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February 6, 1910

HANDSOME STUDIO OPENS.

Henry Moore, Winner of Many Med-
als From Photographer's Asso-
ciations, Is Proprietor.

The well appointed photo studio at 214 East Eleventh street, opened recently by Henry Moore, twenty years a photographer and formerly with the K. C. Photo Supply Co. and a winner of many medals from the Photographer's Association, has many features of advantage in addition to the departments adapted to carry on a large volume of business. A new feature is the dressing rooms, a red room for the ladies and a green room for the gentlemen. The studio is beautifully furnished, and prominently located. Mr. Moore issued initial invitations for free sittings to visitors.

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January 22, 1910

REEDER PICTURE MOVED.

For Half a Century It Has Hung at
Coates House.

For the first time in several years the life-size oil painting of Andrew H. Reeder, the first governor of the territory of Kansas, which has graced the walls of the Coates house for half a century, was removed from its place in the lobby yesterday so that steamfitters could get at a defective pipe. The painting will be cleaned and re-hung in its old place.

The removal of the picture yesterday resulted in a flood of questions at Clerks Mong and Preston. Each told the story of the picture at least a score of times during the day and evening. The painting was made at the direction of Colonel Kersey Coates, the founder of the Coates house, from a photograph. The painting pictures Governor Reeder in flight.

It was back in 1856 that Governor Reeder had much trouble with the pro-slavery men and was forced to hide in Kansas City. He was a close friend of Colonel Kersey Coates, and Colonel Coates successfully hid the governor for two weeks at the Gillis house and other places about the city, finally furnishing him with a disguise in which he was able to escape as a deck passenger on the Missouri river steamer, the A. B. Chambers. When he arrived at St. Louis he had a photograph taken and sent it to Colonel Coates.

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November 28, 1909

PICTURES OF RETIRED JUDGES.

Adorn Kansas City Court of Ap-
peals Court Room Wall.

Pictures of the judges who have retired from the bench of the Kansas City court of appeals were placed yesterday in the court room. The pictures were enlarged from photographs secured by the three judges now on the bench.

The pictures of the judges included are: Jackson L. Smith, W. W. Ramsey, Willard P. Hall, John F. Philips and Turner A. Gill. Judge Smith is dead and Judge Ramsey is now practicing in St. Joseph. The other three live in Kansas City. Judge Philips, one of the first three judges, is now on the federal bench.

The Kansas City court of appeals was established by an act of the legislature in March, 1885.

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October 31, 1909

SWOPE MONEY AND
LAND TRANSFERRED.

INSTITUTE'S NAME CHANGED IN
HONOR OF BENEFACTOR.

Thousands of Dollars Contributed
After Announcement That Re-
quired $50,000 Had
Been Obtained.

No longer is it the Franklin institute. Satisfied with the great response made to the institute's appeal for aid, S. W. Spangler, agent for Thomas H. Swope, who gave $50,000 in land and cash conditionally to the institute, and John J. Paxton and S. S. Fleming, administrators of the Swope estate, yesterday gave to the directors of the institute the deed to the land on which the Thomas H. Swope Institute is to be built, and Mr. Swope's pledge of $25,000 in money. The deed was filed yesterday afternoon.

The officers of the institute received about $55,000 in the canvass for funds. there was $9,101.29 in cash and the rest in pledges. Ralph P. Swofford, president of the institute, Fletcher Cowherd, treasurer; and Benjamin B. Lee, H. D. Faxon, Herbert V. Jones, D. L. James, directors, and James T. Chafin, head resident of the institute, took the certificates of deposit and the pledges to Mr. Spangler's office yesterday. Mr. Paxton and Mr. Fleming, Mr. Swope's nephew, arrived soon after.

ENTIRELY SATISFIED.

"We are satisfied entirely with the result of the campaign and with the pledges," Mr. Paxton said. "Speaking for Mr. Fleming and myself, I wish to say that every one of the Swope family sympathized with your effort to raise the fund and with the purpose for which Mr. Swope made the gift."

"My uncle was deeply interested in the institute," Mr. Fleming said. "I am glad you were successful and trust that you will be able to make the institute all that you wish it to be."

A photograph of Mr. Swope was given the institute officers. It will be framed and placed in the new institute, which is to be named for Mr. Swope. Thousands of dollars were given to the institute fund yesterday after the announcement was made that the fund was complete. The latest mail yesterday brought more and it is believed that the flood of subscriptions which started Friday will not end for several days.

DR. WOODS GIVES $500.

