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November 8, 1909

OLD FOLKS' DAY AT
CHURCH IN ROSEDALE.

W. I. DAVIS, 65, AND WIFE, 62,
ONLY PIONEERS PRESENT.

Aggregate Age of Thirty-three Per-
sons Who Attended Is 2,280
Years -- Two Weeks' Special
Service Is Inaugurated.
The Original Rosedale Methodist Church.
ROSEDALE'S METHODIST CHURCH THIRTY YEARS AGO.

Mrs. Susan Weller, who is 90 year of age, was the oldest person to attend the old folks' reunion in the First Methodist church, Rosedale, yesterday morning. The oldest man in attendance was William S. Garrett, who is 81. The aggregate age of thirty-three persons who attended this unique gathering is 2,280 years.

The Rosedale church was organized thirty three years ago and the original enrollment showed just thirty members. Out of that original membership there were only two of the pioneers present yesterday. These were Mr. andMrs. W. I. Davis. Mr. Davis is 65 years old while his wife is 62. The husband is still active and is an engineer at the Swift packing plant.

The First Methodist Church in Rosedale as it Is Now.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AS IT APPEARS TODAY.

In the thirty years that the church has been in existence there have been many changes. The original church was a small frame structure which cost $1,000. The present edifice is a magnificent stone structure, which cost $25,000 and which is one of hte most imposing buildings of the kind in the state. Its membership has grown from a meager thirty to more than 250 and its debt is more than half paid.


CUSTOM IS POPULAR.

Twelve years ago the custom of holding an old folks' reunion each autumn was establisheda nd this event has proved a popular one. H. W. Gates always has supplied buggies and carriages and Amos Martin and S. B. Bell, Jr., have provided automobiles. With these the persons who are too feeble to walk to the service are taken to church.

The features of yesterday's service was a sermon by Rev. I. V. Maloney, the pastor, who took for his text: "Thou shalt come to old age like as a shock of corn cometh in the season," Job v. 26.

The church was decorated with autumn leaves and foilage and the choir rendered a special music programme.

At the church last night a two weeks' special service was inaugurated. There will be services every night, the pastor being assisted by the Rev. Marion Donleavy of Kansas City, Kas.

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October 18, 1909

FAMOUS SONS UNITE
CHILDHOOD CHUMS.

BOY SINGERS' MOTHERS LEARN
THEY ARE OLD FRIENDS.

Strange Coincidence Revealed at
Convention Hall Banquet Table.
Three Youths Earn Fame
With Remarkable Voices.
Frank Vrooman and Lawrence P. Smith, Boy Singers

Those persons who have followed closely the remarkable careers of Maxwell Kennedy, Frank Vrooman and Laurence Smith, boy singers, are pointing to a remarkable coincidence in the life history of the three boys.

Although reared in widely separated sections of the country, these boys have attained almost international reputations because of the remarkable qualities of their voices. Two of these singers, Laurence Powars Smith and Frank Ellsworth Vrooman, met for the first time at Convention hall in Kansas City, Mo., where they appeared on the programme and held spellbound the great assembly which had gathered to honor the postal clerks of the country.

MEET AT BANQUET.

Sitting opposite each other at the banquet table and sharing equally the congratulations of hundreds of persons who had been thrilled by the remarkable carrying power of their young voices were the boy singers and their parents. For a long time Mrs. Clarence J. Voorman, the mother of Frankie, gazed at the smiling countenance of Mrs. C. G. Smith, the mother of Laurence, seeing there something that carried her back in memory to her girlhood days in Junction City, Kas., when her dearest friend and playmate had been Laura Patterson, a girl her own age.

"I am sure you must be my old schoolmate, Laura Patterson," said Mrs. Vrooman, reaching her hand across the table. "Don't you remember me? Lottie Wood."

The two friends who had not met for thirty years quickly reverted to by-gone days and spoke with wonder of the coincidence that the mothers of the two greatest boy singers should have been playmates in their childhood days. The wonder of Mrs. Vrooman was increased, however, when Mrs. Smith spoke of little Frankie Kennedy, who "turned ropes," "spun tops" and did many other wonderful things for their edification while attending the public school in Junction City. Mrs. Vrooman then learned for the first time that this same little Frank Kennedy is the father of Maxwell Kennedy, the wonderful boy singer.

