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December 13, 1909

ORPHANS TO BE AT MATINEE.

Benefactor Ill, Boys Will Depend on
Charity for Christmas.

The boys of the Kansas City Orphans' home will be the guests of Oscar Sachs at the matinee at the Orpheum tomorrow afternoon. The boys will be chaperoned by Mrs. Lee Lyson, Mrs. Ferdinand Heim, Mrs. Oscar Sachs, Mrs. J. W. Wagner, Mrs. S. Harzfeld and Mrs. A. D. Cottingham. Mrs. John C. Tarsney, the benefactor of the home, has been ill for some time and so the boys expect that good people will take an interest in them and remember them on Christmas. About 130 orphans are cared for at the home, which is in the charge of sisters of the order of St. Vincent de Paul.

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December 5, 1909

ART IN A CROATIAN CHURCH.

Beautiful Paintings Now Adorn Edi-
fice of St. John the Baptist.

While the nuns were saying their evening prayers before the alter in St. John the Baptist Croatian Catholic church, at Fourth street and Barnett avenue in Kansas City, Kas., last night, workmen were busy in the rear of the church tearing away a great wooden scaffolding The scaffold has been used during the last six weeks by Oton Tvekovic, an artist, who has been decorating the church after the manner of the Catholic churches in Croatia.

In the alcove above the alter the artist has painted the figures of Jesus and the prophets Jeremiah, Isias and Elias. The figures are somewhat larger than life size and are skillfully executed. In the north alcove of the church the artist has executed a painting thirty-eight feet in length, which represents the prophets, Cyril and Methodus, on their presentation to Prince Rastislav of the Slavonic peoples. Thee picture tells the story of these two apostles who first carried the Christian religion to the Slavs at the close of the eighth century.

An unfinished picture in the south alcove will, when completed, represent the birth of Christ. In the ceiling of the church the pictures of the twelve apostles will be executed. Mr. Tvekovic is a native of Agrin, Croatia. He is a graduate of the Fine Arts institute in Vienna, and is a professor of art in the fine arts schools of Karlsruhe and Munich. He is staying with the Rev. M. D. Krmpotich, pastor of the church. Besides being a portrait painter, Mr. Tvekovic is a landscape artist of note. He has several sketches which he will place on display soon at 416 East Eleventh street, Kansas City, Mo.

Father Krmpotich said last night that his church was the first Croatian church in America to be decorated as are the churches in the mother country. Besides the pictures of the Biblical characters, the church has been decorated in the national colors of Croatia. Several designs peculiar to Croatia have been worked into the decorative scheme, and when finished the interior of the church will present a picturesque and pleasing appearance. Father Krmpotich organized St. John the Baptist parish seven years ago. Since that time a substantial brick church, a rectory and a school have been built. The parish now comprises more than 150 Croatian families, and is in a flourishing condition.

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December 4, 1909

ZONES OF CONTAGION
NEAR THREE SCHOOLS.

SCARLET FEVER AND DIPH-
THERIA IN SEVERAL SECTIONS.

Tin Drinking Cup Blamed by Medi-
cal Inspectors, Especially at
Benton -- Several Parochial
Schools Involved.

The medical inspectors going the rounds of the public schools have unearthed diphtheria and scarlet fever zones within the confines of Benton, Washington and Karnes schools. They are also learning from the daily returns of practicing physicians, of the existence of the two maladies among pupils of two or three of the parochial schools, but as the authority of the inspectors does not extend to schools of this description Dr. W. S. Wheeler, sanitary commissioner, has not felt justified in taking any voluntary official notice or action.

Of the parochial schools the worst afflicted is St. John's Parochial school, 534 Tracy avenue. This school, located in a district largely inhabited by Italian children, is conducted by the Sisters of St. Joseph. Yesterday Sister Superior Monica appealed to the health authorities to make an investigation. Dr. H. Delamater, chief inspector, made a personal visit to the school and was informed that ninety of the 160 pupils are detained at home by sickness. Within the last six days cases of scarlet fever have developed among the pupils, and Dr. Delameter fears that many who are home at home may have it. He will have an examination made of the school building as to its sanitary condition, and will have class rooms fumigated.

