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February 7, 1910

"MOOCHED" ON A SCHEDULE?

Police Hold Thirteen Suspected of
Being Professional Beggars.

What the police believe to be an organized gang of professional beggars was effectually broken up yesterday morning, when thirteen men and women were taken from 12 East Missouri avenue to police headquarters pending investigation.

Tacked on the back of a door of their quarters was a placard on which was written the dates of various forthcoming attractions at Convention hall, presumably compiled as a reminder of the "on nights." The circus to open in the big hall on February 14 was noted, together with the auto show to be held February 28. The telephone number of Convention hall was also jotted down across the bottom of the card.

Three men who gave their names as Ed Murray, Harry Beach and George Wilson were apparently the leaders, as "general orders" by each of them posted about the walls of the room, indicated that the others were directed where and when to "work."

One of the women had a 3-year-old child and the police say she has been seen several times begging on the streets with her baby in her arms. It is understood that the nickels and dimes collected went into a general fund which was apportioned and divided according to the standing of each member.

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February 7, 1910

A WALKING HABERDASHERY.

Overdressed Man Imagines He's
Hunted Magnate.

Robert C. Kainz, a young man who says he is an Englishman recently imported to this country, went to police headquarters about 3 o'clock Sunday morning and demanded to know why he had been locked out of jail. The desk sergeant apologized for the oversight and sent him to the holdover.

When searched Kainz was found to be a walking haberdashery, with everything from a clean collar to an extra suit of clothes on his person. Aside from the assortment of dry goods and men's furnishings were:

One ruby ring, three boxes of Egyptian cigarettes, several cigar lighters, a half dozen packages of chewing gum, two pairs of new horsehide gloves and several neckties.

Kainz wore two overcoats, two complete suits of clothes, a jersey sweater and two vests, besides two shirts and some under garments. His feet were protected by three pair of hose, each a different color, and two silk mufflers were wrapped around his neck.

Investigation revealed that he had been living at the Salvation Army hotel on Fifth street. For a time he is said to have imagined that he was the president of a great insurance company, who feared that the United States government might prosecute him for selling bad "policies." He had a quantity of sample insurance policies and a rate book in his pocket.

Kainz was turned over to Colonel J. C. Greenman yesterday and his mental condition will be looked into.

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January 24, 1910

PENSION FOR POLICE.

Kansas City, St. Joseph and St.
Louis Department Officials
In Conference Here.

Police officials from St. Louis and St. Joseph were in conference with Captains John J. Casey and John J. Ennis of the Kansas City department at police headquarters yesterday afternoon to formulate plans for the passage of a police pension fund bill through the state legislature.

The meeting was held in the private office of Commissioner Ralph B. Middlebrook, the commissioner himself being present. No definite line of action was decided upon. The rough draft of the bill already formulated requests that all cities in the state of Missouri with a population of 100,000 be allowed to set apart a percentage of their yearly income for the maintenance of a pension fund for the support of police officers, who, by reason of illness or injuries, may be incapacitated. Commissioner Middlebrook stated that he thought that it was a humane idea and worthy of success.

The visiting officers are Inspector Major Richardson McDonald, Lieutenant T. J. Donegan and Sergeant James Healey of St. Louis, and Chief of Police Charles Haskell, Sergeant Martin Shea and Patrolman Joseph O'Brien from St. Joseph. Another meeting will be held this morning.

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January 22, 1910

BRIDE LOYAL TO PRISONER.

Says They Have Plenty of Money
and Charge is Absurd.

Clyde Houk, a prisoner at police headquarters awaiting the arrival of officers who will take him back to his home at Memphis, Tenn., on suspicion of having passed worthless paper, still retains the unshaken confidence of his bride of two weeks.

All day yesterday Mrs. Houk, a fragile little woman of about 25 years, sat in the matron's room holding her husband's hand and consoling him as best she could. They were visiting Kansas City on their honeymoon when Houk was arrested by Detectives Andrew O'Hare and D. D. Mitchell Thursday night.

"Of course Clyde is innocent," Mrs. Houk said yesterday. "The whole affair is a terrible mistake. Clyde is well known in Memphis, where he was engaged in the implement business. We have plenty of money, and it is absurd to connect my husband with anything dishonest. He merely overdrew his bank account a few dollars, that's all. Why, he did not even know that he had done so. I don't see the need of having policemen come to get Clyde, as we were going back to Memphis anyhow. I shall go with him and see the matter through."

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January 15, 1910

HUNTS DOWN WOMAN TO REWARD.

Laura Kessler Befriended Harry
Shaw Years Ago.

If Laura Kessler, who several years ago befriended Harry Shaw after the latter was injured in a street car accident, still is in the city, Shaw is here and anxious to reward her. Shaw's home is in Davenport, Ia., but he has been West the last few years and has made money in the mines.

Last night he called at police headquarters and asked the assistance of the police in locating Miss Kessler. When he was injured he was working for the Depot Baggage & Carriage Co., he says.

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January 10, 1910

HOBOES RAID ROOMING HOUSE.

But Police Cut Short Their Rest; 17
in Jail.

Tired of loafing around on street corners, seventeen hoboes organized themselves Saturday night and made a raid on a rooming house at 427 Delaware street, taking possession of all the beds after driving the keeper and guests away. The police were notified and the gang taken into custody.

"We got to sleep in a bed once in a while to keep from forgetting how," declared one of the tramps at police headquarters. "But I reckon you've got some bunks here."

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January 3, 1910

DID NUDE VISITOR
BECOME SENATOR?

KANSAS CITY DETECTIVE TELLS
OF EDITOR-POLITICIAN'S
HUNT FOR CRIME.

Covered With Mud, He Broke
Into Station, but Later
Showed Big Roll.
Detective Joe Halvey Narrates a Tale.
HALVEY SMOKES UP.

Murder was in the air in the detective bureau rooms of Central police station -- murder, along with other things, particularly tobacco smoke. This is said to be the atmosphere of a police secret service department the world over.

It is stronger when there is a story telling contest on and the sweating of a murder suspect in an adjoining room. Detective Joe Halvey had elected to while away the time until the end of the secret conference. His audience consisted of newspaper men, Inspector of Detectives Edward Boyle and Detectives Robert Truman and Dave Oldham.

"It was a late spring night three years ago," said Detective Halvey. "One of those chilly early mornings when reporters love to sit about the 'phone in the lobby and call up instead of going out after their stories," he added, with a ponderous wink.

A SCRIPTURAL WIND.

"It was a very cold night and a wind like the one spoken of in the scriptures was blowing down Missouri avenue."

"What kind of a thing was that scriptural wind?" inquired the reporter.

"I don't see why you intellectual cubs never seem to have had a religious bringing up," scornfully broke in Inspector Boyle, who prides himself in having maintained a Bible in his home since his marriage twenty years ago. "I think it is in Psalms where a March wind is spoken of that blows the straw hat wherever it listeth while many a good man and strong sweareth thereat."

The silence which followed the inspector's quotation was profound. The narrator took advantage of the lull.

"Well, it was getting along toward the second owl car. Michael O'Brien had just brought in a 'drunk' and booked him under the charge of investigation and Pat O'Brien and I were toasting our shins by a warm fire in this same office. I remember every detail, you see, just as though it was yesterday.

YELL AND A SOB.

"Suddenly there came from somewhere on Fifth street near the Helping Hand institute, a blood curdling yell ending in a sort of a sob, as though some man was being choked.

"There were twelve good men in different parts of the station, wherever there was a heating stove, and all jumped at once. There had been a good many holdups during the winter months and of course the first thing we thought was that some villain had made a touch under the eaves of the station. We were not going to stand for that, no sir-e-e-e.

