in bed, although it was then noon. In the sole of one of their shoes was secreted considerable money and a revolver was found wrapped in a shirt and hidden in a dresser drawer.

The murder in Kansas City with which Adams is charged occurred shortly after midnight November 23. M. A. Spangler was killed and his son, Samuel, had both arms broken. Ackerman was present at the time.

TO BE BROUGHT HERE.

Young Spangler and Ackerman were confronted at the city hall this morning by a group of ten prisoners, among whom were Adams and Brown. Ackerman immediately picked out Adams as the man who killed the elder Spangler. They also said that Brown looked like the other holdup.

Joe Shannon, a Kansas City politician, who was held up and robbed of his watch and $48 shortly before the murder, positively identified Brown as one of the desperadoes. He says the second man looked like Adams.

George H. McCray, a Kansas City business man, identified Adams and Brown as the two robbers who held him up and robbed him of $2. He says that Brown's mask dropped from his face and that he therefore got a good look at him.

Cash Welch, the messenger service man, identified the two young men as having worked for him during the robberies.

It is thought that Adams will be sent to Kansas City to answer a murder charge. Brown will probably be also sent there on a robbery charge, since the Missouri cases are even stronger than the Omaha ones.

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December 30, 1909

FIND WOMEN IN A SALOON.

Italian Promises Police Board to
Bar Them in Future.

The board of police commissioners is having a hard time impressing upon the Italians of "Little Italy" the fact that their women must not frequent saloons. In the past some Italian women have b een as much at home in the saloon as in the home; in fact, many of them used to tend bar while their husbands were at meals.

Yesterday Mattaeo La Salla, who has a saloon at Missouri avenue and Cherry street, was before the board for permitting his wife and mother to frequent his saloon. It was some time before Judge Middlebrook could impress La Salla with the fact that there was a law in this state which prevents women from frequenting saloons. The Italian looked worried, puzzled, but he promised that his women folks would keep out of his saloon in the future.

Salino Defeo, 600 East Fifth street, and his bartender were seen twice, it is alleged , to serve a woman with a bucket of beer. Commissioner Marks was closing Defeo's saloon for two days, but, being Christmas week, Judge Middlebrook thought the board should be more lenient and a reprimand was given.

For having a man not in his employ in his saloon at 1:20 a. m. last Friday, John Honl, a saloonkeeper at 7306 East Fifteenth street, was ordered to close his place Friday and Saturday.

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December 30, 1909

FOUND DEAD IN A CELLAR.

George Dixon Stricken While at
Work Cultivating Mushrooms.

George Dixon, 66 years old, living in the Metropolitan hotel, was found dead in a cellar under the Last Chance saloon, Bridge street and Broadway, yesterday morning. Dixon, who cultivated mushrooms in the cellar, did not return to his home on Tuesday night, and his wife requested the police to make a search.

Coroner Harry Czarlinsky was summoned and after pronouncing death to be due to heart failure, ordered the body sent to the Carroll-Davidson undertaking rooms.

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December 26, 1909

FREE LIQUOR, MANY SCRAPES.

Broken Heads and Knife Wounds
Result of Saloon Celebrations.

The North End saloons last night gave free liquor to their customers. The result is that there were several broken heads, some cutting scrapes, not to speak of the parched throats to come. A few of the Christmas celebrators were given free rides to the emergency hospital.

Edward Evans, 1077 Grand avenue, a dishwasher at Eighth and Main streets, was cut in the chest with a knife. His cheek also was slit, the knife blade entering his neck and barely missing the jugular vein. After being treated at the emergency hospital he was taken to the general hospital.

Only one saloon in Kansas City was known to be closed yesterday. "Wish you all a Merry Christmas. This place will be closed until Monday morning on account of Christmas day."

This is the inscription which greeted the would-be Christmas patrons of Jack Sheehan's saloon, 2340 Grand avenue. So far as is known, this is the only saloon which observed Christmas by closing.

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December 14, 1909

FAIL TO FIND EVIDENCE
AGAINST THREE YOUTHS.

Robberies or Murder Cannot Be
Traced to Dye, Shay and Clyne, in
Spite of Saloonkeeper's Son's
Identification.

Evidence gathered the past ten days by the prosecuting attorney's office, so it was announced yesterday, completely exonerates Louis Dye, Harry Shay and Ralph Clyne of the suspicion of having murdered M. A. Spangler, killed on the night of November 23 in his saloon at Twentieth and Grand.

Not only this, but the prosecutor's office is convinced that the young men are not guilty of the dozen or more robberies charged against them by the police. The investigation has been practically concluded. Two city detectives and two police officers have worked the past week to gather evidence. Nothing has been found thus far to connect the three boys with the murder.

"Their preliminary will be held before some justice of the peace," said Edward J. Curtin, an assistant prosecuting attorney, "and unless new evidence is found against them the cases will be dismissed."

"The robbery charges, too?"

"Yes, the robbery charges," replied Mr. Curtin. "There have been many persons here to identify the young men as the ones who held them up, not an identification has been positive. In every instance the person has said they thought they were the ones."

The coroner's jury yesterday recommended that Dye be held for further investigation on the murder charge. The verdict was due largely to the testimony of Sam Spangler, the saloonkeeper's son, who was present at the murder.

It is said there is a conflict between the police authorities and the prosecutor's office in the case.

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December 8, 1909

BOYS IDENTIFIED AS
SPANGLER'S SLAYERS.

ROBBERS' VICTIMS RECOGNIZE
TRIO, ONE A BRIDEGROOM.

Elevator Operators, Ages 17, 19 and
21, in Downtown Dry Goods
Store, Are Arrested -- Youngest
Weeps, Others Indifferent.
Louis Dye, Ralph Clyne and Harry Shay, Suspects in the Spangler Murder.
LOUIS M. DYE, RALPH A. CLYNE AND HARRY SHAY,
Three Suspects Held by Police for Spangler Murder and Recent Holdups.
(Sketched at Police Headquarters Last Night.)

Working on the "boy bandit" theory, the police yesterday evening arrested three youths, two of whom were identified as having shot and killed M. A. Spangler and wounded Sam Spangler, his son, in their saloon at Twentieth street and Grand avenue on the morning of November 23. Their names are Louis Dye, 21 years old; Ralph Clyne, 19, and Harry Shay, 17. All are employed as elevator operators in a down town dry goods store. Dye is a bridegroom.

The arrest was made at 5:30 o'clock by Captain Walter Whitsett and Plain Clothes Officers E. M. Smith and E. L. Maston.

VICTIMS VISIT STORE.

The officers visited the store in company with several recent victims of holdups and rode in the elevators with the boys as they were at work. They were arrested and taken to police headquarters. Albert Ackerman, 502 1/2 Wyandotte street, the man who was in the Spangler saloon at the time of the shooting, was summoned and in Captain Whitsett's office identified Dye and Clyne as the two who shot up the saloon.

"That's the fellow that had the gun," Ackerman stated, pointing at Dye. "The other fellow was with him. Of course they are dressed differently now, but there is no mistaking their faces."

Four others who have been robbed recently visited police headquarters in the evening and in every case identified the boys.

DRUGGIST IDENTIFIES.

