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January 22, 1910

BRIDE LOYAL TO PRISONER.

Says They Have Plenty of Money
and Charge is Absurd.

Clyde Houk, a prisoner at police headquarters awaiting the arrival of officers who will take him back to his home at Memphis, Tenn., on suspicion of having passed worthless paper, still retains the unshaken confidence of his bride of two weeks.

All day yesterday Mrs. Houk, a fragile little woman of about 25 years, sat in the matron's room holding her husband's hand and consoling him as best she could. They were visiting Kansas City on their honeymoon when Houk was arrested by Detectives Andrew O'Hare and D. D. Mitchell Thursday night.

"Of course Clyde is innocent," Mrs. Houk said yesterday. "The whole affair is a terrible mistake. Clyde is well known in Memphis, where he was engaged in the implement business. We have plenty of money, and it is absurd to connect my husband with anything dishonest. He merely overdrew his bank account a few dollars, that's all. Why, he did not even know that he had done so. I don't see the need of having policemen come to get Clyde, as we were going back to Memphis anyhow. I shall go with him and see the matter through."

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January 13, 1910

SOLDIER DICK AND
GIRL ARE PARTED.

"WAIT 'TIL I'M 21" HE SAYS,
"I'LL BE TRUE," GIVES
CHESSIE.

"Mooning" Around Third
and Main When Arrested
by Policeman.
Parted Sweethearts Chessie Nave and Richard Wiliford.
CHESSIE NAVE AND RICHARD WILIFORD.

Chessie Nave is 16, and Richard Wiliford is 20, but they each felt a great deal older and more responsible than when they arrived in Kansas City yesterday morning on an early train, with a wish and a determination to get married. they didn't feel so old nor so responsible last night. This is the way of it:

Last Tuesday the young people ran away together from Lexington, Mo., where the young man is a student in Wentworth Military academy. The girl is just a girl. they were accompanied on their matrimonial excursion by two friends, Grace Nave, a cousin of Miss Chessie, and Calvin Cook of Bartlesville, also a student in the military academy. The plan of the eloping kittens was to get a marriage license in Kansas City, Kas., where officials dealing in Cupid's paper are generally supposed to be gentle and kind. They missed the direction and went "mooning around the vicinity of Third and Main streets at an early hour yesterday morning. There a policeman found them.

The police had been notified that the young people were headed toward Kansas City with some kind of a prank in veiw, and the policeman saw them and happened to remember. He nailed them.
HIS FATHER ARRIVES.

Joel Wiliford, Woodford, Ok., father of Richard, had also been notified of his son's unceremonious leave in company with a little girl in skirts. The old gentleman hopped a train and got to Kansas City about as soon as the elopers. He dropped into central police station about the time that Richard and Chessie, Grace and Calvin were making a botch of trying to argue the police into the belief that while the resemblance was probably great, it was not absolute.

Papa Wiliford tried moral persuasion on his son. Nothing doing. Son was obdurate. What's the use of trying to make a soldier of a fellow, anyway, if you expect him to give up his girl at a mere parental command Richard said a soldier should never surrender. And he further declared he wouldn't. So into the dungeon cell went he, like any real, spicy, belted and buckled Don Juan of old. His good friend Calvin went along with him, but not from choice.

As for the girls, they saw life as it is from the matron's room Thus stood the matter all day. Richard would not desert the principles of academic soldiering, and Chessie vowed she would be as true as "Beautiful Bessie, the Banana Girl, or, "He Kissed Me Once and I Can't Forget." Then came Nash Ruby, brother-in-law of Chessie. He came From Lexington. He looked real fierce.

HERDED BEFORE CAPTAIN.

Forth from the dungeon cell marched Soldier Richard, and friend Calvin. Down from the matron's melancholy boudoir minced Chessie and Grace. They were herded into the office of Captain Walter Whitsett, where more moral suasion was rubbed on.

Richard, during the afternoon, had agreed with his father upon a compromise, bu which he was to return to school and finish his education. Later he took it all back. And w hen he saw Chessie he said:

"I'm going to marry you, Chessie, even if I never become a great general."

"That's where you're wrong," mildly said Papa Wiliford.

Then Chessie put in her word. But it didn't move anybody at all. Unless it was Nash Ruby, Brother-in-Law Nash. "You'll come along home with me, miss," said he. Chessie subsided. But when it came to parting, Richard uttered his defiance. "I'll be 21 before long," said he, "and then we can marry."

"I'll be true to you," sobbed Chessie.

Brother-in-law Nash led her away to catch a train for Lexington. this morning Richard will go to Woodford, Ok., with pa. Friend Calvin went home last night. That's all, except it is said Chessie made a face at her future father-in-law.

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December 4, 1909

AGED WOOER TO GO HOME.

The Woman in the Case May Be
Charged With Vagrancy.

John Kenyon of McLouth, Kas., the 85-year-old wooer of Mrs. Ada Cross, whose matrimonial affairs were satisfactorily settled at police headquarters last Thursday, will, in all probability, leave leave for his home today in company of his son, Walter, who has come for him.

Mrs. Cross was further examined yesterday and the police placed her under the care of the matron at police headquarters. She will appear in police court to answer a charge of vagrancy.

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December 3, 1909

CALLED ON THE POLICE TO
ARBITRATE LOVE AFFAIR.

John Kenyon of McLouth, Kas.,
Wasn't Sure of His Ground, So
Asked Advice.

Meets an Unromantic Police Sergeant.

The intervention of the police spoiled a runaway marriage yesterday. John Kenyon, a farmer of McLouth, Kas., 84 years old, walked into police headquarters yesterday morning and, producing a letter from his fiancee, Mrs. Ada Cross of Frankfort, Ind., sought the advice of Chief of Police Frank Snow as to his matrimonial affairs. The chief refused to arbitrate and advised John to return to the farm.

Kenyon left headquarters, but a few hours later returned and this time called on the desk sergeant to referee. The sergeant, a big unromantic man, thought that Kenyon was a fit charge for the police matron and after depositing his valuables, some $20 in cash and a bank book showing a healthy balance, in the office safe, Kenyon was escorted upstairs.

Kenyon went to bed, but was not permitted to rest long in peace. Mrs. Ada Cross, in company with several real estate dealers, soon appeared on the scene. They wished to pay the old man a visit and informed Captain Whitsett that Kenyon was negotiation for the purpose of a rooming house on Twelfth street opposite the Hotel Washington. The captain then took a hand in the administration of the old man's finances. Mrs. Cross, on being questioned, admitted that she was engaged to be married to Kenyon and that he had promised to indorse her note for $2,500 for the purchase of the property. She stated that if it had not been for the intervention of Walter Kenyon, the old man's son, who made a trip from McLouth for the purpose of breaking up the marriage, the couple would have appeared before a justice of the peace Sunday.

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November 1, 1909

NO PLAN BUT TO GET
SON, THEN JUST REST.

ADAM GOD'S WIFE RELEASED
FROM JAIL.

At Home of Police Matron Re-
nounces Husband's Religious
creed, Declaring She Will
Live Only for Boy.

Melissa Sharp, the wife of "Adam God," who started the riot December 8, 1908, that resulted in the death of two officers, two members of the "Adam God" flock and a private citizen, as well as injury to others, slept in freedom last night.

For the first time in nearly eleven months this woman yesterday walked in the open and free air; enjoyed the liberty of persons not guilty of crime, and was entitled to do as she chose.

With this liberty, thrust upon her suddenly yesterday morning when the prosecutor's office decided that there was no charge upon which she could be held, Mrs. Sharp was almost as helpless as she had been when confined by prison walls, and when asked the simple question as to what she intended to do said she didn't know.

HAS NO PLAN.

She had no notion, no plan.

"All I want is rest," she said. "I want to be able to sit down or to lie down and solve this tremendous problem. I want my boy, my 16-year-old son, who is far away. Maybe when I get him I can think of something to do."

When Mrs. Sharp was released from the county jail yesterday morning she did not know which way to turn. She had relatives in Southern Missouri, but she cared not to ask them for aid. Then it was that Mrs. Margaret Simmons, matron of the jail, came to her rescue.

"You come home with me," said Mrs. Simmons. "Come home with me and stay there until you can decide what to do."

And Mrs. Sharp went home with her.