"I was about the first of the officers to reach the big folding doors in the north end of the station. My six shooter was in my hand and there was blood in my eye, I can tell you. If there was something going on I wasn't bound to let the blue uniformed mutts with the brass buttons do the pinch act to the discredit of the detective department.

"Just as I had reached the last step the doors flew open in my face. There was just enough time for action and no time for thought. A lean white streak had started to unwind itself up the stairway when I dropped on it like a thousand bricks.

NAKED, SHIVERING MAN.

" 'Look out below!' I yelled, grabbing it by the neck and bearing it to the linoleum. Then I made a careful analysis. what I was holding was a naked man shivering with the cold and dirtier than any tramp from having been dragged in the mud. 'Great thunder,' said I, 'this must be Adam returned to look after his Eden interests. Who are you, anyway?'


THOUGHT IT WAS ADAM.

"It didn't take much tugging and hauling after I got up off of him to get him in front of the desk sergeant and it took still less time for the entire force to see that he was in the last stages of destitution. He didn't have a finger ring left and his clothing was mud.

" 'What's your name?' the sergeant asked.

" 'You can put me down John Smith,' said 'Adam' with a groan. 'I ain't got any other name, for political reasons. Gentlemen, what I want is clothes, clothes, clothes.'

CLOTHES OBTAINED.

"The nude wonder somehow looked respectable and we could see that he was right about what he wanted. Half a dozen of us took him into the sink room and gave him a bath, while the rest of the shortstops went in search of clothes. He was not a very tall man and very slim, while the officers we had to draw from were all big, so when we got done with dressing him he looked like a Populist of the short grass country the year of the drought.

"I can't help but laugh when I think of him sitting there in the detectives' room with the waist band of the sergeant's extra trousers drawn up under his arm and his feet in shoes the size of four-dollar dictionaries.


LOOKED BETTER CLOTHED.

"But for all his togs he couldn't help but look respectable. Every time he opened his mouth he emitted an idea by the double handful, which was strange considering his appearance when we first saw him. He was no ordinary man, that was a cinch. He was a genius.

ASKS FOR REPORTERS.

"About the time we were settling back into the humdrum of waiting until morning the unknown quantity took a hitch on himself and asked: 'Where are the reporters? Seems like there ought to be one or more around. It isn't time for the second mail edition yet.'

"We told him there was a little reporter named Billings in the room allowed for the use of newspaper men and that he was probably at that moment writing a story of how a naked, insane man had broken into the police station with the intent to murder the captain.

" 'I'll risk it,' he said with a laugh, 'send him to me.'

"We sent for Billings and it was evident that the two would be kindred spirits. The very first thing the stranger said to the reporter was what he refused to tell the sergeant, and that was how he had come to be naked. We had set him down to be a sort of a crank with spells of lucidness who had undressed and run into the station on a bet, but now we knew better.

HELD UP AND ROBBED.

" 'I was held up and robbed because I got into bad company trying to have a good time when I ought to have been decent,' he told Billings. 'I am sure none of this I tell you will get into the papers because I am a fellow newspaper man.

" 'Now what I want is clothes. I haven't got a cent but plenty of credit. I can get $10,000 anywhere when the banks open. I want you to strike some second-hand clothing store where the proprietor sleeps in the rear and get me a complete suit. I'll pay you when pay day comes.'

"Billings did not answer at once, and we could see he was studying hard. He had the money, for it was Saturday, the day he got paid, but he appeared not to like the idea of lending so much on such a short acquaintance. Finally an idea seemed to come to him. He looked sharply at the stranger and asked rather quick: 'What's thirty?' Now 'thirty' is a newspaper term that few people understand, but this one answered in a second, grinning from ear to ear: 'It means to chuck work and go home,' he answered.

REPORTER BUYS SUIT.

"Well, sir, the reporter did just as he said and got a whole outfit for $14.50 and the stranger left at daybreak telling us all to stick around until he could get another and better rig and return.

"In three or four hours he was back. He had on a brand new suit of the best ready-made clothes in town, patent leather shoes and a plug hat. Also he had a roll of $100 bills so large that they wouldn't go into his inside coat pocket without a special effort. He was showing us that he had the credit he had boasted about.

"This time when we saw him he was feeling better toward the world and would talk more about himself, but he wouldn't tell his name, although I have since suspected the reporter knew it. He told us, though, that he was a prominent Missouri editor with aspirations to the United States senate.

"He had been in politics for years with his paper and never wanted anything so bad as that Senate plum. His platform from the start, he said, had been the cleaning up of the state morally.

WANTED TO FIND TRUTH.

" 'I have preached against immorality so much," he explained, 'that I just had to get out and find the truth about the other side. If my political enemies get hold of last night's caper it will be my undoing.'

"After he had gone the reporter looked at me and said: 'Well, we have promised never to mention this and it is safe, I guess. But my! what a story it would be for some newspapers I know.'

"The reporter is out of town now. By the way, Billings wasn't his name, either. I wonder which United States senatorial candidate that was?"

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December 26, 1909

"BURGLAR" SAVED
AS POLICE COME.

Guest Mistaken by Roomers
for Robber, Imprisoned
in Guarded Closet.

"Come to 912 East Ninth street immediately," came a call late last night to police headquarters. "We've got a burglar locked in a closet."

The patrol wagon made a record run, but when it arrived only a crowd of badly frightened men and women roomers were found. There was no burglar.

"It was just one of the roomers," explained one of the crowd. "A man came out here tonight to visit a friend. He stepped out into the hall to look for a water cooler. The man had been drinking, and in his wandering through the dark halls stepped by mistake into a closet. A roomer, seeing the prowler, slipped up behind him and slammed the closet door."

The cry of "burglars" aroused the roomers. While the men rushed about in search of lodge swords and the women went for hat pins, one of the roomers stood guard with a revolver.

"Come out and I'll shoot," warned the guard in night robe, peering around his fortification, a chimney.

The prisoner took a drink. His courage restored, he shouted, "Help," thinking that he himself was the one being held up.

SOLID PHALANX.

The cohorts of the besiegers were now ranged in solid phalanx in front of the closet. There were all sort and manner of weapons. The men felt the edges of their lodge swords, and the women jabbed at supposed burglars, their forms outlined on the wall. The man with the revolver formed the advance line of attack. The rear was brought up by a boarder with a battle ax, used at a masquerade ball in the '60s.

"Help, burglars," came more audibly from the closet.

The friend in a nearby room was attracted by the noise. He came to the hall armed with a .44, not knowing that his guest was in trouble. He lined up behind the rear guard.

"Help, I'm suffocating," came another cry from the closet, this time more insistent and appealing.

GUARD CALLED OFF.

The roomer recognized the voice as that of his guest. The guard of nightie-clad roomers was called off. The guest with the jag was released.

A clanging of bells was heard in the front of the house. A squad of blue-coats came rushing in at the front door.

"Saved," cried the joyful man, emerging from his prison, mopping his brow.

"Stung," answered the chorus of nighties.

The police returned to headquarters empty-handed.

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December 26, 1909

"LEAN" CHRISTMAS FOR COPS.

Only One Exception Was Made to
Order Prohibiting Gifts.

Yesterday, in the annals of the police department, went down as a lean Christmas. It was owing to the order issued by the board of police commissioners shortly after the members went into office last April.

On the official records it reads, "No member of the police force shall give or receive presents." Short and to the point it caused clouds of gloom to settle right around the city hall. This year the patrolman on the beat was forced to wave aside all offers of boxes of cigars, black bottles, etc., and the family turkey was bought from the officer's monthly stipend.

One exception to the rigid rule of the police commissioners was made yesterday, however, and the officer in question is not likely to be called upon to answer for infringement.

On "Battle Roy," known officially as Beat 7 and the roughest beat in the central district, an old shoe string peddler plies his trade. Worn and bent, the old man walked into headquarters last night and asked for Officer Herman Hartman who, for the past five years, has patroled out of headquarters.