W. S. McCann, a druggist, living at 1405 East Tenth street, identified Dye and Clyne as the two men who attempted to rob his store at Twenty-seventh street and Agnes avenue on the night of November 25. He said they went in the store, and that Clyne pointed a revolver at his head while Dye attempted to rob the cash register. When he showed fight they fired four shots at him and ran. He thinks that Harry Shay is the man that was left outside as a look out.

Miss Stella Sweet, 529 Brooklyn avenue, and Mrs. C. L. Flaugh, 629 Brooklyn avenue, who were held up Thanksgiving night on the steps of the Admiral Boulevard Congregational church, identified all three of the boys as the robbers.

Edward C. Smith of the Smith-McCord-Townsend Dry Goods Company declared that the three boys had robbed him on Thirty-sixth street, between Locust and Cherry streets, on the night of December 3. They took a pocket book containing a Country Club bond for $100. At that time they had handkerchiefs tied over their faces, but Smith was sure that he recognized them.

SPANGLER TO SEE TRIO.

Captain Whitsett made no attempt to cross-examine the boys last night, but ordered them locked up until this morning when they will be confronted by further witnesses, the chief of whom will be Sam Spangler, who was discharged from the general hospital yesterday. The prosecutor's office was notified and representatives will be on hand today to take their statements.

"I am sure that we have got the right men this time," stated Captain Whitsett. "They answer the description of the gang that have been doing all the robbing lately, and I am sure that it was they that held up Joseph B. Shannon last week."

None of the boys would make any statement except that they were strangers in town, only having been working for a week. During the identification process both Dye and Clyne showed indifference, while the younger boy, Shay, broke down and cried.

Dye lives at 1921 Oakland, Shay at 1242 Broadway and Clyne at 1710 East Thirteenth street. Dye was married three weeks ago, shortly before the Spangler murder.

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December 6, 1909

LONG AND SHORT MEN BUSY.

Victims of Highwaymen Report to
Police the Loss of More Than
$300 on Sunday.

J. S. Hubert, a member of the United Brewery Workers of America, living at 2518 Charlotte, was felled by a blow from behind and robbed of five $20 bills, ten $10 bills and five $5 bills at Twenty-first and Locust at 9:30 o'clock last night by two men, one of whom, he says was very tall and the other extremely short. He says he saw the same men in a saloon at Nineteenth street and Grand avenue Saturday night. Hubert immediately reported the case to police and he was taken to his home by Officer Sherry. Upon examination of his head no signs of where he had been slugged could be found.

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December 2, 1909

AFTER TEN YEARS
'GATOR HAS A HOME.

STUFFED SAURIAN'S CAREER
FULL OF VICISSITUDES.

Hoodoo to a Chicago Saloon, Brought
to Kansas City by a Bartender,
and Sold to a Doctor for
a Small Sum.

Homeless, disowned and an outcast, the mounted form of a once giant saurian occupies floor space -- by sufferance only -- in Schaefer's buffet on Wyandotte and Twelfth streets. It changed ownership three times yesterday and is now the property of Dr. James O. Lee, who before he can remove it from the saloon must build an addition to his office.

Ten years ago Dan Flannigan, a saloonkeeper at Twenty-second street and Wabash avenue, Chicago, loaned a curio man $10 on the stuffed "gator," which was twelve feet long, and its age estimated all the way from 1,000 to 2,000 years. A taxidermist said it was worth at least $50 to mount the reptile, so Flannigan thought he was in the clear.

ONCE A SHOW WINDOW PIECE.

Joe O'Brien was a bartender at Flannigan's, and he helped put the gator on a shelf in the saloon. From that time on, it was said Flannigan's business suffered reverses. Whether the look that a man would give the 'gator w hen he stepped in the saloon sobered him or made him think that he "had 'em" or whether the 'gator was just a hoodoo Flannigan never decided.

When O'Brien left for Kansas City five years ago, however, Flannigan gave him the saurian. O'Brien shipped the thing along with his household furniture, and the story is told around the freight house that three pay checks still await the claim of negro laborers who looked in the car.

The 'gator passed into several hands and for a couple of years was a showpiece in an Eighth street saloon. Then it came into possession of Jack Murty of 1031 Wyandotte street, who put it in the window of his cleaning establishment. This show got tiresome after a while and he placed it farther back in his store. All his friends admired it, but none would purchase it.

One day W. C. Schaefer happened in. Yes, he would purchase the stuffed reptile. He would give all of $3 for it. Murty clasped his hand to seal the bargain. Yesterday morning four men carried the 'gator to Schaefer's saloon. Not until it was deposited on the floor did Schaefer realize that an elephant would have taken up less room.

AND THE DOCTOR BUYS HIM.

"Give him to me," said his brother Al.

"All right," responded Schaefer and the deal was closed. A short while later Dr. Lee happened in. He could use the 'gator all right and would give $2.50 for him. Again Mr. 'Gator was sold. Dr. Lee had forgotten to measure him before he purchased him and when he discovered that the reptile was 12 feet long and a yard wide, he discovered that he did not want him as bad as he had a short while before. The Schaefers would not take him back as a gift.

A carpenter gave Dr. Lee an estimate on an addition which will have to be built into his office to accommodate the alligator. Meanwhile "Ivory," the porter, will have to mop around Mr. Gator.

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November 23, 1909

MIDNIGHT ROBBER
KILLS SALOON MAN.

M. A. SPANGLER MURDERED BE-
HIND HIS OWN BAR.

Drops Dead With Bullet Through
Heart -- Son Shot in Pistol Duel
With His Father's
Slayer.

While trying to grasp the revolver of one of two robbers who "stuck up" his saloon at the northeast corner of Twentieth street and Grand avenue at 12:45 this morning, M. A. Spangler was shot across the bar and instantly killed.

In a pistol duel with his father's murderer, Sam Spangler was shot through both arms.

He believes he shot the robber. The latter and his companion escaped.

The murder and holdup occurred in Spangler's saloon at the northeast corner of Twentieth street and Grand avenue about 12:45.

The Spanglers were getting ready to close the saloon for the night. Sam Spangler had removed the cash from the register and was reading the totals from the detail adder, while the father was writing them on a card.

There were two men in the saloon, Al Ackerman, a friend of the Spangler family, and an old man whose identity is not known. Both were seated at tables in front of the bar.

SHOT THROUGH THE HEART.

At this juncture two men, one short and heavy set and the other tall and thin, entered the saloon. They were roughly dressed, and sauntered up about the middle of the room. The tall man walked as far as the big cannon stove at the rear of the bar, but the short man walked up to a point in front of Spangler.

Whipping out a revolver, the short man flourished it and commanded Ackerman and the old man, "Hands up and line up alongside the bar every one of you."

Ackerman and the old man and young Spangler lifted their hands in a hurry to obey the order. Not so old man Spangler. He had been in the street lunch stand business for years and he was not to be bluffed by the sight of a gun.

"Throw up your hands quick," was the second command, this time directed to Mr. Spangler. The latter evidently had been gauging the distance across the bar. Instead of throwing up his hands he lunged forward, grasping for the revolver. He missed the gun and that instant the robber pulled the trigger.

"Oh!" Spangler cried, and collapsed.

Another shot was fired at him, but it missed. The first one had passed through his heart.

SON TRIED TO AVENGE HIM.

