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February 3, 1910

SUDS MAKERS ON CARPET.

Police Board Investigates Heim De-
liveries in East Bottoms.

The Heim Brewing Company was called on yesterday to explain the presence of twenty-five cases of its beer in the house of a Belgian in the East Bottoms near the Milwaukee bridge. This with a large quantity of whisky and wine was found there Sunday, January 23, by police from No. 8 station. They were disguised as railroad men and reported that they had no trouble in getting whatever they wanted, the Belgian's wife waiting on them as bar maid.

"It is not unusual," said a driver for the brewery who delivers in that district, "for five or six cases of beer to be left at one Belgian home on Saturday, especially where they keep boarders. One Belgian will easily consume a whole case over Sunday. All sales are cash and many times one person will buy several cases saying they are for different parties who left the money with him because he lived near the road."

An agent for the brewery explained that if the sales had been made in any other part of the city but the East Bottoms it would have caused suspicion and an investigation.

"But who would suspect a bootlegging joint down among the Belgians?" he said. "We never thought of such a thing and therefore the sales caused no remark."

"But the driver who sold the beer is still in your employ, I see," insisted Commissioner Thomas R. Marks. "Does that show good faith with this board?"

"We do not think the driver is to blame," said the agent. "It was an everyday occurrence. And how is the company to blame?"

"Well," said Mr. Marks, "we have no right to try the driver. This board now is holding up two of the Heim licenses on account of sales made to the Buffalo Club, a lid-lifting organization, and I think when it holds up about three more next July you will keep an eye on where your beer goes when delivered to other than saloons."

Judge R. B. Middlebrook made no remark other than to say that the case would be taken under advisement and decided later.

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January 20, 1910

TWO SERGEANTS STEP UP.

Commissions as Lieutenants for
James and Anderson.

The first promotion of any moment to be made by the present police board took place nar the close of the meeting yesterday when Sergeants Robert E. L. James and Frank H. Anderson, who have given the better parts of their lives to the service, were made lieutenants. Anderson is said to be a Republican and James is a Democrat. Neither man got much encouragement from former boards though their records are both clean.

Anderson, now assigned to desk work at No. 3 station on the Southwest boulevard, went on the force November 9, 1889. On account of his intelligence and adaptability for the work he was assigned for m any eyars to duty in the city clerk's office where he served papers in condemnation suits and did clerical work. On January 9, 1907, while H. M. Beardsley was mayor, Anderson was made a sergeant by a Democratic board. His promtion is said to have been due to former Mayor Beardsley's efforts.

Lieutenant James went on the department as a probationary officer July 22, 1889, a few months before Lieutenant Anderson. As a patrolman James has walked every beat in Kansas City. On July 22, 1902, he was promoted to sergeant.

James early showed particular efficiency in handling large crowds. While outside sergeant at No. 2 station in the West Bottoms during the destructive flood of June, 1903, James distinguished himself.

Last July, when still a sergeant, James was assigned by the police board to Convention hall as instructor in the matter of police duty. This pertained to the old men, already on the force as well as new recruits. In all 241 policemen were instructed in groups of from twenty-five to seventy and their instruction lasted from seventy-two to ninety hours per group. Lieutenant James also had charge of the initial opening of Electric park a few years ago. For two weeks he has had charge of the desk at No. 7 station in Sheffield. Lieutenant James was born at Tipton, Cooper county, Mo., October 17, 1867. His father, Dr. P. T. James, was assistant surgeon general to General Sterling Price of the Confederate army. Some time after the war the family moved to Holden, Mo.. Lieutenant James is married and has four children. He is a brother of Dr. Samuel C. James, a member of the general hospital staff of visiting surgeons and physicians.

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December 30, 1909

FIND WOMEN IN A SALOON.

Italian Promises Police Board to
Bar Them in Future.

The board of police commissioners is having a hard time impressing upon the Italians of "Little Italy" the fact that their women must not frequent saloons. In the past some Italian women have b een as much at home in the saloon as in the home; in fact, many of them used to tend bar while their husbands were at meals.

Yesterday Mattaeo La Salla, who has a saloon at Missouri avenue and Cherry street, was before the board for permitting his wife and mother to frequent his saloon. It was some time before Judge Middlebrook could impress La Salla with the fact that there was a law in this state which prevents women from frequenting saloons. The Italian looked worried, puzzled, but he promised that his women folks would keep out of his saloon in the future.

Salino Defeo, 600 East Fifth street, and his bartender were seen twice, it is alleged , to serve a woman with a bucket of beer. Commissioner Marks was closing Defeo's saloon for two days, but, being Christmas week, Judge Middlebrook thought the board should be more lenient and a reprimand was given.

For having a man not in his employ in his saloon at 1:20 a. m. last Friday, John Honl, a saloonkeeper at 7306 East Fifteenth street, was ordered to close his place Friday and Saturday.

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December 26, 1909

"LEAN" CHRISTMAS FOR COPS.

Only One Exception Was Made to
Order Prohibiting Gifts.

Yesterday, in the annals of the police department, went down as a lean Christmas. It was owing to the order issued by the board of police commissioners shortly after the members went into office last April.

On the official records it reads, "No member of the police force shall give or receive presents." Short and to the point it caused clouds of gloom to settle right around the city hall. This year the patrolman on the beat was forced to wave aside all offers of boxes of cigars, black bottles, etc., and the family turkey was bought from the officer's monthly stipend.

One exception to the rigid rule of the police commissioners was made yesterday, however, and the officer in question is not likely to be called upon to answer for infringement.

On "Battle Roy," known officially as Beat 7 and the roughest beat in the central district, an old shoe string peddler plies his trade. Worn and bent, the old man walked into headquarters last night and asked for Officer Herman Hartman who, for the past five years, has patroled out of headquarters.

"Yes, he saved my life once," he stated to the desk sergeant, Robert Smith. "He pulled me out of the way of a runaway team. I haven't got any money but I would like you to give him this half dozen pair of shoe laces."

The sergeant took the gift and placed it in an envelope for the officer, who is at present a member of the traffic squad and stationed at Eleventh and Walnut streets.

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November 15, 1909

WOOLF TOOK NO CHANCES.

Didn't Even Take Cigars Until
Board Gave Permission.


A box of cigars was handed to the board of police commissioners yesterday with a written request from Patrolman J. L. Woolf that he be permitted to accept it. Counselor Cromer explained that he had recently sent Woolf out to stand guard at a wedding.


"When he left," said Cromer, "the host handed Woolf a cigar. He noticed that a bill was folded beneath the band. Woolf refused the cigar. The man asked Woolf to call at his place and gave him this box of cigars, which he is asking permission to accept."

"Good," shouted Commissioner marks, "I wish there were more men on the force like this one. Let him have the cigars. That's what all the men should do when they receive a present -- but they don't."

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September 24, 1909

CLEANING UP M'GEE STREET.

Eight Rooming Houses Must Move
by October 1.

Notice to move before the first of October was served by Lieutenant C. D. Stone of the Walnut street police station yesterday, to eight women now conducting rooming houses between Thirteenth and Fourteenth on McGee street.

The order is direct from the police commissioners and is a movement, Lieutenant Stone said last night, to clean up districts in the line of travel to the new Union station when it is erected.

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September 17, 1909

DRILL BY ROOKIES OPENS
POLICE NIGHT SCHOOL.

First Lecture on Etiquette and Mili-
tary Tactics Given to Cap-
tains and Sergeants.

In the office of the police commissioners last night about thirty sergeants, captains and lieutenants of police heard the first of a series of lectures on military tactics, etiquette and duties of a police officer.