"Yes, he saved my life once," he stated to the desk sergeant, Robert Smith. "He pulled me out of the way of a runaway team. I haven't got any money but I would like you to give him this half dozen pair of shoe laces."

The sergeant took the gift and placed it in an envelope for the officer, who is at present a member of the traffic squad and stationed at Eleventh and Walnut streets.

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December 20, 1909

ARREST A SACK OF SNAKES.

Police Also Take "Grave Robber"
and "Wild Man."

Detectives who do not object to tackling bad men draw the line when it comes to taking snakes into custody. There was a case of near insubordination in the detective bureau last night. It came about owing to the arrest of the proprietors of an animal show which held forth at 525 Bluff street.

The animals consisted of a choice selection of snakes, one fine specimen of Gilamonster and a weird and non-descript sort of animal which was advertised on the handbills as the "South American Grave Robber." There was also a "wild man of Borneo," but he was roped in, tusks, nose rings and all and deposited in the holdover at police headquarters. The detectives were willing to go up against the "grave robber" and even tackle the Gila monster, but they drew the line at a gunny sack full of lively reptiles.

S. H. Terry, S. D. Rose, L. Crossman and C. H. Hornsen, the alleged proprietors were taken to police headquarters and booked for investigation. The arrest was made on complaint of a man who declared that he had been defrauded of $30 while in the show room. The stock alive and kicking was left at 525 Bluff street.

"Suppose the animals should escape," said the inspector of detectives. "You men had better go back and bring them down here." With one accord the officers declared that they had no experience in animal training. The matter was finally compromised by letting one of the proprietors out on bond to care for the sackful of snakes.

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December 15, 1909

ONE WIFE AT HOME,
ANOTHER AT HOTEL?

WED NO. 1 27 YEARS AGO; NO. 2
DEC. 7, 1909, THE CHARGE.

Prosecutor and Police Say Benjamin
Franklin Hughes, Held for In-
vestigation, Admits It --
Wife No. 2's Story.
Benjamin F. Hughes, Alleged Bigamist.
BENJAMIN F. HUGHES.
(From a sketch at police headquarters last night.)

That he married one woman, with whom he makes his home, twenty-seven years ago, and another, who, until Sunday lived as his wife at the Hotel Kupper, on December 7, 1909, is said by Captain Walter Whitsett of the police department and Norman Woodson, an assistant prosecuting attorney, to have been admitted by Benjamin Franklin Hughes, 124 North Hardesty avenue, in a statement secured from him in the matron's room at police headquarters last night.

Hughes was arrested yesterday on complaint of Valerie W. Wiler, who lives with her mother, Mrs. Cora Westover, and her sister, Clarice Wiler, at 1622 Madison street. To Lieutenant Robert Smith at police headquarters Miss Wiler represented that she had been married to Hughes, who has a wife and family at the Hardesty avenue address, by Probate Judge Van B. Prather in Kansas City, Kas. The ceremony, she said, was performed Tuesday, December 7.

Miss Wiler was under the impression that Hughes had left the city when she notified the police. It was later determined that he was home with Mrs. Hughes. Officer Oliver A. Linsay made the arrest. The man was held in the matron's room last night and will remain there until an investigation is made of the charges against him at 9 o'clock this morning.

HAS THREE CHILDREN.

Benjamin Hughes is 52 years old, and has lived in Kansas City two years, coming here, Mrs. Hughes said last night, from Glasgow, Mo. He is said to come of an excellent family and has dabbled in politics.

The details of Hughes's statement were not given out last night. It was announced by the prosecutor and Captain Whitsett, however, that he broke down and admitted marrying the Wiler woman in Kansas City, Kas., Tuesday a week ago, giving as his reason that pressure had been brought to bear upon him to unite with the girl.

According to the statement he was married to Mrs. Hughes in Osborn, Mo., April 16, 1882. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. James E. Hughes, pastor of the Baptist church there. Three children, two boys and a girl, were born to them. The oldest son, aged 20, is a clerk in the First National bank. The other son is 16 years old, the girl 11. Few clouds, he declared, darkened his married life until he met the Wiler woman last April. Mrs. Hughes had been congenial, a good, Christian woman whom all respected.

STORY OF NO. 2.

Valerie Wiler last night said she had first met Hughes when she was in the inmate of a home ofr girls at Chillicothe, Mo., under the care of Mrs. E. Carter. She believed the man was a state officer inspecting such public institutions. he seemed to like her at first sight, and came to see her often. Finally he induced her to become his wife.

Leaving Chillicothe, she stated, they went directly to Kansas City, Kas., where she gave her age as 17 years, while Hughes gave his as 45. She produced a certificate on which both names were signed together with that of Judge Van Prather who officiated at the wedding.

After the marriage, she said, the went to the Hotel Kupper where her supposed husband registered ans Frank Hughes and wife. They stayed at the Kupper several days.

"I discovered my mistake last Sunday morning when I was visiting my mother," said Miss Wiler. "She was aware of the attentions paid me by Mr. Hughes and told me that he had a wife and family on Hardesty avenue. I decided to find out if he had deceived me at once.

"Mother, my sister Clarice and I went to the Hughes home about 6 o'clock Sunday evening. We were allowed to enter unannounced, and found the man whom I had supposed to be my husband there surrounded by his family. He was very much frightened, got up quickly, and asked if he could see me alone for a few minutes. I would not listen. It did not take me very long to tell him that what I had to say was to be to his wife as well as to him.

BEGS NO. 1's FORGIVENESS.

"I said to Mrs. Hughes: 'Madame, I have married this man and have the certificate to prove it. We were married last Tuesday.' Then I threw myself at her feet and begged her forgiveness, telling her it was not my fault, that i knew nothing of any former marriage when I allowed him to lead me into matrimony. She forgave me then and told her husband that he was worse than I was. Later she seemed to take it all back, and when I went again to the ho use with my mother and sister tonight she treated me coldly. She even ordered me out of the house. I guess she is a perfect Christian woman. Anyway I loved her at first sight, and feel deeply sorry for her.

When Hughes was courting me he offered me many inducements to become his wife. He said he had been a member of the legislature and owned property in town and a farm near Cameron, Mo., worth in all about$75,000. He admitted that he had been married once, but added that his wife died eight years ago. 'I never loved her as I love you and we will be a very happy couple if you will have me,' he said once.

MRS. HUGHES DISCONSOLATE.

"Sunday night when we confronted him before his wife in his own home, he asked to speak with me aside. I refused, and he seemed very much annoyed. Finally he managed to get close enough to my ear to whisper, 'If you will make up with me, honey, we will get out of this town and go to Mexico.' I do not remember replying. The way he treated his wife did not suit me, although he was kindness itself to me from the first."

At the Hughes home last night Mrs. Hughes would not be interviewed about her husband. She was nearly distracted over his arrest, she said. Occasionally as she spoke she hesitated, wrung her ands and repeated passages from the Bible.

"This woman he married is a very wicked woman," she cried out once. "She drew my husband way to her through her evil ways. Lord have mercy on them both and me. My poor children."

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December 8, 1909

BOYS IDENTIFIED AS
SPANGLER'S SLAYERS.

ROBBERS' VICTIMS RECOGNIZE
TRIO, ONE A BRIDEGROOM.

Elevator Operators, Ages 17, 19 and
21, in Downtown Dry Goods
Store, Are Arrested -- Youngest
Weeps, Others Indifferent.
Louis Dye, Ralph Clyne and Harry Shay, Suspects in the Spangler Murder.
LOUIS M. DYE, RALPH A. CLYNE AND HARRY SHAY,
Three Suspects Held by Police for Spangler Murder and Recent Holdups.
(Sketched at Police Headquarters Last Night.)