Sam Spangler at the first shot pulled open a drawer in the back bar and grabbed a huge navy revolver. Turning around he faced the robber, and began firing. Both emptied their revolvers, the robber retreating toward the front door as he fired his last shot. Meanwhile the tall, thin robber, who had gotten half way behind the bar, turned and fled toward the rear, when young Spangler started shooting. He escaped through a rear door.

Ackerman, who had been standing near the front of the saloon, ran out of the door at the first shot. When the shooting inside ceased he started back but was met by the robber with the revolver who pressed it against his abdomen.

"Get out of my way before I kill you," cried the robber.

Ackerman got out of the way, and returning to the saloon asked for the big revolver.

Young Spangler put a shell in it by this time and Ackerman started after the robber. He chased him to McGee street and half way down to Twenty-first street pulling the trigger several times on the shell, which proved defective and failed to explode.

When he returned to the saloon, he found Sam Spangler bending over the body of his father. He had been shot in both arms and his blood was mingling with that of his father's.

WHO GOT THE MONEY?

It could not be positively ascertained this morning whether the robber got the money which Spangler had taken from the cash register and placed in a glass. During the excitement it is believed that the money was replaced in the register. This was locked and the keys were taken in charge by the police. The sum is said to have been in the neighborhood of $50.

A riot call was sent to No. 4 police station and a squad of police under Sergeant H. L. Goode drove to the saloon. Young Spangler was taken to the general hospital, where his injuries were dressed.

The body of Mr. Spangler was taken to the Stewart undertaking establishment.

M. A. Spangler was about 50 years old. He lived with his family at No. 1322 1/2 Wyandotte street. He leaves a widow and two sons, Sam and William, both grown. The widow and some relatives are in Glasgow, Mo. A telegram was sent to them immediately after the shooting.

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November 8, 1909

WRONG MAN SIGNED PLEDGE.

How Joe Donnegan Was Euchred by
Friend Who Drank.

Joe Donnegan, theatrical manager and hotel man, is pledged to abstain from the use of alcoholics for five years. When Joe, who does not drink anyhow, discovered that he had taken the pledge, he was wroth. Not that he delights in supping from the cup when it is red, or blowing the froth from more plebeian beverages, but that he was euchred into signing the pledge when, at the time, he thought he was merely a witness to such a transaction for a friend.

A couple of weeks ago Donnegan induced a friend who had been looking long on the cup to accompany him to a notary, there to take a pledge of total abstinence from liquor for five years. It was hard work for Joe, but he finally gained his point. The friend insisted on two last drinks, and these he was permitted to have.

Joe walked into a saloon recently and there, just able to hold on to the bar, was his friend who had taken the pledge.

"You are a fine specimen of manhood," declared Donnegan, as he grabbed his friend by the shoulders and shook him. "I thought you took the pledge not to take a drink for five years, and here I find you so drunk you can hardly stand up."

"You're mishtaken, that's all," replied the friend, at the same time pulling a sheet of paper from his coat pocket. "You see you took the pledge. See your name. I am witness to it, and you dassent take a drink, so be careful now and don't violate your pledge. What'll you have?"

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November 6, 1909

ASKS $300 FOR SIX DRINKS.

Mrs. Carson Says Saloonkeeper Sold
Her Son That Number.

Suit for $300 damages, brought by Mrs. I. M. Carson against the Kansas City Breweries Company and James Meany, a saloonkeeper at Sixth and Main streets, was begun yesterday afternoon in Judge John G. Park's division of the circuit court.

Mrs. Carson alleges that her son, Claude, 18 years of age, was sold six glasses of beer at Meaney's saloon, one year ago. The Missouri statute allows the parents of a minor who is sold drinks in a saloon to recover $50 for each drink.

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November 1, 1909

ASHES OF FRIEND TO
POOR ARE SCATTERED.

HEAVENS WEEP AS LAST RITES
FOR DR. OSBORNE END.

Eulogy Spoken on Hannibal Bridge
by Dr. Miller, Who Braves Sick-
ness to Carry Out Wish of
Philanthropist.

"Goodby, Dr. Osborne, may God by with you until we meet again."

Standing on the middle span of the Hannibal bridge at 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon Dr. Thomas D. Miller, a physician with offices in the Shukert building, spoke these words.

A minute before Louis Goldblatt, a saloon man on West Ninth street, had unscrewed the top of a fruit jar, and when Dr. Miller spoke, scattering to the winds the ashes which the jar contained.

These ashes were the mortal remains of Dr. E. H. Osborne, friend of the poor; Dr. Osborne, the mysterious, the eccentric.

It was the first time in the history of the Hannibal bridge that the ashes of a human being were thrown from it into the muddy, surging river below.

Fifty persons witnessed the odd spectacle.

A few minutes before they had listened to Dr. Miller make a eulogy on the man whose ashes were to be conveyed to the waters.

The night before, hundreds had gathered at Goldblatt's saloon on Ninth street on a strange mission. They came to view the remains of their dead friend. Many of them were surprised to find no evidence of a casket when they entered, and were more surprised when Mr. Goldblatt pointed to a two-quart fruit jar, filled with what appeared to be white gravel, surrounded by bottles of various brands of whiskey. The saloonkeeper told them that the white substance in the jar was all that was left of their friend.

A large crowd thronged the brilliantly lit saloon that Saturday night. Negroes, Croatians, Greeks and Americans brushed shoulders and laughed and talked as they drank. As Mr. Goldblatt pointed to the odd receptacle among the bottles, he told many interesting stories of the man he had known intimately for twenty years, and nearly all in the large crowd held beer mugs and sipped the beverage as they listened.

A COLLEGE GRADUATE.

"The old doctor and I were friends for many years," he began, "but despite our friendship he told me little of his early history or his people. He came here twenty-five years ago from Brooklyn, where he had owned a drug store. The store was destroyed by fire, and he, disheartened, came here for a fresh start. For a year or two he lived at 1624 West Ninth street, but moved over in Kansas to two little rooms in the rear of 3 central avenue, where he died. He always said he was "Welsh and Saxon, mixed," and that his forefathers settled on Long Island in 1640.

"Dr. Osborne graduated from Columbia University in New York city, and was highly educated. His greatest delight was to argue. He would argue on religion, politics, history, in fact anything he could start an argument about. He believed in a Divine Creator, but did not believe in the scriptures, and had little use for preachers. He could describe the important battles of some of the European wars until I actually believed I could see them. To my knowledge, he has only one living relative, a cousin, Arthur A. Sparks, who lives in Los Angeles, Cal. He was never married and seemed to care but little for the society of women.

WORSHIPPED BY THE POOR.

"The old doctor was a daily visitor to my place," Mr. Goldblatt continued. "He always came in in the evening. We would have a little drink, and then a friendly game of cards, and then he would go home to his bachelor quarters. He practiced among the poorer classes in the West bottoms, and his life record is full of many kinds of deeds for the poor unfortunate ones. That was Dr. Osborne's platform; that was the sentiment that won him everlastingly to the hearts of his people. He was a man of superior knowledge. He mingled with persons far inferior to him in intellect, but he gave them the knowledge that he had, as best he could, and they worshipped him."

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October 21, 1909

TRIPLE TRAGEDY IN
WYANDOTTE COUNTY.