After listening to speeches by Commissioner Marks, Sergeant Charles Edwards and Sergeant Robert James, a squad of "rookies" were brought in to the room and gave an exhibition drill. With shoulders squared back, uniforms that fairly glistened with their newness and white gloves that matched the spotless collars, the new men created a favorable impression, some of whom could not have carried out a single order as given by Sergeant Lang.

"What do you think of that?" was Commissioner Marks's satisfied remark as he smiled.

"Now you men have got to know all about these orders and drill regulations or how we can expect the men to know anything about them?" he added, addressing the sergeants and captains.

"We expect the officers in charge to know how to lead a squad of men the same as these new men know how to obey them."

The new night school will be open every night for about two weeks. The officers on the opposite shift who work nights will be lectured this afternoon. Commissioner Marks said that later each man would be required to take turn in giving orders and that drilling would be one of the main features. It is thought that many of the officers will weigh considerably less at the expiration of two weeks. Reporters were not admitted to the lecture last night.

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September 16, 1909

POLICE FORBIDDEN
TO TAKE PRESENTS.

TWO DETECTIVES SUSPENDED
FOR THIS REASON.

Board Rules in Case Where Woman
Gave $25 to Show Appreciation,
That a Postage Stamp
Is Graft.

The police board ruled at its meeting yesterday afternoon that it would consider any officer as grafting who accepted "even a postage stamp or a cigar as a present."

The ruling was made after Detectives J. F. Lyngar and Charles T. Lewis had been suspended for sixty days for accepting a present of $25 from Mrs. Rose Herman, 909 Lydia avenue. The money was given to Lewis on September 1 for recovery of a $125 locket. He gave his partner, Lyngar, half of it. The board ordered that if the $25 was not returned to Mrs. Herman within twenty-four hours the officers would be dropped.

Mrs. Herman was an unwilling witness and when she took the stand she said, with her eyes suffused with tears: "I would like to make a preliminary statement. I am not making these charges against these officers. A friend of mine virtually trapped me into doing it. If in telling the truth here I am going to cause trouble for either of them I want to say now that I am very, very sorry for it."

GAVE HIS PARTNER HALF.

The witness then went on to tell how previously she had lost $30 and how Detective Lewis had succeeded in recovering it for her. When the locket was stolen she sent for him. On August 30 it was located in a pawnshop at 812 Independence avenue, where sh paid the pawnbroker $10 to get it back.

"Both officers were there," she continued, "and advised me that I could replevin the locket, but lawyer's fees would have been more than $10, so I paid it. The man wanted $18.

"It was then I told Mr. Lewis to come to my house the next day. When he did I voluntarily gave him $25. I meant it as a present, as I felt very grateful to get my locket back. And I still want the men to have the money. I was dragged into this thing unwillingly."

Detective Lewis admitted all that Mrs. Herman said and added that he had worked on both cases alone, simply giving his partner half of the $25.

"It was my idea," he said, "that we were not allowed to accept of a published reward without permission of this board. I did not know it was a violation of the statute to accept a present. I have done it before, and so has every man on the force for that matter. Mrs. Herman will tell you that I told her she owed me nothing, but still she insisted and I took it."

POSTAGE STAMP IS GRAFT.

Commissioners Marks and Middlebrook discussed the case in low tones for a long time before rendering a verdict. Then Judge Middlebrook wheeled swiftly about in his chair and said:

"Were it not for the fact that Mrs. Herman was an unwilling witness, that the money appears to have been thrust upon the officer, both men would be dropped from the department here and now. That is the only mitigating circumstance in this case. You are suspended for sixty days and the money must be paid to the secretary tomorrow. He will return it. Hereafter men found accepting presents will be absolutely dismissed from the force.

"The mere fact that you see no wrong in what you have done is to say the least distressing. You are paid $115 a month and the acceptance of a postage stamp above that is regarded as graft."

"Rear in mind now," added Mr. Marks, "this means that you are to accept nothing form the public, not even a cigar, without the permission of this board."

"If that rule is enforced," said an officer who heard the order, "the board would be kept busy examining new men for the force, as every ma on the department would lose his job every day. I know a copper who has lost his eleven times today, as he has just that many good cigars in his inside pocket."

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August 17, 1909

LOANED STARS TO FRIENDS.

Hereafter, a Policeman Invites Dis-
charge When He Does It.

There were no names mentioned at a meeting of the police board yesterday, but it was stated that some of the officers on the force had been in the habit of loaning their stars to their friends. Admissions to the parks, and in other ways, the possession of a star would prove a money saver. Hereafter, when a policeman loans his star he faces immediate discharge from the department.

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August 13, 1909

NEW POLICE BOARD
SECRETARY NAMED.

BRYON E. LINE SUCCEEDS "JIM-
MIE" VINCIL SEPTEMBER 1.

Soldiered With Commissioner Marks
During Spanish-American War.
Retiring Secretary Held
Office Twelve Years.

Byron E. Line, formerly chief clerk and assistant purchasing agent of the Quincy, Omaha & Kansas City railroad, has been appointed to succeed James E. Vincil, for twelve years secretary to the board of police commissioners, who presented his resignation to the board yesterday afternoon, effective September 1. Mr. Vincil went into the office under Commissioners Gregory and Scarritt in 1897.

The new secretary is 30 years old. He has lived in Kansas City eight years. His salary will be $2,100 a year. His address is 1001 Penn street, Aberdeen Flats.

During the Spanish-American war Mr. Line was sergeant-major of the Fifth Illinois infantry, and for a time his regiment was brigaded with the 160th Indiana infantry, in which Commissioner Thomas R. Marks was captain. It was there that Line and Marks became acquainted.

Probably today the board will name a clerk to assist the secretary. He will bear the title of "excise clerk," and will have the saloons to look after. He will be expected to prepare a history of each saloon in Kansas City since the law limiting them went into effect.

"He will be expected to look after the sanitary conditions of each saloon," said Mr. Marks, "and also the moral tone, as it were. He must keep a record of all saloon proprietors, bartenders, porters and other employes, with their residences, and a complete history of each man. The day when well-dressed vagrants, 'con' men, highwaymen and burglars may tend bar in Kansas City will become a thing of the past very soon."

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June 17, 1909

ATTEMPTS MURDER TO
CONCEAL RECORD OF
POLICE PROBE.

THUG STRIKES DOWN MISS A. LEE
OWEN IN HER OFFICE IN
DWIGHT BUILDING.

WON'T STOP
INVESTIGATION.

MAYOR OFFERS A REWARD.

Young Woman Was Alone in Her
Office When Murderous Assailant
Tried to Crush Her Skull With a
Black Jack -- Commissioner Marks
Orders Men Who May Be Attacked
to Shoot to Kill -- Governor Had-
ley May Offer Reward Today.
Girl Struck Down by Unknown Assailants.
UNKNOWN THUG STRIKES DOWN POLICE BOARD'S GIRL STENOGRAPHER; STEALS RECORD OF INVESTIGATION.

Struck on the left temple with a "black jack" by an unknown thug, Miss Anna Lee Owen, a public stenographer who has been taking the evidence in the investigation held by the police commissioners, was knocked unconscious while at work in her office, 605 Dwight building, last night and a part of her stenographic notes stolen. She was taken to the University hospital immediately after being found by Hugh E. Martin. She is said to be in critical condition. Her skull probably is fractured.

Mayor Crittenden personally offers a reward of $100 for the arrest of her assailant.

The attack upon Miss Owen was made some time between 6:30 and 7:15 o'clock, while she was alone in her office. She regained consciousness before being removed to the hospital, but was not able to furnish a description of her assailant.


STRUCK FROM BEHIND.

Miss Owen's office is separated from the hall by a reception room. When Mr. Martin left the office at 6:30, she was at work on the notes. The hall door was closed and also the door leading from the reception room into her office. Mr. Martin returned to his office at 7:15. Opening the door into Miss Owen's office, he found her huddled on the floor. Believing she had fainted from overwork, he lifted her head and was startled by her groaning as if injured.