Dr. W. S. Woods, of the Commerce Trust Company, gave $500 after the fund was complete. The Kansas City Live Stock Traders' exchange considered a motion to give $100 to the fund. A member suggested that a collection be taken instead. The collection was $225. The Kansas City Live Stock exchange also gave $100. More than that amount was given by the employes of Emery, Bird, Thayer's, when nearly 300 persons working in the store gave 25 or 50 cents each, after the fund had closed. Six church societies, half of them Christian Endeavor bodies, also contributed.

"Personal Help," by Churchill Bridgeford, a live stock commission man, netted the institute $1,-34 from the stock yards district in the campaign. The board of trade raised $450 and its members gave, or solicited, $2,500 for the fund.

Officers of the institute will visit other cities for ideas before the plans of the new institute will be agreed upon. One of the great needs of Kansas City, the officers say, is a modern creche. The institute now cares for children 2 years old and more, but has not been equipped to care for infants. It has been necessary to refuse to care for the babies of several mothers who are employed because of this. It is probable a creche will be added to the activities of the institute in the new building.

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October 31, 1909

SHIELDS AT 12th AND GRAND.

Well Known Photographer Has Dis-
play in New Studio.

C. Harrison Shields, who is well known as one of Kansas City's leading photographers, having conducted a studio at Eighth and Grand avenue for almost seven years, but now located in the Rookery building at Twelfth and Grand avenue, is displaying a collection of water colors, Vandykes, and sepia portraits. Part of this collection is his own production and some of the work of contemporary artists, friends of Mr. Shields. The occasion of the display is the recent opening of the new Shields studio.

Prior to his residence in Kansas City the name of Shields was associated with high class photography in St. Louis, where Mr. Shields engaged in the business for fourteen years.

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August 24, 1909

GIFT FOR CARL BUSCH.

Composer Presented With Oil Por-
trait of Himself Yesterday.

A number of the friends of Carl Busch, the Kansas City composer, who recently returned from Denmark, where he conducted an orchestra on American day at the exposition of Aarhus, assembled in Mr. Busch's studio in the Studio building early yesterday morning. When Mr. Busch arrived he was presented with a finely executed oil portrait of himself by J. H. Nelson, an artist at 918 Main street. Mr. Busch was traditionally surprised and declared that the portrait was a speaking likeness. It represents Mr. Busch seated and was painted from a photograph. It will be exhibited for a week at Jenkins' music store.

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August 22, 1909

GRANDMA CAMPBELL'S
FAMILY OF CHILDREN.

EIGHTY-SEVEN LIVING DE-
SCENDANTS -- SHE IS 84.

Anniversary of Her Birth Was Cele-
brated Yesterday -- Two Sons
Are Ministers -- Five Weigh
Over 200 Pounds Each.
Four of the Five Generations in Milbra R. Campbell's Family.

Six children, twenty-eight grandchildren, fifty-two great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild.

The foregoing are the living descendants of Mrs. Milbra R. Campbell, whose eighty-fourth birth anniversary was celebrated yesterday at the home of her son, George W. Campbell, 728 Wabash avenue. All the five sons who attended are over six feet tall and weigh more than 200 pounds each. They are Rev. John A. Campbell of Chillicothe, Tex., Rev. W. T. Campbell of Pueblo, Col., both ministers in the Baptist church, James H., George W. and David Campbell, all engaged in the live stock commission business in this city. Mrs. E. J. Henry, the only daughter, 1221 Bales avenue, was detained at home on account of illness.

At 1 o'clock a dinner was served to the immediate relatives attending the anniversary. During the afternoon an informal reception was held for relatives and friends. A photographer took pictures of "Grandma" Campbell, as she is familiarly known, and her five stalwart sons. After that group pictures of those present, representing many generations, were taken.

FIVE GENERATIONS.

The accompanying photograph represents but four generations of the Campbell family. There are now five. This picture was taken eleven years ago and shows Mrs. Campbell, her only daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth J. Henry, her son, Charles D. Henry and the latter's daughter, Miss Dorothy J. Henry, now in her sixteenth year.

The Rev. W. T. Campbell, who is here with his four children from Pueblo, Col., where he is pastor of the First Baptist church, is not a stranger in Kansas City. He held several pastorates in this city and organized what is now known as the Olive street Baptist church. He will occupy the pulpit there this morning and tonight. Rev. Mr. Campbell was also a pastor of a church in Independence, Mo., for four years.

The ancestors of this sturdy family, in which there has been no deaths since 1864, came from Scotland and the North of Ireland. In 1836 the father and mother immigrated from Tennessee and settled among the early pioneers in Northwestern Arkansas.