POSSE WITH BLOODHOUNDS SEARCH-
ING FOR THE UNKNOWN SLAYER OF
ALONZO VAN ROYEN, HIS WIFE
AND HER SISTER.

MANY BULLET WOUNDS
IN THE WOMEN'S BODIES.

MYSTERIOUS VISITOR SOUGHT
BY OFFICERS.

Coroner's Office Delays Sheriff
Several Hours by Failing
to Promptly Report
Crime.
Mrs. Margaret Van Royen and Miss Rose McMahon, Murder Victims of a Triple Homicide.
MRS. MARGARET VAN ROYEN AND MISS ROSE M'MAHON.
Two of the Victims of a Triple Tragedy That is Mystifying the Kansas City, Kas., Officials.

A triple murder in which Alonzo Van Royen, a farmer; his wife, Margaret Van Royen, and Mrs. Van Royen's sister, Rose McMahon, were the victims was enacted Tuesday night or Wednesday morning on the Reidy road in Wyandotte county, about five miles west of Kansas City, Kas.

A posse with bloodhounds is now searching for the assassin whose identity is not known.

The body of Van Royen was not discovered until ten hours after the bodies of the murdered women had been found, and during the interim the theory of the officials was that Van Royen had murdered his wife and sister-in-law and had fled.

The bodies of the women were discovered by their brother, James McMahon, who went to their ho me and found them lying on the floor of their one room about 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Shortly before midnight Sheriff Al Becker and a party discovered the body of Van Royen lying near a ravine about fifty feet from the house.

MANY BULLETS FOR WOMEN.

Six bullet wounds, made by a 38-caliber revolver, were in the body of Mrs. Van Royen, and three bullets were found in the body of her sister. Both women were pierced through the heart and every bullet was fired into their breasts.

When the news of the murder spread through the country, fifty farmers, carrying lanterns in their hands, organized a posse to search for Van Royen. At 11 o'clock his body, buried under leaves, was found by Geo. Stimpson, a 19-year-old farmer boy living a short distance west of the Van Royen farm on the Reidy road.

The body was found to have two bullet wounds in the back. One of them passed through the heart. His face had three bruises on it. At 1 o'clock this morning the body was taken to Daniel Bros. undertaking rooms in Armourdale.

The police who brought the bloodhounds to the scene were forced to give up the hunt. The trail of the murderer was found to be "cold." A good description has been secured. Telegrams were sent this morning to the police departments in this part of the country to be on the lookout for the man.

There was a visitor at the Van Royen home Tuesday morning and it is for this man that the officials are vigorously searching. James McMahon saw the stranger talking to Van Royen, but did not learn his name. He thought the man was buying potatoes. The diaimond ring which Mrs. Van Royen wore is gone from her finger, also other jewelry and money, possibly as much as $700, which was known to be in the house.

The Van Royens lived on a twelve-acre farm about a half mile distant from the farm of Mrs. Van Royen's mother, who is the widow of Timothy McMahon, one of the first settlers in Wyandotte county. On the mother's farm live three sons, James, Timothy and Patrick McMahon. Rose McMahon lived with her mother, but was a daily visitor at the home of her sister.

James McMahon made this statement to The Journal:

"Van Royen came over to our place Tuesday morning and said he was going to Kansas City, Mo., to sell some potatoes, and asked that Rose go over to his house and stay with Margaret. Rose left here Tuesday afternoon. I went to town Wednesday morning and when I returned my mother told me that Rose had not come home Tuesday night. This was an unusual thing. I also expected to see Van Royen at the market, but I learned that he had not been there.

"I went over to their home and then went to the back door and knocked. I got no response, so I tried the door. It was not locked. As I entered I saw the dead bodies of my sisters. Margaret was lying near the south door, a part of her body resting under the dining table. Rose, wearing her outer cloak, was lying near the west door. Thee bed clothes were rumpled and the dishes were not washed, but the room did not indicate that there had been a struggle. I looked for my brother-in-law, but found him nowhere in sight. I was stunned, of course, that there was no reasoning of the problem. I ran to a neighbor's and notified the coroner.

MAY HAVE SEEN SLAYER.

"I am confident that the man I saw my brother-in-law with the day before had something to do with the killing. I was not introduced to him, but Mr. Van Royen appeared to know him pretty well. We have been selling a good many potatoes and I supposed that it was some fellow after potatoes or possibly a load of wood.

"The man wore overalls and a gray coat. He was of dark complexion, having black hair and a black moustache, and of medium build."

James A. Downs, the uncle of Mrs. Van Royen, said last night that Van Royen, in company with a stranger, whose description answers that of the man seen by McMahon, came to his Union avenue saloon about a week ago. Downs was not there, but his bartender told him that Van Royen had called for him.

"About a week ago," said Mr. Downs, "Mrs. Van Royen visited me and said that she and her husband had decided to sell their farm and move to Colorado. They wanted to farm out there on a larger scale.

"I advised them not to leave. She said that her husband was anxious to move and was insistent upon it. I had not seen her since and don't know whether the sale was consummated. My theory is that Van Royen had talked about the prospective sale and that someone just laid for the money. Even if the sale was not consummated there probably was $600 or $700 in the house."

The great number of shots fired into the women by the assassin mystifies the authorities. According to the coroner, nearly every one of the bullet wounds would have caused the death. The coroner searched the premises and found in a trunk a 38-caliber revolver, unloaded. It did not smell of powder and he doesn't believe it was the weapon used in the tragedy. Three loaded cartridges were found in the trunk.

HER UNTIMELY ARRIVAL.

In the coroner's opinion the victims had been dead at least eight or ten hours before their bodies were discovered. The killing of Rose McMahon, it is conjectured, resulted from her arriving at the house at an unexpected moment, just as the assassin had begun his plan of slaying the husband and the wife and that he killed her to put the only witness out of the way. The fact that the girl's cloak was about her body indicates that she had either just arrived or was just departing.


MET AT CHURCH FAIR.

Alonzo Van Royen was 32 years old and his wife was the same age. They met at a Catholic church fair in Chelsea place, Kansas City, Kas., three years ago and were married soon after, Father Stephen Kelly, the pastor of the Chelsea Place church performing the ceremony. Van Royen was then a driver for a baker, an occupation he had followed for several years. He continued with the bakery until about a year after his marriage when he started a small grocery store in Mount Washington. He ran the grocery store a few months and then he and his wife went to live with Mrs. Van Royen's mother.

Mrs. Van Royen owned twelve acres, which originally was a part of her father's farm. A short time ago her husband erected on this land a one-room frame house and they went there to live. The married life of the Van Royens was said to be ideal and both were extremely popular. Their plan to sell the property and move to Colorado was not approved of by any of their relatives, who did not want to see them leave Kansas City.

Their threatened departure was especially opposed by Rose McMahon, the slain sister, who was always her sister's companion. Rose was 24 years old and an attractive girl of the brunette type. Every day she went over to her sister's house.

Another sister, Nellie, is the wife of Edward E. Blue of 4909 Michigan avenue. A third sister is Cyrilla, wife of Richard O'Brien of St. Joseph, Mo., and a fourth, Catherine, is a nun in a Catholic convent at Butte, Mont. Mrs. John Ellis, an aunt, lives at Seventh street and Oakland avenue, Kansas City, Kas., and it was at her home last night that Mr. and Mrs. Blue, Mr. Downs and a few intimate friends of the family gathered. At this time the body of Van Royen had not been discovered and the theory that he had murdered his wife and sister-in-law was suggested. No member present would be convinced that such was the condition.