VOICES GAIN FAME.

Laurence Powars Smith is now 17 years old and was born in Ottawa, Kas. His former rich soprano voice combines a wonderful interpretation with great carrying power and has now developed into a tenor of the highest quality. He is the son of C. G. Smith, president of the People's National bank, Kansas City, Kas. His services are much in demand throughout the country, especially at Chautauquas. He is now engaged as soloist at the Linwood Boulevard Presbyterian church, Kansas City, Mo.

Frankie Vrooman is 13 years old. He is a son of Clarance J. Vrooman, 3114 Washington street, Kansas City, Mo. Frankie is a slight, manly little chap, unaffected; and a typical American school boy. His voice is a rich soprano, and every word is enunciated perfectly, so that the carrying power is remarkable. he has been singing in public three years and has met with much success. On June 13 he sung in the Westminster Presbyterian church of Minneapolis. He is a protege of Walton Holmes, and a brilliant future is predicted. At present he is soloist at St. Paul's Episcopal church, Fortieth and Main streets, Kansas City, Mo.

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August 21, 1909

FEW QUANTRELL'S MEN THERE.

Former Guerrillas Are More Inter-
ested in the Crop Prospects.

Only twenty-five men responded yesterday morning at the roll call of the Quantrell guerrillas, now in reunion in Independence. Cole Younger was not present, being on a lecture tour, the subject of his lecture being "Keep Straight." Frank James, another noted guerrilla, is down in Oklahoma in the Big Pasture, farming, and did not have time to attend. James has not attended any of the reunions since his noted speech made in the Independence court house yard, in which he declared that his friends were in the North and that he was never turned down except by those of the Southland.

The headquarters of the reunion were in the Brown building, North Main street. Here the scattered membership met and registered and it was here that it was noted that among the absent ones were John C. Hope, ex-sheriff of Jackson county, and Cyrus Flannery Wolf of Bates county, both having died within the past year. Captain Benjamin Morrow was present, Lieutenant Levi Potts of Grain Valley and Warren Welch were busy among the veteran guerrillas. Captain Gregg, who has been in about as many tight places as the next guerrilla who followed Quantrell, was present with his family. Also Dr. L. C. Miller of Knobnoster.

There was no formality about the reunion. "They just met and that was all there was to it," was the way one of them expressed himself. Some of those from Kansas City and nearby points brought well-filled dinner baskets, but the greater portion of those present had to go to restaurants. It was a day of reminiscent stories for the guerrillas and the oft repeated stories of the civil war were gone over and over again. Gabe Parr, who as a boy shot his way to freedom, yet lives, and others with equally hair raising stories were present and passed the day, telling of the yesterdays of their early manhood. The thing that interested these men most was the state of the crops.

The veterans will hold another session today and adjourn, in all probability to meet in Independence next year.

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July 21, 1909

THREE 'OLD CRONIES' MEET.

W. E. Hutton, E. S. Jewett and
Henry Garland Have Reunion.

In 1867 W. E. Hutton was general Western passenger agent of the Missouri Pacific in Kansas City, and E. S. Jewett was ticket agent. Henry Garland was with the St. Louis, Kansas City & Northern, as the Wabash was known in that year. The three old cronies met again yesterday, Mr. Hutton coming on from his home in Cincinnati for the reunion. Their anecdotes sounded like frontier stories.

"I lived right over there in a hotel kept by 'General' Crafton," said Mr. Hutton as he sat in the Missouri Pacific ticket office yesterday afternoon, indicating the Diamond drug store. " 'General' Crafton had been in the army."

"So he said," added Mr. Garland, and Colonel Jewett had to laugh at the boast of an old hotel man, who "kept tables" in a place run by Ed Findlay's father, where they never closed the door and the ceiling was the limit.