Immediately after the "Adam God" riot the woman was placed in jail. She was transferred from the city holdover to the county jail. Ever since she has remained in prison without trial. What her fate would be she never knew and as the months dragged along she didn't care.

WAS MODEL PRISONER.

"She was a model prisoner," said Mrs. Simmons. "I don't believe that her mind was unbalanced and regardless of what some people may think I decided to take her into my own home. It is an act of charity and I can conceive of no greater charity than the sheltering of this lonely, lonesome woman."

Mrs. Sharp is 38 years old and she appears to be younger. Her husband is 54 and he is now serving a sentence of twenty-five years in the Missouri penitentiary. While Mrs. Sharp wants to be faithful to him, she doesn't care to discuss the fate of her husband or her relations with him.

She has a son and her whole life now is centered in that boy, who, despite his years, is doing a man's work on a railroad in Montana in an effort to earn his own living.

James Sharp, who is the "Adam God," was not alone old, but he was ugly and repulsive. He was many years older than his wife and why she married him only she herself knows and she won't tell why.

MISSOURI FARMER'S DAUGHTER.

She was the pretty daughter of a farmer, living in Mountain Grove, Mo., and Sharp was working on a neighboring farm. It was after their marriage that the religious frenzy got possession of them. they were not converted by the words of a man. They got the idea of fanatical religion and they got it together.

"I can't explain how I began to believe in the strange creed," said Mrs. Sharp. "It just came on me, and it came on him. I am through with that creed now. I still have the faith. I believe in God' I believe in the Bible. What I want to do now is to go into some church; to hear the reading of the Bible; to listen to the instruction of some good minister. I am through with the other form."

When Mrs. Sharp left the jail she expressed no thought of her son. It was when she reached the home of Mrs. Simmons that the mother love pronounced itself. When the woman entered the matron's home on Troost avenue she little realized the character of the friend who had taken her to her own abode to afford her shelter. Mrs. Simmons's son was at home and when he started to leave it he put his arms affectionately around his mother and kissed her. Mrs. Sharp began to weep. The sign of affection between Mrs. Simmons and her son had awakened her to new ideas.

CRIED AT THOUGHT OF SON.

"O, if I only had my boy," she said. "That's what you want to do," said the matron. "Get your own boy. Let him be with you; let him solace you; let him live for you and you live for him."

This simple statement from a simple woman of culture, the widow of Major Simmons, a confederate officer, a former newspaper man of Kansas City and one of the most revered of the town's early-day inhabitants, afforded consolation to the distressed woman.

"I shall send for my boy," she said.

"He must come to me. I'll try to forget this terrible ordeal through which I've passed. I'll live for that boy."

The woman dried the tears in her eyes and seemed comforted.

In the afternoon she took a long walk along Troost avenue, the first walk in the outdoors in nearly a year. She looked at the people and studied them. She came back to Mrs. Simmons refreshed. She still seemed a bit worried, but she appeared as one who expected happiness. She retired about 9 o'clock after bidding Mrs. Simmons goodby for the night.

"I'm tired," she said, "but I feel so much better. I think I can sleep now."

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October 25, 1909

NO TRACE OF BABE'S MOTHER.

Infant Left With Stranger at Sta-
tion Sent to St. Anthony.

Walter Almos of Rock Island, Ill., apparently not at all wearied by his long vigil in the Union depot Saturday night taking care of a month's-old baby and waiting for the mother that never returned, went to police headquarters bright and early yesterday morning to visit the infant preparatory to leaving town.

"I have only an hour before train time," he told the police matron, "but I felt that I could not leave town without visiting the youngster."

The matron left Walter dandling the baby on his knee and when she returned an hour and a half later he was sitting with the little one asleep in his arms.

"I guess I have missed my train," he explained, "but I hated to put the kid down for fear I would wake him up."

No clue to the identity of the young woman who deserted the baby has been found. Employes of the depot lunch counter say that she was in the company of an elderly woman and that they purchased some milk for the child at the counter.

They gave the baby to Almos and then the elder woman left hurriedly and the other followed shortly after. The child was taken to St. Anthony's home yesterday afternoon.

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October 17, 1909

MISSED MOTHER AT DEPOT.

Boy of 8 From Ohio Now in Charge
of Police Matron.

Charles Francis, 8 years old, arrived at the Union depot yesterday from Toledo, O., expecting to meet his mother, Mrs. Eva M. Francis of Kansas City, who sent for him. Mrs. Francis was not at the station and Matron Ollie Everingham sent the little fellow to the police matron, until Mrs. Francis could be found. A telegram addressed to Mrs. Frances from Toledo awaits her at the Union depot.

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September 28, 1909

NOTES IN SPLIT POTATOES.

Two Men Accused of Smuggling
Missives to Women Prisoners.

For throwing split potatoes, said to have contained notes for women prisoners, into the cellroom of the matron's department at police headquarters, Patorlman Arthur Dorset, who saw the occurrence yesterday afternoon, arrested Earl Lee and James Hastings of Liberty, Mo.

The girls held in the matron's room denied knowledge of any notes. The men were locked up.

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September 27, 1909

TELLS A WEIRD LIFE STORY.

Waif Picked Up by Police Gives
Account of Himself.

To justify his presence in Kansas City, Theodore Kautz, 14 years old, picked up yesterday by the police in an alley between Walnut and Main streets, Tenth and Eleventh, and placed in the Detention home, told a weird life story of melodramatic interest.

While the family, consisting of his parents, his baby sister and himself, lived in Coffeyville, Kas., eight years ago, Theodore said, a woman nurse left in charge of the baby, angered because the child would not sleep during the mother's absence, shoved it into the oven of the kitchen stove, put on her bonnet, left the house, and was never heard of again.

The mother, he said, drew the baby out of the oven alive, but it died after a few days., and the woman within a year was a maniac. The father, he said, placed her in the asylum and disappeared, leaving the boy to drift.

Coffeyville officials, he said, sent him to the Christian orphans' home in St. Louis, where he lived until a short time ago when, dissatisfied with the treatment, he ran away.

Theodore told the police he rode most of the way from St. Louis to Kansas City in the caboose of a freight train, coming in here on top of the cars. He was ill clad and suffering from cold and hunger. Mrs. Joan Moran, the police matron, gave him an overcoat.

Theodore says he came to Kansas City because he heard his mother was here in an asylum. Probation officers will investigate his story.

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September 23, 1909

NEVER AGAIN, SAYS MARKS.

Women With Babies Will Not Be
Put in the Holdover.

The matron's room at police headquarters has been refitted with new furniture, new beds and clothing. Commissioner Marks said last night that a repetition of Monday night's condition when two women with babies in their arms were confined in the holdover would not likely occur again.

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September 22, 1909

Excuse the Police Make.

Were Afraid Someone Would Talk
to Women in Matron's Room.

That someone might talk to the women prisoners who were confined in the matron's room Monday night was the excuse yesterday of the police for keeping two women with babes in arms in the holdover, instead of placing them in the matron's room, where they are ordinarily taken.

Mrs. Mattie Bell, whose 6 months old baby was removed to the Emergency hospital before morning, was turned over to the Humane society, and the child was sent to Mercy hospital.

The other woman was removed to the matron's room this morning.

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September 21, 1909

STEEL CELLS FOR BABES;
SOFT BEDS FOR EVILDOERS.

"Oh, Please Don't Put Us in There,"
Pleaded Mother With Infant as
Police Thrust Her Into Dungeon.

A condition never before heard of at police headquarters in all of its history, existed there last night. Four women, keepers of public rooming houses, all had comfortable quarters in the matron's room. Down in the steel cell section of the women's department of the holdover, locked behind bars, were two worn women, each with a babe at her breast.

Both of the babies were ill and crying, but there was no room in the matron's comfortable room for women with babies in arms. Those who had the beds and slept beneath the sheets are women who today will be accused of harboring young girls in disorderly resorts.

Mrs. Nellie Ripetre, with a baby of 6 months old, was sent in about 9 o'clock p. m. for investigation. It has always been the custom in the past never to lock up a woman with a baby. If there was no room in the matron's room for the mother and the babe, room had to be made by putting someone down in the holdover. This negro woman lay on the concrete floor with her crying baby folded tightly to her bosom. The floor got too hard for the mother later on and she chose an iron bunk in one of the cells. There she lay all night. The windows were open and the place cold. Mother-like, however, she huddled her baby close to her, to keep it warm. Part of the time the child lay on top of its mother, covered only by her bare arms.