MURDERER HAS GOOD START.

The bodies of the murdered women were taken to the undertaking rooms of Daniel Bros., Packard and Kansas avenues, and the body of Van Royen will be taken there as soon as Coroner Davis examines it.

In the meantime, the sheriff and his deputies are searching the surrounding country in the hope of apprehending the murderer. The sheriff believes that the murderer has a start of at least twenty-four hours and he has probably gotten a safe distance away.

The ho use of the tragedy stands amid lonely surroundings. Practically the nearest neighbor is the McMahones, a half mile away. A small stream rns near the house and it was beside this that the body of Van Royen was found. There was a team of horses standing tweenty feet away and a short distance from the horses was a wagon. Van Royen had another team, but this was gone and the slayer probably used the horses in his escape.

An inquest will be held today but the funeral arrangements for the three victims have not been determined.

CORONER DELAYED SHERIFF.

Owing to the fact that Coroner Davis did not notify the sheriff until 7 o'clock last night, the Wyandotte county authorities had little opportunity to run down any tangible clue. Mr. McMahon notified Coroner Davis of the tragedy at 1:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Instead of informing the sheriff of the crime the coroner had brought the bodies of the women to an undertaker's establishment, and then he called up the sheriff's office. According to Sheriff Becker, the coroner gave such an indefinite description of the locality last night that he went eight miles out of the way before arriving at the Van Royen home at 10 o'clock. If the bloodhounds could have been brought to the scene yesterday afternoon, the sheriff thinks the animals might have found the trail.

According to the sheriff, other instances of negligence on the part of the coroner have been noticed during the year.

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August 13, 1909

JAMES MORAN SHOT
BY JACK O'DONNELL.

POLITICS SAID TO HAVE CAUSED
THE QUARREL.

After Shooting, O'Donnell Disap-
peared, but Later Surrendered
to Police -- Moran Not Dan-
gerously Wounded.

Enmity said to have grown out of a factional fight in the Democratic party in the Second ward last night culminated in a quarrel between Jack O'Donnell, a cigarmaker, who lives at the Century hotel, and James Moran, formerly proprietor of a saloon in the Washington hotel, in which Moran was shot in the neck and painfully injured by O'Donnell. The shooting occurred in the Century hotel about 8:30 o'clock.

Moran with several friends was standing at the bar in the hotel saloon when O'Donnell and Joseph Donnegan, manager of the Century theater, entered the place.

Moran and O'Donnell began quarreling and Harry Friedburg, who was with the Moran party, endeavored to quiet them. He told O'Donnell that there would be trouble if he stayed int he saloon and that it was best that he leave. O'Donnell went into the lobby of the hotel and was followed by Moran, who again started to upbraid O'Donnell. According to witnesses Moran threatened O'Donnell.

BULLET LODGED IN NECK.

"I'll just get you before you have a chance to do anything to me," is the reply credited to O'Donnell, who drew a revolver and fired at Moran, who had turned and was running from the lobby. As Moran dodged into the bargershop from the lobby, O'Donnell, who was following, fired a second and third time. One bullet struck the fleeing man in the back between the shoulders and ranged upwards and to the left, lodgining in the neck. One bullet lodged in the wall and the third went through the door.

Moran ran out of the barger shop and fell on the sidewalk in front. He was carried into the hotel and Dr. J. D. Griffith was summoned. O'Donnell was caught by Friedberg and John Campbell. A police ambulance with Dr. H. T. Morton from the emergency hospital removed the injured man to St. Joseph's hospital. H is wound is not dangerous and he will be out of the hospital in a few days.

COULDN'T LOCATE O'DONNELL.

The police were notified but when they arrived on the scene O'Donnell had disappeared and they were unable to locate him. Inspector of Detectives E. P. Doyle detailed Detectives Kinney and Jennings on the case. After going to the hotel the men went to the hospital to see Moran, who refused to tell anyone who s hot him. The detectives telephoned the inspector that they could not find O'Donnell, but that Joseph Donnegan informed them that O'Donnell would give himself up the first thing int he morning.

Another officer was informed that O'Donnell was in the Century hotel and would give himself up in the morning. His reason for delaying was said to be because Captain Walter Whitsett disliked him and would place him in the holdover without a chance of securing bond. When Captain Whitsett heard that O'Donnell was at the hotel he instructed Lieutenant M. E. Ryan to send Sergeant Robert Greely to arrest him.

FOLLOWED ANOTHER FIGHT.

The quarrel last night followed one in the afternoon during which O'Donnell struck Moran in the mouth and further bruised the ex-saloonkeeper. This fight occurred in Wisman's saloon, Twelfth and Oak streets. Bert Striegel, a deputy constable named Caulfield, Joseph Donnegan and Moran were in the saloon when Jack O'Donnell came in. The men had a drink together and then Moran, it is claimed,, accused O'Donnell of throwing down politically Michael O'Hearn. Other charges were made by Moran and finally, it is said, he called Edward O'Donnell, a policeman and brother of Jack, a name which Jack resented. The men engaged in a fight. Wisman separated them and put the crowd out, as he said he would not allow a fight in his place.

SURRENDERED TO POLICE.

It was midnight before the police could locate O'Donnell and then he voluntarily gave himself up. He rode by himself in a carriage to police headquarters and surrendered to Lieutenant M. E. Ryan. He was not asked about the shooting by the officers in charge and was placed in the matron's room. He did not mention the shooting nor offer any explanation for it.

The trouble between the men, it is alleged, grew out of the fact that O'Donnell and Donnegan were out of the town on the last election day and Moran and his friends accused the two of being faithless to O'Hearn. The breach between the men was widened more by O'Donnell's brother arresting a barber on election day.

The shooting scrape of last night is not the first in which O'Donnell has figured. He was shot in the back by J. D. Cosby, proprietor of the Cosby hotel, following a fight in the hotel. At the same time J. P. Hayes, who was with O'Donnell, was shot twice in the back. The shooting was in February, 1908.

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August 13, 1909

HE GREW RICH STAR GAZING.

Counted 17,000,000 Shooting Stars,
and 'Phoned John D.

At least one man saw shooting stars in the heavens last night. He had read a prophecy of the pyrotechnical display and early in the evening he started on his rounds star gazing. Occasional trips were made to the drinking emporiums and at the end of refreshments the man would dash madly out into the middle of the street and gaze longingly at the heavens. Passersby saw his lips move convulsively, and one who was possessed of more temerity and curiosity than his brothers approached near enough to hear him whisper:

"Money, Money, Money."

There was a pause until the deluded man saw another star flying from Venus to Jupiter or from Broadway to McGee streets and once more he would gasp convulsively:

"Money, Money, Money."

After some three hours of such behavior the saloons closed. Just before the doors of the saloon of his last choice were to close this strange man went to the telephone.

"Gi'me John D. Rock'feller," he demanded. The operator connected him with the emergency hospital.

"Hello," replied the surgeon in charge in answer to the telephone ring.