"And there was a millinery store kept by a little woman right there," continued Mr. Hutton, indicating Ninth and Delaware. "Her name was Marsh, and I recollect her trying to get a loan of $2,700 on the place. She afterward sold it for a vast amount of money."

"Wrong there, Billy," corrected Mr. Garland. "She owns the place yet, but she has had a fabulous sum of money from it in the way of rents."

Mr. Hutton told of going to Fort Scott and to Lawrence by stage. The center of the city then was Fifth and Main and gambling was the chief excitement. Colonel Jewett is still in the harness. Mr. Garland retired ten years ago. Mr. Hutton is now in the bond and brokerage business. All three are wealthy.

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July 6, 1909

LIVE OLD DAYS OVER AGAIN.

Fremont-Lincoln Association's Re-
Union in Kansas City, Kas.

About fifty white-haired men, led by a fife and drum corps, marched down Seventh street in Kansas City, Kas., yesterday afternoon to the Washington Avenue M. E. church, where the annual meeting of the Fremont and Lincoln Voters' Association was held. All of them had cast a vote for Abraham Lincoln in the presidential election of 1860, and a majority of them had voted for John C. Fremont in 1856.

At the church an address of welcome was delivered by Mayor U. S. Guyer, which was responded to by Major James P. Dew of Kansas City, Mo., the president of the association. Col. L. H. Waters of Kansas City, Mo., gave some personal reminiscences of Abraham Lincoln, of whom he was a personal friend. A number of five-minute talks were made by others who had voted for the "martyred president."

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July 6, 1909

REVIEWED BATTLE
OF OLD WESTPORT.

REUNION AND PICNIC ON WOR-
NALL ROAD.

Pioneers Hear of Kansas City's Pre-
carious Situation During Price
Raid -- Purchase of Shaw-
nee Mission Proposed.

The battle of Westport was lived over again by a hundred of the city's oldest inhabitants comprising what is now known as the Historical Society at the old Wornall homestead at Sixty-first street and the Wornall road yesterday.

The occasion was a basket picnic of the society and the object was no more than to celebrate the nation's birthday but so many could recall the time when the Wornall mansion was a hospital and and the cottonwoods around the premises were split and riven in battle that the names of Price, Mulligan and Curtis came easy, and many a gray headed veteran leaned eagerly forward in his seat while the speakers marshaled before them the contending armies.

"It was this way," said Judge John C. Gage, who was a participant in the battle. "General Price driven from behind by the Federal forces left Independence, Mo., and crossed the Blue. It was a serious moment for Kansas City for General Curtis left the town unprotected and crossed over to Wyandotte to his headquarters. For a whole night the city was practically at the mercy of the Confederates.

"It was a good thing the Confederates did not know of this movement of Curtis. By the next day he had returned and when the battle occurred Curtis was on hand and fought like a tiger."

Several of the old residents who were present had never heard of the incident referred to by Judge Gage. Others who were participants on one side or the other remembered it distinctly.

MISPLACED STRATEGY.

"Very little has been said of Curtis's desertion of Kansas City at this time," said the judge after his speech to some of those who had never heard. "It was an incident quickly closed by the prompt return of the federal forces from across the Kaw. You see General Curtis at first believed it might be more important to protect Fort Leavenworth than the city. When he discovered how small a force General Price had and that he was practically running away from federal pressure behind he changed his mind. He was no coward and his retrograde movement was merely misplaced strategy."

Other speakers were Judge John B. Stone, ex-Confederate soldier; Mrs. Laura Coates Reed, Hon. D. C. Allen of Liberty, Mo., Miss Elizabeth B. Gentry, Mrs. Henry N. Ess, William Z. Hickman and Dr. W. L. Campbell. Frank C. Wornall read the Declaration of Independence and Mrs. Dr. Allan Porter read a selection entitled "Two Volunteers." The meeting of the society was presided over by Dr. Campbell, who also introduced the speakers.

A proposition was made by Mrs. Laura Coates Reed to the effect that the society purchase the old Shawnee mission in Johnson county, Kas., for a historical museum to be used jointly by the D. A. R. society and the Historical Society. Mrs. Reed's remarks along this line were seconded by those of Mrs. Henry Ess.