About 11 p. m. Mrs. Mattie Bell, with a 5-months-old child, was sent in from No. 2 station in the West Bottoms.. Her baby was puny, sickly and crying. The matron's room, however, was still filed with healthy, well-dressed rooming house keepers, so the mother and her sick child had to listen to the harsh turn of the key in a cell door.

"Please don't put me in that place," begged the mother. "It's cold down there and my baby is very sick."

"That's the best we've got," she was informed.

Mrs. Bell was booked for the Humane Society. She had been found wandering about in the streets with her baby. After she was locked up Mrs. Bell tried the concrete floor, and, like the other mother, had to creep to the steel slabbed bed in a cell. She complained to the jailer and the Emergency hospital was notified that there was a sick baby in the holdover.

In a short time a nurse and a doctor went to the cell room and relieved the distressed mother of her sickly burden. The little one was tenderly cared for during the balance of the night but the other mother -- she's colored -- her babe clasped tightly to her breast, spent a chilly night.

The four rooming housekeepers in the matron's room rested easily.

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September 20, 1909

MARKS ASKS MATRON'S
RESIGNATION; GETS IT.

Commissioner Says Mrs. Burns Dis-
obeyed Orders in Various Ways.
She's Off the Force.

Mrs. Elizabeth Burns, for nearly two years a police matron, resigned yesterday upon the request of Thomas R. Marks, police commissioner. Mrs. Burns left police headquarters soon after and went to her home, 1509 Harrison street.

Mrs. Burns said she was accused by Mr. Marks of having allowed a reporter for The Journal to talk with Ethelyn Collins, held by the police as a material witness. The Journal printed no interview with the Collins girl. It was said that strict orders had been given that no one except police officers should talk with the Collins girl.

"I left the matron's room but a minute Saturday night," Mrs. Burns said. Mrs. Maud Fontella, where the Collins girl lived, brought the girl $31. As prisoners are not allowed to have money at police headquarters, I asked Henry C. Smith, a special investigator for the police board, who brought Mrs. Fontella to the matron's room, to wait in the room until I got back.

"When I returned three minutes later a reporter for The Journal was talking to Smith. So far as I know he did not talk to the girl nor make any effort to. I told him he could not talk to her and he laughed and said he 'had the whole story.'

"When Mr. Marks asked for my resignation, I was so stunned that I complied without thinking that he was not the entire board. I would not work at headquarters again, but I would like to be tried by the police board in order that my record may be cleared, as I am guiltless of any charge made."

Mrs. Burns is the widow of William Burns, for many years a member of the police force and a captain at the time of his death. She has four children.

Commissioner Marks denied last night that he had taken into consideration the fact that a Journal reporter had talked to the girl, in the presence of Henry Smith, a patrolman, when he asked Mrs. Burns for her resignation. He said that as far as he was concerned the fact that she had allowed a visitor to see Tony Cruie against expressed orders was not used against her.

She had allowed two men, one an old man and the other a young one, to speak with the girl against orders, he said, and had disobeyed orders in other ways, he intimated.

Soon after taking oath as a commissioner Mr. Marks informed reports that there would soon be two good-hearted matrons at police headquarters. It was rumored last night in police circles that Mrs. Joanna Moran was to be asked for her resignation also. Mrs. Burns and Capt. Walter Whitsett have had little difficulties several times.

Soon after Mrs. Burns left the station yesterday, Mrs. J. K. Ellwood, formerly matron of the detention home, was sent for by Mr. Marks. Her husband is the secretary to Inspector E. P. Boyle. She was placed in charge of the matron's room and spent the night at the station.

She said that Mr. Marks had asked her for forty-eight hours of her time, and then she was to be through. Asked if she expected to receive the appointment as a permanent position she refused to answer.

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August 13, 1909

JAMES MORAN SHOT
BY JACK O'DONNELL.

POLITICS SAID TO HAVE CAUSED
THE QUARREL.

After Shooting, O'Donnell Disap-
peared, but Later Surrendered
to Police -- Moran Not Dan-
gerously Wounded.

Enmity said to have grown out of a factional fight in the Democratic party in the Second ward last night culminated in a quarrel between Jack O'Donnell, a cigarmaker, who lives at the Century hotel, and James Moran, formerly proprietor of a saloon in the Washington hotel, in which Moran was shot in the neck and painfully injured by O'Donnell. The shooting occurred in the Century hotel about 8:30 o'clock.

Moran with several friends was standing at the bar in the hotel saloon when O'Donnell and Joseph Donnegan, manager of the Century theater, entered the place.

Moran and O'Donnell began quarreling and Harry Friedburg, who was with the Moran party, endeavored to quiet them. He told O'Donnell that there would be trouble if he stayed int he saloon and that it was best that he leave. O'Donnell went into the lobby of the hotel and was followed by Moran, who again started to upbraid O'Donnell. According to witnesses Moran threatened O'Donnell.

BULLET LODGED IN NECK.

"I'll just get you before you have a chance to do anything to me," is the reply credited to O'Donnell, who drew a revolver and fired at Moran, who had turned and was running from the lobby. As Moran dodged into the bargershop from the lobby, O'Donnell, who was following, fired a second and third time. One bullet struck the fleeing man in the back between the shoulders and ranged upwards and to the left, lodgining in the neck. One bullet lodged in the wall and the third went through the door.

Moran ran out of the barger shop and fell on the sidewalk in front. He was carried into the hotel and Dr. J. D. Griffith was summoned. O'Donnell was caught by Friedberg and John Campbell. A police ambulance with Dr. H. T. Morton from the emergency hospital removed the injured man to St. Joseph's hospital. H is wound is not dangerous and he will be out of the hospital in a few days.

COULDN'T LOCATE O'DONNELL.

The police were notified but when they arrived on the scene O'Donnell had disappeared and they were unable to locate him. Inspector of Detectives E. P. Doyle detailed Detectives Kinney and Jennings on the case. After going to the hotel the men went to the hospital to see Moran, who refused to tell anyone who s hot him. The detectives telephoned the inspector that they could not find O'Donnell, but that Joseph Donnegan informed them that O'Donnell would give himself up the first thing int he morning.

Another officer was informed that O'Donnell was in the Century hotel and would give himself up in the morning. His reason for delaying was said to be because Captain Walter Whitsett disliked him and would place him in the holdover without a chance of securing bond. When Captain Whitsett heard that O'Donnell was at the hotel he instructed Lieutenant M. E. Ryan to send Sergeant Robert Greely to arrest him.

FOLLOWED ANOTHER FIGHT.

The quarrel last night followed one in the afternoon during which O'Donnell struck Moran in the mouth and further bruised the ex-saloonkeeper. This fight occurred in Wisman's saloon, Twelfth and Oak streets. Bert Striegel, a deputy constable named Caulfield, Joseph Donnegan and Moran were in the saloon when Jack O'Donnell came in. The men had a drink together and then Moran, it is claimed,, accused O'Donnell of throwing down politically Michael O'Hearn. Other charges were made by Moran and finally, it is said, he called Edward O'Donnell, a policeman and brother of Jack, a name which Jack resented. The men engaged in a fight. Wisman separated them and put the crowd out, as he said he would not allow a fight in his place.

SURRENDERED TO POLICE.

It was midnight before the police could locate O'Donnell and then he voluntarily gave himself up. He rode by himself in a carriage to police headquarters and surrendered to Lieutenant M. E. Ryan. He was not asked about the shooting by the officers in charge and was placed in the matron's room. He did not mention the shooting nor offer any explanation for it.

The trouble between the men, it is alleged, grew out of the fact that O'Donnell and Donnegan were out of the town on the last election day and Moran and his friends accused the two of being faithless to O'Hearn. The breach between the men was widened more by O'Donnell's brother arresting a barber on election day.

The shooting scrape of last night is not the first in which O'Donnell has figured. He was shot in the back by J. D. Cosby, proprietor of the Cosby hotel, following a fight in the hotel. At the same time J. P. Hayes, who was with O'Donnell, was shot twice in the back. The shooting was in February, 1908.

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June 27, 1909

LEFT BABY WITH STRANGER.

Then Mother Disappeared in Crowd
at Union Depot.