Liquor which was kept in another office in the suite was secured by Martin and he rubbed the young woman's head with it. She partially revived and exclaimed, "Mother, they have taken my notes." Dr. Eugene Carbaugh was summoned to attend Miss Owen, and Commissioner Thomas R. Marks was notified. He informed the police and then took personal charge of the case.

Cowardly Assault by a Brutal Thug With a Black Jack.
A BLACK JACK, SUCH AS WAS PROBABLY USED IN THE COWARDLY ASSAULT ON MISS OWEN.

Inspector of Detectives Edward P. Boyle carried Miss Owen down stairs in the elevator and placing her in an automobile assisted Dr. Carbaugh in supporting her during the drive to the hospital.

From what little Miss Owen could tell last night she was working over her typewriter when she heard a step behind her chair. Knowing that the men who had offices in the suite had gone home, she looked up to see who it was. She had not heard the outer doors opened. Just as she secured a glance of the figure of a man, she was struck down.

IMPORTANT EVIDENCE GONE.

The stenographic notes and transcripts which she had made during the trials and investigations before the police commissioners were always carefully guarded by Miss Owen, who was afraid an attempt would be made to steal them. The notes were securely locked up in the office vault each night. When an investigation was made after she regained consciousness it was found that a large part of her notes were missing.

Just what notes were secured is not known. It was said that the evidence given late yesterday afternoon in the trial of the case against the conduct of the saloon conducted by James Redmond, 1205 Walnut street, were not secured. But it is believed that a large part of the testimony in the other investigations was lost.

ENTIRE FORCE AT WORK.

Through the inability of Miss Owen to assist the police by furnishing a description of her assailant, and also the failure of the police to elicit any information from the elevator operators was impossible to secure a clue to work on. No one could be found last night who had seen or noticed any stranger loitering in the halls or around the office in the Dwight building.

When Commissioner Marks arrived he ordered that the police make every possible effort to capture the thug, and until midnight he was actively engaged in directing the police in their work. The police were not notified of the assault until 8 o'clock, and inspector Boyle dispatched e very officer in the headquarters at the time to the scene. He and Captain Whitsett followed and were closeted with the commissioner for some time. Every detective in the city was called in and placed at work upon the case. The the substations were notified, and in all over 150 police officers were engaged in searching the city.

GIRL AND MARKS SHADOWED.

After the assault last night Commissioner Marks informed the police that he had been followed and shadowed by two men since he began his activity in the police shakeup. Not only has Mr. Marks been trailed, but Miss Owen has been dogged by two men to and from her work in the city. She was not positive of this surveillance, according to Mr. Marks, until Tuesday evening after the adjournment of the police board.

Intuitively feeling that she was being followed, Miss Owen boarded a Twelfth street car and transferred to a Northeast car. Arriving at Budd park she left the car and entered the park. All of this time the suspected man was in close proximity. At the park he disappeared for a time but was on hand when she again got on a car to ride into the city. She went to the Dwight building after leaving the car and while on the sixth floor saw the man in the hall. She then went to the office of Mr. Marks and informed him of what she had done.

GIRL FREQUENTLY ANNOYED.

Telling her to hold a handkerchief to her mouth if she saw the man on the street, Mr. Marks went down and walked around. He found a man on the street who appeared to fit the description of the man who had bothered Miss Owen, but she denied he was the one. The police were not notified at any time previous to the assault that either Miss Owen or the commissioner were being shadowed.

On another occasion it is said Miss Owen was frightened by men who followed her about the streets and went to the Coates house for the night, instead of returning to her home. While there, it was said, she received a telephone message from some man who refused to give his name. The purport of the telephone message was that there was a man in an adjoining room who intended her harm.

The mother of Miss Owen, who visited her daughter at the University hospital last night in answer to questions, said that her daughter had never mentioned to anyone at home that she was annoyed by anyone or that she had ever been followed.

On orders received from Mr. Marks, the hospital authorities refused to allow anyone to see Miss Owen. Strict orders were issued to not allow anyone but the nurse, her physicians and mother to visit the young woman. A special nurse was secured for her and the police commissioner's orders included a special diet for Miss Owen.

Several hours after the assault Dr. A. H. Cordler was called in consultation and the patient was pronounced to be in a very critical condition.

BY AN IMPORTED THUG.

The Dwight building was thoroughly searched by the police. Every street car in the city, and especially those leading into the suburbs, was being ridden by a police officer all night long. The outgoing trains were watched, although the police believed that the man would endeavor to leave the city by street car.

Inspector Boyle said last night that it was his opinion that the attack upon Miss Owen, and the theft of the stenographic notes, was done by an imported thug. If it was accomplished by home talent the inspector expressed the opinion that it was done on the spur of the moment to cover, if possible, damaging testimony given during the recent investigation. If the thug was imported for the purpose, St. Louis is probably the city, Inspector Boyle said, and his belief is also that of Captain Whitsett and Chief of Police Frank Snow.

Two men who have already figured in the police investigation and the saloon trials were ordered arrested and locked up of investigation. The theory of the police is that while these two men did not do the work they could give valuable information as to who did. But the men had not been found at 1 o'clock this morning. Captain Whitsett said he believed that the man would be arrested before twenty-four hours had passed. Acting Chief Snow said the man would be in custody by morning and inspector Boyle was positive he could not escape arrest.

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June 17, 1909

APOLOGIZES FOR POLICEMAN.

Special Officer Flourished Gun and
Marks Placates Man Whose Feel-
ing Had Been Outraged.

Charging that one of Bryant Cromer's special policemen stopped him near the Dwight building last night and thrust a revolver in his face, ordering him to hold up his hands, C. Owens of the Baltimore hotel demanded an apology from Police Commissioner Thomas R. Marks, last night. It was forthcoming.

According to Mr. Owens, he was walking slowly down Baltimore avenue in front of the Dwight building when a man stepped from the shadow and held a revolver in his face. Mr. Owens said that the man, whom he afterwards recognized, ordered him to halt and throw up his hands. "It's an outrage, Mr. Marks, and I demand an apology," he said. "That man had no right to draw a gun on me. He had been doing it all night. I have witnesses to prove what I say. I demand an apology."

Mr. Marks tried to explain the matter in a satisfactory way, shielding the special policeman, but finally was forced to apologize in order to save further trouble.

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May 28, 1909

TO GET BERTILLON REPORTS.

Police Department Now Member of
National Identification Bureau.

Within a month the Kansas City police department will be entitled to the advantages of the National Bureau of Identification. At the special meeting of the police board yesterday morning enough money was appropriated to entitle the department to membership.

As a member of the bureau the Kansas City department will be advised of the movements of all noted criminals. Every month, the pictures of all crooks liberated from prisons will be forwarded to the seventy different cities that belong to the association.

Hitherto Lieutenant Stege has been compelled to rely on his memory to locate crooks when they have been arrested in Kansas City.

The total cost to Kansas City for membership is only $105.

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May 28, 1909

BOUNDARIES FOR TENDERLOIN.

Tenement Commission's Advice Con-
cerning "Red Light" Districts.

In a letter to the board of police commissioners yesterday the tenement commission advised the board that conditions on Twelfth street in the neighborhood of Central high school were not ideal, and that many hotels and rooming houses in that neighborhood were frequented by an undesirable class of inmates.

The commission also advised that the "red light" district be segregated to definite boundaries, south of Twelfth street. The letter advised that the boundaries of the district be fixed at Main street on the west, McGee street on the east, Eighteenth street on the south and Fourteenth street on the north. The district in the North End should be bounded on the north by Second street, on the east by Wyandotte street, on the south by Fifth street and on the west by Broadway.

Commissioner Marks was delegated to make an investigation of the matter, and report at the next meeting.