"Is that you J. D. R.? Well I just called you up to tell you that you are backed off the financial map. I saw 17,000,000 shooting starts tonight and said 'Money, Money, Money' after each one of them, three times apiece. Sure sign of money. What'll you sell out for?"

"Guess he really needed emergency treatment," said the amiable emergency surgeon. "Batty, clean batty."

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August 13, 1909

NEW POLICE BOARD
SECRETARY NAMED.

BRYON E. LINE SUCCEEDS "JIM-
MIE" VINCIL SEPTEMBER 1.

Soldiered With Commissioner Marks
During Spanish-American War.
Retiring Secretary Held
Office Twelve Years.

Byron E. Line, formerly chief clerk and assistant purchasing agent of the Quincy, Omaha & Kansas City railroad, has been appointed to succeed James E. Vincil, for twelve years secretary to the board of police commissioners, who presented his resignation to the board yesterday afternoon, effective September 1. Mr. Vincil went into the office under Commissioners Gregory and Scarritt in 1897.

The new secretary is 30 years old. He has lived in Kansas City eight years. His salary will be $2,100 a year. His address is 1001 Penn street, Aberdeen Flats.

During the Spanish-American war Mr. Line was sergeant-major of the Fifth Illinois infantry, and for a time his regiment was brigaded with the 160th Indiana infantry, in which Commissioner Thomas R. Marks was captain. It was there that Line and Marks became acquainted.

Probably today the board will name a clerk to assist the secretary. He will bear the title of "excise clerk," and will have the saloons to look after. He will be expected to prepare a history of each saloon in Kansas City since the law limiting them went into effect.

"He will be expected to look after the sanitary conditions of each saloon," said Mr. Marks, "and also the moral tone, as it were. He must keep a record of all saloon proprietors, bartenders, porters and other employes, with their residences, and a complete history of each man. The day when well-dressed vagrants, 'con' men, highwaymen and burglars may tend bar in Kansas City will become a thing of the past very soon."

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August 8, 1909

KILLS SISTER-IN-LAW
AND COMMITS SUICIDE.

GRANT SIERS SHOOTS MRS.
MARY SIERS AND HIMSELF.

Jealousy and Continual Quarreling
Alleged Cause -- Negro Witness of
Tragedy Says Woman Also
Used Revolver.

Jealousy and continual quarelling is the alleged cause of the death of Mrs. Mary Siers, 1025 Jefferson street, who was shot and instantly killed yesterday afternoon about 4:45 o'clock by her brother-in-law, Grant Siers, who then turned the pistol upon himself and sent a bullet into his head, dying before anyone reached his side. The only witness to the murder and suicide was Susie Richardson, a negro woman, who lives in a house in the rear of the Siers residence.

Siers had lived at the home of Mrs. Siers for the last two years, after being separated from his wife, who lives in Humeston, Ia. Mrs. Siers' husband is divorced and is an inmate of the Soldiers' home at Leavenworth, Kas. From boarders in the house and Chester Siers, a son of the slayer and suicide, it was learned that the couple quarreled most of the time. Jealousy on the part of both is said to have caused nearly all of the domestic trouble.

ORDERED TO LEAVE HOUSE.

About 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon Mrs. Siers was busy showing two real estate men over the house when Grant Siers returned home and began to quarrel with his sister-in-law. She told him to leave the ho use and he entered the hall to get his suit case. The woman threw the suit case at his feet with the admonition not to return. Siers requested time to get his clothing from his room, but she again told him to leave. His son, Chester, finally induced him to leave the house, and the two men went to a saloon at Eleventh and Jefferson streets. Later in the afternoon the father left his son at Eleventh and Main streets.

The next heard of Siers he was entering the yard at the Jefferson street residence. Instead of going in the back way, as was his custom, Siers entered from the front and went around the house to the rear door. A latticed porch is just off the kitchen door, and as Siers walked upon the porch Mrs. Siers appeared in the doorway. She ordered him off and according to the theory of the police he drew a revolver and shot three times. Two bullets entered her body, one on each side of the chest. The third bullet lodged in the wall back of her. Then Siers placed the muzzle of the pistol behind the right ear and killed himself.

SAYS WOMAN USED PISTOL.

The version of the double killing as given by the Richardson woman differs greatly from that of the police theory. She said she was standing in the yard and saw Mrs. Siers point a revolver at Siers and fire twice. Siers, she said, turned and fell, and while on the floor of the porch took a pistol from his pocket and fired at Mrs. Siers, afterwards shooting himself. However, when the deputy coroner, Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, examined the bodies only one revolver was found and that was under Siers. the body of Mrs. Siers was slaying in the kitchen and Siers's body was on the porch.

Mrs. Richardson said that Siers was asking for his clothes and that Mrs. Siers finally ordered him away and said:

"I'll see you dead before I will give you your clothes."

"My God, please don't kill me," Siers exclaimed, she said.

Immediately after this conversation Mrs. Siers began to shoot, according to the negro woman. She was positive two revolvers were displayed. As the police could only find one pistol, and that underneath Siers's body, the discredit the negro's story.

Dr. Czarlinsky also found five shells, which were for the pistol, in the coat pocket of Siers.

SON TELLS OF QUARRELS.

Chester Siers, who is a restaurant cook, said yesterday evening that his father did not own a pistol so far as he knew, but that his aunt had one. He said his father and aunt were in love with each other, but that he had never heard them discuss the subject of marriage.

W. L. Haynes and Charles Callahan, boarders,were in the parlor during the shooting and counted four reports of shots fired. Mrs. Moyer, housekeeper, was in another part of the house. The son of Siers said that in the past when his father had left home after a quarrel with his aunt she always sent him money to come back. About a month ago she had him arrested on a charge of disturbing the peace. He was sent to the workhouse, but after serving a short sentence, Mrs. Siers paid his fine, it is said.

Siers, who was 54 years old, was a barber and had a shop at the corner of Nicholson and Monroe streets. He leaves a widow and six children. The widow and three children reside in Humeston, Ia.

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July 13, 1909

FOUGHT OVER 10-CENT MEAL.

Railroad Man and Restaurant Pro-
prietor Land in the Holdover.

A free-for-all fight occurred yesterday afternoon in Main street in front of the city hall, when Harry Fox, a railway laborer, was thrown out of Peter Scando's restaurant, 420 Main street.

The police took all the participants in the fight to headquarters.

Fox, who had been out of employment for several days, as standing in Henry Miller's saloon at 402 Main street when he saw John B. Davis, a clerk for the Burlington camp near St. Joseph. He had worked for Davis two years ago.

"I haven't had anything to eat for two days," declared Fox as he shook hands with Davis. "My pal hasn't had anything either."

Davis consented to buy the two men "the best 10-cent meal in the city," and stopped at 420 Main street. He paid the cashier, and Fox and his friend proceeded to eat.

Both started to leave when they had finished. Alex Feandos, the cashier, halted them at the door.

"Pay me," he said. "Not a step until I get 20 cents."

Fox started to remonstrate when the proprietor jerked off his hat and refused to return it.

"You've eaten about 50 cents worth of food anyway," he said.

Fox picked up a chair and was starting for the cashier when a bottle of ketchup struck the wall near his head. Then Scandos chased him into the street with a double barrel shotgun when the cashier threw him to the sidewalk. He had cocked both barrels of the gun, when Charles Chadwick, a fireman from the station across the street, interfered and took the gun away.