Entrusting her 4-months-old girl baby to an entire stranger at the Union depot, a woman whose name could not be learned, yesterday disappeared into the crowd, ostensibly to see a friend on the train, and has not been heard from since. The woman who volunteered to care for the child turned it over to Mrs. Ollie Everingham, depot matron, and declared she did not believe the mother would ever call for it.

Accompanying the mother of the baby was a girl about 12 years. When they approached with the baby and asked the woman, who gave the name of Laura Jones, to care for it, they also left a grip containing a good supply of clean clothes.

In the grip were two bottles of paregoric, one small bottle of castor oil, two cans of cream and two nipples. The bottles bore the label of M. L. Galloway, Holden, Mo., and the druggist who sold the castor oil was W. H. Nelson of Kingsville, Mo. No other marks of identification were found.

Mrs. Everingham declared she would take the child and care for it, but the authorities ordered it turned over to the police matron, pending the search for its mother.

The mother is described as wearing a large black straw hat, a gray gingham suit and walked with a decided stoop. She is about 35 years old.

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June 25, 1909

BOY'S PRAYER IS ANSWERED.

Supplication to St. Anthony Brings
Food to Hungry Child.

After being apparently abandoned in the Union depot for a day and a half and waiting thirty-four hours without a bite of food for a friend who had promised him that he would come, in the hour of his distress Sylvester Stark, 11 years old, had recourse in prayer. He breathed a supplication to St. Anthony, his patron saint since his confirmation, and his prayer was answered. A red capped depot usher came and took him to Mrs. Olive Everingham, the depot matron. To her he told his story and Mrs. Everingham, turning to some men nearby, said:

"Who'll pitch in to buy this boy a meal?"

"Come with me, sonny," said one of the bystanders and led Sylvester to a restaurant across the street.

Ham and eggs and side dishes were ordered. Sylvester consumed them all and then, contented as a hibernating bear, was bundled into a car and taken to the central police station where he was turned over to the matron and put to bed.

Sylvester lives at 2108 Market street, St. Louis. He is the only son of a widowed mother. In the winter he attends school and last summer he worked. This year a friend of his mother, Charles Ayers, who lives at Whitewater, Kas., invited the boy to pay him a visit. A week ago he sent the ticket and Sylvester came. There on his friend's stock farm he enjoyed himself, but his mother wrote that she was getting lonesome and he must go home. Mr. Ayres bought the boy a ticket to Kansas City and put him on the train, saying he would follow on a stock train and meet him yesterday morning in the women's waiting room at the Union depot.

"I got here at 9:45 o'clock Wednesday night," said the boy last night. "When night came I crawled beneath a bench and slept. When I woke up I was awfully hungry, but I was afraid to go out of the station because while I was gone Mr. Ayres might come and not find me. Then after a while I didn't feel hungry any more. I got a headache and I began to pray and then the man with the red hat came and got me. I think Mr. Ayres must have passed through the station and failed to find me. I'm sure he didn't forget about me."

Word was telegraphed to Ayres last night that the boy was safe.

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June 13, 1909

GIRL WANDERER HELD.

Humane Society Investigation Story
of Rose Slocovitch.

Agents for the Humane Society are holding in the matron's room Rose Slocovitch, 11 years old, until they can investigate the story she told the police last night after Sergeant Robert Greeley had found her wandering on the streets. When found by the sergeant the girl said her foster mother mistreated her and that evening when trouble arose she was left on the street corner.

The story as told by rose is that five months ago a Mrs. Anna McDonald visited Houston, Tex., and claiming to be interested in orphans sold motto cards the the charitably inclined Texans. She was in Houston two weeks ago and when she left she was accompanied by Rose, whose father agreed to the girl's leaving home. Rose said she sold the cards for Mrs. McDonald. Now she desires to return to her home where her mother is supposed to be dying.

Frank E. McCrary, humane agent, visited Mrs. McDonald last night at her home, 1442 Jefferson street, and the girl's story in the main part was corroborated. Mrs. McDonald said she traveled around the country selling post cards and used the proceeds in helping orphan children.

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February 24, 1909

POLICE HOLDOVER IS A
DISGRACE TO THE CITY.

Pardon and Parole Board Takes Offi-
cial Cognizance of Conditions
at City Hall.

Unsanitary, filled with vermin and a disgrace to the city, are a few of the things said about the holdover at police headquarters in the report of the secretary of the board of pardons and paroles, which report was made on motion of Jacob Billikopf. Frank E. McCrary, the secretary, investigated the condition of the holdover.

The jail for men is situated in the cellar and is a breeding place for disease, the report says. The room in which prisoners are held while waiting for their cases to be called in the municipal court, the report continues, is too small and not well ventilated, the foul air making it very offensive in the court room.

Captain Whitsett is quoted as saying that all prisoners arrested by the uniformed police are only held until the following morning, while those arrested by the detectives, or secret branch, are held longer. One case brought to the attention of the board was that of witnesses against Dr. Harrison Webber, accused of selling cocaine and having $8,000 in fines against him. Dr. Webber is detained in the matron's room, while two witnesses who bought the drug from him are being held in the holdover. They have been there now over twenty days. The three are being held as witnesses against members of a medical company.

While the board admitted its inability to remedy the unsanitary condition of the holdover, they suggested that even public buildings came within the jurisdiction of the tenement commission. The Humane Society will be asked to investigate the sanitary conditions, and, if possible, have them improved.

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February 10, 1909

POLICE "ARREST" MENAGERIE.

Elephant and Giraffe as Well as Ten
Human Beings In Haul.

The police department yesterday "arrested" a menagerie, which included one elephant, one giraffe, one zebra, one hungry-looking tiger and ten human beings. The arrest was made under the orders of the sheriff of Mena, Ark., and the Kansas City department faithfully carried out the instructions, though no one yet knows the reason for the arrest.

"When Detectives James Todd, David Oldham, Ralph Trueman, John Farrell and Samuel Lowe went to the Kansas City Southern yards they found a weather-beaten circus car with more than half of the windows broken. The inmates, consisting of five men, two women and three children, all shivering, seemed to be glad to be arrested. The animals seemed satisfied when the car was run into the Kansas City Southern roundhouse under the orders of the inspector of detectives.

"We are waiting for further instruction," said Inspector Ryan last night.

Members of the company said that they were on their way to Santa Cruz, Cal., and that they did now know why they were being detained. The women and children remained in the matron's room, while the men were locked up in the holdover.

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December 24, 1908

SHE'D SHOOT ANY MAN
THAT WOULD SLAP HER.

Mrs. Rose Peterson, Who Killed Her
Husband, Expresses No Re-
gret for the Deed.

Instead of enjoying Christmas day as she expected, Mrs. Rose Peterson, who shot and killed her husband, Frederick L. Peterson, early Wednesday morning, will occupy a cell in the county jail. Her husband accused her of going to a theater with a young man Saturday evening, but the 19-year-old widow says she was arranging Christmas presents at her home.

Mrs. Peterson told Captain Walter Whitsett yesterday that she shot her husband because he slapped her. Two weeks ago she said she threatened to shoot her husband when he slapped her at Eighteenth and Cherry streets. Peterson at that time ran.

She said they were married in St. Joseph, March 31, 1907, and that her husband deserted her in November, 1907. After they were married, Mrs. Peterson told Captain Whitsett, her husband compelled her to work, although she wanted to keep house on what he was earning. His income was $13 a week and she earned $7 and paid all of the living expenses out of it. He often slapped and mistreated her and she decided not to ever stand for it again.

Her husband had taken her to a dance at the Eagles ball room Tuesday night, and the two spent a pleasant evening. Going home on the car about midnight, she said her husband quarreled with her and accused her of seeing other men too often. After leaving the car at Eighteenth street and Askew avenue, he slapped her, and Mrs. Peterson said she then drew her revolver and fired five times.

Mrs. Peterson had sued her husband for divorce, and yesterday she told the police that she had paid her attorney $18 toward his fee.

She sat in the matron's room yesterday and refused to talk about her act, except to Captain Whitsett. With him she was defiant in her answers and declared that she would again shoot any man that slapped her.

She was taken to Justice James. B. Shoemaker's court at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon for arraignment, but the justice had gone. She will be arraigned this morning.

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December 22, 1908

POLICE BREAK INTO
AN INDIAN ROMANCE.

ELOPING COUPLE FROM PRYOR
CREEK ARRESTED HERE.