Working on the "boy bandit" theory, the police yesterday evening arrested three youths, two of whom were identified as having shot and killed M. A. Spangler and wounded Sam Spangler, his son, in their saloon at Twentieth street and Grand avenue on the morning of November 23. Their names are Louis Dye, 21 years old; Ralph Clyne, 19, and Harry Shay, 17. All are employed as elevator operators in a down town dry goods store. Dye is a bridegroom.

The arrest was made at 5:30 o'clock by Captain Walter Whitsett and Plain Clothes Officers E. M. Smith and E. L. Maston.

VICTIMS VISIT STORE.

The officers visited the store in company with several recent victims of holdups and rode in the elevators with the boys as they were at work. They were arrested and taken to police headquarters. Albert Ackerman, 502 1/2 Wyandotte street, the man who was in the Spangler saloon at the time of the shooting, was summoned and in Captain Whitsett's office identified Dye and Clyne as the two who shot up the saloon.

"That's the fellow that had the gun," Ackerman stated, pointing at Dye. "The other fellow was with him. Of course they are dressed differently now, but there is no mistaking their faces."

Four others who have been robbed recently visited police headquarters in the evening and in every case identified the boys.

DRUGGIST IDENTIFIES.

W. S. McCann, a druggist, living at 1405 East Tenth street, identified Dye and Clyne as the two men who attempted to rob his store at Twenty-seventh street and Agnes avenue on the night of November 25. He said they went in the store, and that Clyne pointed a revolver at his head while Dye attempted to rob the cash register. When he showed fight they fired four shots at him and ran. He thinks that Harry Shay is the man that was left outside as a look out.

Miss Stella Sweet, 529 Brooklyn avenue, and Mrs. C. L. Flaugh, 629 Brooklyn avenue, who were held up Thanksgiving night on the steps of the Admiral Boulevard Congregational church, identified all three of the boys as the robbers.

Edward C. Smith of the Smith-McCord-Townsend Dry Goods Company declared that the three boys had robbed him on Thirty-sixth street, between Locust and Cherry streets, on the night of December 3. They took a pocket book containing a Country Club bond for $100. At that time they had handkerchiefs tied over their faces, but Smith was sure that he recognized them.

SPANGLER TO SEE TRIO.

Captain Whitsett made no attempt to cross-examine the boys last night, but ordered them locked up until this morning when they will be confronted by further witnesses, the chief of whom will be Sam Spangler, who was discharged from the general hospital yesterday. The prosecutor's office was notified and representatives will be on hand today to take their statements.

"I am sure that we have got the right men this time," stated Captain Whitsett. "They answer the description of the gang that have been doing all the robbing lately, and I am sure that it was they that held up Joseph B. Shannon last week."

None of the boys would make any statement except that they were strangers in town, only having been working for a week. During the identification process both Dye and Clyne showed indifference, while the younger boy, Shay, broke down and cried.

Dye lives at 1921 Oakland, Shay at 1242 Broadway and Clyne at 1710 East Thirteenth street. Dye was married three weeks ago, shortly before the Spangler murder.

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December 3, 1909

CALLED ON THE POLICE TO
ARBITRATE LOVE AFFAIR.

John Kenyon of McLouth, Kas.,
Wasn't Sure of His Ground, So
Asked Advice.

Meets an Unromantic Police Sergeant.

The intervention of the police spoiled a runaway marriage yesterday. John Kenyon, a farmer of McLouth, Kas., 84 years old, walked into police headquarters yesterday morning and, producing a letter from his fiancee, Mrs. Ada Cross of Frankfort, Ind., sought the advice of Chief of Police Frank Snow as to his matrimonial affairs. The chief refused to arbitrate and advised John to return to the farm.

Kenyon left headquarters, but a few hours later returned and this time called on the desk sergeant to referee. The sergeant, a big unromantic man, thought that Kenyon was a fit charge for the police matron and after depositing his valuables, some $20 in cash and a bank book showing a healthy balance, in the office safe, Kenyon was escorted upstairs.

Kenyon went to bed, but was not permitted to rest long in peace. Mrs. Ada Cross, in company with several real estate dealers, soon appeared on the scene. They wished to pay the old man a visit and informed Captain Whitsett that Kenyon was negotiation for the purpose of a rooming house on Twelfth street opposite the Hotel Washington. The captain then took a hand in the administration of the old man's finances. Mrs. Cross, on being questioned, admitted that she was engaged to be married to Kenyon and that he had promised to indorse her note for $2,500 for the purchase of the property. She stated that if it had not been for the intervention of Walter Kenyon, the old man's son, who made a trip from McLouth for the purpose of breaking up the marriage, the couple would have appeared before a justice of the peace Sunday.

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December 1, 1909

CHANGE ON "TOUGHEST" BEAT.

"Hoboes' Friend" Transferred From
"Battle Row" to Traffic Squad.

"Battle Row," adjoining police headquarters and generally conceded the "toughest" beat in town, owing to the number of cheap saloons and the rough element, will be patrolled by a new man today. It is the first change in five years.

Patrolman Herman Hartman, "the hoboes' friend," has been transferred to the traffic squad and will be stationed at the intersection of Eleventh and Walnut streets. Hartman is the heaviest officer on the force, tipping the scales at 330 pounds.

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November 26, 1909

WORKHOUSE INMATES
NOT SERVED TURKEY.

ROAST PORK THERE, WITH SIDE
DISHES PLENTY.

Various Institutions Served Thanks-
giving Dinners -- Children Had
Their Fill of Chicken -- Pris-
oners Not Forgotten.

The unfortunate who are in institutions and the unlucky who happened to be in jail yesterday were not overlooked Thanksgiving day. While a regular turkey and cranberry sauce dinner was not served at all places, on account of the high price of the bird, a good, wholesome, fattening meal was served, where turkey was absent.

In the holdover at police headquarters there were forty prisoners, all but five men. when noontime arrived the following was served to a surprised and hungry bunch: Turkey and cranberry sauce, real biscuits and hot cakes, baked potatoes, hot mince pie and coffee with real cream.

Out at the city workhouse there were 107 men and eighteen women prisoners to be served, too many for turkey at prevailing prices. They were all given their fill, however, of the following menu: Roast pork with dressing, baked Irish potatoes, bakes sweet potatoes, vegetable soup, cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie, coffee.

A real turkey dinner with cranberry, baked potatoes, celery, vegetables, pie, and coffee with genuine cream was served to the 109 prisoners in the county jail. After appetites had been appeased the men and women put in the rest of the day singing old-time hymns. It has been truthfully said that no old-time hymn can be started in the county jail but that enough voiced immediately join in to make it a success. And they always know the words and the chorus.

CHILDREN MADE HAPPY.

There were but seven children in the Detention home yesterday, but they were not overlooked. The matron saw that they were served with turkey, vegetables, mince pie, coffee, etc.

At the Salvation Army Industrial home, 1709 Walnut street, fifty-five men, and employes of the institution, sat down to Thanksgiving dinner.

"We had turkey, cranberries, potatoes, celery and other vegetables, bread and butter, mince pie, cake, coffee, candy, nuts and apples," said one of the men. "And we got all we wanted, too."

The Salvation Army proper served no Thanksgiving dinner to the poor yesterday, as it makes a specialty of its big Christmas dinner. Baskets are also given out at that time. Wednesday and yesterday baskets were sent out to a few homes where it was known food was needed.

Probably the happiest lot of diners in the entire city were the twenty little children at the Institutional church, Admiral boulevard and Holmes street. While they laughed and played, they partook of these good things: Chicken with dressing, cranberry sauce, sweet and Irish potatoes, celery, olives, salad, oysters, tea, apple pie a la mode, mints, stuffed dates and salted almonds.

DINING ROOM DECORATED.