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February 5, 1909

DIVORCED TEN YEARS,
DECIDED TO REMARRY.

S. D. Hollis and Wife Couldn't Bear
To Be Apart, So the Second Wed-
ding Takes Place At Daugh-
ter's Home.

Ten years ago S. D. Hollis and his wife Mary, both of this city, quarreled and there was a legal separation. In the divorce court they had complained bitterly of each other, and when the hour of final parting came they declared with one accord that their marriage was a mistake, although they had lived together thirty years and reared ten children. It was a dry-eyed farewell. Hollis, glad of his freedom, went to Oklahoma, leaving Mrs. Hollis with her daughter, Mrs. Maude O'Flaherty, at 1606 Charlotte street.

Last night there was another chapter to the story in the Hollis household when at the house on Charlotte street a minister remarried the couple after they declared they were willing to remain together for the rest of their lives. Yesterday morning Mr. Hollis, who is now a night clerk at the Model hotel of El Reno, Ok., dropped in to the O'Flaherty home unexpectedly and asked for a reunion. And then it developed that he had come at the instigation of Mrs. Hollis, who had written him a letter from Omaha telling him she was lonely. The children as well as the parents were very happy last night.

"I admit that I was foolish and it all happened because of my ungovernable temper," said Mr. Hollis in explaining how it came about.

"We quarreled about a member of our family ten years ago. My wife took one course and I took another. We ended the argument in the divorce court.

"Three years ago I tried to take her back and she agreed, but we finally decided not to marry again. Last December I called here with the intention of bringing Mrs. Hollis back to Oklahoma as my wife. She had gone to Omaha, so after waiting six weeks I went home without her. This time I knew nothing could keep us apart, for we have both grown old and need each other's society."

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December 19, 1908

FAMILY REUNITED BY RIOT.

Dr. Harry Czarlinsky Meets Relative
Through Publicity Given Him.

The appearance of the name of Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, deputy coroner, in the local papers following the riot of religious fanatics on December 8 brought about a reunion of half brothers and sisters who had known nothing of of each other for thirty-eight years. A week ago yesterday, three days after the riot, Mrs. Pearl Wheeler of 16 South Bellaire avenue appeared at Dr. Czarlinsky's office in the Commerce building and asked:

"Did you ever know a man named Herman Czarlinsky?"

When the doctor informed Mrs. Wheeler that the man mentioned, who died here January 27, 1899, was his father, he was informed that Herman Czarlinsky was her father also. She said that her brother, William Whippell, who took the name of his stepfather, lived in Englewood station. A meeting was arranged for last Sunday and an impromptu reunion was held at Dr. Czarlinsky's home, 3510 Vine street.

"Shortly after the war," said Dr. Czarlinsky yesterday, "my father married a Miss Goode in New Orleans. She was a Gentile and, on account of religious differences, they separated in 1870. My father came West and settled at Warsaw, Mo., with three of the children, Fannie, G. A. and Charles. Fannie, who is now Mrs. McCubbin, lives at 1625 Jackson avenue. G. A. Czarlinsky lives here and Charles in St. Louis. Two of the children remained with their mother. They were William and Pearl, now Mrs.Wheeler. Father's first wife married again and Will took his stepfather's name of Whippell. Father moved here in 1889.

"Nothing was ever known of the other two children and their mother until Mrs. Wheeler appeared at my office last Friday. She said her mother died January 18, 1899, at Monett, Mo., fourteen days before my father's death.

"By my father's second marriage there were three children, Mrs. Esther Morris, 3517 Vine street; Maud Czarlinsky, who lives with her and myself. We were, of course, reared with the three children who came West with my father, but neither they nor us knew that the other two were living so close at hand. The mention of my name in the papers as deputy coroner in the handling of the riot victims brought about the reunion."

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December 3, 1908

SIXTY YEARS THEY'VE
JOURNEYED TOGETHER.

COL. R. T. VAN HORN AND WIFE
CELEBRATE ANNIVERSARY.

Men Who Helped Him Lay Founda-
tion of This City 50 Years and
More Ago, Gather to
Wish Them Well.