The Girl Declares She Is 18, and That
Her Father Wants Her Single
So He Can Use
Her Land.

Young hopes were blighted and an elopement nipped in the bud late yesterday afternoon, when a telegram was received at Central police station from Sheriff L. S. Dallas of Mayes county, Okla., asking that Dora Fair, a quarter-blood Cherokee Indian lass, and Louis Rodgers, said to be part negro and part Indian, be held until further notice.

The couple were arrested by detectives in the Union depot the moment they alighted from the northbound train. The girl was dressed in a blue serge dress. Because of an extraordinary shortness of her skirt she appeared much younger than 18, which she gave as her age. She was pretty, too, and an abundance of dark hair hung below her waist. Rodgers also looked the typical half-breed Indian.

Miss Fair and her lover were taken to police headquarters, the girl being placed in the detention room, Rodgers getting an iron-bound den in the basement.

"It's all a mistake and it's cruel to keep us from getting married when we have gone to such trouble to get here where we supposed no one would look for us," sobbed Dora to Police Matron Joanna Moran last night. "I am sure it was my father who sent the telegram. He never wanted me to get married at all, he never did. My mother, who was a pure-blooded Cherokee, ran away from us when I was a baby and father married again. He always liked me. I own the land he farms, or tries to farm, near Pryor Creek.


PACKED UP AND SKIPPED.

"I have known Louis since I was a little girl and we had grown very fond of each other before he came back from the West this last time. He used to work for father, but they had a disagreement several months ago so Louis skipped out for Montana.

"Several times I told father I loved Louis and wanted to marry, but all I got for my pains was advice not to marry. He always tried to joke me out of the notion. When I saw he never would be serious about my relations to Louis, we packed up our duds and skipped.

"The plan was to come to Kansas City first, get married and then go to Montana to the beet fields where working men like Louis can get good wages, or about $75 a month. That would have been enough to support us with the rent off my farm and the $600 Louis had saved.

"But my father was very angry, as we knew he would be, when he heard about our running away. When he is out of patience he will say and do anything, so in order to stop us I guess he sent word to the officers here that Louis was a negro with kinky hair and I was only 16 years old, which is wrong. Louis is brother to my father's wife, or my step-mother, and there is no negro blood in him. I was 18 last January 15."


HE'S AN HONEST LAD.

Before the Fair girl was taken to the detention room at the station she was kept for several hours at the Helping Hand institute. She cried continually and would not be pacified.

"I want to find Louis!" she kept crying. "We were to be married today and it is getting late. He must be waiting for me somewhere. What will he think!"

Rodgers was called from his cell to be examined by Police Captain Walter Whitsett last night. He told a straight story. corresponding in every particular to that of his sweetheart. When he was returned to the cell the captain said he thought the boy was a good worker and honest and intended to marry the girl all right and would have done so if left alone yesterday.

According to Rodgers his father and mother were both fullblooded Cherokee Indians.

Sheriff Dallas is expected to appear at Central police station sometime this afternoon. It is thought extradition papers will not be necessary.

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December 15, 1908

BELIEVES HE'S ROOSEVELT.

Remarkable Fantasy of a Man From
Grandin, Mo., With $290.

Joseph DeViera, 56 years old, was picked up at the Union depot yesterday afternoon in a bewildered condition. Sergeant R. P. Lang took him to police headquarters and turned him over to Colonel J. C. Greenman, investigator for the police department.

When searched DeViera had $290 but he acted as if he had been drugged. When Colonel Greenman asked him what was the matter he answered: "Ask J. B. White. He knows." Mr. White, who is connected with the Missouri Lumber Company in the R. A. Long building, was called over the telephone. He said DeViera worked for him at Grandin, Mo. He is an engineer and machinist.

"He was in my office this morning," Mr. White said. "He seemed all right then. When he left he said he would leave for home in the afternoon."

After being locked in a cell in the matron's room DeViera became very violent last night. He yelled with all his lung power that he was "Roosevelt, the mighty hunter." Then he became Napoleon I, and finally said, "I am the Christ, son of the living God, here to reform the world."

"Do you know Adam God, the reformer?" Patrolman Patrick Boyle asked.

"Sure," was the quick reply, "knew him in Africa when he was a baboon. He knows all about the origin of the species, just like I do. We are living too fast for the mighty hunter. I can hit a bear in the left eyebrow at thirty miles."

This sort of rambling talk, yelled in a tone to attract a crowd outside the station, DeViera kept up most all night.

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December 14, 1908

MRS. PRATT IS ALLOWED
TO VISIT HER CHILDREN.

Sharp and His Companions in Crime
Spend a Gloomy Day
in Jail.

Sunday was a day of rest and pleasure for Mrs. Della Pratt and her four children, but James Sharp and his wife found little to brighten their stay in jail. Ed Fish and William Engnell were sullen and morose when they were seen.

At the Detention home the three Pratt girls and their brother Dewey had been dressed in clean clothes early in the morning. A few minutes after they had had dinner they were surprised to see their mother enter the large room in which they were playing.

The sorrowing little woman did not have arms enough to receive the rush of children, all of whom wanted to kiss and hug her at the same time. "Do you feel well," "Did you sleep all night," and a hundred other questions were hurled at the smiling woman by the happy little children who are trying to help their misguided mother forget the past. With the two smaller children on her lap and the two larger girls standing by her side with their arms around her, Mrs. Pratt listened to the wonderful tales of the happy moments her children had spent in the Detention home.

Mary and Lena Pratt could hardly be taken away from the primers furnished to them, so eager to learn are they. Even Dewey and Edna showed enthusiasm in their progress of being educated.

Mrs. Pratt was allowed to visit with her children for an hour, and was then taken back to the county jail where she shares her cell with Mrs. Sharp. The two women find much comfort in the friendship of each other, but Mrs. Pratt is the brighter of the two and is buoyed up by her affectionate children.

Both women spend the greater part of the time in jail pacing up and down the narrow confines of the cell, bemoaning their trouble and fearful of the final outcome. Mrs. Sharp had but little to say yesterday, except she did not understand how she ever became complicated in such an awful crime. Both women expressed sorrow for the grief of Mrs. Michael Mullane and Mrs. Albert O. Dalbow.

In another wing off from the women's quarters James Sharp, Ed Fish and William Engnell are locked. The once powerful "Adam God" sits with downcast head and eyes that appear to plead for a kind word. "Brother, it is awful. I am up a stump and don't know what to think," Sharp repeated several times when asked how he was feeling. Fish and Engnell were not inclined to talk very much, appearing to be unconscious of their positions.

After Mrs. Pratt left the Detention home the four little ones said they were happier since seeing their mother. Dewey told Mrs. Lizzie Burns, police matron, who had called on them that "we thought mamma was going to go crazy, but now she is better and we don't think she will."

"No, mamma slept well last night and feels cheerful today," Mary Pratt said. Lena, the eldest girl, watched the younger children and did her best to fill the place of her mother and the children were appreciative of her kindness. "We all want to learn and hope we can be able to help our mamma when we get out of here," she said to her visitors. Asked if they liked dolls, the three girls said they did. "We haven't had a doll since we left our home about three years ago," Mary said.

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December 12, 1908

WEEPS WHEN CHILDREN LEAVE.

Mrs. Della Pratt Declares That She
Is Not Inhuman -- Wards of
Juvenile Court.

With all their peculiarities, their odd beliefs, seeming to make them so unlike other people, the Pratt family became intensely human yesterday afternoon when the hour came for mother and children to part -- perhaps forever.

The parting came about 8 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Mrs. Pratt was in the matron's room, surrounded by her remaining flock, Lena, 12; Mary, 11; Dewey, 8, and Edna, 4 years old. She was talking of the future for her little ones, who were playing about the matron's room. She had just finished speaking of the riot of Tuesday, which she said she heartily condemned.

"I want to send my children to school now," she said. "I want them to have an education and be like other people."

"I want to start tomorrow," spoke up little Mary, the brightest one of the lot. "Della, can't I begin tomorrow? I want to learn to read and write." Mrs. Pratt's children all call her by her first name, Della.

"I want to learn, too," interposed Dewey.

"Me too," spoke up Edna, the baby, Lena, the one who took a leading hand in the riot, said nothing. She was leaning with her elbows on the window sill looking wistfully into the street.

"SUCH AN INSANE BELIEF."