The dining room was prettily decorated with flowers, and Miss Louise Mayers, a nurse, and Miss Mae Shelton, a deaconess, saw to the wants of the little ones. After the feast all of them took an afternoon nap, which is customary. When they awoke a special musical programme was rendered, and the children were allowed to romp and play games. Those who had space left -- and it is reported all had, as they are healthy children -- were given all the nuts candy and popcorn they could eat.

"I wist Tanksgivin' comed ever day for all th' time there is," said one rosy-cheeked but sleepy little boy when being prepared for bed last night.

Over 200 hungry men at the Helping Hand Institute yesterday were served with soup and tomatoes, escalloped oysters, roast beef, celery, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, cream turnips,cabbage stew, bread, butter, pumpkin pie and coffee.

Out at the General hospital, the convalescent patients were allowed to eat a genuine turkey dinner but those on diet had to stick to poached eggs, toast, milk and the like. A regular Thanksgiving dinner was served to the convalescent at all the hospitals yesterday.

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November 16, 1909

MARCHED HIM TO STATION.

Employer Surprised Employe Dis-
posing of Ham and Bacon.

George Teck, head of the firm of Teck, Waterman & Co., 411 Delaware street, wholesale dealers in cured meats, acted as his own detective and yesterday morning caused the arrest of an employe of the firm on a charge of larceny.

For some time past Teck has been missing hams and sides of bacon from the stock. Early yesterday morning, according to his statement at police headquarters, he caught the man trying to dispose of a twelve-pound ham and a side of bacon.

Taking him into custody, Teck marched him to headquarters and turned him over to the police.

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November 15, 1909

CRIES OF MURDER FROM
A HACK THAT VANISHED.

Patrolman's Shots Fail to Stop Car-
riage on Main Street - Near Po-
lice Headquarters.

Cries of murder and help, from an owl hack, and a chase by the police, with shots fired at the jehu of the four-wheeler, caused considerable excitement ont he streets of the downtown district early yesterday morning, and has given the police a mystery outrivaling that famous old query as to "Who hit Billy Patterson?"

The trouble started about 3 o'clock when police headquarters was disturbed by cries apparently of a woman for help. The shrieks were punctuated by a bass voice yelling murder. A half dozen police and other attaches dashed from the station to the street and as they reached the sidewalk a cab driven at breakneck speed went south on Main street.

Patrolman Kartman opened fire when no attention was paid to the command to halt, but the officers were soon outdistanced by the carriage. A general alarm was sent out to various stations to watch for the driver, his vehicle and its occupants, but no trace has been found.

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October 25, 1909

NO TRACE OF BABE'S MOTHER.

Infant Left With Stranger at Sta-
tion Sent to St. Anthony.

Walter Almos of Rock Island, Ill., apparently not at all wearied by his long vigil in the Union depot Saturday night taking care of a month's-old baby and waiting for the mother that never returned, went to police headquarters bright and early yesterday morning to visit the infant preparatory to leaving town.

"I have only an hour before train time," he told the police matron, "but I felt that I could not leave town without visiting the youngster."

The matron left Walter dandling the baby on his knee and when she returned an hour and a half later he was sitting with the little one asleep in his arms.

"I guess I have missed my train," he explained, "but I hated to put the kid down for fear I would wake him up."

No clue to the identity of the young woman who deserted the baby has been found. Employes of the depot lunch counter say that she was in the company of an elderly woman and that they purchased some milk for the child at the counter.

They gave the baby to Almos and then the elder woman left hurriedly and the other followed shortly after. The child was taken to St. Anthony's home yesterday afternoon.

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October 17, 1909

"JOY RIDER" NOW SORRY.

Didn't Anticipate Arrest for Giving
Another's Name to Auto Firm.

Representing himself as a Grand avenue furniture dealer, a man who yesterday told the police that his name is Charles E. Lach, engaged a motor car from the Royal Auto Company Friday night. After running up a bill of $67.50 he returned the auto and told the company to send up the bill "any time." Naturally the furniture dealer remonstrated yesterday when the bill was presented and then the police were notified. The "joy rider" was discovered and locked in a cell at police headquarters.

"I have always wanted to entertain my friends in a lavish fashion," he told the officers. "You see I'm a stranger in the city and after looking through the city directory to see if there was any one by the name of 'Lach.' Sure enough, I noticed the furniture dealer and decided to place the expenses of a motor trip on him. I didn't anticipate any such result, however, and I'm heartily sorry that I took such a notion."

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September 28, 1909

NOTES IN SPLIT POTATOES.

Two Men Accused of Smuggling
Missives to Women Prisoners.

For throwing split potatoes, said to have contained notes for women prisoners, into the cellroom of the matron's department at police headquarters, Patorlman Arthur Dorset, who saw the occurrence yesterday afternoon, arrested Earl Lee and James Hastings of Liberty, Mo.

The girls held in the matron's room denied knowledge of any notes. The men were locked up.

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September 23, 1909

NEVER AGAIN, SAYS MARKS.

Women With Babies Will Not Be
Put in the Holdover.

The matron's room at police headquarters has been refitted with new furniture, new beds and clothing. Commissioner Marks said last night that a repetition of Monday night's condition when two women with babies in their arms were confined in the holdover would not likely occur again.

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September 22, 1909

Excuse the Police Make.

Were Afraid Someone Would Talk
to Women in Matron's Room.

That someone might talk to the women prisoners who were confined in the matron's room Monday night was the excuse yesterday of the police for keeping two women with babes in arms in the holdover, instead of placing them in the matron's room, where they are ordinarily taken.

Mrs. Mattie Bell, whose 6 months old baby was removed to the Emergency hospital before morning, was turned over to the Humane society, and the child was sent to Mercy hospital.

The other woman was removed to the matron's room this morning.

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September 21, 1909

STEEL CELLS FOR BABES;
SOFT BEDS FOR EVILDOERS.

"Oh, Please Don't Put Us in There,"
Pleaded Mother With Infant as
Police Thrust Her Into Dungeon.

A condition never before heard of at police headquarters in all of its history, existed there last night. Four women, keepers of public rooming houses, all had comfortable quarters in the matron's room. Down in the steel cell section of the women's department of the holdover, locked behind bars, were two worn women, each with a babe at her breast.

Both of the babies were ill and crying, but there was no room in the matron's comfortable room for women with babies in arms. Those who had the beds and slept beneath the sheets are women who today will be accused of harboring young girls in disorderly resorts.

Mrs. Nellie Ripetre, with a baby of 6 months old, was sent in about 9 o'clock p. m. for investigation. It has always been the custom in the past never to lock up a woman with a baby. If there was no room in the matron's room for the mother and the babe, room had to be made by putting someone down in the holdover. This negro woman lay on the concrete floor with her crying baby folded tightly to her bosom. The floor got too hard for the mother later on and she chose an iron bunk in one of the cells. There she lay all night. The windows were open and the place cold. Mother-like, however, she huddled her baby close to her, to keep it warm. Part of the time the child lay on top of its mother, covered only by her bare arms.

About 11 p. m. Mrs. Mattie Bell, with a 5-months-old child, was sent in from No. 2 station in the West Bottoms.. Her baby was puny, sickly and crying. The matron's room, however, was still filed with healthy, well-dressed rooming house keepers, so the mother and her sick child had to listen to the harsh turn of the key in a cell door.

"Please don't put me in that place," begged the mother. "It's cold down there and my baby is very sick."

"That's the best we've got," she was informed.

Mrs. Bell was booked for the Humane Society. She had been found wandering about in the streets with her baby. After she was locked up Mrs. Bell tried the concrete floor, and, like the other mother, had to creep to the steel slabbed bed in a cell. She complained to the jailer and the Emergency hospital was notified that there was a sick baby in the holdover.

In a short time a nurse and a doctor went to the cell room and relieved the distressed mother of her sickly burden. The little one was tenderly cared for during the balance of the night but the other mother -- she's colored -- her babe clasped tightly to her breast, spent a chilly night.