IN PRICE'S RAID.

The father, who was born in 1826, served in the United States army during the Mexican war of 1847. When volunteers were being called for to stay the failing fortunes of the Confederacy he volunteered to the governor of Arkansas in 1861 and was made captain of Company D, Fourteenth Arkansas infantry. After being engaged in many battles he surrendered with his company at Fort Hudson, July 8, 1863, and was made a prisoner of war. He died shortly afterward of a disease contracted in the army.

J. H. Campbell, the oldest brother, and John A. Campbell, now a minister, enlisted in the Confederate army later on and were with General Price in most of his big fights, and with Price's raid into Missouri. John was severely wounded in the battle of the Little Blue and captured, spending the rest of the war time in a military prison at Indianapolis, Ind. J. H. Campbell served with Price until the surrender at Shreveport, La., June 9, 1865. Both brothers were in the same company.

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August 14, 1909

IF NUDE IS ART, THEN
ART IS "ON THE BUM"

JUDGE LATSHAW STRICTLY TO
ENFORCE NEW LAW.

In Fining Photographer the $500
Limit, Court Calls Attention to
Most Drastic Enactment
Effective Monday.

If the nude is art, then, in the immortal words of Alderman Miles Bulger, art will be "on the bum" in Kansas City on and after Monday, August 16. Mark the date on the calendar.

Judge Ralph S. Latshaw administered this latest jolt to the "nude" in art yesterday afternoon in the criminal court. Incidentally, he said in no uncertain words that the nude is not art.

Photographers and art schools, who make a practice of reproducing likeness of the human form as it appears without the constraint of clothing will have to get out the fig leaves or something that will be even less translucent than the Adam ready to wear clothes.

The ruling on art in general and nude art in particular came in the case of Leon Vickers, a photographer who had a studio in the Sterling building. He advertised for girls to pose at 50 cents an hour. Then he informed some of the applicants that they would have to pose in the nude altogether and made advances toward two girls.

Vickers was tried in the municipal court, where a fine of $100 was imposed. He appealed to the criminal court, where the fine was raised to $500.

"Photographers all over the city make a practice of posing nude subjects," said the attorney for Vickers.

TO STOP "LIFE CLASSES."

"If they do," said Judge Latshaw, "they will soon be on the inside of the jail bars, looking out."

"But they pose nude subjects and make sketches from the nude at the Fine Arts institute," suggested Daniel Howell, assistant city attorney, who conducted the prosecution.

"They will not do so after Monday," remarked the court, decisively. "The legislature has enacted a law, effective Monday, which covers just such cases. I am sorry, Vickers, that I cannot send you to the penitentiary. There ought to be a law under which I could do so."

However, the fine of $500 imposed on Vickers is equivalent to the maximum imprisonment fixed in the new statute. The photographer will have to go to the workhouse for a year. The new law makes the maximum imprisonment one year and the maximum fine $1,000 and provides that both may be imposed.

A further section of the new law forbids the circulation of any obscene pictures or literature. If rigidly enforced, it will have a considerable bearing on the trade in suggestive postcards, which has grown to abnormal proportions in the past few years.

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May 2, 1909

TRACING MRS. YARBROUGH.

Woman Suicide, Implicated in Mur-
der Charge, Stopped Here.

The police are positive that Mrs. Helen Yarbrough, who committed suicide in the Manhattan hotel in Wichita Friday night, was in Kansas City several weeks ago. She was wanted at Claremore, Ok., on a charge of complicity in the murder of John Bullette, and rather than face the officers she took strychnine.

Detectives had been looking for Mrs. Yarbrough in Kansas City for several days. With the aid of a photograph she was traced to an East Side boarding house, where she had stopped during the month of March. She left ostensibly for Topeka April 7, but went to Claremore instead. The murder was one of the most brutal on record in Oklahoma. While in Kansas City Mrs. Yarbrough had no callers and made no friends.

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April 22, 1909

FINDS OLD LAND PATENT.

Among Effects of Late Mrs. Fergu-
son Was Washington's Signature.

Porter B. Godard, administrator of the estate of Mrs. Nona R. Ferguson, widow of Rodney Ferguson, once treasurer of the Bell Telephone Company, has discovered some curiosities among her effects.

Among them are photographs of scenes in Kansas City during the years of 1868, '69, and '70, forty-eight of them. They are river and levee scenes and are very rare. Also there was found a land patent bearing the date of 1796 and signed by George Washington.

Mrs. Ferguson's home was at 708 Garfield avenue. There is a contest in the courts over the disposition of the estate on account of two wills made by Mrs. Ferguson.

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