Fox had received a severe beating and was locked up with the proprietor of the restaurant.

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June 21, 1909

MARKS CALLED A BLUFF.

Invaded an Italian Saloon Where
He Had Been Threatened.

A few nights ago a carpenter, a citizen of Armourdale, Kas., strayed into an Italian saloon in West Fifth street. While there, he said he overheard the bartender and others talking of Commissioner Thomas R. Marks. Dire threats, even to cutting the commissioner's throat, or decapitating him, he claims, were made.

Believing he would do a service in warning the police of what he he heard, the carpenter went to police headquarters and told his story. While he was telling it, Mr. Marks came in and was called to hear what was said to be in store for him.

Suddenly Mr. Marks left the station. He knew the location of the saloon where the threats were said to have been made, and he went there.

"My name is Thomas R. Marks, one of the police commissioners of Kansas City," witnesses report him as saying. "I hear that someone over here is going to cut my throat or cut my head off before I reach the city hall tomorrow. Here I am and you may as well begin now."

Mr. Marks was so mad that for once he is reported to have used adjectives not in the dictionary.

"Notta me," said the man behind the bar. "Me say notta da word bout you, Mr. Commisinia de Marka. You doa one granda work. Me tink you one granda da man, good as Garibaldi or Georga de Wash. You come one wrong place; we all for Mr. Commisha de Marka."

About this time a customer arrived in the saloon, and, not knowing was was on, ordered a glass of beer. The man behind the bar, still lauding Mr. Marks, turned to draw the beer.

"Don't you turn your back on me, you stiletto-sticking, black-handed rascal," ordered the police commissioner.

The frightened Italian wheeled about with more profuse apologies, saying Mr. Marks was a greater man than "Mayor de Crit or Presidenta da Taffa."

After satisfying himself that all within his hearing had been thoroughly subdued and that no more threats would come from such a source, Mr. Marks strode from the trembling bunch of dark-eyed foreigners and went back to police headquarters. His venture was regarded as foolhardy by the police, none of whom he asked to accompany him. The police say, however, that the proprietor of that saloon now cannot have too much praise for "Mr. Commisha de Marka."

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June 18, 1909

MORE THAN $2,000
ON SLUGGER'S HEAD.

EXTRAORDINARY EFFORTS TO
GET MISS OWEN'S ASSAILANT.

City Council in Special Session
Offers $1,000 -- Mayor and Other
City Officials Pledge $100
Each for Him.

Rewards aggregating more than $2,000 have been offered for the arrest and conviction of the thug or thugs who slugged Miss Anna Lee Owen, official stenographer for the police board investigation, in her office in the Dwight building Wednesday night, and stole shorthand notes of the important testimony relative to saloons, gambling and the police force, which she was transcribing.

Both houses of the council, in extraordinary session at noon yesterday, by resolution authorized a reward of $1,000, and ten officials personally, following the example of Mayor Crittenden, offered $100 each. Governor Hadley, for the state, announces a reward of $300. The owners of the Dwight building and John T. Wayland, an attorney, offered $100 each.

While Miss Owen was much improved yesterday, she was still carefully guarded at the University hospital., and visitors were not admitted to the sick room. She was unable to throw any more light upon the affair than she had the evening of the brutal attack. That the man who slugged her with a "black jack" wore dark clothes was the nearest to a description that she could supply.

Every detective and policeman in the department was at work on the case yesterday, having been detailed especially to search for clues which would lead to the apprehension of the guilty person. Such a cowardly attack was made upon Miss Owen by the unknown thug aroused every police officer and they were working willingly overtime. The large reward which has been offered through various sources also caused the detectives and uniform men to do their best to secure sufficient evidence to warrant an arrest.

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May 14, 1909

DEATH BY CARBOLIC ACID.

Unidentified Man Commits Suicide
Near Centropolis.

The body of an unidentified man was found in a lot between Drury and Hardesty avenues on Fifteenth street yesterday morning by Mrs. Della Morris, who lives in the vicinity. Harry Czarlinsky, deputy coroner, said death was due to carbolic acid poising.

The name Henry Patterson was found on a piece of paper in the man's pocket. The underclothing bore the letters J. E. C. and the initials J. C. were upon a signet ring which he wore. H e was about 50 years old, five feet five inches in height, weighed 140 pounds and wore a dark suit, patent leather shoes and a soft hat. His eyes were gray and his hair brown.

ENDED LIFE WITH SHOTGUN.

Morgan Jones, a farmer who lives near Dallas, Mo., killed himself with a shotgun early yesterday morning. He had been ill for a number of years and it is thought by his friends that it caused despondency. He was 30 years old and unmarried. He had been formerly employed as a bookkeeper in Kansas City.

TRIED TO DIE, BUT FAILED.

In a saloon at 1025 East Nineteenth street F. D. Miskelly of Excelsior Springs attempted to kill himself by drinking chloroform. He was taken to the general hospital. He is in precarious condition.

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May 8, 1909

ATTEMPTED HOLD UP
MAY END IN MURDER.

VICTIM DOES NOT OBEY ORDERS
AND ROBBER SHOOTS.

Charles Zondler, Saloonkeeper, Seri-
ously Injured by Outlaw, Who
Is Captured by Police-
man After Chase.

"I want your money. Hold up your hands."

Charles Zondler, alone in his saloon at Eighteenth and Cherry streets last night at 10 o'clock, looked up into the muzzle of a 38-calibre revolver. He reached for his own gun beneath the bar and the stick-up man shot him twice in the face. The assassin fled from the saloon and darted south through an alley. Zondler fired twice, but missed.

Jerry O'Connell, patrolman on the beat, heard the shots when he was at Nineteenth and Charlotte streets, and caught a glimpse of the flying figure. He cut across lots and headed the man off in the alley. Putting his left hand over the robber's revolver he jammed his own gun close to the fellow's car and brought him to a stop. Then, with the assistance of Patrolman George Brooks, O'Connell marched his prisoner to the Walnut street station.

Zondler, who is an elderly man and has owned the saloon but a few months, was taken to the general hospital in the ambulance from the station. Examination showed that one of the bullets had entered his mouth and passed out through the right cheek. The other bullet entered the left side of the neck and passed out through the right side. He is in a precarious condition.

Lieutenant Michael Halligan put the prisoner through a searching examination at the station. He gave the name of Henry Horton, but a card case had the name of H. S. Seward upon it, and he acknowledged that he sometimes went by that name. Horton admitted to Lieutenant Halligan that he had been arrested in this city before for petty crimes, but said that this was his first attempt at the stick-up game. He had only recently arrived in town, he said, and needed money. A dime and a stamped postcard were in his pockets. Horton asked permission to send the postcard to his mother. He addressed it, "Mrs. W. H. Strain, 3001 Cisna avenue, Kansas City, Kas." On the card he wrote:

"I guess I am gone for good. Come over and see me, Scott."

Horton said that his mother's name was different from his own because she had married twice. He said that he lived at the Kansas City, Kas., address when at home, but had only recently come from Omaha. He made no attempt to deny the act.

Jerry O'Connell, who made the arrest in sensational fashion, is known as the best sprinter in the precinct, if not on the force. He was complimented by Lieutenant Halligan on his capture.