"I wish you could all start right now and me with you," said Mrs. Pratt. "If I had had an education I never would have been a follower of a man with such an insane belief."

Just as she finished speaking Captain Walter Whitsett entered the room, followed by George M. Holt, the probation officer over whom the trouble of Tuesday started.

"Come on children," said the captain, "I am going to take you down stairs."

The children started out of the room, when the captain added, "Get your wraps."

"Why take their wraps?" spoke up Mrs. Pratt, a pained expression on her face. The captain said something about "just taking them downstairs" but the mother, who appears to have a great deal of love for her children, seemed to realize that the hour of separation had come. Her eyes were still suffused with tears as she had been softly weeping ever since she looked upon the face of her dead child, Lulu, at the undertaker's only a few hours previous. Tears started afresh as she gathered her little flock about her.

"Don't take them away from me. Don't do that," she pleaded. "I prayed all night this would not happen, yet something told me it would. I have had all the grief I can bear, it seemed, but this is even greater than the rest.

"What h as happened may cause people to think that I am inhuman, that I am not like the rest. But I am. I love these children; they are all I have now and you are going to take them from me. Let me go with them, even be near them where I can hear the sounds of their voices. Let me do that, please do."

WE'LL ALL BE GOOD.

Little Dewey was the first to shed tears as he clung tightly to his mother's skirts. Edna wept because he did, and Mary, her face wet with tears, said comfortingly, "We are just going downstairs, Della; we'll all be back. The man said so."

"Good care, the best of care, will be taken of them," said the captain as eh drew the children gently from the mother's grasp and started out of the room. Once more the frail little woman interposed. "Let me kiss them," she wailed. "I know this is the last I will see of them on earth." She kissed them passionately, one by one. Lena, the oldest, was mute, but choked back a sob as she left her mother's arms.

"We'll all be good, Della," called back Mary, "awfully good, and then maybe we'll all go to school and you can be with us -- if we are good."

The little ones were walked to the detention home, a large crowd following. Until they were landed there Mary, who always acts as spokesman, believed that they were to be taken back to their mother.

"Let me go back with you and tell Della that we are all right over here in a big house," she begged. "I think I ought to do it. She will worry so if she don't know where we are." Her request was not granted.

The children will be disposed of later by the juvenile court.

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December 10, 1908

HER FAITH IN ADAM
IS GONE.

"If Only I'd Stayed in the Baptist
Church," She Wails -- Sees
Her Error Now.
Della Pratt, Fanatical Religionist
DELLA PRATT.

The Pratt Children
LENA, age 12; MARY, age 11; DEWEY, Age 8; EDNA, age 4.
Lena was armed with a revolver during the fight between the police and the religious fanatics. It is thought she fired the shot that struck Patrolman Mullane. Mary was in the skiff with her mother when Lulu was killed by a bullet.

"If I had only stayed in the Baptist church!" Mrs. Della Pratt said last night, while playing with her four children in a cell in the matron's room at police headquarters. "I know now that Jim Sharp was not a prophet, and that his teachings were wrong. I cannot believe in him now, when everything has happened just opposite to what he told us it would be.

"My mother, who is down in Texas, begged me not to leave our home when we got the faith. Lulu, my girl who was killed in the skiff, begged me to give up while the officers were on the river bank. She said, "Della, it is all wrong; let's give up and go with them.' When I get out of here I am going to work to support my children and send them to school. If my husband wants to continue in the faith, I will not join him."

"I am going to have all the babies call me 'mamma,' too. Now I know it is wrong to kill people, and I am going to teach the children to believe in the good, old Baptist church.

"Yes, I shot the pistol five times," Lena, the 12-year-old girl said. "Just as soon as the police began to fire at us, I knew Adam, or Sharp, was wrong, and I wanted to get away, but was afraid. I told Mrs. Sharp that God was not on our side, and that I was going to run. I am sorry if I killed that policeman."

Mary Pratt, who was with the religious band when the shooting began, has also lost her faith in the prophet. She said she was running down the street for the skiff and dropped the pistol because she was afraid of it. "I never could shoot them," she said.

Even the two little children, Dewey, 8 years, and Edna, 4 years, seemed to be happy yesterday except for the loss of their sister. "Where were you, Dewey, during the fight," the boy was asked. "I don't know, I was piking for the boat when that man that took my picture just now caught me up in his arms and carried me over here," he said.

Edna added her mite to the conversation by saying, "I was afraid, but it is warm in here and I like to go barefooted." She had taken off her shoes and stockings and was climbing up the bars of the cell.

William Engnell told the prosecuting attorney, who took his statement yesterday, that he joined the band in April. He said that he never been completely in the faith, because he did not believe Sharp had all the power he claimed to have. "Now," he said, "I haven't any faith in him."

Melissa Sharp, alias Eve
MELISSA SHARP, "EVE."

Edward Fish and Mrs. Melissa Sharp, "Eve," wife of the escaped James Sharp, "Adam," were yesterday transferred to the county jail where they were first incarcerated, to the police holdover.
Edward Fish, Now in Jail
EDWARD FISH.

Fish was locked in a cell in the men's quarters and Mrs. Sharp was given like treatment in the women's division. Both are moody and have little to say.

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September 12, 1908

HANGED HERSELF, BUT LIVES.

Mrs. Harry Woodruff Made a Rope
of Police Station Bedding.

Frustrated in her attempt to throw herself into the Missouri river early Friday morning, Mrs. Harry Woodruff, Fourth street and Broadway, hanged herself in the cell in the matron's room at police headquarters four hours later. Mike Mullane, a patrolman, saw the woman running toward the river in an excited manner. He gave chase and caught her. While taking her to Second and Main streets the woman broke from him and tried to throw herself in front of a passing freight train. Again the patrolman rescued her and called the patrol wagon from police headquarters. It took four officers to put the maniacal woman in the wagon.

All the way to the station the woman said that she would not live for twelve hours and she defied the officers to save her life. After she had been locked in the matron's office it was thought she was quieted. At 7 o'clock yesterday morning a passing officer heard strange sounds coming from the cell in the matron's room. Entering the room he saw the woman hanging by a cloth rope from the bars. She was taken down almost unconscious and later sent to the Door of Hope.

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August 31, 1908

MOTHER IS WON
BY BABY'S SMILE

YOUNG WOMAN WAS ABOUT TO
DESERT UNWELCOME CHILD.

ONCE SHE RAN AWAY FROM IT

BUT EMERGENCY HOSPITAL DOC-
TORS BROUGHT HER BACK.

She Concluded to Face the World and
Strive for the Mite, When
It Looked Up at Her
and Laughed.

Late yesterday afternoon two women applied to Mrs. Lizzie Burns, police matron, for aid in disposing of a baby boy, which the mother said was just 11 days old. She said the child was hers and that she wished to give it away, as she could not take the tiny fellow to her Southern Missouri home. The woman with her said she was a sister-in-law.

Mrs. Burns told the women to go to the emergency hospital and ask for the nurse, Mrs. Ralph A. Shiras, who would direct them to the Helping Hand institute, where they were to remain until this morning, when arrangements for the final disposition of the youngster were to be made. The women obeyed her instructions as to the first part. They found Mrs. Shiras and told her their mission.

Now, Mrs. Shiras is a woman possessed of strong motherly instinct. Her first move was to grab the baby and begin to fondle it. She did not notice the sister-in-law as she walked into the hallway, and, beckoning to the young mother, said: "Mabel, come here a minute."

Nor did she see the two women walk hurriedly out of the hospital and begin to make tracks toward Fifth and Walnut streets. She was engrossed in trying to make the baby laugh by "dimpling" its chin. When she turned and said, "Come on now, I'll show you the way," she found herself with a baby on her hands.

THEY PURSUED HER.

An alarm was sounded and a "posse" was immediately formed form a squad of doctors and board of health inspectors. The chase was soon over, as the two women were captured at Fifth and Walnut streets just as they were about to board a car. They were returned and Mrs. Shiras headed the procession to the Helping Hand.

There the women refused to give their names. The young mother told of her shame and said that was the reason she wanted to desert her helpless infant. All the time she was talking she held the tiny bundle in her arms. The matron at the institute and Mrs. Shiras were trying to persuade her to keep her baby, work for it and rear it herself.