Washington public school is at the southwest corner or Independence avenue and Cherry street, and the Karnes school is at the northwest corner of Troost avenue and Fourth street. Large numbers of the pupils have scarlet fever, the majority of victims predominating among those attending Karnes school. The diphtheria is not as epidemic as scarlet fever. The attendants of these two schools live in the territory bounded on the south by Admiral boulevard, north by the river, west by Grand avenue and east as far as Lydia avenue. The majority of the cases are north of Fifth street and scatter as far to the east as Budd park. As an assistance to the health authorities in keeping in touch with the exact location of the disease, a large map of the city has been prepared, and when a case of diphtheria develops a green-headed pin is driven into the map, designating a particular territory, and when one of scarlet fever is reported the map is perforated with a red-headed pin.

MAP RAPIDLY FILLING.

The map describing the Washington and Karnes school districts is rapidly filling up with the pin indicators, but not as noticeably as the district in which Benton school is situated. At the latter school diphtheria is the most prevalent, and is giving some alarm. The infection is spreading with rapidity. Benton school is at the southwest corner of Thirtieth street and Benton boulevard, in a fashionable and well-to-do neighborhood. There are from twenty to thirty cases of diphtheria among pupils going to this school, and it is feared that the disease got its start from the drinking cups in use there.

"The drinking cup in the public schools is a menace to health and is a communicator and spreader of disease," said Dr. Delamater yesterday. "Its frightful possibilities were fully described by Dr. W. S. Wheeler in his last annual report, and he advises that it be relegated and sanitary fountains installed in the schools. The health of no child is safe when the tin cup is in use. While I am not directly charging the appearance of diphtheria at Benton school to the drinking cup, still there is plenty of room for that suspicion as the school building is new and should be sanitary."

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November 19, 1909

MOTHER CORNELIA DIES.

Assistant to Superioress at House of
Good Shepherd Passes Away.

Mother Cornelia, assistant to Mother Elizabeth, superioress of the House of Good Shepherd, died yesterday at the home, Twentieth street and Cleveland avenue.

Mother Cornelia had been ill for months, but continued with her work at the House of Good Shepherd until last Thursday. Mother Cornelia was Cornelia Thompkins of St. Louis. The family is one of the most wealthy and widely known in St. Louis. A sister, Mrs. Philip Scanlon, died several weeks ago in St. Louis.

The body of Mother Cornelia will be taken in a special car to St. Louis this morning by her parents, who are in Kansas City. In taking up her work among the inmates of the House of Good Shepherd, whose lives the sisters try to correct, Mother Cornelia gave up her family and prospects for a life of personal help and self-abnegation.

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August 8, 1909

TO RAISE $700 FOR THE
HOUSE OF GOOD SHEPHERD.
Irish-American Athletic Club Will
put on Benefit Baseball Game
With Kansas Team.

The city, when it cut the street through at Twentieth street and Cleveland avenue, took forty feet of the property of the home of the Sisters of the Good Shepherd. And that was not all. The sisters are now called upon to pay $700 and the Irish-American Athletic Club has undertaken to raise the money for the home by holding a benefit game at its athletic field at Forty-seventh and Main.

The game will be between the Edgerton, Kas., team, and one of the Irish-American Athletic Club teams. The Kansas team volunteered its services, and as this is considered one of the best baseball organizations in Kansas, considerable interest is shown in the contest.

One of the directors of the Irish-American Athletic Club, who formerly lived at Edgerton, says that when the Edgerton baseball team plays at a neighboring town Edgerton moves with the team. The advance sale of tickets is very encouraging to the club.

A thirty-two page programme will contain the pictures and the line-up of both teams, also a brief history of the Irish-American Athletic Club of Kansas City, portraits of some of their athletes, their officers and directors, the objects and purposes of the club, is being published. These programmes will be distributed to the members of the club and to all who attend the game next Saturday afternoon.

The athletic field of the Irish-American Club is an ideal location. The club has erected a covered grand stand; the entire ground is fenced and the baseball diamond is one of the best in the country.

It is proposed to have a quarter-mile track, handball courts, tennis courts, bowling alleys and every facility for outdoor sports and games of all kinds.

The club now has about 700 members. All are entitled to the privileges of the grounds, excepting when there is a special event of some kind. At these events everybody pays, and all who attend will put up the 25-cent admission for the grandstand seats at the game for the benefit of the Home of the Sisters of the Good Shepherd.

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May 4, 1909

WAITING FOR MASTER'S VOICE.

But Broken Ankles Prevented John-
son Reaching His Mangy Pup.