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April 15, 1909

POLICEMEN MUST NOT CURSE.

Officer Cox Suspended Because He
Used Profane Language.

The fact that the complainant, J. E. Worley, 1500 St. Louis avenue, went before the police board yesterday and asked that it be lenient with Patrolman William Cox, who, on the morning of April 3, swore at him at Eighth street and Woodland avenue while learning why he was out so late, saved the officer.

Cox made a clean breast of the affair, but Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., was not willing to let him off simply with a reprimand.

"There has been too much of this cursing of men under arrest by officers," he said. "It is absolutely unnecessary and must be stopped. I think the officer should be suspended for five days and that the word should go out to the rest of the force that hereafter the punishment will be more severe in cases where arresting officers use profane and obscene language."

Cox was ordered suspended for five days.

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April 8, 1909

NEW POLICE BOARD
TO CLEAN UP TOWN.

MAKES FRANK SNOW ACTING
CHIEF, ED BOYLE INSPECTOR.

Flahive Given Pick of Force and
Told to Drive Out District 4's
Tough Gang and Ignore
the Politicians.
The New Police Board.
THE POLICE BOARD AS IT IS NOW COMPOSED.
T. R. MARKS, MAYOR CRITTENDEN, R. B. MIDDLEBROOK.

Captain Frank F. Snow, property clerk at police headquarters, was appointed acting chief of police, and Edward P. Boyle, a detective, was appointed acting inspector of detectives yesterday by the new board of police commissioners.

Captain Thomas P. Flahive of district No. 4 was given his pick of the force, and told to drive out the gang of crooks and undesirables in his district, despite the interference of any politician. Democrat or Republican, and clean up a certain disreputable element that has infested that part of the city for so long a time.

Chief Daniel Ahern was placed in charge of the new district, No. 10, and Inspector Charles Ryan was told that he would be taken care of.

Thomas R. Marks and R. B. Middlebrook, the first Republican police commissioners Kansas City has ever had, being in the majority on the board did not wait for the presence of Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., to start the ball rolling. By appointment they met in the office of Daniel Ahern, chief of police, shortly after noon. Then they sent for Charles Ryan, inspector of detectives.

RYAN IN THE RANKS.

Telling the two officials that they would be cared for in some manner, the commissioners asked for their resignations. In a few minutes, they had them in writing.

Captain Snow and Ed. P. Boyle were sent for and told that Snow was to be made acting chief of police and Boyle acting inspector of detectives.

Later, when the board met with the mayor in the chair, Commissioner Middlebrook presented Ahern's resignation and moved its acceptance. Snow was then formally made acting chief. The same form was gone through in regard to the acceptance of Ryan's resignation and the temporary appointment of Detective Boyle to his place.

The next order of business was to take care of the deposed officers. Ahern was appointed captain of the new police district, to be known as No. 10. Ryan was made a detective, and assigned to duty under Acting Inspector Boyle, his former subordinate.

AHERN IS APPRECIATIVE.

Captain Ahern showed great appreciation when the board cared for him in the manner in which it did.

"I did not expect to remain," said the former chief. "My position belonged to the new commissioners, and they had a right to it. I certainly appreciate the magnificent manner in which I have been cared for, and will show it by doing my full duty and carrying out to the letter every order of the board."

Former Inspector Ryan had little to say except that he would line up with the men he used to boss with such severity, and do the best he could. It was intimated that Ryan may resign from the force later, but that could not be confirmed.

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April 6, 1909

EXIT JONES AND GALLAGHER.

Retiring Commissioners Draw Two
Months' Salary and Say Goodby
to Associates.

A sort of farewell service took place yesterday afternoon at city hall, when Elliott H. Jones and A. E. Gallagher, the retiring board of police commissioners, paid their last visit to police headquarters in an official capacity. Incidentally, it marked the first time in the memory of the oldest policeman that a Democratic board retired in favor of Republicans.

The two men first visited James Vincil, the secretary of the board, who probably will say adieu to his quarters within the next month. Both men drew their salaries which they had allowed to accumulate during the last two months and left office smiling.

"I'll have to loook into the room where we have had so many sessions," said Mr. Gallagher, and the two men paused at the door of the room where the weekly meeting takes place. Mr. Jones did not seem particularly sorry that the last meeting was over.

"Well, goodby, Mr. Vincil," said both men, as they left the secretary's office. "Good luck to you."

The retiring commissiones then paid a visit to Captain Whitsett, Chief Ahern and Captain Frank Snow. They conversed a few minutes at each place and wished all good luck.

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April 4, 1909

MAY GET WHITSETT'S JOB.

Rumored Captain Casey Will Go to
Headquarters Station.

It was common talk among the politicians at the city hall yesterday that in case the new board of police commissioners made a general shift of all officers now in command of their different outside stations Captain John J. Casey, who is now at No. 6 station, would be shifted to headquarters in the place of Captain Walter Whitsett. A few days ago Thomas A. Marks is reported to have said that there would be a general change as soon as the new board took control.

Captain Casey is considered the most likely candidate for the important place at headquarters, owing to the fact that his brother, Senator Michael Casey, was active in lining up the Democratic senate in favor of the confirmation of Marks and Middlebrook. Casey is considered to be one of the most efficient officers in the department.

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March 18, 1909

PEACEMAKER'S PRAYER
RIGHTS FAMILY WRONGS.

WOMAN'S PETITION KEEPS A
COUPLE FROM SEPARATION.

Unusual Occurrence at Humane So-
ciety Headquarters -- Couple Told
to Think of Child and
Bear and Forebear.

Wives with grievances against their husbands for non-support or for the late hours with "sick friends," generally go to the city hall and tell their troubles to the Humane Society.

The little room at the northwest corner of city hall on the second floor is always crowded with men and women who have come to pour their tales of distress into the patient cares of Mrs. Frank McCrary and W. H. Gibbens, Humane agents. But yesterday, an incident occurred which will long be remembered by the Humane Society.

"You know that you haven't given me a cent in two weeks," exclaimed a woman, as she went through the door with her husband, who was carrying an infant in his arms.

KNEELS AND PRAYS FERVENTLY.

"I do my best," said the man apologetically to Mr. Gibbens, "but she is always picking on me. She won't let me have a minute's rest."

"You don't support me and the children," she retorted angrily.

A neatly dressed woman who was listening to the conversation walked over to the couple.

"I don't want to assume too much interest in your affairs," she said, "but I think you are both wrong. Neither will give in to the other. You owe it to the child there in your lap to live a different life. You owe it to you Maker to be patient with each other. Instead of separation, you should talk about the future. Now let's get down on our knees and ask the Lord to help us."

The man and woman, as their adviser knelt in front of her chair, knelt also. A minute later both were crying softly as she prayed fervently for their happiness.

KISS AND MAKE UP.

The door into the hall was open, and down the corridor several men were waiting till the police board would commence its weekly session. At last the woman's voice became loud enough for the words to be distinguished, and instinctively many of the men removed their hats and stood in silence.

At last the prayer was over, and as the three arose tears of gladness were in the eyes of the man and wife.

They kissed each other and left the room apparently reconciled. Both were weeping.

"It has been a long time since I've heard a prayer up here," said Mr. Gibbens. "If all the domestic troubles were cured that easy, I think we ought to try it."

Out in the hall the crowd of men replaced their hats, but for a long time, a stillness reigned. The prayer in the police station had had its result.

"I was only doing my duty," said the little woman to the Humane officer.

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February 27, 1909

POLICE BOARD IS
NAMED BY HADLEY.

R. B. MIDDLEBROOK AND THOS.
R. MARKS APPOINTED.

Mr. Middlebrook Is to Serve Until
the Time When He Can Be Ap-
pointed to Board of Elec-
tion Commissioners.