The young mother demurred. When it seemed she was about determined to give the offspring away, the little fellow looked up into her face and actually crooned, as a broad smile overspread his face. The mother looked down at her smiling child. A light not seen before came into her eyes, still suffused with tears, and she burst forth afresh.

"I'LL KEEP HIM."

"I'll keep him and bear my burden," she said.

"I know I'd never desert a baby smart enough to laugh like that when only 11 days old," said the white-haired matron. "That child knows its mother right now. Yes he does."

Then there was a season of billing and cooing as the baby was passed from one woman to another, while the admiring mother looked on through her glistening eyes. The sister-in-law was then taken in tow and shown her duty. The outcome of it was that a slender arm slipped about the young mother's waist as "Mabel, you can go home with me. You'll not have to bear your burden alone," was whispered in her ear.

Probably a Missouri Pacific train never carried two happier women than did the one bound for Joplin last night. They took turns about fondling a little baby, who occasionally looked at the smiling face of one of them and smiled back as if he knew his unfortunate young mother, but was by no means ashamed of her.

"She seen her duty and she done it," said a policeman after the curtain had rung down.

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August 13, 1908

WON'T SPEND PENSION MONEY.

Aged Woman Prisoner Prefers Term
in the Workhouse.

"I don't know who she is or what she has done, but here she is," Robert Weisman, the jailer at police headquarters, told Mrs. Lizzie Burns, the police matron, as he led an old woman into the matron's room yesterday afternoon. When the woman was asked why she was being held she said she was not sure, but supposed for disturbing the peace. She said she had been in the general hospital for seventy-six days.

Last week, she said, she threatened to strike another patient because the other woman was mistreating a patient. The prisoner is Mrs. Elizabeth Aldred, 56 years old. She said she draws a pension of $12 a month, but that she will go to the workhouse before she will give the city any of her money.

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July 16, 1908

WAS HIS OBJECT MURDER?

Jack Gallagher Calls on King
and Creates a Disturbance.
Jack Gallagher, Bully and Attacker of Albert King.
JACK GALLAGHER
(From a sketch made in the Police Matron's Room at Central Station Yesterday Afternoon

Following his vicious inclinations, Jack Gallagher attempted to assault Albert King, a reporter for The Journal, who is lying seriously injured as the result of a previous attack made upon him by Gallagher, in Mr. King's apartments at 720 East Fifteenth street yesterday morning at 5 o'clock. Failing in his first attempt to satiate his brutal desires because of arrest, Gallagher returned to Mr. King's rooms after having been released on an $11 bond, and again tried to force entrance into the room, uttering violent threats while trying to break in the door. Again he was arrested, but this time he was held without bond, because he was taken before a police officer who knew his duty.

Shortly after 5 o'clock yesterday morning Gallagher went to the hotel in which Mr. King is staying and asked Mrs. Etta Condon, the proprietress, to show him to Mr. King's room. Mrs. Condon replied that it was too early for visitors, especially too early for a sick man to be awakened. Gallagher and a friend who had gone to the hotel with him insisted, saying that they were very intimate friends of Mr. King from St. Louis, and that they only had an hour to stay in Kansas City.

Mr. King, who is well known in Kansas City, had been receiving many visits from friends since he was injured; so Mrs. Condon said that she would see if Mr. King would see them.

NURSE ORDERED HIM OUT.

Gallagher did not wait until she had awakened the injured man, but brushed past her and stood over his bedside. Mr. King was aroused and turning in bead, saw his former assailant.

"Hello, Albert. How do you feel about it?" asked Gallagher.

"I feel pretty tough since you got through with me," replied King, "and I don't want to talk to you. Get out of here."

"I want to introduce my friend, Mike O'Brien, to you before I go," replied Gallagher, beckoning to the friend who had remained in the doorway. "You remember Mike, don't you, Al?"

King replied that he might have seen O'Brien before but did not recall the circumstance. Then he ordered them out of the room, saying that he did not wish to have anything to do with them. By this time Miss Mayme Lefler, Mr. Kin's nurse, had returned to the room. Noticing that her patient did not treat his visitors in a cordial manner, she bent over them and asked who they were.

Upon being told that one of them was Jack Gallagher she ordered them from the room. Gallagher stood and laughed at her until she finally pushed him towards the doors.

"Oh, I'll step outside and let you all talk it over for a minute," said he; "but I'm goin' to stay here till I see your finish," addressing the last remark to Mr. King.

Once the bully was out of the room, Miss Lefler locked the door and writing a note for passers-by, telling them to call the police station for help, she slipped to the open window ready to drop it out on the street.

Meanwhile Mrs. Condon had gone downstairs to a telephone and called the police. She was followed by O'Brien.

PACED THE HALLWAY.

Mrs. Condon returned to her hotel and saw Gallagher pacing up and down the hallway, bellowing out his mad threats to the closed door. Soon he stopped his loud talking and hid behind a turn in the hall. Every time a door would open or close he would hasten to Mr. King's door to see if King had left the room or if he might be caught in the act of leaving. Mrs. Condon tried to argue with Gallagher, but her words had no effect. Then she tried threats and told Gallagher that if he did not go she would call for help.

"Don't you dare call for help you--" he rasped between his closed teeth. "If you do I'll fix you," and he shook his fist in Mrs. Condon's face.

Just then Officer James Mulloy was seen hurrying across the street. He had been notified by the operator at No. 4 police station that Gallagher was threatening Mr. King. Miss Lefler called out to him and the officer hastened up the steps. When he reached the hallway he heard Gallagher threaten Mrs. Condon. Approaching Gallagher, the patrolman told him to come with him to the police station.

"It will take four of you to take me there," boasted the bully, as he began to beat and kick on Mr. King's door.

"Not this morning," said the officer as he dragged Gallagher to the head of the stairs. There they were met by three officers who had gone to the house with the patrol wagon from the Walnut street police station. Once in the patrol wagon Gallagher quited down.

When he was taken before Patrolman Gus Metzinger, acting desk sergeant, he was charged with disturbing the peace and locked up. His friend, O'Brien, pleaded with Officer Metzinger for his release on bond, saying that he would see that Jack went directly home and did not bother King again. The officer graciously complied and made the bond $11, which Gallagher himself deposited.

Twenty minutes afterwards Gallagher was back at Mr. King's door, demanding entrance. As Gallagher hurried up the hotel steps he was healed by Mrs. Condon, who tried to get him to go back. Finding that her p leas were of no avail she called out in a loud voice so that King could just hear her, "Jack Gallagher, you get out of this house at once."

KING WAS ARMED THIS TIME.

But Gallagher thrust her aside and went directly to the door of King's room. Miss Lefler had locked the door and helped King to a sitting posture in the bed. Armed with a large revolver which had been secured after the first disturbance, King sat ready for his assailant should he manage to break through the door.

Gallagher was demanding entrance, but he got no answer from behind the door. Through the door Mr. King and his nurse could hear Mrs. Condon pleading with him to desist in his bestial endeavors, saying that Mr. King was not in the room and that he had gone home immediately after Gallagher's first visit.

But Gallagher would not be satisfied. He demanded that the door be unlocked. Mrs. Condon replied that the maid had the keys and that he would have to wait until she could be found.

Inside the room, Albert King sat in bed with the revolver pointed at the door.

"I am going to shoot through the door at him," he told his nurse.

"No, don't do that," she cautioned, "you might hit Mrs. Condon. You can't tell just where she might be standing.

As a matter of fact, Mrs. Condon was standing between Gallagher and the door, keeping him from reaching the knob as he had attempted. For five minutes they stood at the door and argued whether or not King was in the room.

"Haven't you enough trouble already?" asked the woman of Gallagher.

"Yes, but King and The Journal have given it all to me, and now I'm going to give King his. He and The Journal run the whole police department, and they have put me down and out, so it's me or King now."

"Well, he's gone home now, out on Wabash avenue, so you can't find him here. You had better go on and leave me alone."

"I don't believe King has gone, I'm going to see, anyhow."

WAS READY TO SHOOT.

The it occurred to Gallagher to look over the transom and see for himself.

"Stand clear of the door," wh ispered Mr. King to Miss Lefler. "The minute his head comes up over that transom I'm going to shoot. I believe that I will be justified in doing so."

Gallagher grasped hold of the knob, with one hand upon the top of the door, which he with his great height could easily reach. He was just in the act of swinging up to the transom when Patrolman W. K. Latcham came bounding up the stairs. He had been called by H. F. Hollecker, a saloonkeeper at 716 East Fifteenth street.