The attention of many people who passed the new St. Mary's hospital at Twenty-eighth and Main streets yesterday was attracted to a small, mangy looking pup of the all-wool variety, who sat near the areaway leading into the boiler room. Occasionally the pup looked skyward and howled dismally. Sisters from the hospital were seen tempting the little watcher with pans of milk and other delectables, but he steadfastly refused to desert his post, and last night laid down with an eye on the areaway.

While looking for a place to sleep Saturday night, Gabriel Johnson, the owner of the faithful pup, fell down the areaway and broke both ankles. He was found Sunday and taken to the general hospital where the broken bones were set, but the dog did not see his master leave St. Mary's hospital as he was not taken through the areaway.

Johnson says he works for John Wolf, a quarryman of Centropolis. His condition was improved yesterday.

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April 7, 1909

FATHER SEEKS COURT'S AID.

Wants Daughter Taken From House
of Good Shepherd.

In the circuit court this morning there will be a hearing int he case of Gertrude M. Gross, whose father, T. E. Gross, seeks her removal from the House of the Good Shepherd by a writ of habeas corpus. Gross, who lives in Kansas City, Kas., filed suit in the circuit court yesterday, alleging that the girl was placed in the home March 19 by Addie Gross, his wife, without his consent.

The writ, which is directed against Mother Mary, the superior at the institution, was issued by Judge Slover and made returnable today.

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September 6, 1908
SISTERS ABANDON
ST. ANTHONY'S

AFTER EIGHT HARD YEARS
OF LABOR THERE.

HIRED NURSES NOW IN CHARGE

DISAGREEMENT SAID TO BE
BACK OF IT ALL.

Sisters Had No Interest in the Home,
Owned by Corporation, and
Worked There Contrary
to Precedent.

Bad news for the foundlings of Kansas City. The Sisters of St. Vincent, who for eight years have been in charge of St. Anthony's Home for Infants, have abandoned the work and left the home. Differences between the sisters and the women board of managers finally led to notice on the sisters' part that they would leave. Orders from the mother house of the sisterhood came to them a week ago, and now strange hands are ministering to the motherless babes. The trouble, it is said, has been brewing for a year.

The building occupied by St. Anthony's home is owned by a corporation consisting of Mrs. Richard Keith, its president, Miss Rose Altman and several other Catholic women of the city. The money for the purchase of the property has all been received in the way of charitable contributions, and as proceeds from church fairs and the like, but for some reason the property has always remained in the hands of the corporation, although it is an old established rule of the Catholic church that all church property be held in the name of the bishop, in trust for his successor. Many of the convents and educational institutions of the Catholic church are owned by the orders conducting them, but there are few cases, if any, on record where the property acquired by public donations, remains in the hands of the corporation's seculars, as in the case of St. Anthony's home. And thereby hangs the substance of the trouble which culminated last week in the Sisters of Charity withdrawing from the home.

TELL CONFLICTING STORIES.

Just what led to the present crisis is hard to determine, as those in a position to know refuse to talk, and conflicting stories are given out by both sides to the controversy. But it is said that some heated scenes occurred between Sister Ceclia, superioress of the home, and the women officers of the corporation.

The trouble resulted in a visit to this city last May of the mother superior of the black cap sisters of charity. With Mrs. Keith she visited Bishop Hogan, at which time matters were temporarily patched up, but no definite understanding was reached. Last Tuesday two of the sisters of charity left St. Anthony's home for Trinidad, Col., two for St. Vincent's hospital in Santa Fe, N. M., and the other left Saturday for the mother house, near Cincinnati.

There were five sisters in charge of the work at the home, whereas last night there were eighteen paid nurses, according to the statement of Miss Mary Workman, the matron.

BABY TURNED AWAY.

Miss Workman is a nurse who has been employed at the home for a long time, and was made matron and given charge of the home by Mrs. Keith, when the sisters left the institution. When a reporter visited the home last night, the piano in the reception room was open, a stylishly gowned young woman was fingering the keys, and St. Anthony's home no longer wore its convent air. Two women, one carrying a 6-months-old babe, left the home as the reporter entered. the child had been refused admittance at the home, an unheard of proceeding when the sisters were in charge.

"The woman wants to go home and leave her child here," said the matron. "She has been working and supporting it for six months, and now she wants to leave it here; hasn't she a cheek to think we should care for it for her?"

"The sisters were broken hearted at leaving here," said Miss Workman. "Their hearts were in the work, nad I could not bear to see them bid goodby to the infants they learned to love so well, and even to the building itself, the scene of many hardships to them."