Feasting upon memories of the many years gone by, scores of "during the war" pioneers of Kansas City enjoyed the gathering at the home of Colonel R. T. Van Horn in honor of his sixtieth wedding anniversary, yesterday afternoon.

The large home at Honeywood, Evanston station, was crowded throughout the day and many groups of gray haired men selected quiet corners to pass the gossip of years, and to count grandchildren. stories of the distant past were recounted as if they happened but yesterday. Everybody was so many years young. Nobody was old.

Colonel Van Horn, 84 years young, was the leader in all the reminiscences.

"Don't you remember, George, that little incident on the steamboat Perry, when my wife paid me such a high compliment? he asked of George L. Andrews, one of the old-timers.

"Of course I do," replied Mr. Andrews, and his eyes twinkled merrily at the recollection. "That was forty years ago. You and I were standing on the deck when John Conover called up and held out a knife to us, saying it was for the best looking man."

"And you tried to take it the first thing," put in the colonel. "But that wouldn't do. So we called my wife up to let her decide the matter, and you got the knife."

Then there was a laugh from all, and one story led to another. Things long forgotten were discussed once more and little stories brought long unrecollected incidents to mind, and the gray heads would nod enthusiastically as familiar names were called.

BUT IT WAS GOLD.

"It was in J. Q. Watkins's little brick bank down on First and Main streets that I saw my first gold brick," said C. N. Brooks. "A tall, thin and hungry looking man brought it up to the bank one day and got off the black and white mule he was and handed the gold over to J. Q. It was real gold, too, and how we fellows did stare. The whole street was lined with people who wanted just a glimpse of that brick."

From the little red brick bank the old men turned their attention to the afternoons spent in the rear part of Mike Dively's grocery store at Third and Main streets, and Mr. Diveley was one of them who brought back the happy memories.

Interest in the afternoon's impromptu entertainment was just at its height when the front door opened and Thomas McNabb entered. With McNabb came visions of the prayer meeting night long ago, in the Baptist church, which was located at Missouri avenue and Walnut street. It was in that little church that McNabb was wont to sing hymns every night, and it was the gathering place of all the young couples at that time.

"One night just after prayer meeting was over," began McNabb after he had gone the rounds of handshaking and congratulations, and had joined the group of old-timers. "I remember that a fire broke out in a little store owned by Alex Holland here. I had just got through singing a solo about meeting again, and Frank Foster, the chief of the fire department -- that hand-cart, volunteer brigade; you remember it boys --had been to church. He leapt up and ran to the old fire house at Second and Walnut streets singing 'God Be With You Till We Meet Again.' And so we all joined in and helped to save Alex a few dollars."

TALES OF OTHER FIRES.

Stories of that one fire brought to the mind other conflagrations in which Mr. Foster, now dead, played a prominent part. Some of the old volunteers were present at the reception yesterday afternoon, and many a hearty laugh was had over some amusing adventures. Frank and Walter Withers figured largely in some of the amusing stories.

And so the afternoon was spent by the old men -- once more as boys. Gray hair and wrinkles were forgotten, and no one noticed an occasional trembling of hands or the thinness of voice which had come over many of those present. It was seldom that so many of the old pioneers could get together that they might live over more of the pleasant days when they were young, and the gathering yesterday was immensely enjoyed.

The Old Men's Club went out to Honeywood, as did some of the McPherson post of the G. A. R. And Colonel Van Horn and his wife were the recipients of scores of hearty congratulations. E. S. Jewett and wife have had the pleasure of attending the twenty-fifth, fiftieth and sixtieth anniversaries of Colonel and Mrs. Van Horn, and they said that never before has such a gathering been held upon such an occasion in Kansas City.

Light refreshments were served at the informal reception, consisting of coffee and sandwiches. Colonel Van Horn and his wife were exuberant in their good, old-fashioned hospitality.

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August 15, 1908

WILL FORGET THE PAST.

Union Soldiers Will Attend Reunion
of Quantrell's Men.