The four rooming housekeepers in the matron's room rested easily.

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September 20, 1909

MARKS ASKS MATRON'S
RESIGNATION; GETS IT.

Commissioner Says Mrs. Burns Dis-
obeyed Orders in Various Ways.
She's Off the Force.

Mrs. Elizabeth Burns, for nearly two years a police matron, resigned yesterday upon the request of Thomas R. Marks, police commissioner. Mrs. Burns left police headquarters soon after and went to her home, 1509 Harrison street.

Mrs. Burns said she was accused by Mr. Marks of having allowed a reporter for The Journal to talk with Ethelyn Collins, held by the police as a material witness. The Journal printed no interview with the Collins girl. It was said that strict orders had been given that no one except police officers should talk with the Collins girl.

"I left the matron's room but a minute Saturday night," Mrs. Burns said. Mrs. Maud Fontella, where the Collins girl lived, brought the girl $31. As prisoners are not allowed to have money at police headquarters, I asked Henry C. Smith, a special investigator for the police board, who brought Mrs. Fontella to the matron's room, to wait in the room until I got back.

"When I returned three minutes later a reporter for The Journal was talking to Smith. So far as I know he did not talk to the girl nor make any effort to. I told him he could not talk to her and he laughed and said he 'had the whole story.'

"When Mr. Marks asked for my resignation, I was so stunned that I complied without thinking that he was not the entire board. I would not work at headquarters again, but I would like to be tried by the police board in order that my record may be cleared, as I am guiltless of any charge made."

Mrs. Burns is the widow of William Burns, for many years a member of the police force and a captain at the time of his death. She has four children.

Commissioner Marks denied last night that he had taken into consideration the fact that a Journal reporter had talked to the girl, in the presence of Henry Smith, a patrolman, when he asked Mrs. Burns for her resignation. He said that as far as he was concerned the fact that she had allowed a visitor to see Tony Cruie against expressed orders was not used against her.

She had allowed two men, one an old man and the other a young one, to speak with the girl against orders, he said, and had disobeyed orders in other ways, he intimated.

Soon after taking oath as a commissioner Mr. Marks informed reports that there would soon be two good-hearted matrons at police headquarters. It was rumored last night in police circles that Mrs. Joanna Moran was to be asked for her resignation also. Mrs. Burns and Capt. Walter Whitsett have had little difficulties several times.

Soon after Mrs. Burns left the station yesterday, Mrs. J. K. Ellwood, formerly matron of the detention home, was sent for by Mr. Marks. Her husband is the secretary to Inspector E. P. Boyle. She was placed in charge of the matron's room and spent the night at the station.

She said that Mr. Marks had asked her for forty-eight hours of her time, and then she was to be through. Asked if she expected to receive the appointment as a permanent position she refused to answer.

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September 20, 1909

"WHITE SLAVE" ARRESTS.

Woman and Girl Held by Police on
Serious Charges.

The police yesterday made two arrests in connection with the "white slave" traffic alleged to be carried on here. A woman and young girl she is accused of harboring were arrested late yesterday afternoon and held last night at police headquarters. No further information could be obtained about the case.

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September 3, 1909

UP FIRE ESCAPE SIX STORIES.

Patrolman, Weighing 275, Rescues
Girl Locked in Factory.

Patrolman Herman Hartman, who weighs 275 pounds, climbed the fire escape of the Cluett-Peabody Shirt Company at Eighth street and Broadway and rescued Lucy Henkensmeier, 15 years old, from the sixth floor where she had accidentally been locked in at closing time.

Lucy called up police headquarters over the telephone and between sobs said taht it looked like she would have to stay there all night unless help was sent at once. She had been in and adjoining room, she said, and the floor manager concluded that all had left when he locked the door. Ivan Knuedsen, a patrolman, accompanied Hartman to the scene.

In hopes of picking the lock of the building, Hartman was equipped with burglar outfits found in the station. A "jimmy" was of no avail, he found, and no skeleton kep would work. A charge of nitroglycerine was the only alternative, the two "cops" concluded. Just then a girl's sob drifted down from an open window.

"I can't stand that," said Hartman. "I'm going in the building."

Five feet above was the fire escape, just high enough to be hard to ascend from the ground. With a cat-like spring and a twist of the body, the fat policeman managed to get on the first rung and then the ascent was easy. He soon disappeared in the building and reappeared a moment later. He helped the girl down the ladder and she jumped in safety to Knuedsen's arms at the bottom.

Hartman perspired freely when he reached the ground.

"I guess that will take the fat off me about as good as drilling in Convention hall," he said.

The girl, who lives at 1811 Charlotte street, was hardly able to talk when she reached the ground.

"I was afraid to try the fire escape," she said.

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August 28, 1909

HALTED A NEGRO PARADE.

Laundry Wagon Driver Was Rough-
ly Handled by Negroes.

During the parade of the negro Knights of Pythias yesterday morning at Twelfth and Central streets a small race riot took place when W. S. Jarboe, a driver for the Fern Laundry Company, accompanied by his wife, tried to drive his wagon in the direction that the procession was marching. His horse was seized by several negroes and others drew the wagon to one side. The excitement subsided of its own accord before the arrival of police from headquarters. Sergeant Robert Smith, in command of the squad, decided that the trouble had been magnified and returned to the station without making any arrests.

After the trouble had subsided and the parade had passed, Jarboe and his wife drove to police headquarters and made a complaint to Daniel V. Howell, assistant city attorney. A warrant was issued for the arrest of George Thompson, a negro lawyer who was leading the parade, and who first seized the horse which Jarboe was driving. The warrant was served last night and the case will be tried in the municipal court this morning.

"I'm not injured -- except my feelings," said Mrs. Jarboe, as she told her trouble to Attorney Howell.

Spectators, both whites and negroes, agree that Jarboe used considerable indiscretion in trying to drive his horse up the line of the parade. Even after the police had arrived and the horse had been rehitched to the wagon, Jarboe had to be restrained from whipping his horse into the mob of persons that were lined along the curbing.

There was very little excitement, considering that it was purely a racial affair, and the parade did not stop. There was no interference on the part of the "armed knights." Mrs. Jarboe was not injured, aside from her feelings, as she admitted to Mr. Howell.

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August 13, 1909

JAMES MORAN SHOT
BY JACK O'DONNELL.

POLITICS SAID TO HAVE CAUSED
THE QUARREL.

After Shooting, O'Donnell Disap-
peared, but Later Surrendered
to Police -- Moran Not Dan-
gerously Wounded.

Enmity said to have grown out of a factional fight in the Democratic party in the Second ward last night culminated in a quarrel between Jack O'Donnell, a cigarmaker, who lives at the Century hotel, and James Moran, formerly proprietor of a saloon in the Washington hotel, in which Moran was shot in the neck and painfully injured by O'Donnell. The shooting occurred in the Century hotel about 8:30 o'clock.

Moran with several friends was standing at the bar in the hotel saloon when O'Donnell and Joseph Donnegan, manager of the Century theater, entered the place.

Moran and O'Donnell began quarreling and Harry Friedburg, who was with the Moran party, endeavored to quiet them. He told O'Donnell that there would be trouble if he stayed int he saloon and that it was best that he leave. O'Donnell went into the lobby of the hotel and was followed by Moran, who again started to upbraid O'Donnell. According to witnesses Moran threatened O'Donnell.

BULLET LODGED IN NECK.

"I'll just get you before you have a chance to do anything to me," is the reply credited to O'Donnell, who drew a revolver and fired at Moran, who had turned and was running from the lobby. As Moran dodged into the bargershop from the lobby, O'Donnell, who was following, fired a second and third time. One bullet struck the fleeing man in the back between the shoulders and ranged upwards and to the left, lodgining in the neck. One bullet lodged in the wall and the third went through the door.