R. B. Middlebrook and Thomas R. Marks were yesterday appointed by Governor Herbert S. Hadley members of the police board. In making the announcement, the governor gave out the following statement:

"I have offered the positions of police commissioners of Kansas City to R. B. Middlebrook and Thomas R. Marks and they have somewhat reluctantly consented to serve. Neither was an applicant for the position. I have given almost as much time to the selection of police commissioners in Kansas City as to all of my other appointments.

"The question has not been the selecting of two commissioners, but the selection of a commissioner that would meet the requirements of the situation. In my effort to secure such a commissioner I have offered the appointments to R. C. Meservey, D. J. Haff, Henry M. Beardsley, Eugene H. Blake, Clyde Taylor, Thomas H. Reynolds and John H. Thatcher. None of these gentlemen felt that they ought or could accept the position.

"I feel that in Mr. Middlebrook and Mr. Marks, I have finally secured two men who are familiar with the conditions existing in the police department in Kansas City, and know how a good police department ought to be conducted. I feel confident that they will meet my expectations and the requirements of the situation."

Mr. Middlebrook is to serve as police commissioner only until there is a vacancy on the board of election commissioners, when he will be appointed to fill it.

Both of Governor Hadley's appointees to the Kansas City board of police commissioners were of the opinion yesterday that the announcement of any particular brand of reform would be presumptuous as well as premature. Neither was inclined to go into generalities concerning the duties of the members of the board, but even with the short notice on which their appointments were made, each had a number of ideas that promise much in the way of curbing criminal activities.

"I have no swamp-root remedies or sweeping reforms to proclaim," said Thomas R. Marks last night at his office in the First National bank building. "I have a well-imbedded idea that the police service should become one of the military arms of the state, with its efficiency raised to the highest possible degree by the enforcement of discipline and promotion for the men, based on merit alone. It should be the alm of the police department to win the confidence of respectable citizens and not submit to the machinations of a lot of political gangsters.

"It appears to me that the published reports of an epidemic of crime are not exaggerated. Of course, you can't put down crime with a theory, and I hope I'm not a crank on such matters, but it seems to me that the problem can be boiled down to this: Law enforcement."

"Will a chief of police be appointed from within or with the force?" Mr. Marks was asked.

"Personally, I would much prefer that a head of the department be selected from those attached to it, provided a man who can meet the qualifications can be found. On the other hand I should not hesitate to go outside of the force for a chief, if I thought it were for the benefit of the service. This same applies to other appointments to be made by the board./

"Governor Hadley called me up this afternoon and told me I simply must accept the appointment," said Robert R. Middlebrook last night at his residence, 1800 Linwood boulevard. "It could not but militate against good taste for me to make any statement as to reform," Mr. Middlebrook went on. "The trouble with most so-called reformers," he said, "is that they do not preserve the rotundity of the law as they would have it enforced. They vigorously enforce the statutes against certain classes of criminals, while other classes, not so conspicuous perhaps, go unchecked. That is lop-sided reform. I am for a clean, orderly administration, with the explicit understanding that the compensation fixed by law shall be the only remuneration. In other words -- no graft."

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February 25, 1909

NOT ALLOWED TO LEAVE HALL.

Police Compelled H. B. Wagner to
Stay at a Gypsy Smith Meeting.

H. B. Wagner, 407 Baird building, addressed a communication to the police commissioners yesterday, complaining that he was compelled to sit and listen to Gypsy Smith in Convention hall February 22 against his will. He desired to be informed by what authority the police stationed at the revival meeting refused to allow anyone to leave the building.

The writer stated that Captain John Branham, No. 3 police station, informed him that he was acting under orders of Ex-Mayor Beardsley, and he wanted to be cited to the authority giving anyone the right to take away his constitutional privileges. The board failed to take any action on the complaint.

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February 4, 1909

SALOON MAN ON CARPET.

Serious Charges Against P. B. Young,
Self-Confessed Philanthropist.

According to P. B. Young, saloonkeeper, at 611 East Twelfth street, he and his two bartenders threw the cloak of protection around N. Marx of 820 East Twelfth street, and performed a humane act when they allowed him to slumber in a chair from noon to 5 p. m. on January 12.

"I know I was drunk," said Marx before the police board yesterday, "but even in that state I am not in the habit of sleeping in an uncomfortable chair without waking from 11 a. m. to 5 p. m. When I awoke I was sitting on my coat, my hat was behind the bar and my gold watch, the fob, and something over eight dollars was gone." Young is charged with running a disorderly place and his license is in danger. The case went over until Sergeant Goode, who is now ill, can testify.

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January 28, 1909

WASN'T INTERFERENCE;
JUST LOSS OF TEMPER.

FARCICAL ENDING OF SULLIVAN
SALOON POLICE ROW.

Commissioners, However, of the Opin-
ion That Saloonkeeper Should
Be More Particular as to Patrons.

The trial of John Sullivan's "No. 3" saloon, at 6 West Missouri avenue, where it was alleged police officers were interfered with Saturday night while making an arrest, was very brief before the police board yesterday.

After cautioning the father of the proprietor to be careful hereafter in the selection of his patrons, as a certain element, said by police to make that a headquarters, would endanger his license. Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., "rebuked" Thomas Pendergast, superintendent of streets, by saying:

"It looks to me like some of our citizens lost their temper. Now, Tom, you know you must have been mad or you wouldn't have used those cuss words. You are a good superintendent of streets, but we can't expect you to keep the saloons clean, too. Matter dismissed. Be more careful in the future and don't let it occur again."

THE DETECTIVES' STORY.

Lieutenant Harry E. Stege and Detectives M. J. Halvey and J. J. Raftery testified that when they went into the saloon to get "Eddie" Kelly and Thomas Loftus on the order of Inspector Charles Ryan, they were interfered with by Pendergast, Bert Brannon, a deputy marshal, and Dennis Sullivan, brother of the saloon man.

"Brannon stepped out of a side room," said Detective Halvey, "and grabbed Stege, saying: 'Don't take those men. They are coming with me.' Then Pendergast rubbed his fist in Stege's face, and called him vile names. When I tried to get to them, Sullivan held me from behind. It looked at once time as if Brannon was going to make a gun play -- but he didn't. As we left the place Pendergast again abused Stege."

SAYS KELLY'S THE "GOAT."

Brannon was not present, but Pendergast and Sullivan were, the latter having nothing to say. Mr. Pendergast said that he blamed the whole thing on Inspector Ryan. He said that while Kelly may have done some bad things he had never been convicted anywhere, and that of late he had been working steadily when the police would let him alone.

"Every time a man loses a hat or a pair of shoes, though, Ryan sends out and has Kelly arrested and just as promptly he is released in police court when they try to prove him a vagrant. Ryan hasn't liked me for seven or eight years and these arrests are always a direct slap at me. There was no interference there Saturday night -- not a word said about it. I told the boys to go on with the officers. I know better than to interfere with a man in the discharge of his duty.

"All I said," continued Mr. Pendergast, "was: 'These two detectives are all right, but the other fellow is a big stiff.' That is not interfering, is it?"

The board at this point dismissed the case with the "reprimands" before mentioned. Brannon, it is said, would be left to the county marshal, as the board had no jurisdiction over him.

Fred Baily, secretary to Inspector of Detectives Charles Ryan, yesterday tendered his resignation to the board. Mr. Baily intends going on the road as a traveling salesman.

The board yesterday issued thirty-one special commissions to park policemen and watchmen. The matter of taking them into the regular police department, where they would be under the direction of the police board and the chief of police, was not mentioned. About six months ago it was thought that this would soon be done.

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January 26, 1909

MONUMENT IN THE PASEO?

Location of Memorial to Policemen
and Firemen Decided Tomorrow.