"You're under arrest, Gallagher," he called, being warned by Mrs. Condon that Mr. King was inside the door waiting to shoot at the first opportunity. That stopped Gallagher, and probably saved his life; for if his head had appeared above the transom Mr. King says that he would surely have shot.

Then Gallagher began to beg to get inside the door or to look over the transom. By signs only Mrs. Condon had told Officer Latcham that Mr. King was in the room waiting for a sight of Jack Gallagher. The officer would not allow him to climb up the door.

"You've got to come with me," said the officer, "and you've got to come at once. You know I'm able to take you and take you alone, so come along and behave."

GALLAGHER KNEW HIS MASTER.

Officer Latcham said afterwards: "The coward began to crawl like a whipped cur and came right along, not giving a bit of trouble. I did not even have to draw my revolver on him. When we got downstairs we found the patrol wagon waiting for us and nothing else happened."

At the station the day shift of police had come on and Sergeant Halligan booked Gallagher for disturbing the peace and refused to allow him to be released on bond. He was taken to police headquarters with the rest of the prisoners who had been arrested during the night.

Gallagher said that he would not go in the patrol wagon with the rabble, but he found out that the officers were determined that he should and soon stopped his bullying and took his seat in the wagon beside a drunken man.

"S-a-y," was the word used by Gallagher when he was brought before Theodore Remley, acting police judge.

"Now you keep quiet until your time comes," remonstrated Judge Remley.

"All right, judge," Gallagher replied in his blustering, bullying manner. "I suppose you are going to fine me because Albert King said for you to."

After James Mulloy, the policeman making the arrest, Miss Lefler, the nurse, and several witnesses had told their stories to the court, Gallagher asked permission to ask questions of Miss Lefler.

His first question was so insulting and foreign to the case that Judge Remley told her not to answer.

"That's right," Gallagher snarled at the judge, "you take away my rights after convicting me on their testimony. Now fine me if you dare to."

"Your fine is $500," replied the judge.

"How about signing a personal bond' asked Gallagher.

"Wait a minute, Gallagher, I have another case against you," Cliff Langsdale, the city attorney, said as Gallagher was being led back to the holdover.

"That's right, stick me, fine me another $500, the police and papers are against me and I guess you are, too."

A few necessary steps required by law and Judge Remley levied a fine of $500 on the second charge of disturbing the peace.

Looking over towards the table occupied by the newspaper men, Gallagher said: "I know when the police reporters leave the station They leave here at 2:45." Swearing vengeance against the police and the newspapers, Gallagher was placed in the holdover, later to be removed to the matron's room.

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July 16, 1908

CUNNING SHOWN
BY GALLAGHER

SLUGGER WILL TRY TO HAVE
HIMSELF DECLARED INSANE.

THUS ESCAPE HIS MIS-DEEDS

CREATES A SCENE IN THE ROOM
OF ALBERT KING.

Arrested and Released on Ridiculous
Bond of $11 -- Fined $1,000
in Police Court on Two
Charges.

An attempt is to be made by the friends of Jack Gallagher to have him declared insane.

The object is to prevent justice from taking its course.

The first suggestion for a lunacy commission was made by Jack Gallagher himself.

His saloon license gone, under a double fine of $500, and with a penitentiary sentence staring him in the face, Gallagher's only hope is in an "easy" lunacy commission that will free him of all responsibility for his brutal, wanton and wicked acts.

A depravity seldom equalled, unbridled license and bad whiskey is what's the matter with Jack Gallagher. His mentality, even though of a low order, is capable of recognizing right from wrong. Gallagher, according to the statements of eye witness, was too drunk when taken to Central police station yesterday morning that the officers in charge hesitated about arraigning him in court.

The lunacy commission judge is the last desperate stand of this desperado and his friends.

Gallagher was locked in a cell in the police matron's room last night.

INSANE? NO, BAD WHISKY.

When the city attorney, Cliff Langsdale, called the case of the city against Jack Gallagher, arrested yesterday morning on two charges of disturbing the peace, it was said Gallagher was too drunk to appear. Newspaper men attending police court insisted that he be brought out before the court and arraigned on the charges. Sergeant Frank Snow informed the court that Gallagher was "pretty drunk," but Judge Remley finally ordered him brought out of the holdover so he could judge for himself.

Gallagher's demeanor before the court was that of the bully. While he showed signs of heavy drinking he was sufficiently sober to know what he was talking about and the police judge decided he was sober enough to stand trial.

After Gallagher had been fined $500 on two charges he asked his brother, Thomas Gallagher, to apply for a lunacy commission to inquire into his sanity. Thomas Gallagher immediately sought the chief of police, Daniel Ahern, and asked that the $1,000 fine be stayed until he could have his brother tried for insanity. Chief Ahern readily granted the request, giving Gallagher a stay for twenty-four hours. Judge Remley consented to the stay granted by the chief of police. Jack Gallagher was then turned oer to Colonel J. C. Greenman who has charge of all insanity cases for the police department. Gallagher was taken from the common holdover and placed in a cell in the matron's room. The police stated that he had been put in the matron's room because it was rumored that Gallagher's friends had passed cigars and whisky into the jail to him when he was held for investigation when he assaulted Albert King on Wednesday, a week ago.

Gallagher's friends called on the chief of police during the morning and afternoon, but the chief refused to say what their mission was. Jack Spillane, a street inspector, was in evidence at police headquarters and in the chief's office all of yesterday afternoon. He refused to say what he wanted, except that he was a friend of Gallagher's.

SLUGGER'S FRIENDS BUSY.

Thomas Gallagher insisted on an early meeting of the lunacy commission and desired to name the members who were to be called in to act. He was informed by Colonel Greenman that the law required a certificate of two reputable physicians to determine whether a man was insane or sane. He also told Tom Gallagher that he intended to go further than the law required, that he intended to appoint four physicians so the public would be satisfied with any verdict that the board should return.

A physician, who said he had been Jack Gallagher's family doctor for the last five years, appeared at police headquarters and said he wanted to be called as a witness to testify that Jack Gallagher had been insane for nearly five years. He was one of the physicians that Thomas Gallagher asked Colonel Greenman to appoint as a member oft he lunacy board.

Willis King, a brother of the reporter assaulted by Jack Gallagher, called on Colonel Greenman yesterday afternoon and asked that he be notified so he could have witnesses summoned to appear before the commission. Colonel Greenman set the time for the commission to meet at 10 o'clock today.

"BAD MAN," SAYS AHERN.

Chief of Police Daniel Ahern said yesterday afternoon that he considers Jack Gallagher a "bad" man and that he does not want him at large. He said he will hold him pending a report of the self-solicited lunacy commission, a member of which Gallagher requested to be allowed to name.

"When Gallagher was brought in here the second time today I made up my mind that he is dangerous and should not be allowed his liberty again, said the chief. "Why, he might attack you, or me. I wouldn't allow a bully like that to strike me, but I know I am just as liable to a cowardly assault from a man of that kind as a newspaper reporter or any other person.

"Gallagher was fined in police court. His fines were heavy, but if he were went to the workhouse I thought Jack's friends might pay his fine, and I decided to prevent it.

"It was my plain duty to send him to the workhouse, though. What could I do under the circumstance of a fine and no cash forthcoming. When Jack's friends suggested he is crazy I was a way to keep him under restraint.

"It does not matter to me whether he is crazy from the effects of bad whisky or from other causes. I simply had to keep him under restraint, and I thought the lunacy commission plan was the best way out. I straightway turned the prisoner over to Colonel Greenman, the humane officer."

MUST KEEP THE PEACE.

At the request of Albert King, Jack Gallagher will be placed under a heavy police bond by the prosecuting attorney. After being placed under a bond, if Gallagher cannot raise funds to meet it, he will remain in jail for thirty days, after which time he is at liberty and will forfeit the bond if he disturbs the peace of the complainant.

Besides this, a warrant charging Gallagher with burglary is in the hands of the authorities. The charge of burglary is brought under a statute which defines burglary as the forcible entry into the dwelling house of another in the night time with intent to commit a felony therein.

Gallagher's actions in the home of Mr. King yesterday morning bring him under the rule of the statute and the warrant for his arrest on the charge of burglary is the result.

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