Moran ran out of the barger shop and fell on the sidewalk in front. He was carried into the hotel and Dr. J. D. Griffith was summoned. O'Donnell was caught by Friedberg and John Campbell. A police ambulance with Dr. H. T. Morton from the emergency hospital removed the injured man to St. Joseph's hospital. H is wound is not dangerous and he will be out of the hospital in a few days.

COULDN'T LOCATE O'DONNELL.

The police were notified but when they arrived on the scene O'Donnell had disappeared and they were unable to locate him. Inspector of Detectives E. P. Doyle detailed Detectives Kinney and Jennings on the case. After going to the hotel the men went to the hospital to see Moran, who refused to tell anyone who s hot him. The detectives telephoned the inspector that they could not find O'Donnell, but that Joseph Donnegan informed them that O'Donnell would give himself up the first thing int he morning.

Another officer was informed that O'Donnell was in the Century hotel and would give himself up in the morning. His reason for delaying was said to be because Captain Walter Whitsett disliked him and would place him in the holdover without a chance of securing bond. When Captain Whitsett heard that O'Donnell was at the hotel he instructed Lieutenant M. E. Ryan to send Sergeant Robert Greely to arrest him.

FOLLOWED ANOTHER FIGHT.

The quarrel last night followed one in the afternoon during which O'Donnell struck Moran in the mouth and further bruised the ex-saloonkeeper. This fight occurred in Wisman's saloon, Twelfth and Oak streets. Bert Striegel, a deputy constable named Caulfield, Joseph Donnegan and Moran were in the saloon when Jack O'Donnell came in. The men had a drink together and then Moran, it is claimed,, accused O'Donnell of throwing down politically Michael O'Hearn. Other charges were made by Moran and finally, it is said, he called Edward O'Donnell, a policeman and brother of Jack, a name which Jack resented. The men engaged in a fight. Wisman separated them and put the crowd out, as he said he would not allow a fight in his place.

SURRENDERED TO POLICE.

It was midnight before the police could locate O'Donnell and then he voluntarily gave himself up. He rode by himself in a carriage to police headquarters and surrendered to Lieutenant M. E. Ryan. He was not asked about the shooting by the officers in charge and was placed in the matron's room. He did not mention the shooting nor offer any explanation for it.

The trouble between the men, it is alleged, grew out of the fact that O'Donnell and Donnegan were out of the town on the last election day and Moran and his friends accused the two of being faithless to O'Hearn. The breach between the men was widened more by O'Donnell's brother arresting a barber on election day.

The shooting scrape of last night is not the first in which O'Donnell has figured. He was shot in the back by J. D. Cosby, proprietor of the Cosby hotel, following a fight in the hotel. At the same time J. P. Hayes, who was with O'Donnell, was shot twice in the back. The shooting was in February, 1908.

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August 9, 1909

WIFE FLIRTS, HUSBAND SAYS.

Demanded Special Police to Follow
Woman to Park.

Hardly a night goes by without some person telephoning or calling in person at police headquarters and making requests that are not listed in the police manuals as among a copper's duties. If a refusal is met with it is not unusual for the officer's job to be threatened by the person making the request.

Last night was possibly a bit quiet but Lieutenant M. E. Ryan, in charge at headquarters, received two demands to detail officers to perform work that is commonly turned over to the private detective agencies. The first request was made by a woman who demanded that a policeman be sent out on Admiral boulevard and take her husband home. She had found him calling upon another woman, and the wife wanted him escorted home after he declared he would return later in the evening.

Demand No. 2 was made a few hours later. A man hurried into the station and walking up to the desk inquired for the Chief of Police. As the chief was not there he asked for the captain and was informed that a lieutenant was about his size. He then asked to have a plain clothes man follow his wife out to one of the parks during the evening and keep an eye on her actions.

"Guess you will have to do your own trailing," Lieutenant Ryan remarked.

"Gertie always flirts when I am not with her," the man said in further pleading for a policeman to spy for him.

"Then watch her," the lieutenant answered as he told the shortstop to put the man out of the station.

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July 22, 1909

WAS IN HIDING TWO
YEARS AS MURDERER.

MISSOURIAN BECAME A WAN-
DERER AFTER SHOOTING GIRL.

Betrayed to Police by a Boyhood
Friend, Fines Stark of Neosho
Learns the Girl He Shot
Is Still Alive.

After hiding from justice for two years in the mountains and deserts of the West, following an attempt to kill his sweetheart on the steps of the South Methodist church at Neosho, Mo., on the night of April 3, 1907, Fines Stark, 36 years old, was captured in Salt Lake City, Utah, on July 5. Last night Stark was placed in a cell at police headquarters for safe keeping, while I. H. collier, the sheriff of Newton county, waited for a Kansas city Southern train to take both back to Neosho.

Shortly before train time last night Stark was led from the cell and waited a few minutes while the handcuffs were adjusted to his hands by the sheriff, who evidently wished to take no chances with his prisoner. He looked careworn, and his face was deeply lined. Until the time of his arrest in Salt Lake City, he imagined that his attempt to kill Zea Carnes, his sweetheart, had been successful.

REFUSED TO MARRY HIM.

"I'm mighty glad I didn't kill her," he said. "I've been wandering all over the West, thinking I was a murderer. But I'm going back to face an awful crime, that I wasn't responsible for at the time. I was so crazed with love that I didn't know what I was doing.

"She had refused to marry me and I waited for her on the steps of the South Methodist Episcopal church. As she came down the steps that night with her sister, I fired at her twice with a revolver, and if it had not been for the sister, I would have fired again.

"When the people began running out of the church, I fled into the darkness, for the first time realizing what I had done. I hid in the hills for a couple of days and then beat my way to Arizona. Since that time I've never heard a word from home, until the day of my capture."

If it hadn't been for Samuel Williamson, a boyhood friend, Stark might have still been enjoying his liberty. For the last few months, the fugitive has been a ticket seller for the Sells-Floto circus, though he realized that his constant contact with the crowds might be his undoing. Williamson, who had grown to manhood on an adjoining farm in Newton county, unknown, of course, to Stark, was working in Salt Lake City. On circus day he approached the big tent and at one of the ticket boxes was Stark.

ONCE TALK OF LYNCHING.

"How are you, Stark?" he said.

That was the fugitive's first intimation that he was recognized. He smiled weakly and admitted his identity.

"For God's sake, don't give me up," he pleaded, and to conciliate his friend, refunded the money he had paid for the ticket. At the conclusion of the performance he took Williamson down town and exacted a promise from him that his secret was to be safe. But an hour later a detective placed him under arrest.

Possibly the $300 reward which was offered jointly by the governor of Missouri, the county court and the father of the injured girl, might have been instrumental in Williamson's anxiety to break his word. At any rate, he lost no time in finding the chief of police after he left Stark.

Prior to the shooting of Miss Carnes, Stark had been her devoted lover. They had become acquainted at Pierce City three years previously and when the girl moved with her parents to Neosho, Stark followed her. At last she refused his attentions and the shooting followed.

The community was extremely wrought up over the affair and and at the time there was considerable talk of lynching should the young man be captured. Will Carnes, the father of the young woman, is a contractor in Neosho.

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July 13, 1909

FOUGHT OVER 10-CENT MEAL.

Railroad Man and Restaurant Pro-
prietor Land in the Holdover.

A free-for-all fight occurred yesterday afternoon in Main street in front of the city hall, when Harry Fox, a railway laborer, was thrown out of Peter Scando's restaurant, 420 Main street.

The police took all the participants in the fight to headquarters.

Fox, who had been out of employment for several days, as standing in Henry Miller's saloon at 402 Main street when he saw John B. Davis, a clerk for the Burlington camp near St. Joseph. He had worked for Davis two years ago.