Zondler lives with his family at 3220 East Twenty-third street.

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April 14, 1909

BERT BRANNON DISCHARGED.

Justice Says State Had No Case
Against Ex-Deputy Marshal.

"Not guilty," was the verdict rendered by Theodore Remley, justice of the peace, yesterday morning at the conclusion of the preliminary hearing of Bert Brannon, ex-deputy marshal. Brannon was arrested on April 6 by Detectives J. H. Farrell and Denver Mitchell, and charged with receiving and concealing stolen property.

One diamond pawned by Bert Brannon to Edward Costello, a saloonkeeper, was the "property" the police claimed had been stolen from L. V. Reichenbach on April 3.

Reichenbach and Henry Metzger, who had sold the diamond to Reichenbach, testified that the stone was identical with the one Reichenbach lost. Captain Walter Whitsett was not allowed to testify as to the conversation he had with Costello previous to the arrest of Brannon and left the court room in an indignant mood.

Brannon testified that he purchased the diamond from a pawnbroker, S. R. Alisky, 540 Main street, for $65 on March 29. It was bought "on time," he said. The diamond, Brannon said, was pawned to Costello on the same day for $35. Costello, the pawnbroker, and his clerk corroborated Brannon's testimony, and the pawnbroker produced his receipt book with Brannon's signature in it as evidence.

Judge Remley said the evidence produced by the state was not sufficient and he discharged Brannon. A "bum steer" on a horse race Brannon said was the cause of the "little inconvenience" which he suffered for one night in the city holdover.

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March 28, 1909

FIVE HOLD UP TWENTY IN
BOLD SALOON RAID.

HIGHWAYMEN SECURE $160 AND
WATCH FROM VICTIMS.

Compelled to Hold Up Hands Ten
Minutes After Robbers Left.
May Have Been Aided
by a Woman.

One of the most sensational holdups in recent years occurred about 10 o'clock last night when five men robbed the saloon of John Galvin at 1419 West Twenty-fourth street. The twenty or more men in the place all held up by two of the bandits and compelled to remain in the saloon fully ten minutes before they dared to leave. About $160 was secured by the highwaymen.

It was unusually crowded in the saloon last night. A dozen men were lined up at the bar, and Thomas McAuliff, the bartender, was so busy that he had hardly time to visit with the frequenters. But he stopped at his work when a woman began to yell in the back yard.

A moment later she burst into the barroom through the rear entrance and yelled, "Murder!" All eyes were fixed in her direction when two men stepped in behind her. Each had a red handkerchief over his face and each held a revolver.

"Up with your hands," commanded the taller of the two.

A few of the patrons tried to slip through the front door, but they changed their minds when they saw three more men with guns on the outside. In a moment they had all backed up against the wall and were holding their hands as high as possible. In a businesslike manner the short man went down the line and searched the pockets of each of the victims. He was evidently disappointed at the small amount of change that he managed to extract.

"The cash register must have it all," he said.

Maculiff was also standing with his hands in the air and made no objection to the robber's familiarity with the cash register. Not satisfied with the $100 which the register contained, the highwaymen searched the bartender. He secured $60, besides a watch which Maculiff valued at $65.

The woman, on whom all the attention was at first directed, had left the room. It was getting tiresome for the twenty victims who were leaning against the wall and they were more than glad when the operations of the robbers seemed to be about over. But the prospect of freedom was not so good when one of the men said:

"Now, if a single one of you move in the next ten minutes, he gets his head blown off." The two men backed out of the saloon through the front entrance and ran eastward on Twenty-fourth street. They were joined by their companions, though the patrons and the bartender were not aware of the fact. All remained in the same tiresome position for fully ten minutes. When Maculiff got to the door he saw that the coast was clear.

The police at the Southwest boulevard police station were notified and hurried to the scene. A few clews were picked up which made the officers believe that the holdup gang had been in the neighborhood all evening. The part that the woman played in the holdup was still a topic of conversation at closing time at midnight. Several affirmed that she was an accomplice to the robbers, while others said that she was some woman who lived in the neighborhood and had run in the saloon for protection.

The frequenters of the saloon were too excited to talk about the robbery in a coherent manner last night. Henry Beadles, who lives at 2014 Summit street, said he thought that there were only two men in the gang, but Michael Connolly, who lives at 2136 Madison street, said that he saw three others plainly through the door.

John Reed, 2312 Terrace street, was sure that he could recognize the robbers should he ever see them again. One of them had high cheek bones, and limped slightly in walking. All of the victims said that the ten minutes which they spent against the wall after the robbers had left were the longest ten minutes they had ever experienced. About $3 was secured from the men.

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March 23, 1909

TOOK A STROLL; IS SHY $30.

Farmer Slept in Rear of Saloon and
Was Touched.

When Farmer Gus Peterson of Topeka, Kas., strayed from the glare of the Union depot last night and started for a little stroll along Union avenue he merrily jingled three golden eagles in his pocket. Two hours later when he awoke from a troubled sleep in the rear of a Union avenue saloon all he could find was a bunch of keys. He remembers going into the saloon to have a drink with two "nice appearin' gents."

Peterson reported his loss to the police at No. 2 station and wired home for money.

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March 12, 1909

FOUND HER BOY IN
THE PRISONER'S DOCK.

MOTHER HAD BEEN TOLD HE'D
BE HOME AFTER A WHILE.

"Do You Know This Man?" She Was
Asked -- "Why, It's Ernest, My
Boy," Slowly Said the
Aged Witness.

For more than a year Ernest H. Wolf, accused of murder, has been in the county jail, but his mother did not know where he was. On the witness stand in Judge E. E. Porterfield's division of the circuit court yesterday, she said:

"They told me my boy had been in an accident and would come home after a while."

Even then Mrs. Wolf, who is 74 years of age and retains her faculties with difficulty, did not understand what charge her son was facing. She was put on the stand to support the defense of insanity.

"Do you know this man?" she was asked, as the attorneys pointed to Wolf.

Slowly the old woman got out of the witness chair and went over to the defendant. There she threw her arms around him and sobbed:

"Why, it's Ernest, my boy."

For several minutes mother and son were fast in each other's embrace, while tears came to both.

Even after she left the courtroom the aged woman did not realize that her son was on trial for murder.

Dr. B. A. Poorman and Dr. Fred J. Hatch were called as experts on insanity by the defense. They said there were evidences of a disordered mind on the part of the mother.

"Why is the attention of the public not called to insane persons before damage is done?" Dr. Poorman was asked.

"It should be done, but seldom is," said the physician. "Relatives are slow about getting into court and having one of their family declared insane. So it is almost impossible to secure commitment for insanity until the person in question does something which brings him to the public notice and his case its into the hands of public officials.

The case of Wolf, who is charged with murder in the first degree for shooting James R. Smothers in Stelling's saloon on Westport avenue in November of 1907, went to the jury last evening. Smothers died five days after the shooting, which grew out of a barroom fight. Wolf is 36 years of age. Judge Porterfield announced that he would hold a night session to finish, if necessary, because he holds juvenile court today. So there was a rush to finish in order to get everything before the jury before 6:30 o'clock.

After deliberating until late last night t he jury found him guilty of second degree murder. He was sentenced to ten years in prison.

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