The police and park boards and Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., will meet at Fifteenth and Paseo tomorrow morning for the purpose of considering a suggestion, made yesterday by Fred S. Doggett of the park board, that the proposed policemen and firemen's monument be erected in the Paseo, between Seventeenth and Eighteenth streets.

The mayor waited on the park board yesterday, formally informing them of a resolution adopted by the council favoring the monument to the memory of firemen and policemen who die in the discharge of duty. The board added its approval to the movement, and volunteered its co-operation.

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January 7, 1909

WILL "CUT UP" THE REWARD.

Each of Three Capturers of "Adam
God" Will Receive $33.33.

The row over who should get the reward for the capture of James Sharp, alias "Adam God," was settled by the police board yesterday, when it was decided to cut the $100 into three parts. The fanatic was caught by R. M. Bair, a farmer near Olathe, Kas., and his hired man, E. P. Barrett. But Sheriff J. S. Stead was in the vicinity looking for the fugitive, so these three men will each get $33.33 each, as near as James E. Vincil, secretary of the board, is able to cut it.

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December 17, 1908

RIOT GUNS FOR
POLICE STATIONS.

BATTLE WITH FANATICS EXPOSED
DEPARTMENT WEAKNESS.

To Be Available When Needed, and
Not Locked Up, as Were the
Rifles During the Re-
cent Riot.

The board of police commissioners yesterday decided that it had been taught a lesson by the riot of December 8 and that it wound never again be caught unprepared. When riot guns were called for on that day, not knowing the magnitude of the trouble or how many men might be encountered at the river, a key to the gun case first had to be sought. Then there was no ammunition for the old Springfield rifles in store there, and there was another twenty minutes' delay until loads were secured from a vault in the commissioners' office. If the trouble had been more serious the town could have been sacked before police were properly armed.

Yesterday the board examined the latest make of riot gun, a weapon that shoots six loads, nine buckshot to each cartridge. It is worked the same as a pump gun, and one alone will do fearful damage, if handled properly.

It is the intention of the board to purchase a sufficient number of these guns and place them in glass cases in stations Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6. Those stations are situated at headquarters (Fourth and Main), 1316 St. Louis avenue, 906 Southwest boulevard, 1430 Walnut street and Twentieth street and Flora avenue, respectively. They are regarded as the most likely districts in which riots might break out.

The glass cases containing the riot guns are to be built near the floor so that, in an emergency, they may be broken and weapons, loaded for just such an occasion, may be found ready for action.

The question of a reserve force of men to be kept on hand at headquarters all the time, was also taken up. It was decided, as a nucleus, to assign two men on duty there from 10 a. m. to 10 p. m. who, with the "shortstop" man, would make three who could get into action on a moment's notice. Had that number of men been sent out to deal with James Sharp and his band of fanatics, the board believes that the result would have been different.

"We have been taught a terrible lesson," said the mayor, "and the fault should rest on our shoulders if such a thing should ever occur again and find us unprepared. Henceforth we intend to be ready for any situation that may arise."

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December 10, 1908

BRAVE POLICEMEN
WILL BE HONORED.

PROMOTION FOR PATRICK
AND MICHAEL MULLANE.

At Least That's What the Commis-
sioners Were Believed to Convey
When They Spoke of Re-
ward Yesterday.

Sergeant Patrick Clark and Patrolman Michael Mullane, if nature favors them and they recover from their wounds received in the battle with fanatics Tuesday afternoon, are to be rewarded. That is the intention of the present police board.

Only Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., and Andrew E. Gallagher were present yesterday at the meeting. Commissioner Elliot H. Jones was at the funeral of Joseph Chick. The board had hardly convened when Mayor Crittenden announced that he wanted to say a few words regarding the bravery displayed by the police the previous day, some of which he and Commissioner Gallagher witnessed.

"This board wants here and now to command the bravery displayed by its officers in the fight with religious fanatics yesterday," began the mayor. "The action of Sergeant Patrick Clark in going into the fight empty handed and the game fight put up by Patrolman Michael Mullane, both of whom were wounded, is to be especially commended. It is the intention of the board to reward these men in a befitting manner. The board, of course, deeply deplores the accidental shooting of the girl, Lulu Pratt, but under the circumstances it was unavoidable."

The "befitting manner" spoken of can mean nothing but promotion. Patrick Clark went on the department September 12, 1888. On May 6, 1901, he was made acting sergeant and September 18 of the same year he was made a regular sergeant. Since his appointment he has served faithfully, not a black mark being made against him.

During the life of the present board many promotions have been made, some of them men who had served but a few years on the department. Every time any promotions have been made, it was always believed that long service men would get prizes. "Pat" Clark's name was always spoken of in rumor as the one man who would certainly be rewarded. But he got nothing, the promotions going to men who evidently had more influence. The sergeant never turned a hand in his own favor and refused always to let his friends annoy the commissioners.

Now that promotion is in sight for the brave officer who, unarmed, defended his brother officers, his friends all say that nothing short of a captaincy will do for him. His friends will not stand back any more, even at his request.

Patrolman Michael Mullane went on the force November 16, 1905, as a probation officer, and on December 31, a year later, was made a regular patrolman. That might seem a short time upon which to base promotion, but there are men on the force who have not done one-tenth the service that Mullane did who wear sergeant's stripes. "Mullane has proved that he will stand under fire," everybody is saying, "and if he is not made a sergeant it will be nothing short of unjust."

The board also took up the matter of allowing the city's streets to be used promiscuously by itinerant fanatics. An order was issued requiring the chief of police to personally handle this class of fakirs, and use his judgment regarding the issuance of a permit. Hereafter all new comers who attempt to use the streets to expound their peculiar religious teachings will be immediately arrested.

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December 10, 1908

MUST HAVE PERMIT TO PREACH.

Chief of Police Issues Order Relative
to Street Howlers.

The following order, issued by Chief of Police Daniel Ahern yesterday afternoon, went into effect last night:

On and after this date no preaching will be allowed on the streets of the city without a written permit from the chief of police. By order of the police commissioners. -- Daniel Ahern, Chief of Police

"There is not any use waiting until tomorrow to begin to get these people off the street or to start a crusade," the chief said. "I will be mighty careful of how I issue such permits from now on."

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December 3, 1908

ASLEEP, HE WALKED A BEAT.

Charge Made Against Policeman G.
L. Burton by His Captain.

Probably the most unusual case ever tried before the board of police commissioners is set for next Wednesday. A policeman, George L. Burton, by name, is to be tried for walking the beat in his sleep, so the report of his captain, Patrick Bray, charges. Briefly, the following is Captain Bray's report:

"While making my rounds on the afternoon of November 29, I found George L. Burton walking Beat 4, in Precinct 8, dead asleep. In a restaurant on the northwest corner of Nicholson and Monroe avenues, I had to shake him two or three times before I could awaken him. I asked him if that was the way he was doing police duty, and he replied that he had a sick headache. He acted like he had something. He missed his signal point at 2:10 p. m. and I found him at 2:20 p.m. He was walking about asleep then, and I told him I would report him."

"Now, the question is, Was he waking in his sleep, or was he asleep on his beat instead of walking it?" said a commissioner. "If we could find men who could walk a beat in their sleep, we could discharge half the force and let the remainder work day and night -- get in double time, you know."

Burton will be called upon to explain what ailed him on the day the captain found him.

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November 6, 1908

CARS SPREAD CONSUMPTION.

Dr. R. M. Schauffler Says They Do.
Wants Ordinance Enforced.

In a talk before the members of the City Club yesterday at noon, Dr. R. M. Schauffler said that consumption in Kansas City was largely due to the uncleanliness of street cars. He charged the people of Kansas City with spitting on the floors of the cars and the conductors of the cars with making no effort to stop the practice. Dr. Schauffler is strongly in favor of having an ordinance passed compelling all tuberculosis patients to be registered. He is also in favor of building a tuberculosis hospital near Leeds, and he want the city to enforce its anti-spitting ordinance.