The annual reunion of Quantrell's men will be August 21 and 22, at Blue Springs. There will be a basket dinner on the schoolhouse lawn the first day and on the second officers will be elected and reminiscent speeches made.

The Quantrell men have broken over the long established rule and have this year invited Union soldiers to meet with them and forget the animosities of a half century ago. The people of Blue Springs are preparing to give the blue and the gray a reception . Many of the soldiers who wore the blue expect to attend the reunion and show their friendliness to the men who fought on the other side fifty years ago.

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August 24, 1907

IT DIDN'T BOTHER THEM.

"QUANTRELL" MEN AND WOMEN
KEEP UP THE MERRY MAKING.

Attempt of One Man to Shoot An-
other, After a Three-Cornered
Struggle, Looked Upon as
a Sort of Joke.

It was scarcely an hour after David Edwards had shot at Jim Cummings yesterday noon, and "shot to kill" to use Edwards' own words, as he lay in jail, that Miss Feta Parmer, one of the hundred women at the Quantrell raiders' reunion at Wallace grove, who saw the shooting at close range, said:

"Oh, it's nothing! I turned around to see who was fighting and then went on about my business."
"It didn't amount to anything," another woman said. "The old men just had a quarrel."

The shooting truly did not terminate fatally, because Edwards missed Cummings and the stray bullet merely grazed the feet of two other men, but it would have broken up almost any other picnic. But the veterans of the Quantrell raids, their wives and daughters, forgot all about it in fifteen minutes and resumed their merrymaking. Even Cummings, the man shot at, treated the matter as a joke. Cummings was with the James brothers during their bloody days and has seen some real fighting. The only person who seemed excited was Jack Noland, a negro, who was Quantrell's hostler. When Edwards fired, Noland got behind a tree.

"I won't prosecute Edwards," Cummings said. "I understand that he has called me a thief and all that, but I'll let it pass. I'm not afraid of him. He was standing less than three feet from me when he pointed the revolver at my head and fired, and all he did was to hit the other men on the feet. He'll never have a better chance to kill me again, and if he couldn't succeed this time he can't do it later."

MARSHALL PREVENTS BLOODSHED

Joseph Stewart, deputy marshal and bailiff of the criminal court, helped prevent bloodshed. He was standing beside Cummings, talking over old times, when Edwards caame up and got into a quarrel with Cummings. Edwards pulled a revolver out of his pocket and fired a shot. Cummings stepped forward and grabbed his hand. Edwards jerked the imprisoned hand free and threw it around Cummings' neck, pointing the barrel of the pistol down Cummings' spine. Stewart grasped the pistol, sticking his thumb through the aperture back of the trigger to keep Edwards from shooting Cummings in the back, and tried to wrest the weapon from his hand. In the struggle the three men fell. Edwards still holding the weapon and pulling on the trigger, which wouldn't work with Stewart's thumb caught in it.

Kit Rose, a brother-in-law of Cole Younger, intervened. He searched Cummings to see if he, too, had a gun, and then Rose and Cummings jerked Edwards' revolver from his hand. Stewart's thumb was badly bruised in the struggle.

BULLET STRUCK BYSTANDER.

The bullet was afterwards found. It had struck the toe of W. H. Perkins' shoe, glanced hit the rung of a chair and athen stuck in the sole of Dr. Oliver C. Sheley's foot, but did not have force enough left to break the skin. Dr. Sheley lives in Independence. Mr. Perkins is from Oak Grove. Perkins has the bullet as a souvenir of the occasion.

Edwards was detained at the county jail last night, and slept in the deputy marshal's bedroom. He will be sent to the Confederate Veterans' home in Higginsville today.

There are four or five stories of how the trouble between him and Cummings arose. Edwards says Cummings had been threatening him ever since a year ago last Halloween night, when a pet raccoon was stolen from his room at the Confederate home. He accuesed Cummings of the theft and Cummings became sore.

They have had quarrels since. Both men are inmates of the Higginsville Confederate home. Edwards was with Quantrall a year, and assisted in the burning of Lawrence, Kas. He is 73 years old, while Cummings is but 56. Cummings was one of the followers of the James boys.

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