Miss Rose Altman refused to make any statement regarding conditions at the home, referring the reporter again to Mrs. Keith, but she admitted that she had heard rumors of trouble between the sisters and the corporation controlling the home, but insisted that the rumors were not true.

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August 14, 1908

BOYS HAD A GREAT DAY.

Orphans From Perry Memorial Home
at Fairmount Park.

One hundred children form the Perry Memorial home were given an outing at Fairmount park yesterday afternoon. they were in charge of Mrs. J. C. Tarsney, patroness of the home, and several Sisters. The children were taken to the park in a special Metropolitan street car, and immediately after their arrival there they were served a luncheon. The concessions were free to the youngsters and they had the time of their lives.

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April 25, 1908

NEW ST. TERESA'S ACADEMY.

It Will Be Near Fifty-Fifth and Main
Streets and Will Cost $300,000.

Architects Wilder and Wight are drawing plans for a new school building which is to be erected by the Sisters of St. Joseph in charge of St. Teresa's academy, near Main street and Fifty-fifth. The Sisters recently closed a deal with E. S. Yoemans for the purchase of a twenty-acre tract in this vicinity at a cost of $40,000, and will shortly begin the erection of the school building. It is understood about $300,000 will be expended on the building. St. Teresa's academy is exclusively for girls.

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September 24, 1907

WOMAN SUES A PRIEST

ASKS $50,000 FROM FATHER ED-
WARD P. FITZGERALD.

He is Assistant Pastor of St. Mary's
Church, Independence, and Com-
plaintant Is Mrs. Beatrice M.
Sotomayor.

Edward P. Fitzgerald, assistant pastor of St. Mary's Catholic church in Independence, was sued for $50,000 damages yesterday in the circuit court at Kansas City by Mrs. Beatrice M. Sotomayor, a Spanish woman. She has charge of the nurses' quarters at the University hospital, 1005 Campbell street. Mrs. Sotomayor alleges that the priest slapped her on the evening of June 9, 1907, at the parish house in Independence. Both Mrs. Sotomayor and the priest last night refused to be interviewed.

Mrs. Sotomayor, in her petition, says that ever since she came to Kansas City seven years ago, she has been a frequent visitor at the convent conducted by the Sisters of Mercy adjoining St. Mary's church and the parish house in Independence, and that she has always been on friendly terms with the sisters.

Some old quarrel, about which both the priest and Mrs. Sotomayor refuse to talk, came up for discussion at the convent on the evening of June 9, and the sister urged Mrs. Sotomayor, so she asserts in her petition, to go the the priest and apologize. The petition then goes on to recite that after she knocked at the door of the parish house, Father Fitzgerald invited her into the house, shut the door and told her that the only way she would be forgiven was to permit him to throw over her a white sheet, put a bell around her neck and lead her into the church where a large congregation was assembled and be shown to the church."

She refused to do this, the petition cites, but offered to go before the sisters and ask forgiveness. Then, asserts the woman, "he became angry and commanded her to go down upon her knees before him." This, she says, she refused to do, and then, she alleges, he struck her on both cheeks with his hand.

Mrs. Sotomayor was born in Spain, but has lived most of her life in Mexico. She came to Kansas City seven years ago and for a time gave private lessons in Spanish. For the past four years she has been at the University hospital, in charge of the nurses' quarters. She is a little woman, not over five feet three inches in height, with jet black hair and eyes. She talks with a Spanish accent. She appears to be about 40 years of age.

"I have not read the allegations made by Mrs. Sotomayor in the suit she has brought against me, and at this time I prefer to make no statement," said Rev. Edward Fitzgerald. He has been pastor of St. Mary's church for three months. The priest makes his home at that of the vicar general, Rev. Father Thomas Fitzgerald, but they are not related.

Vicar General Fitzgerald said that personally he knew nothing of the assaults charged by the woman, whom he was disposed to believe was not responsible for all she says or does.

"I form this impression," said the vicar general, "from her peculiar actions of the past. She was a persistent visitor at the convent and seemed to be very much attached to one of the sisters. Mrs. Sotomayor had an apparently uncontrollable passion for visiting the convent during the class hours, and her presence had a demoralizing influence on the studies of the pupils. The annoyance eventually became intolerable, and orders were given that the woman should abandon her visits. If to enforce this order any violence was resorted to I am not aware of it, and I am disposed to believe that Mrs. Sotomayor is exaggerating the whole affair.

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