A. E. Gallagher, one of the police commissioners, stated that the police board was willing to enforce the law. William P. Borland, congressman-elect, talked upon transportation. He believes that the question may be solved, to an extent, by the improvement of the Missouri river.

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October 1, 1908

CRUSADE COMMENCED
AGAINST STREET STANDS.

Police Are Ordered to Place Them
100 Feet Back From
the Corners.

During the meeting of the police board yesterday Commissioner A. E. Gallagher brought up the question of the street peanut and candy wagon standing in front of fuit and confectionery stores and drawing away trade.

"There is a fruit and confectionery stand near Ninth and Main street which pays a rental of $150 a month. Not long ago one of these peanut wagons took up a stand right in front of the man's place. When moved by the policeman he would return as soon as the oficer left. Now there are three of the wagons circled about this man's place.

"II know these street stnds pay no rent," continued Mr Galagher. I dout if they pay any taxes at all, and all they do is pay a mal licene fee to the city. It is not right that a man who pays taxes and big rent should be made to compete with such vendors. At Eighth and Main streets there is a man who pays $50 to $75 a month for a small space Right out on the treet beneath the viaduct i one of those wagon agaist which he must compete for trade."

Mr. Gallagher spoke of the wagons always being in the way at transfer points and cited the wagon at the northwest corner of Eighth street and Grand avenue as an instance. He said they should be made to stand at least 100 feet from the corner. Commissioner Elliott H. Jones agreed with him, and Chief Ahern was ordered to move all such stands away from street corners. The mayor was not present.

The chief stated that most of the street wagon, lunch wagons included, paid rent to the business man in front of whose place they stand.

It came to light in a police court trial some time ago when an attempt was made to move a candy and a lunch wagon from Fifth and Walnut streets, that both men had been paying rent to a dry goods store near where they stood, one $25 and the other $20 a month. The lunch wagon was moved on complaint of the management of the Gilliss theater, but the candy wagon is still against the curb right at the corner.

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October 1, 1908

POLICEMEN GET $725.

Includes Uncalled For Cash and Re-
ceipts From Old Horse Sale.

Captain Frank F. Snow, property clerk, tendered a report to the police board yesterday of the left-over property sale which was held at police headquarters July 18 last. Actual cash left behind for one reason and another amounted to $425.45, and the sale of "junk," as it is called, netted an even $300, making a total of $725.45. This money will be turned over to Thomas Cashen, treasurer of the Police Relief Association.

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September 24, 1908

NEGRO CHARGES BRUTALITY.

Says Three Patrolmen Gave Him Un-
necessary "Trimming."

Jonas Williams, a negro, with a bruised and battered cranium and a somewhat disfigured countenance, appeared before the board yesterday to prefer charges of unprovoked assault against Patrolmen R. S. Elliott, J. P. Withrow and Jerry Callahan. Williams, who lives at 609 May street, said the three policemen about 5:30 yesterday morning had all taken a hand in "trimming" him. He did not say what for, only alleging that it was unnecessary. The officers were all cited to appear next Wednesday and explain.

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September 17, 1908

DOGS "TALK LOUD AND CURSE."

Said a Written Complaint Received
by Police Board.

A combination of howling dogs, rolling beer kegs and talking men has been annoying residents in the vicinity of Fifteenth street and Baltimore avenue so much of late that complaint was made by two members of the police board yesterday. The complaint was written on post cards and somewhat unique.

"You ought to send someone around here to shoot them howling dogs," it began. "They talk loud and curse all the time and roll beer kegs down the street late in the night. Such men ought to be arrested."

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September 10, 1908

WAS DISCOURTEOUS TO WOMEN.

So Policeman H. C. Johnson Was
Dropped From the Force.

Henry C. Johnson, a probation officer walking a beat in the East Bottoms, No. 8 district, was yesterday ordered dropped from the department by the board of police commissioners. Johnson was one of the last batch of forty-one men added to the force. Charges of conduct unbecoming an officer had been filed against him by several women.

It was agreed by the board yesterday that the place to try the case of Patrolman E. F. Stockdale, charged by his wife with abandonment, non-support and cruelty, was in divorce court. When the patrolman's attorney informed the board that suit for divorce had been filed August 25, the case was ordered continued indefinitely.

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September 2, 1908

DETECTIVES MUST BE GOOD.

Sullivan and Hayde Are Given Just
One More Chance.

Thomas F. Hayde and Eugene F. Sullivan, city detectives, were before the board of police commissioners yesterday charged with similar offenses -- failing to report for duty. Sullivan was also charged with being incorrigible, because it was said he refused to walk with his partner. He said, however, that his partner had refused to walk with him, that the board has it backwards.

Both men admitted that they "dabbled in wet goods," just a little, when the failed to report. To Sullivan, who is redheaded, Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., said: "See here, do you know that there aren't but a few of us redheaded fellows left? You'd better wheel into line now. I am always willing to give a man one chance, especially when he is redheaded like myself."

"If this board ever has occasion to call me before it again I will ask no favors," said Sullivan. "I will resign."

"How about Old Black Joe?" asked the mayor of Detective Hayde.

"Them's my sentiments," he replied.

"Then go, both of you, and sin no more," was the verdict of the board.

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July 17, 1908

BOARD DOESN'T BLAME HAMILL.

Commissioner Gallagher Exonerates
Lieutenant of Responsibility.

Police Commissioner Andrew E. Gallagher at a meeting of the police board Wednesday afternoon said he believed Lieutenant H. W. Hamill to be responsible for Jack Gallagher being released Wednesday morning on an $11 bond. Last night he called up The Journal an d said he had found that he was mistaken when he made the statement. Mr. Gallagher said he had discovered that Lieutenant Hamill was not on duty that day and was not in charge of the station. The lieutenant is on duty during the day and the bond was signed before the day force goes on, so he could not have been held responsible for the small bond even if he had worked on that day.

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July 9, 1908

REPORTER VICTIM
OF BRUTAL ATTACK.

ALBERT H. KING ASSAULTED BY
JACK GALLAGHER.

IN FRONT OF
CENTRAL STATION.

THE ATTACK IS COWARDLY AND
ENTIRELY UNPROVOKED.

King's Injuries Are Serious and Sa-
loonkeeper's Case Will Be Pre-
sented to Grand Jury -- Was
Struck From Behind.

Jack Gallagher, Democratic politician, former policeman and saloonist, assaulted Albert H. King, a reporter for The Journal, while the two were in friendly conversation in the street in front of police headquarters late yesterday afternoon. Frank Frost a reporter for the Kansas City Star, who Gallagher says was scheduled for a like assault, escaped the brute strength of the big saloonkeeper by rushing into the police station to call out officers to ave King.

Gallagher was arrested, but immediately began a legal battle to gain his freedom. Milton J. Oldham, a lawyer hurried to the holdover from the police board rooms but his efforts to get the prisoner released were fruitless. Mr. King was taken to the emergency hospital, where the surgeons in attendance declined to examine him until the shock he had sustained had worn off. His injuries were later discovered to be serious, and John W. Hogan, an assistant prosecuting attorney, was called to take the injured man's statement. The assistant prosecutor at once placed a bar against the release of Gallagher by stating that he would prepare a serious charge against him, to be served immediately if political friends of the saloonist politician should succeed in getting the police department to accept a bond.

Mr. King, who is a reporter for The Journal assigned to police duty, is still at the emergency hospital. He is not an able-bodied man because of injuries received in the Spanish-American war, and the attending physicians fear his injuries may prove permanent.


BOARD EASY WITH HIM.