"I haven't had anything to eat for two days," declared Fox as he shook hands with Davis. "My pal hasn't had anything either."

Davis consented to buy the two men "the best 10-cent meal in the city," and stopped at 420 Main street. He paid the cashier, and Fox and his friend proceeded to eat.

Both started to leave when they had finished. Alex Feandos, the cashier, halted them at the door.

"Pay me," he said. "Not a step until I get 20 cents."

Fox started to remonstrate when the proprietor jerked off his hat and refused to return it.

"You've eaten about 50 cents worth of food anyway," he said.

Fox picked up a chair and was starting for the cashier when a bottle of ketchup struck the wall near his head. Then Scandos chased him into the street with a double barrel shotgun when the cashier threw him to the sidewalk. He had cocked both barrels of the gun, when Charles Chadwick, a fireman from the station across the street, interfered and took the gun away.

Fox had received a severe beating and was locked up with the proprietor of the restaurant.

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June 21, 1909

MARKS CALLED A BLUFF.

Invaded an Italian Saloon Where
He Had Been Threatened.

A few nights ago a carpenter, a citizen of Armourdale, Kas., strayed into an Italian saloon in West Fifth street. While there, he said he overheard the bartender and others talking of Commissioner Thomas R. Marks. Dire threats, even to cutting the commissioner's throat, or decapitating him, he claims, were made.

Believing he would do a service in warning the police of what he he heard, the carpenter went to police headquarters and told his story. While he was telling it, Mr. Marks came in and was called to hear what was said to be in store for him.

Suddenly Mr. Marks left the station. He knew the location of the saloon where the threats were said to have been made, and he went there.

"My name is Thomas R. Marks, one of the police commissioners of Kansas City," witnesses report him as saying. "I hear that someone over here is going to cut my throat or cut my head off before I reach the city hall tomorrow. Here I am and you may as well begin now."

Mr. Marks was so mad that for once he is reported to have used adjectives not in the dictionary.

"Notta me," said the man behind the bar. "Me say notta da word bout you, Mr. Commisinia de Marka. You doa one granda work. Me tink you one granda da man, good as Garibaldi or Georga de Wash. You come one wrong place; we all for Mr. Commisha de Marka."

About this time a customer arrived in the saloon, and, not knowing was was on, ordered a glass of beer. The man behind the bar, still lauding Mr. Marks, turned to draw the beer.

"Don't you turn your back on me, you stiletto-sticking, black-handed rascal," ordered the police commissioner.

The frightened Italian wheeled about with more profuse apologies, saying Mr. Marks was a greater man than "Mayor de Crit or Presidenta da Taffa."

After satisfying himself that all within his hearing had been thoroughly subdued and that no more threats would come from such a source, Mr. Marks strode from the trembling bunch of dark-eyed foreigners and went back to police headquarters. His venture was regarded as foolhardy by the police, none of whom he asked to accompany him. The police say, however, that the proprietor of that saloon now cannot have too much praise for "Mr. Commisha de Marka."

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June 20, 1909

LEAVES THE POLICE FORCE.

Wm. Long, Jailer at Headquarters,
Becomes Hotel Detective.

After more than a dozen years on the police department, William Long, the jailer at police headquarters, resigned yesterday to take a position at the Hotel Baltimore as night house officer. He will serve under H. W. Hammil, former lieutenant in the police department, who resigned to go with the hotel about three months ago.

Long was sent to the "woods" with others who thought that Hayes should have been retained as chief. He was moved back to headquarters five months ago.

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June 14, 1909

CONFISCATE 22 CASES OF
BEER AT GALLAGHER'S.

POLICE ARREST 22 IN NORTH
END SUNDAY RAID.

Eight Women Beside Mrs. Gallagher,
Who, With Husband, Is Charged
With Selling Liquor With-
out a License.

Charged with selling liquor without a license, Jack Gallagher, ex-patrolman and former North End saloonkeeper, was arrested and locked up in the holdover at Central police station yesterday in default of $500 cash bond. He was arrested in a raid made by Captain Walter Whitsett on the Star hotel, Oak street and Independence avenue, at 11:30 o'clock yesterday morning.

Since Gallagher's saloon licenses were taken away from him by the board of police commissioners after he assaulted Albert King, a reporter for The Journal, he has been conducting a rooming house in the Star hotel.

Yesterday the lid in the North End was on extremely tight. Gallagher had twenty-two cases of bottled beer in a room in the hotel.

One of the numerous enemies Gallagher had made by his bullying attitude went to police headquarters about 11:00 and reported to Captain Whitsett that Gallagher was violating the excise laws. Calling Sergeant Edward McNamara and ten patrolmen, Captain Whitsett headed the squad in making the raid. Arriving at the Star hotel building, the police found the door leading to the rear stairway locked and barred. Entrance to the hotel was made by the front door.

TWENTY-NINE AND 22 CASES.

The captain and sergeant led the patrolmen in a rush up the stairway. Scattering out the patrolmen searched every room for evidence. Men and women, the police claim, were found drinking beer in several rooms. While searching the house the police discovered one room which was locked. Gallagher said he did not have the key. The prisoners were sent to the station in a patrol wagon which made three trips to take the twenty-nine persons placed under arrest.

When the locked room was entered twenty-two cases of bottled beer were found and sent to headquarters where they are held as evidence. Among the persons arrested were eight women besides Jack Gallagher's wife, who at midnight was released on a cash bond of $500.

All of those arrested said they lived at the hotel. Mrs. Gallagher denied that all of the women lived there, but said only two or three of them were roomers.

When the raid was made, Gallagher threatened to place charges against the police. Their jobs were to be had, according to him, and he told them he would get them. Until he was locked in the holdover Gallagher continued his swaggering tactics. He refused to discuss his arrest.

BEER FOR OWN USE.

Gallagher's wife informed the police that they had a government license, which expired in July. She denied that the police found anyone drinking beer, or that any beer had been sold. Before she was aware that the police had confiscated the beer, she said no evidence had been secured. When asked what they were doing with so many cases in the hotel, she said it was for their private use. Mrs. Gallagher said the police and newspapers were endeavoring to bankrupt them, but that they had plenty left. The habitues were released on $11 bond.

Jack Gallagher has had a varied experience in the North End, having been at various times a policeman, ward politician and saloonkeeper. Following numerous arrests for disturbing the peace, he was finally compelled to serve a term in the workhouse for an assault upon a newspaper man.

The officers participating in the raid under Captain Walter Whitsett were Sergeant Edward McNamara and Patrolmen George Hightower, Daniel Jones, P. J. Murphy, Vincent Maturo, Charles Walters, Walter Doman, Thomas Eads, Thomas Maddigan, Frank Rooth and Patrick Dalton.

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June 14, 1909

CAN'T BE MARRIED ON SUNDAY.

Young Couple From Smithville Com-
pelled to Postpone.

"It's a blame shame people can't be legally married on Sunday because it is a legal holiday," Mark Pate of Smithville, Mo., remarked to his sweetheart, Lovie Burge, as the two left police headquarters last night. The young people arrived in Kansas City from Smithville with the intention of being married.

A trip to the court house to secure the license revealed to the pair that trouble was ahead of them. Some one directed them to the county jail, but the deputy marshals pleaded ignorance as to marriage licenses and recommended police headquarters. Arm in arm the couple entered the station and inquired for a license.

"Bonds are the only legal papers we handle," Lieutenant M. E. Ryan informed them.

Then the officers became interested in the young people and by suing the telephone finally reached the county recorder, but he refused to issue a license on Sunday. A minister had been tentatively engaged to perform the ceremony by Holly Jarboe, desk sergeant, who later commanded the order.

The Smithvillians left the station discouraged, but said they would secure a license early in the morning. They came to Kansas City to avoid the "cut-ups" of their home town.

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