Yesterday afternoon, Mr. King attended a meeting of the board of police commissioners The board had before it charges against Gallagher for selling liquor on Sunday at 8 East Fourth street, directly across the street from the entrance to Central police station, and operating a crap game at his other saloon, 310 Independence avenue. The charges regarding the last named place were postponed until the next meeting, but the board closed the Fourth street place. Milton J. Oldham, attorney for Gallagher, stated last night that the board promised him they would give Gallagher a chance and let his Independence avenue saloon run, but that the Sunday selling at 8 East Fourth street has been so flagrant a violation of the board's orders that the license would have to be forfeited.

Gallagher and Mr. King have been acquaintances for some time, and, immediately after the court meeting Gallagher invited Mr. King to go across the street and take a drink before the police closed his place. Mr. King declined, stating that he was too busy at that time. On the stairs a few minutes later Gallagher again extended the invitation and again Mr. King, who was busy about his day's work, declined.

In the press room on the main floor of the city hall Mr. King and Frank Frost, a reporter for the Kansas City Star, were discussing various orders made by the police board a few minutes later when Gallagher opened the door and with a smile, asked the two across to his place.

"I guess we had better go," said Frost.

"Cheer up," said Gallagher to Mr. King, and the latter reached for his cane and the three went into the street.

Gallagher's place, the one soon to be closed by the board's order, made earlier in the afternoon, is immediately across Fourth street from the main entrance to the Central police station. It was there that Gallagher, growing reckless in his prosperity as a saloonkeeper, had openly sold liquor on Sundays until the place was raided by the police from the Walnut street station a week ago last Sunday. It was the evidence secured in this raid which the police board considered sufficient for revoking the license.


A COWARDLY ASSAULT.

As Mr. King, who, on account of former injuries, must carry a cane to steady himself, stepped from the curb into the street, Gallagher fell back a step between Mr. King and Mr. Frost. Just as they reached the center of the narrow street Gallagher took a hurried step forward and struck Mr. King in the forehead. The reporter fell to the pavement.

Mr. Frost immediately hurried back into the police station door and called to the assembled officers and men:

"Jack Gallagher is killing King."

Knowing Gallagher as a "bad" man, every police officer in the station was alert in an instant. Patrolman John J. Crane hurriedly took a pistol from the desk and Captain Walter Whitsett and Detective Inspector Charles Ryan, both shut off from the main lobby of the station, hurried to the door. Patrolman Joseph Welsh followed.

In the meantime in the street Mr. King was at the mercy of the brutal saloonkeeper. Gallagher struck him again as he tried to get up , and then kicked him in the back. Mr. King rolled over, and the big saloonkeeper brought his heel down on the right side of the reporter's face, cutting a jagged wound across the face. As he kicked Mr. King in the ribs Patrolman Patrick Boyle grappled with him. He had reached the street ahead of Captian Whitsett, Inspector Ryan and Patrolman Crane, the latter being the only armed man in the crowd.

CARRIED TO HOSPITAL.

Gallagher did not resist arrest, as the police had expected, and was led into the station door, but a few feet away, by Boyle, while Captain Whitsett, Inspector Ryan and newspaper reporters who had hurried from the press room at the head of the stairs, picked up the inured man Gallagher, was locked up, charged with investigation, and Mr.King was carried around the corner of the building to the emergency hospital.

Upstairs in the police board rooms Commissioners A. E. Gallagher and Elliot H. Jones were just leaving their chairs. They heard the commotion in the central station below and went down to investigate. When they learned the circumstances of the assault, both commissioners became agitated. Commissioner Galagher went to the commanding officer's desk and admonished those in charge to hold Jack Gallagher, the saloonkeeper, unless a heavy bond was furnished.

"I don't think he ought to be released uner any circumstances," said Commissioner Jones.

The assault was considered unusually brutal by police officers and other witnesses, and the story soon reached the office of R. L. Gregory, acting mayor, Gus Pearson, city comptroller, and John Murray, formerly a newspaper reporter, saw the assault from the corner of Fourth and Main sterets as they were boarding a street car. They went at once to the emergency hospital and soon were joined by Mr. Gregory.

HELD HIM WITHOUT BOND.

The acting mayor asked Mr. King about the assault and then went at once to police headquarters, where he gave orders that Gallagher be held without bond. Mr. Gregory was closeted with Captain Walter Whitsett for several minutes and, when he emerged from the captain's office, assured those outside that the prisoner would be held for the customary twenty-four hours, when a charge must be placed against him. Assistant Prosecutor Hogan had taken Mr. Kin's statement by that time, and stated that if Gallagher's attorney saw fit to sue out a writ of habeas corpus he would have the prisoner held for the prosecutor. Mr. Hogan said he would call the assault to the attention of the grand jury this morning.

Immediately after Attorney Oldham appeared, Jack Spillane and Patrick Larkin, the latter a Sixth ward politician, were called tot he station to furnish bond.

When told that no bond would be accepted Oldham demanded that a charge be placed against Gallagher. He boasted that he would clear the saloonkeeper of any charge which would be brought Spillane, a sidewalk inspector for the city, was very angry when he found he not furnish a bond big enough to get his slugger friend out of the holdover. Thoroughly baffled, the trio later telephoned for a dinner to be served the prisoner and left the station.

Mr. Oldham and Gallagher told him that he had intended to assault Frank Frost, the Kansas City STar reporter, who went into the street with him and Mr. King, but failed because the police got action too quickly for him.

"He told me," said Mr. Oldham, "that King had double-crossed him and was responsible for his Fourth street pace being raided."

Mr. King, who knew of the flagrant violation of the Sunday law by Gallagher, did not have anything to do with the raid. He had not written a line about the place for the paper which employs him and had told Tom Gallagher as much when the latter, a week ago, asked him why he was "sore at his brother Jack.

"Jack is my friend," was the reply Mr. King made to Tom Gallagher.

INJURED IN PHILIPPINES.

Previous to his career as a newspaper reporter Albert King had been an invalid for many months. He had received injuries in the Philippine islands while in the army and had wlaked on crutches a long time after being mustered out of the service. Mr. King was enlisted in the army here as a private in the Thirty-second United States infantry in July, 1899. He sailed for the Philippines in September the same year. In the islands he became regimental sergeant major.

On the night of August 5, 1900, while the building where he was quartered was under fire, he fell down a flight of stone steps while attempting, in pajamas and cartridge belt, to get to the first floor to consult with his superior officer. He was an invalid in a Manila hospital and later at the Presidio, San Francisco. December 28, 1900, he was mustered out of service and sent to his home, 3031 Wabash avenue, Kansas City.

Mr. Kings injuries from the assault include an injured spine and a severe shock to his legs, which were so long paralyzed. The right side of his face is cut and bruised and the attending physician, Dr. J. Park Neal, feared last night that blood poisoning might result from the jagged wound in his face. His ribs on both sides are injured, but the physician had not discovered if any were fractured because the injured man was in too great pain to permit a thorough examination.

JONES "LACKS INFORMATION."

In regard to the standing of Jack Gallagher as a saloonkeeper, Commissiner Elliott H. Jones last night said:

"It was reported to the police commissioners taht Gallagher's place on East Fourth street was open on Sunday and after closing h ours. For this reason the board refused to grant him a renewal of his license to operate that saloon."

Mr. Jones was asked if he thought Gallagher a fit man to run a saloon or if he deemed him worthy of the privelge after having made such a brutal attack upon a man as he had done upon Albert King. Mr. Jones said he could not answer that question without going into the case to greater extent than he had already done.

Commissioner Jones was then asked: "If any manmakes an attack on another while walking on the street while the victim is under the impression that there is no feeling of hostility between them; if the attack be sudden and unexpected and very brutal in its nature, should such a man be granted the privelege of owning and operating a saloon?"

The commissioner refused to answer the question.

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